County’s Deputy Chief Constable to retire

DCC Craig Denholm

DCC Craig Denholm

First published in News Daily Echo: Photograph of the Author by , Crime Reporter

HAMPSHIRE’S Deputy Chief Constable has announced that he is retiring at the end of the year – just a year after taking the post.

DCC Craig Denholm will leave at Christmas following a career in policing spanning nearly 32 years.

Before heading to Hampshire last year he had hit the headlines after he was the senior officer at the centre of “collective amnesia” over the alleged hacking of murdered schoolgirl Milly Dowler’s phone.

The search to replace him is already under way, with the five-year fixed term role advertised online with a salary of £128,520.

DCC Denholm came to Hampshire in May last year, having transferred from Surrey Police.

He was appointed to the same position as he held in Surrey, despite being sanctioned after an investigation found that the force knew for a decade that News of the World reporters had gained access to the youngster’s phone.

As the man in charge of the Dowler inquiry, the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) found it “hard to understand” how he could have not been made aware of hacking allegations.

But at the time of the appointment, Hampshire’s Chief Constable Andy Marsh said that DCC Denholm, who was brought up in Fareham, was “experienced and very capable”, with “a good track record of leadership”.

In a letter to prospective candidates, Chief Constable Marsh writes: “I am looking for someone who can work alongside me to lead an exciting and challenging phase of change whilst maintaining and building upon the excellent services and public confidence for which Hampshire has such a strong reputation.”

The closing date for applications is August 11.

Comments (13)

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7:01am Sat 26 Jul 14

skeptik says...

Maybe a good time to reduce the number of chief officers by not renewing the post. The time must come when 43 forces are amalgamated into 8 regions and the Met.
Maybe a good time to reduce the number of chief officers by not renewing the post. The time must come when 43 forces are amalgamated into 8 regions and the Met. skeptik
  • Score: 3

8:13am Sat 26 Jul 14

redsnapper says...

Reward for total mediocre performance . A big fat pension.
Reward for total mediocre performance . A big fat pension. redsnapper
  • Score: 4

8:28am Sat 26 Jul 14

westhantsboy says...

So the guy responsible for the Hampshire force change programme, managing all the cuts the force has to make retires before it is actually implemented.....
So the guy responsible for the Hampshire force change programme, managing all the cuts the force has to make retires before it is actually implemented..... westhantsboy
  • Score: 4

8:35am Sat 26 Jul 14

one in the crowd says...

Another senior female police commander somewhere else, did something like this recently, it gave her a lovely boost to her pension at taxpayers expense .
Another senior female police commander somewhere else, did something like this recently, it gave her a lovely boost to her pension at taxpayers expense . one in the crowd
  • Score: 2

8:35am Sat 26 Jul 14

westhantsboy says...

redsnapper wrote:
Reward for total mediocre performance . A big fat pension.
Yes, a pension he has paid in to for 32 years so is perfectly entitled to take it.
[quote][p][bold]redsnapper[/bold] wrote: Reward for total mediocre performance . A big fat pension.[/p][/quote]Yes, a pension he has paid in to for 32 years so is perfectly entitled to take it. westhantsboy
  • Score: 6

9:40am Sat 26 Jul 14

Des James says...

The Officer who led the Deepcut re-investigation in 2002 retires one week after the inquest into the second Deepcut death is quashed in the High .court.
The Officer who led the Deepcut re-investigation in 2002 retires one week after the inquest into the second Deepcut death is quashed in the High .court. Des James
  • Score: 2

10:17am Sat 26 Jul 14

david33 says...

westhantsboy wrote:
redsnapper wrote:
Reward for total mediocre performance . A big fat pension.
Yes, a pension he has paid in to for 32 years so is perfectly entitled to take it.
Yes but he only has to do one year in post to get the next level of pension which he's cleverly done., he's not silly.
[quote][p][bold]westhantsboy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]redsnapper[/bold] wrote: Reward for total mediocre performance . A big fat pension.[/p][/quote]Yes, a pension he has paid in to for 32 years so is perfectly entitled to take it.[/p][/quote]Yes but he only has to do one year in post to get the next level of pension which he's cleverly done., he's not silly. david33
  • Score: 2

10:23am Sat 26 Jul 14

david33 says...

If it's true that he's at the top of the the tree for managing all the current changes going on in Hampshire police and the changes are yet to be implemented then that skinks . It shows yet again no really gives a dam in the police only themselves. Now when things go wrong in the very near future they can blame him because he's gone !
If it's true that he's at the top of the the tree for managing all the current changes going on in Hampshire police and the changes are yet to be implemented then that skinks . It shows yet again no really gives a dam in the police only themselves. Now when things go wrong in the very near future they can blame him because he's gone ! david33
  • Score: 1

11:39am Sat 26 Jul 14

cliffwalker says...

Whatever the truth of the matter, there's no doubt that police forces around the country seem like self serving inward looking cliques. The most senior officers go through the motions of high profile operations to fool the public into thinking they are only dedicated to protecting us when the public good is a necessary but unwanted distraction from feathering their own nest. New entrants and junior officers who believe in the trumpeted police service ethos soon have it knocked out of them or keep their heads down if they want to progress.

Perhaps it's always been like that, I don't know, but there is more public scrutiny today which discovers even more examples of what looks like corruption almost daily.
Whatever the truth of the matter, there's no doubt that police forces around the country seem like self serving inward looking cliques. The most senior officers go through the motions of high profile operations to fool the public into thinking they are only dedicated to protecting us when the public good is a necessary but unwanted distraction from feathering their own nest. New entrants and junior officers who believe in the trumpeted police service ethos soon have it knocked out of them or keep their heads down if they want to progress. Perhaps it's always been like that, I don't know, but there is more public scrutiny today which discovers even more examples of what looks like corruption almost daily. cliffwalker
  • Score: 5

12:33pm Sat 26 Jul 14

good-gosh says...

Fortunately, the police do vital work very well - running down criminals and helping the public day and night – and the senior officers organise it all - but there will always be those who like to jeer at law and order – mainly because they are free to do so. Try sniping at the police in many other countries and it would be instant jail for a week – longer if nobody bothers to help.
Fortunately, the police do vital work very well - running down criminals and helping the public day and night – and the senior officers organise it all - but there will always be those who like to jeer at law and order – mainly because they are free to do so. Try sniping at the police in many other countries and it would be instant jail for a week – longer if nobody bothers to help. good-gosh
  • Score: 1

1:48pm Sat 26 Jul 14

forest hump says...

This person, like many others in senior positions (both public and private sector) has worked many, many hours and paid many, many pounds into his pension scheme. His salary reflected his senior position and responsibility that went with it. All of you people poking and posting negative comments are purely jealous. You lot would be the first to whinny and whine if there were near anarchy in this country. He deserves his pension and long, happy retirement. His colleague, ACC David Pryde, also deserves similar treatment when he decides to hang up his boots.
This person, like many others in senior positions (both public and private sector) has worked many, many hours and paid many, many pounds into his pension scheme. His salary reflected his senior position and responsibility that went with it. All of you people poking and posting negative comments are purely jealous. You lot would be the first to whinny and whine if there were near anarchy in this country. He deserves his pension and long, happy retirement. His colleague, ACC David Pryde, also deserves similar treatment when he decides to hang up his boots. forest hump
  • Score: 0

6:13pm Sat 26 Jul 14

skeptik says...

Many are not sniping and maybe not always negative, it is my belief that the command structure of the police is based on a different era. We need to spend less on an outdated and over manned command structure. Money saved by reducing administrative HQs could be diverted to operational commanders who would still have local contact. ACPO is too political and should not exist in the form it is in a democracy. The lads and lasses on the front line I believe deserve better.
Many are not sniping and maybe not always negative, it is my belief that the command structure of the police is based on a different era. We need to spend less on an outdated and over manned command structure. Money saved by reducing administrative HQs could be diverted to operational commanders who would still have local contact. ACPO is too political and should not exist in the form it is in a democracy. The lads and lasses on the front line I believe deserve better. skeptik
  • Score: 5

7:04pm Sat 26 Jul 14

redsnapper says...

westhantsboy wrote:
redsnapper wrote:
Reward for total mediocre performance . A big fat pension.
Yes, a pension he has paid in to for 32 years so is perfectly entitled to take it.
FYI.

Mark Lewis, the lawyer representing Milly's parents, Bob and Sally, described as an "absolute disgrace" the decision to appoint Mr Denholm in the face of the IPCC report, which described it as "scarcely credible" that no-one connected to the Dowler investigation had recognised the importance of the knowledge about hacking held by Surrey in 2002.

Labour's shadow immigration minister, Chris Bryant, who has been a prominent phone hacking campaigner, described the Hampshire appointment as "extraordinary".

The Hampshire force said it had appointed Mr Denholm, who has repeatedly denied that he knew about the hacking, in full knowledge of the findings of the watchdog, which were published on Wednesday - a day before the final interviews for the deputy chief constable post on Thursday.

In a statement, the force said: "We were aware of the IPCC report. DCC Denholm was an outstanding candidate and selected on merit. We look forward to welcoming him."

The decision to appoint Mr Denholm, who has worked for Hampshire earlier in his career, was also approved by the county's new police and crime commissioner, Simon Hayes.
[quote][p][bold]westhantsboy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]redsnapper[/bold] wrote: Reward for total mediocre performance . A big fat pension.[/p][/quote]Yes, a pension he has paid in to for 32 years so is perfectly entitled to take it.[/p][/quote]FYI. Mark Lewis, the lawyer representing Milly's parents, Bob and Sally, described as an "absolute disgrace" the decision to appoint Mr Denholm in the face of the IPCC report, which described it as "scarcely credible" that no-one connected to the Dowler investigation had recognised the importance of the knowledge about hacking held by Surrey in 2002. Labour's shadow immigration minister, Chris Bryant, who has been a prominent phone hacking campaigner, described the Hampshire appointment as "extraordinary". The Hampshire force said it had appointed Mr Denholm, who has repeatedly denied that he knew about the hacking, in full knowledge of the findings of the watchdog, which were published on Wednesday - a day before the final interviews for the deputy chief constable post on Thursday. In a statement, the force said: "We were aware of the IPCC report. DCC Denholm was an outstanding candidate and selected on merit. We look forward to welcoming him." The decision to appoint Mr Denholm, who has worked for Hampshire earlier in his career, was also approved by the county's new police and crime commissioner, Simon Hayes. redsnapper
  • Score: 1

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