Southampton man Samuel Binnington pilfered Lego, computer games and action figures from Toys R Us

Daily Echo: Samuel Binnington. Samuel Binnington.

A MAN stole £13,000-worth of toys from his workplace in just three months – and then sold them all on eBay.

Samuel Binnington pilfered Lego, computer games, action figures and more from Toys R Us while he was employed at the store in Poole, Dorset.

He then took to the Internet to sell the new toys on, spending the money he made on the cost of living.

The 21-year-old, of Benbow Gardens in Southampton, admitted a charge of theft by employee when he appeared before a judge who described his actions as an “absolute breach of trust”.

And although he could have faced a jail term for taking the high-value items, magistrates took the “unusual step” of sentencing him to a community order because she believed he was genuinely sorry.

Caroline Foster, presiding magistrate at Bournemouth Crown Court, said: “We have thought very carefully about this. There are various reasons for the decision.

“We see a lot of people coming through the courts each day. We believe you are genuinely remorseful.”

Binnington had gone to court surrounded by family members who were supporting him. The court was told how he had co-operated with police and had also made “generous” attempts to repay Toys R Us for what he had stolen.

The court heard that Binnington, who carried out the thefts between November 1, 2013 and February 26 of this year at the Nuffield Industrial Estate toy store in Poole, has no previous convictions.

He has already paid back around half of the amount taken, and will start a new job in the coming weeks.

Mrs Foster, who commended Binnington for having employment, “at a time when it’s very difficult for young people”, said she didn’t want to impose any sentence that would prevent him from “moving on” with the rest of his life.

However, she added: “I do believe this is a very serious matter. It is an absolute breach of trust.”

He was sentenced to a 12-month community order, and ordered to pay £145 in costs.

Comments (11)

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12:35pm Sat 24 May 14

userds5050 says...

Got a feeling his new employer might have a change of heart once they read this.
Got a feeling his new employer might have a change of heart once they read this. userds5050
  • Score: 5

12:38pm Sat 24 May 14

Mary80 says...

So he steals 13k worth of stuff and gets away with it by saying SORRY? WTF is wrong with the justice system
So he steals 13k worth of stuff and gets away with it by saying SORRY? WTF is wrong with the justice system Mary80
  • Score: 13

2:24pm Sat 24 May 14

mickey01 says...

honest people cant find work yet a thief seems to manage it easily !
something wrong somewhere
honest people cant find work yet a thief seems to manage it easily ! something wrong somewhere mickey01
  • Score: 11

7:26pm Sat 24 May 14

apm1954 says...

is he banned from lego land
is he banned from lego land apm1954
  • Score: 8

7:47pm Sat 24 May 14

skeptik says...

Building a new career?
Building a new career? skeptik
  • Score: 0

8:47am Sun 25 May 14

Dai Rear says...

Mary80 wrote:
So he steals 13k worth of stuff and gets away with it by saying SORRY? WTF is wrong with the justice system
Judges and magistrates have had a Home Office circular telling them to rein in on custodials-or inviting them to. The pendulum between continental jurisdictions where the age of criminal responsibility is 16 or 18 and the USA where "life means life" has swung too far towards the continent. But the criminal justice system is not concerned with property offences such as men breaking in on your home or ripping off their employers only allegations of "inappropriate touching" around the time when JFK was assassinated , so that's where the money has to go boys and girls.
[quote][p][bold]Mary80[/bold] wrote: So he steals 13k worth of stuff and gets away with it by saying SORRY? WTF is wrong with the justice system[/p][/quote]Judges and magistrates have had a Home Office circular telling them to rein in on custodials-or inviting them to. The pendulum between continental jurisdictions where the age of criminal responsibility is 16 or 18 and the USA where "life means life" has swung too far towards the continent. But the criminal justice system is not concerned with property offences such as men breaking in on your home or ripping off their employers only allegations of "inappropriate touching" around the time when JFK was assassinated , so that's where the money has to go boys and girls. Dai Rear
  • Score: -5

9:59am Sun 25 May 14

derek james says...

Mary80 wrote:
So he steals 13k worth of stuff and gets away with it by saying SORRY? WTF is wrong with the justice system
easy the prisons are full!
[quote][p][bold]Mary80[/bold] wrote: So he steals 13k worth of stuff and gets away with it by saying SORRY? WTF is wrong with the justice system[/p][/quote]easy the prisons are full! derek james
  • Score: 1

10:08pm Sun 25 May 14

Peters567 says...

The guy seems "a bit of a lad" if you search through his social media pages.
The guy seems "a bit of a lad" if you search through his social media pages. Peters567
  • Score: -3

11:53am Mon 26 May 14

PhilipCohen says...

“Is that online bargain a deal, or a steal?”

http://www.usatoday.
com/story/money/pers
onalfinance/2014/05/
24/cnbc-buying-stole
n-goods-online/93820
59/

‘An eBay spokesman said the company has dedicated teams to mitigate listings of stolen property and other fraud. "We utilize a combination of sophisticated detection tools, enforcement and strong relationships with brand owners, retailers and law enforcement agencies to effectively combat fraudulent activity and present our customers with a safe, trusted shopping experience," he said.’

And if you believe that statement you are capable of believing absolutely anything. Indeed, that disingenuous statement is, in itself, a “fraud” on consumers who will sometime likely unwittingly buy a stolen good, or think that they may get a good deal on an eBay nominal-start auction that will most likely be infested with shill bidding.

And, I would be prepared to bet that eBay has never been the initial reporter to the authorities of any suspected criminal activity, except for any that which may be aimed directly at eBay itself …

Regardless, it can be easily demonstrated that eBay does little or nothing to mitigate fraud, by exposing a small sample of the massive fraud activity. Nor does eBay do anything to stop the selling of stolen goods, for how can they know if a good is stolen? If they where interested in doing anything about stolen goods they would, at the very least, require that the serial number be included in a listing for any good that carries such a number—but you can be sure that eBay will never apply such a requirement voluntarily; it would too greatly restrict their revenue from the sale of such stolen goods …
http://www.ecommerce
bytes.com/forums/vbu
lletin/showthread.ph
p?24736-Shill-Biddin
g-on-eBay-Case-Study
-5

Fortunately, it’s easy to tell when an eBay or "PreyPal" spokesperson is being disingenuous—their lips are moving! ... http://bit.ly/YvxFEg

eBay Inc (and its auction marketplace), where the incompetent mingle with the malevolent and the criminal ... http://bit.ly/11F2ea
s

“We hang petty thieves and appoint the bigger thieves to public office.”—Aesop, Greek slave & fable author.
“Is that online bargain a deal, or a steal?” http://www.usatoday. com/story/money/pers onalfinance/2014/05/ 24/cnbc-buying-stole n-goods-online/93820 59/ ‘An eBay spokesman said the company has dedicated teams to mitigate listings of stolen property and other fraud. "We utilize a combination of sophisticated detection tools, enforcement and strong relationships with brand owners, retailers and law enforcement agencies to effectively combat fraudulent activity and present our customers with a safe, trusted shopping experience," he said.’ And if you believe that statement you are capable of believing absolutely anything. Indeed, that disingenuous statement is, in itself, a “fraud” on consumers who will sometime likely unwittingly buy a stolen good, or think that they may get a good deal on an eBay nominal-start auction that will most likely be infested with shill bidding. And, I would be prepared to bet that eBay has never been the initial reporter to the authorities of any suspected criminal activity, except for any that which may be aimed directly at eBay itself … Regardless, it can be easily demonstrated that eBay does little or nothing to mitigate fraud, by exposing a small sample of the massive fraud activity. Nor does eBay do anything to stop the selling of stolen goods, for how can they know if a good is stolen? If they where interested in doing anything about stolen goods they would, at the very least, require that the serial number be included in a listing for any good that carries such a number—but you can be sure that eBay will never apply such a requirement voluntarily; it would too greatly restrict their revenue from the sale of such stolen goods … http://www.ecommerce bytes.com/forums/vbu lletin/showthread.ph p?24736-Shill-Biddin g-on-eBay-Case-Study -5 Fortunately, it’s easy to tell when an eBay or "PreyPal" spokesperson is being disingenuous—their lips are moving! ... http://bit.ly/YvxFEg eBay Inc (and its auction marketplace), where the incompetent mingle with the malevolent and the criminal ... http://bit.ly/11F2ea s “We hang petty thieves and appoint the bigger thieves to public office.”—Aesop, Greek slave & fable author. [Hmmm, that could explain how eBay’s Johnny Ho got appointed to the President’s Export Council, and previously to the White House Council for Community Solutions—LOL] PhilipCohen
  • Score: -1

11:58am Mon 26 May 14

Dai Rear says...

PhilipCohen wrote:
“Is that online bargain a deal, or a steal?”

http://www.usatoday.

com/story/money/pers

onalfinance/2014/05/

24/cnbc-buying-stole

n-goods-online/93820

59/

‘An eBay spokesman said the company has dedicated teams to mitigate listings of stolen property and other fraud. "We utilize a combination of sophisticated detection tools, enforcement and strong relationships with brand owners, retailers and law enforcement agencies to effectively combat fraudulent activity and present our customers with a safe, trusted shopping experience," he said.’

And if you believe that statement you are capable of believing absolutely anything. Indeed, that disingenuous statement is, in itself, a “fraud” on consumers who will sometime likely unwittingly buy a stolen good, or think that they may get a good deal on an eBay nominal-start auction that will most likely be infested with shill bidding.

And, I would be prepared to bet that eBay has never been the initial reporter to the authorities of any suspected criminal activity, except for any that which may be aimed directly at eBay itself …

Regardless, it can be easily demonstrated that eBay does little or nothing to mitigate fraud, by exposing a small sample of the massive fraud activity. Nor does eBay do anything to stop the selling of stolen goods, for how can they know if a good is stolen? If they where interested in doing anything about stolen goods they would, at the very least, require that the serial number be included in a listing for any good that carries such a number—but you can be sure that eBay will never apply such a requirement voluntarily; it would too greatly restrict their revenue from the sale of such stolen goods …
http://www.ecommerce

bytes.com/forums/vbu

lletin/showthread.ph

p?24736-Shill-Biddin

g-on-eBay-Case-Study

-5

Fortunately, it’s easy to tell when an eBay or "PreyPal" spokesperson is being disingenuous—their lips are moving! ... http://bit.ly/YvxFEg

eBay Inc (and its auction marketplace), where the incompetent mingle with the malevolent and the criminal ... http://bit.ly/11F2ea

s

“We hang petty thieves and appoint the bigger thieves to public office.”—Aesop, Greek slave & fable author.
Is a public auction site "market overt" so that anyway the buyer would get good title? Open question since consumer law is not my speciality.
[quote][p][bold]PhilipCohen[/bold] wrote: “Is that online bargain a deal, or a steal?” http://www.usatoday. com/story/money/pers onalfinance/2014/05/ 24/cnbc-buying-stole n-goods-online/93820 59/ ‘An eBay spokesman said the company has dedicated teams to mitigate listings of stolen property and other fraud. "We utilize a combination of sophisticated detection tools, enforcement and strong relationships with brand owners, retailers and law enforcement agencies to effectively combat fraudulent activity and present our customers with a safe, trusted shopping experience," he said.’ And if you believe that statement you are capable of believing absolutely anything. Indeed, that disingenuous statement is, in itself, a “fraud” on consumers who will sometime likely unwittingly buy a stolen good, or think that they may get a good deal on an eBay nominal-start auction that will most likely be infested with shill bidding. And, I would be prepared to bet that eBay has never been the initial reporter to the authorities of any suspected criminal activity, except for any that which may be aimed directly at eBay itself … Regardless, it can be easily demonstrated that eBay does little or nothing to mitigate fraud, by exposing a small sample of the massive fraud activity. Nor does eBay do anything to stop the selling of stolen goods, for how can they know if a good is stolen? If they where interested in doing anything about stolen goods they would, at the very least, require that the serial number be included in a listing for any good that carries such a number—but you can be sure that eBay will never apply such a requirement voluntarily; it would too greatly restrict their revenue from the sale of such stolen goods … http://www.ecommerce bytes.com/forums/vbu lletin/showthread.ph p?24736-Shill-Biddin g-on-eBay-Case-Study -5 Fortunately, it’s easy to tell when an eBay or "PreyPal" spokesperson is being disingenuous—their lips are moving! ... http://bit.ly/YvxFEg eBay Inc (and its auction marketplace), where the incompetent mingle with the malevolent and the criminal ... http://bit.ly/11F2ea s “We hang petty thieves and appoint the bigger thieves to public office.”—Aesop, Greek slave & fable author. [Hmmm, that could explain how eBay’s Johnny Ho got appointed to the President’s Export Council, and previously to the White House Council for Community Solutions—LOL][/p][/quote]Is a public auction site "market overt" so that anyway the buyer would get good title? Open question since consumer law is not my speciality. Dai Rear
  • Score: -1

8:09pm Mon 26 May 14

PhilipCohen says...

"Is a public auction site "market overt" so that anyway the buyer would get good title? ..."

My layman's understanding is that you cannot give a better title than you received; in other words, if it's stolen goods, it's stolen goods; at a traditional auction, a buyer would be entitled to recover from the auctioneer, and the auctioneer, in turn, from the consignor ...
"Is a public auction site "market overt" so that anyway the buyer would get good title? ..." My layman's understanding is that you cannot give a better title than you received; in other words, if it's stolen goods, it's stolen goods; at a traditional auction, a buyer would be entitled to recover from the auctioneer, and the auctioneer, in turn, from the consignor ... PhilipCohen
  • Score: 0

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