The Itchen Bridge closed after car collides with cyclist

Daily Echo: Crash closes city centre bridge Crash closes city centre bridge

A CITY centre bridge has been reopened after a cyclist was hit by a car earlier this evening.

The Itchen Bridge was closed in both directions after a Lexus collided with the cyclist at around 7.28pm.

Police and ambulance crews were called to the scene. 

The casualty was treated by paramedics but suffered minor injuries.

The bridge was reopened at 8.40pm.

Comments (19)

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8:22pm Mon 27 Jan 14

Micle1974 says...

This bridge whiten has accidents involving bikes.
Why not make one of the pavements over the bridge for pedestrians and make bikes use the other to keep them off of the rd?
This bridge whiten has accidents involving bikes. Why not make one of the pavements over the bridge for pedestrians and make bikes use the other to keep them off of the rd? Micle1974
  • Score: 22

8:45pm Mon 27 Jan 14

sj1961 says...

Bring Back The Floating Bridge, For Pedestrians And Cyclists Only. Seems To Me That Cars Today Rules The World.
Bring Back The Floating Bridge, For Pedestrians And Cyclists Only. Seems To Me That Cars Today Rules The World. sj1961
  • Score: -1

9:18pm Mon 27 Jan 14

downfader says...

My experiences of riding over the bridge the past few days:

1) Some drivers are not anticipating the end of the cycle lane towards the road works

2) Some drivers are attempting a dangerous overtake through the road works itself - they should just hold off a few seconds and wait until there is space. Riders should take primary position until they are through the works.

3) There's also a few riders who have no lights still, or are bumping off the path. I've noticed one a day tbh, so not that many. Get lit up and half the problems you'll face will dissappear on that route.

4) The road surface is now appalling thanks to tarmac being dug up. The drains are also blocked with grit and what looks like concrete.

I dont agree that cyclists should use the pavements. The idea is that this new layout should have made cycling safer as it would have separated pedestrian from cyclist, and cyclist more securely from motorist. The last I heard the route had been changed to "shared use" if this is so it is a mistake.
My experiences of riding over the bridge the past few days: 1) Some drivers are not anticipating the end of the cycle lane towards the road works 2) Some drivers are attempting a dangerous overtake through the road works itself - they should just hold off a few seconds and wait until there is space. Riders should take primary position until they are through the works. 3) There's also a few riders who have no lights still, or are bumping off the path. I've noticed one a day tbh, so not that many. Get lit up and half the problems you'll face will dissappear on that route. 4) The road surface is now appalling thanks to tarmac being dug up. The drains are also blocked with grit and what looks like concrete. I dont agree that cyclists should use the pavements. The idea is that this new layout should have made cycling safer as it would have separated pedestrian from cyclist, and cyclist more securely from motorist. The last I heard the route had been changed to "shared use" if this is so it is a mistake. downfader
  • Score: 7

10:08pm Mon 27 Jan 14

tootle says...

Changing the roundabout to be safer for cyclists was easy. All cyclists turn left, all cyclists join on the left. Both slip roads turned into cycle lanes. All cars use central bridge. Bit of blocking off roads, bit of line painting, quite a lot of signposting but it would be cheaper and safer than the works going on at the moment. Bit more pedal pushing for cyclists, bit more fuel cost for motorists but surely worth it to save lives?
Changing the roundabout to be safer for cyclists was easy. All cyclists turn left, all cyclists join on the left. Both slip roads turned into cycle lanes. All cars use central bridge. Bit of blocking off roads, bit of line painting, quite a lot of signposting but it would be cheaper and safer than the works going on at the moment. Bit more pedal pushing for cyclists, bit more fuel cost for motorists but surely worth it to save lives? tootle
  • Score: 3

10:28pm Mon 27 Jan 14

Mary80 says...

No evidence the car was at fault typical DE response to blame the car with noproof. Bravo comment section
No evidence the car was at fault typical DE response to blame the car with noproof. Bravo comment section Mary80
  • Score: 5

11:00pm Mon 27 Jan 14

S Pance says...

Can anyone confirm whether the bike had lights? Sunset was at 16:48 today.
Can anyone confirm whether the bike had lights? Sunset was at 16:48 today. S Pance
  • Score: 2

11:16pm Mon 27 Jan 14

WalkingOnAWire says...

I live near Central Bridge and am often on the road after 6pm i.e. well after it's dark at the moment. I've been keeping a running tally for a couple of weeks on how many bikes are carrying lights. So far I've counted 200 bikes and of these, 49 had no lights at all and another 12 had only 1 light, usually at the front so no help to the traffic approaching them from behind.

I very much support cyclists' right to use the roads. But the 25%+ of bikes which are completely unlit are a menace - mainly to themselves - and do the cycling community no good at all.
I live near Central Bridge and am often on the road after 6pm i.e. well after it's dark at the moment. I've been keeping a running tally for a couple of weeks on how many bikes are carrying lights. So far I've counted 200 bikes and of these, 49 had no lights at all and another 12 had only 1 light, usually at the front so no help to the traffic approaching them from behind. I very much support cyclists' right to use the roads. But the 25%+ of bikes which are completely unlit are a menace - mainly to themselves - and do the cycling community no good at all. WalkingOnAWire
  • Score: 10

11:23pm Mon 27 Jan 14

Mary80 says...

WalkingOnAWire wrote:
I live near Central Bridge and am often on the road after 6pm i.e. well after it's dark at the moment. I've been keeping a running tally for a couple of weeks on how many bikes are carrying lights. So far I've counted 200 bikes and of these, 49 had no lights at all and another 12 had only 1 light, usually at the front so no help to the traffic approaching them from behind.

I very much support cyclists' right to use the roads. But the 25%+ of bikes which are completely unlit are a menace - mainly to themselves - and do the cycling community no good at all.
if cyclists wanted to improve their image all of them should have lights and wear reflective clothing at night there would be no problem. Car drivers could be as safe as possible but there still might be accidents not all cyclists are as safety conscious as others may be
[quote][p][bold]WalkingOnAWire[/bold] wrote: I live near Central Bridge and am often on the road after 6pm i.e. well after it's dark at the moment. I've been keeping a running tally for a couple of weeks on how many bikes are carrying lights. So far I've counted 200 bikes and of these, 49 had no lights at all and another 12 had only 1 light, usually at the front so no help to the traffic approaching them from behind. I very much support cyclists' right to use the roads. But the 25%+ of bikes which are completely unlit are a menace - mainly to themselves - and do the cycling community no good at all.[/p][/quote]if cyclists wanted to improve their image all of them should have lights and wear reflective clothing at night there would be no problem. Car drivers could be as safe as possible but there still might be accidents not all cyclists are as safety conscious as others may be Mary80
  • Score: 3

11:39pm Mon 27 Jan 14

Ginger_cyclist says...

Mary80 wrote:
WalkingOnAWire wrote:
I live near Central Bridge and am often on the road after 6pm i.e. well after it's dark at the moment. I've been keeping a running tally for a couple of weeks on how many bikes are carrying lights. So far I've counted 200 bikes and of these, 49 had no lights at all and another 12 had only 1 light, usually at the front so no help to the traffic approaching them from behind.

I very much support cyclists' right to use the roads. But the 25%+ of bikes which are completely unlit are a menace - mainly to themselves - and do the cycling community no good at all.
if cyclists wanted to improve their image all of them should have lights and wear reflective clothing at night there would be no problem. Car drivers could be as safe as possible but there still might be accidents not all cyclists are as safety conscious as others may be
I don't wear reflective clothing yet everytime i've almost been hit at night and I speak to the driver, I get told that they saw me.
[quote][p][bold]Mary80[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]WalkingOnAWire[/bold] wrote: I live near Central Bridge and am often on the road after 6pm i.e. well after it's dark at the moment. I've been keeping a running tally for a couple of weeks on how many bikes are carrying lights. So far I've counted 200 bikes and of these, 49 had no lights at all and another 12 had only 1 light, usually at the front so no help to the traffic approaching them from behind. I very much support cyclists' right to use the roads. But the 25%+ of bikes which are completely unlit are a menace - mainly to themselves - and do the cycling community no good at all.[/p][/quote]if cyclists wanted to improve their image all of them should have lights and wear reflective clothing at night there would be no problem. Car drivers could be as safe as possible but there still might be accidents not all cyclists are as safety conscious as others may be[/p][/quote]I don't wear reflective clothing yet everytime i've almost been hit at night and I speak to the driver, I get told that they saw me. Ginger_cyclist
  • Score: -9

12:08am Tue 28 Jan 14

WalkingOnAWire says...

@Ginger-cyclist But I assume you're lit up? Reflective clothing is a good idea IMO - as a driver, I see you a lot earlier than I would otherwise. Doesn't excuse the drivers who've almost hit you though, there is not enough courtesy extended to cyclists overall. If we all took things just a little more slowly and counted to ten before getting aggressive the roads would be a better place for everyone.
@Ginger-cyclist But I assume you're lit up? Reflective clothing is a good idea IMO - as a driver, I see you a lot earlier than I would otherwise. Doesn't excuse the drivers who've almost hit you though, there is not enough courtesy extended to cyclists overall. If we all took things just a little more slowly and counted to ten before getting aggressive the roads would be a better place for everyone. WalkingOnAWire
  • Score: 4

12:18am Tue 28 Jan 14

Ginger_cyclist says...

WalkingOnAWire wrote:
@Ginger-cyclist But I assume you're lit up? Reflective clothing is a good idea IMO - as a driver, I see you a lot earlier than I would otherwise. Doesn't excuse the drivers who've almost hit you though, there is not enough courtesy extended to cyclists overall. If we all took things just a little more slowly and counted to ten before getting aggressive the roads would be a better place for everyone.
4 lights on the rear, 3 on the front(getting more for both ends though), one of which is brighter than most car headlights but aimed more towards the ground to avoid blinding others but I in part agree, though in well lit areas, reflective clothing doesn't do much but in areas that don't have many street lights, reflective/hi-vis stuff could help, though riding along the road on Weston shore and up to Victoria country park I've never worn reflective or hi-vis stuff and have still had no problems yet that road is one of the most poorly lit ones in a 6 mile radius of my home besides Alington lane.
[quote][p][bold]WalkingOnAWire[/bold] wrote: @Ginger-cyclist But I assume you're lit up? Reflective clothing is a good idea IMO - as a driver, I see you a lot earlier than I would otherwise. Doesn't excuse the drivers who've almost hit you though, there is not enough courtesy extended to cyclists overall. If we all took things just a little more slowly and counted to ten before getting aggressive the roads would be a better place for everyone.[/p][/quote]4 lights on the rear, 3 on the front(getting more for both ends though), one of which is brighter than most car headlights but aimed more towards the ground to avoid blinding others but I in part agree, though in well lit areas, reflective clothing doesn't do much but in areas that don't have many street lights, reflective/hi-vis stuff could help, though riding along the road on Weston shore and up to Victoria country park I've never worn reflective or hi-vis stuff and have still had no problems yet that road is one of the most poorly lit ones in a 6 mile radius of my home besides Alington lane. Ginger_cyclist
  • Score: -1

8:41am Tue 28 Jan 14

downfader says...

WalkingOnAWire wrote:
@Ginger-cyclist But I assume you're lit up? Reflective clothing is a good idea IMO - as a driver, I see you a lot earlier than I would otherwise. Doesn't excuse the drivers who've almost hit you though, there is not enough courtesy extended to cyclists overall. If we all took things just a little more slowly and counted to ten before getting aggressive the roads would be a better place for everyone.
Reflective clothing doesnt make the difference you think it does. I've worn clothing thats covered in it for year. Even the fluro colours during the day have so little effect.

This is now being proven by scientific study http://road.cc/conte
nt/news/99660-high-v
is-clothing-doesnt-m
ake-cars-pass-you-mo
re-safely-says-new-s
tudy

....the real issue is that people have lost the ability to to hazard perception or are distracting themselves.
[quote][p][bold]WalkingOnAWire[/bold] wrote: @Ginger-cyclist But I assume you're lit up? Reflective clothing is a good idea IMO - as a driver, I see you a lot earlier than I would otherwise. Doesn't excuse the drivers who've almost hit you though, there is not enough courtesy extended to cyclists overall. If we all took things just a little more slowly and counted to ten before getting aggressive the roads would be a better place for everyone.[/p][/quote]Reflective clothing doesnt make the difference you think it does. I've worn clothing thats covered in it for year. Even the fluro colours during the day have so little effect. This is now being proven by scientific study http://road.cc/conte nt/news/99660-high-v is-clothing-doesnt-m ake-cars-pass-you-mo re-safely-says-new-s tudy ....the real issue is that people have lost the ability to to hazard perception or are distracting themselves. downfader
  • Score: 0

8:45am Tue 28 Jan 14

downfader says...

Mary80 wrote:
WalkingOnAWire wrote:
I live near Central Bridge and am often on the road after 6pm i.e. well after it's dark at the moment. I've been keeping a running tally for a couple of weeks on how many bikes are carrying lights. So far I've counted 200 bikes and of these, 49 had no lights at all and another 12 had only 1 light, usually at the front so no help to the traffic approaching them from behind.

I very much support cyclists' right to use the roads. But the 25%+ of bikes which are completely unlit are a menace - mainly to themselves - and do the cycling community no good at all.
if cyclists wanted to improve their image all of them should have lights and wear reflective clothing at night there would be no problem. Car drivers could be as safe as possible but there still might be accidents not all cyclists are as safety conscious as others may be
Therein lies the problem. We are not some hivemind, some collective that thinks the same. Given the problems caused to this city and society in general you could very easily also say "if motorists wanted to improve their image they'd drive less, car share, reread the highway code since their 1960s pass..."

I disagree that problems would disappear also. The emphasis would shift to the Torchie's and Geoff51's of the world who complain that we "get in the way" and are "too slow"
[quote][p][bold]Mary80[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]WalkingOnAWire[/bold] wrote: I live near Central Bridge and am often on the road after 6pm i.e. well after it's dark at the moment. I've been keeping a running tally for a couple of weeks on how many bikes are carrying lights. So far I've counted 200 bikes and of these, 49 had no lights at all and another 12 had only 1 light, usually at the front so no help to the traffic approaching them from behind. I very much support cyclists' right to use the roads. But the 25%+ of bikes which are completely unlit are a menace - mainly to themselves - and do the cycling community no good at all.[/p][/quote]if cyclists wanted to improve their image all of them should have lights and wear reflective clothing at night there would be no problem. Car drivers could be as safe as possible but there still might be accidents not all cyclists are as safety conscious as others may be[/p][/quote]Therein lies the problem. We are not some hivemind, some collective that thinks the same. Given the problems caused to this city and society in general you could very easily also say "if motorists wanted to improve their image they'd drive less, car share, reread the highway code since their 1960s pass..." I disagree that problems would disappear also. The emphasis would shift to the Torchie's and Geoff51's of the world who complain that we "get in the way" and are "too slow" downfader
  • Score: -1

9:54am Tue 28 Jan 14

Ginger_cyclist says...

downfader wrote:
Mary80 wrote:
WalkingOnAWire wrote:
I live near Central Bridge and am often on the road after 6pm i.e. well after it's dark at the moment. I've been keeping a running tally for a couple of weeks on how many bikes are carrying lights. So far I've counted 200 bikes and of these, 49 had no lights at all and another 12 had only 1 light, usually at the front so no help to the traffic approaching them from behind.

I very much support cyclists' right to use the roads. But the 25%+ of bikes which are completely unlit are a menace - mainly to themselves - and do the cycling community no good at all.
if cyclists wanted to improve their image all of them should have lights and wear reflective clothing at night there would be no problem. Car drivers could be as safe as possible but there still might be accidents not all cyclists are as safety conscious as others may be
Therein lies the problem. We are not some hivemind, some collective that thinks the same. Given the problems caused to this city and society in general you could very easily also say "if motorists wanted to improve their image they'd drive less, car share, reread the highway code since their 1960s pass..."

I disagree that problems would disappear also. The emphasis would shift to the Torchie's and Geoff51's of the world who complain that we "get in the way" and are "too slow"
Would love to hear them say I'm too slow when I could easily pass them half way to town during morning rush hour and I've already locked up my bike before they even decide on a car park to use.
[quote][p][bold]downfader[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Mary80[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]WalkingOnAWire[/bold] wrote: I live near Central Bridge and am often on the road after 6pm i.e. well after it's dark at the moment. I've been keeping a running tally for a couple of weeks on how many bikes are carrying lights. So far I've counted 200 bikes and of these, 49 had no lights at all and another 12 had only 1 light, usually at the front so no help to the traffic approaching them from behind. I very much support cyclists' right to use the roads. But the 25%+ of bikes which are completely unlit are a menace - mainly to themselves - and do the cycling community no good at all.[/p][/quote]if cyclists wanted to improve their image all of them should have lights and wear reflective clothing at night there would be no problem. Car drivers could be as safe as possible but there still might be accidents not all cyclists are as safety conscious as others may be[/p][/quote]Therein lies the problem. We are not some hivemind, some collective that thinks the same. Given the problems caused to this city and society in general you could very easily also say "if motorists wanted to improve their image they'd drive less, car share, reread the highway code since their 1960s pass..." I disagree that problems would disappear also. The emphasis would shift to the Torchie's and Geoff51's of the world who complain that we "get in the way" and are "too slow"[/p][/quote]Would love to hear them say I'm too slow when I could easily pass them half way to town during morning rush hour and I've already locked up my bike before they even decide on a car park to use. Ginger_cyclist
  • Score: -2

10:03am Tue 28 Jan 14

bigfella777 says...

At least they took the accident seriously, I was knocked off my bike, unconscious, broken collar bone, cracked ribs and then when I came out of hospital and spoke to the police they hadn't even taken any details of the driver who hit me, I lost a months wages and it took me a year to fully heal. They said I would have to hire a solicitor if I wasn't satisfied, disgusting and it shows cyclists are treated as second class citizens on the road.
Also they were just going to leave my £700 bike on the side of the road, luckily a shop owner took it in and kept it for me.
At least they took the accident seriously, I was knocked off my bike, unconscious, broken collar bone, cracked ribs and then when I came out of hospital and spoke to the police they hadn't even taken any details of the driver who hit me, I lost a months wages and it took me a year to fully heal. They said I would have to hire a solicitor if I wasn't satisfied, disgusting and it shows cyclists are treated as second class citizens on the road. Also they were just going to leave my £700 bike on the side of the road, luckily a shop owner took it in and kept it for me. bigfella777
  • Score: -2

10:03am Tue 28 Jan 14

Niel says...

If cyclists want to be 'visible' then Pedalite ankle lights and arm band lights in addition to the normal bicycle lights make them far more visible at night. The baglite they make is good too, yes I use them. However the other extreme that is becoming more common involves fitting 'off-road' mountain bike flood lights and large high powered strobing LED helmet lights on the road, these blind other road users to the point of putting others at risk, blinding an oncoming driver with a cyclist with 'normal' road lights in front of them and your putting the other cyclists life at risk!
If cyclists want to be 'visible' then Pedalite ankle lights and arm band lights in addition to the normal bicycle lights make them far more visible at night. The baglite they make is good too, yes I use them. However the other extreme that is becoming more common involves fitting 'off-road' mountain bike flood lights and large high powered strobing LED helmet lights on the road, these blind other road users to the point of putting others at risk, blinding an oncoming driver with a cyclist with 'normal' road lights in front of them and your putting the other cyclists life at risk! Niel
  • Score: 1

10:28am Tue 28 Jan 14

Richard 51 says...

Reflective clothing didn't help David Irving did it.
Reflective clothing didn't help David Irving did it. Richard 51
  • Score: -1

10:31am Tue 28 Jan 14

Ginger_cyclist says...

Richard 51 wrote:
Reflective clothing didn't help David Irving did it.
Made things worse for him as he would have blended in(for the most part except for his bag) with the glare from the wet road.
[quote][p][bold]Richard 51[/bold] wrote: Reflective clothing didn't help David Irving did it.[/p][/quote]Made things worse for him as he would have blended in(for the most part except for his bag) with the glare from the wet road. Ginger_cyclist
  • Score: 0

12:43pm Tue 28 Jan 14

bigfella777 says...

Niel wrote:
If cyclists want to be 'visible' then Pedalite ankle lights and arm band lights in addition to the normal bicycle lights make them far more visible at night. The baglite they make is good too, yes I use them. However the other extreme that is becoming more common involves fitting 'off-road' mountain bike flood lights and large high powered strobing LED helmet lights on the road, these blind other road users to the point of putting others at risk, blinding an oncoming driver with a cyclist with 'normal' road lights in front of them and your putting the other cyclists life at risk!
When you drive down a road at night with parked cars either side of it, you don't start plowing into the parked cars do you? Because you can see them with your lights, were not talking about a country lane here, the bridge is lit up like a Christmas tree, you're point is ridiculous and is not valid.
[quote][p][bold]Niel[/bold] wrote: If cyclists want to be 'visible' then Pedalite ankle lights and arm band lights in addition to the normal bicycle lights make them far more visible at night. The baglite they make is good too, yes I use them. However the other extreme that is becoming more common involves fitting 'off-road' mountain bike flood lights and large high powered strobing LED helmet lights on the road, these blind other road users to the point of putting others at risk, blinding an oncoming driver with a cyclist with 'normal' road lights in front of them and your putting the other cyclists life at risk![/p][/quote]When you drive down a road at night with parked cars either side of it, you don't start plowing into the parked cars do you? Because you can see them with your lights, were not talking about a country lane here, the bridge is lit up like a Christmas tree, you're point is ridiculous and is not valid. bigfella777
  • Score: 0

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