Kayleigh Quinn was killed after being hit by a car while standing in the middle of the A36 after drinking alcohol and taking drugs

Kayleigh Quinn died after being hit by a car near West Wellow last year

Kayleigh Quinn died after being hit by a car near West Wellow last year

First published in News
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A YOUNG Hampshire mum died after being hit by a car while standing still in the middle of the A36 with her arms outstretched, an inquest heard.

Kayleigh Quinn suffered fatal multiple injuries when a Volkswagen Golf collided with her near West Wellow at 11.15pm on the night of September 24 last year.

An inquest heard how a post-mortem found that the 27-year-old had three times the legal driving limit of alcohol in her blood at the time, as well as prescription drugs and amphetamines.

It concluded that the mum-of-three would have died instantly.

Hampshire coroner Grahame Short was told how Ms Quinn, of Park Road, Fordingbridge, was asked to leave the Red Rover pub beside the A36 on the night of her death after a solo three-hour drinking session there.

Pub supervisor Katherine Hawkins said she became so verbally aggressive the door was locked behind her when she left.

Ms Quinn was then seen staggering on and off the carriageway shouting: “I will walk in the road, I will do what I want.”

Recalling the moment of the crash, the driver of the car, Khadir Miah, who was returning to his Portsmouth home after work, said: “I saw something in front of me in a star shape. I tried to avoid it.”

But a police investigation concluded it would have been almost impossible for the 45-year-old restaurant worker, who was driving within the speed limit, to have missed Ms Quinn as she was standing in a dip of an unlit road and wearing dark clothes.

The court was told how she was pronounced dead on arrival at Southampton General Hospital.

Ms Quinn, whose children were aged seven, five and two at the time, had previously been diagnosed as suffering from a borderline personality disorder but counselling had been delayed by a long waiting list.

Recording a narrative verdict that her death was caused by a collision with a car, Mr Short said: “I am satisfied that she was behaving in a drunken manner, going on and off the carriageway in a way that endangered not only her but other road users along that section.”

Comments (25)

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1:09pm Wed 6 Aug 14

Waiting says...

A very sad outcome to a situation that should have been avoided.
The licensing act requires a duty of care to the customers, that this lady had been allowed to be served alcohol over a period of three hours during which she became drunk and abusive should and could have been avoided in the first place by correct management procedures being in place, along side proper staff training. That this lady was allowed to get drunk and then ejected without any further thought for her wellbeing is bordering on criminal especially given the fact she was seen " staggering on and off the carriage way" Consequently many lives have been ruined including the poor car driver. I hope the authorities are going to carryout a license review to ensure yet another fatal accident does not occur to customers leaving Pubs on the A36. Whilst I suspect she may have been a difficult customer to deal with on the night in question the pub is partly responsible for the eventual outcome.
A very sad outcome to a situation that should have been avoided. The licensing act requires a duty of care to the customers, that this lady had been allowed to be served alcohol over a period of three hours during which she became drunk and abusive should and could have been avoided in the first place by correct management procedures being in place, along side proper staff training. That this lady was allowed to get drunk and then ejected without any further thought for her wellbeing is bordering on criminal especially given the fact she was seen " staggering on and off the carriage way" Consequently many lives have been ruined including the poor car driver. I hope the authorities are going to carryout a license review to ensure yet another fatal accident does not occur to customers leaving Pubs on the A36. Whilst I suspect she may have been a difficult customer to deal with on the night in question the pub is partly responsible for the eventual outcome. Waiting
  • Score: 46

1:45pm Wed 6 Aug 14

Mr E says...

I cant help feeling sorry for the driver - according to the original article he was arrested on suspicion of causing death by driving without due care and attention.
I cant help feeling sorry for the driver - according to the original article he was arrested on suspicion of causing death by driving without due care and attention. Mr E
  • Score: 73

2:08pm Wed 6 Aug 14

KayleighJade says...

That poor driver, he has to live with that for the rest of his life.
That poor driver, he has to live with that for the rest of his life. KayleighJade
  • Score: 62

2:21pm Wed 6 Aug 14

elvisimo says...

Waiting wrote:
A very sad outcome to a situation that should have been avoided.
The licensing act requires a duty of care to the customers, that this lady had been allowed to be served alcohol over a period of three hours during which she became drunk and abusive should and could have been avoided in the first place by correct management procedures being in place, along side proper staff training. That this lady was allowed to get drunk and then ejected without any further thought for her wellbeing is bordering on criminal especially given the fact she was seen " staggering on and off the carriage way" Consequently many lives have been ruined including the poor car driver. I hope the authorities are going to carryout a license review to ensure yet another fatal accident does not occur to customers leaving Pubs on the A36. Whilst I suspect she may have been a difficult customer to deal with on the night in question the pub is partly responsible for the eventual outcome.
What? she had three times the legal driving limit in her system - if the legal driving limit is circa two pints then that makes 6 pints - hardly a ridiculous amount for 3 hours. The issue here is she decided to drink on top of both legal and illegal drugs. Publicans are not social workers. If someone is abusive after last orders what do you expect them to do? random drug tests?
Very sad and by no mean do the consequences come close to matching the actions but finger pointing is ridiculous.
[quote][p][bold]Waiting[/bold] wrote: A very sad outcome to a situation that should have been avoided. The licensing act requires a duty of care to the customers, that this lady had been allowed to be served alcohol over a period of three hours during which she became drunk and abusive should and could have been avoided in the first place by correct management procedures being in place, along side proper staff training. That this lady was allowed to get drunk and then ejected without any further thought for her wellbeing is bordering on criminal especially given the fact she was seen " staggering on and off the carriage way" Consequently many lives have been ruined including the poor car driver. I hope the authorities are going to carryout a license review to ensure yet another fatal accident does not occur to customers leaving Pubs on the A36. Whilst I suspect she may have been a difficult customer to deal with on the night in question the pub is partly responsible for the eventual outcome.[/p][/quote]What? she had three times the legal driving limit in her system - if the legal driving limit is circa two pints then that makes 6 pints - hardly a ridiculous amount for 3 hours. The issue here is she decided to drink on top of both legal and illegal drugs. Publicans are not social workers. If someone is abusive after last orders what do you expect them to do? random drug tests? Very sad and by no mean do the consequences come close to matching the actions but finger pointing is ridiculous. elvisimo
  • Score: 49

3:02pm Wed 6 Aug 14

realistic-usa says...

What a sad sad event. A lot of lives ruined.

I do have to agree with Waiting though. There is a quite clear duty of care required from the public house to take reasonable steps to ensure the well being of its customers. From the article it would appear that may not have been done. This lady was served for a period of time over which there must been increasing evidence that she was becoming intoxicated. Who made the decision to ask her to leave? Were any steps taken to consider where she would go when she left? Whomever ejected her had actual knowledge that a busy high speed road ( A36) was adjacent. Why was the door locked? A lot of questions here to answer and I would hope that a licensing review would be conducted.
What a sad sad event. A lot of lives ruined. I do have to agree with Waiting though. There is a quite clear duty of care required from the public house to take reasonable steps to ensure the well being of its customers. From the article it would appear that may not have been done. This lady was served for a period of time over which there must been increasing evidence that she was becoming intoxicated. Who made the decision to ask her to leave? Were any steps taken to consider where she would go when she left? Whomever ejected her had actual knowledge that a busy high speed road ( A36) was adjacent. Why was the door locked? A lot of questions here to answer and I would hope that a licensing review would be conducted. realistic-usa
  • Score: -13

3:14pm Wed 6 Aug 14

rudolph_hucker says...

realistic-usa wrote:
What a sad sad event. A lot of lives ruined. I do have to agree with Waiting though. There is a quite clear duty of care required from the public house to take reasonable steps to ensure the well being of its customers. From the article it would appear that may not have been done. This lady was served for a period of time over which there must been increasing evidence that she was becoming intoxicated. Who made the decision to ask her to leave? Were any steps taken to consider where she would go when she left? Whomever ejected her had actual knowledge that a busy high speed road ( A36) was adjacent. Why was the door locked? A lot of questions here to answer and I would hope that a licensing review would be conducted.
It is no one's fault but her own. Can't shift the blame onto others. Plus the pub didn't sell her the drugs
[quote][p][bold]realistic-usa[/bold] wrote: What a sad sad event. A lot of lives ruined. I do have to agree with Waiting though. There is a quite clear duty of care required from the public house to take reasonable steps to ensure the well being of its customers. From the article it would appear that may not have been done. This lady was served for a period of time over which there must been increasing evidence that she was becoming intoxicated. Who made the decision to ask her to leave? Were any steps taken to consider where she would go when she left? Whomever ejected her had actual knowledge that a busy high speed road ( A36) was adjacent. Why was the door locked? A lot of questions here to answer and I would hope that a licensing review would be conducted.[/p][/quote]It is no one's fault but her own. Can't shift the blame onto others. Plus the pub didn't sell her the drugs rudolph_hucker
  • Score: 44

3:15pm Wed 6 Aug 14

Zexagon says...

realistic-usa wrote:
What a sad sad event. A lot of lives ruined.

I do have to agree with Waiting though. There is a quite clear duty of care required from the public house to take reasonable steps to ensure the well being of its customers. From the article it would appear that may not have been done. This lady was served for a period of time over which there must been increasing evidence that she was becoming intoxicated. Who made the decision to ask her to leave? Were any steps taken to consider where she would go when she left? Whomever ejected her had actual knowledge that a busy high speed road ( A36) was adjacent. Why was the door locked? A lot of questions here to answer and I would hope that a licensing review would be conducted.
Give her a lift back to fordingbridge ?
[quote][p][bold]realistic-usa[/bold] wrote: What a sad sad event. A lot of lives ruined. I do have to agree with Waiting though. There is a quite clear duty of care required from the public house to take reasonable steps to ensure the well being of its customers. From the article it would appear that may not have been done. This lady was served for a period of time over which there must been increasing evidence that she was becoming intoxicated. Who made the decision to ask her to leave? Were any steps taken to consider where she would go when she left? Whomever ejected her had actual knowledge that a busy high speed road ( A36) was adjacent. Why was the door locked? A lot of questions here to answer and I would hope that a licensing review would be conducted.[/p][/quote]Give her a lift back to fordingbridge ? Zexagon
  • Score: -6

4:08pm Wed 6 Aug 14

elvisimo says...

realistic-usa wrote:
What a sad sad event. A lot of lives ruined.

I do have to agree with Waiting though. There is a quite clear duty of care required from the public house to take reasonable steps to ensure the well being of its customers. From the article it would appear that may not have been done. This lady was served for a period of time over which there must been increasing evidence that she was becoming intoxicated. Who made the decision to ask her to leave? Were any steps taken to consider where she would go when she left? Whomever ejected her had actual knowledge that a busy high speed road ( A36) was adjacent. Why was the door locked? A lot of questions here to answer and I would hope that a licensing review would be conducted.
why was the door locked? --- perhaps because the pub had closed? Do you suggest that everyone who leave a pub after having a few should perhaps be made to fill in a questionnaire or perhaps be provided with a free taxi home to sleep of their drug fuelled night?????
[quote][p][bold]realistic-usa[/bold] wrote: What a sad sad event. A lot of lives ruined. I do have to agree with Waiting though. There is a quite clear duty of care required from the public house to take reasonable steps to ensure the well being of its customers. From the article it would appear that may not have been done. This lady was served for a period of time over which there must been increasing evidence that she was becoming intoxicated. Who made the decision to ask her to leave? Were any steps taken to consider where she would go when she left? Whomever ejected her had actual knowledge that a busy high speed road ( A36) was adjacent. Why was the door locked? A lot of questions here to answer and I would hope that a licensing review would be conducted.[/p][/quote]why was the door locked? --- perhaps because the pub had closed? Do you suggest that everyone who leave a pub after having a few should perhaps be made to fill in a questionnaire or perhaps be provided with a free taxi home to sleep of their drug fuelled night????? elvisimo
  • Score: 22

4:48pm Wed 6 Aug 14

thesouth says...

realistic-usa wrote:
What a sad sad event. A lot of lives ruined.

I do have to agree with Waiting though. There is a quite clear duty of care required from the public house to take reasonable steps to ensure the well being of its customers. From the article it would appear that may not have been done. This lady was served for a period of time over which there must been increasing evidence that she was becoming intoxicated. Who made the decision to ask her to leave? Were any steps taken to consider where she would go when she left? Whomever ejected her had actual knowledge that a busy high speed road ( A36) was adjacent. Why was the door locked? A lot of questions here to answer and I would hope that a licensing review would be conducted.
So you have never heard of taking personal responsibility then? Are you one of those people that blame everyone else for not spotting your mistakes ?
[quote][p][bold]realistic-usa[/bold] wrote: What a sad sad event. A lot of lives ruined. I do have to agree with Waiting though. There is a quite clear duty of care required from the public house to take reasonable steps to ensure the well being of its customers. From the article it would appear that may not have been done. This lady was served for a period of time over which there must been increasing evidence that she was becoming intoxicated. Who made the decision to ask her to leave? Were any steps taken to consider where she would go when she left? Whomever ejected her had actual knowledge that a busy high speed road ( A36) was adjacent. Why was the door locked? A lot of questions here to answer and I would hope that a licensing review would be conducted.[/p][/quote]So you have never heard of taking personal responsibility then? Are you one of those people that blame everyone else for not spotting your mistakes ? thesouth
  • Score: 28

4:49pm Wed 6 Aug 14

thesouth says...

realistic-usa wrote:
What a sad sad event. A lot of lives ruined.

I do have to agree with Waiting though. There is a quite clear duty of care required from the public house to take reasonable steps to ensure the well being of its customers. From the article it would appear that may not have been done. This lady was served for a period of time over which there must been increasing evidence that she was becoming intoxicated. Who made the decision to ask her to leave? Were any steps taken to consider where she would go when she left? Whomever ejected her had actual knowledge that a busy high speed road ( A36) was adjacent. Why was the door locked? A lot of questions here to answer and I would hope that a licensing review would be conducted.
So you have never heard of taking personal responsibility then? Are you one of those people that blame everyone else for not spotting your mistakes ?
[quote][p][bold]realistic-usa[/bold] wrote: What a sad sad event. A lot of lives ruined. I do have to agree with Waiting though. There is a quite clear duty of care required from the public house to take reasonable steps to ensure the well being of its customers. From the article it would appear that may not have been done. This lady was served for a period of time over which there must been increasing evidence that she was becoming intoxicated. Who made the decision to ask her to leave? Were any steps taken to consider where she would go when she left? Whomever ejected her had actual knowledge that a busy high speed road ( A36) was adjacent. Why was the door locked? A lot of questions here to answer and I would hope that a licensing review would be conducted.[/p][/quote]So you have never heard of taking personal responsibility then? Are you one of those people that blame everyone else for not spotting your mistakes ? thesouth
  • Score: 9

5:13pm Wed 6 Aug 14

Frogham Ferret says...

Why oh why was she kept waiting so long for counselling after being diagnosed with a mental health problem?
Why oh why was she kept waiting so long for counselling after being diagnosed with a mental health problem? Frogham Ferret
  • Score: 21

7:32pm Wed 6 Aug 14

saint robbie says...

The only people to blame are the NHS. Mental health is becoming a major issue that is not being dealt with correctly, people are being left to deal with issues by themselves without receiving any advice or professional support, or simply sitting on waiting list for years.
The only people to blame are the NHS. Mental health is becoming a major issue that is not being dealt with correctly, people are being left to deal with issues by themselves without receiving any advice or professional support, or simply sitting on waiting list for years. saint robbie
  • Score: -7

7:42pm Wed 6 Aug 14

Huey says...

saint robbie wrote:
The only people to blame are the NHS. Mental health is becoming a major issue that is not being dealt with correctly, people are being left to deal with issues by themselves without receiving any advice or professional support, or simply sitting on waiting list for years.
If half of them spent less money on booze drugs and fags they could pay to see a shirink with their own money instead of burdening the nhs with their stories of depression and the like.
I dread to think how much the national nhs wage bill is for psychologists and psychiatrists alone.
That money could be spent on nurses equipment and drugs.
Ex soldiers should still get it free though.
[quote][p][bold]saint robbie[/bold] wrote: The only people to blame are the NHS. Mental health is becoming a major issue that is not being dealt with correctly, people are being left to deal with issues by themselves without receiving any advice or professional support, or simply sitting on waiting list for years.[/p][/quote]If half of them spent less money on booze drugs and fags they could pay to see a shirink with their own money instead of burdening the nhs with their stories of depression and the like. I dread to think how much the national nhs wage bill is for psychologists and psychiatrists alone. That money could be spent on nurses equipment and drugs. Ex soldiers should still get it free though. Huey
  • Score: 5

9:52pm Wed 6 Aug 14

madge731933 says...

She was drunk ffs which the pub had made money on by serving her! No way should they have just thrown her out like she was an animal! At the time she might of not appreciated a night in a cell but i think the least they could of done is ring the police and get help for her! The driver yes will never forget that night but the pub should be blamed!
She was drunk ffs which the pub had made money on by serving her! No way should they have just thrown her out like she was an animal! At the time she might of not appreciated a night in a cell but i think the least they could of done is ring the police and get help for her! The driver yes will never forget that night but the pub should be blamed! madge731933
  • Score: 1

10:02pm Wed 6 Aug 14

realistic-usa says...

For those who believe the pub may not have a liability read a good textbook on Tort Law- duty of care- contributory negligence etc. There might even be some case law on the topic too- :)
For those who believe the pub may not have a liability read a good textbook on Tort Law- duty of care- contributory negligence etc. There might even be some case law on the topic too- :) realistic-usa
  • Score: -1

10:07pm Wed 6 Aug 14

realistic-usa says...

For those who take the view that no liability exists for the pub-- read a good textbook on Tort Law- Duty of Care- was the incident reasonably foreseeable? Did the pub owe her a duty of care? Take into account she was a customer. When did they first notice she was intoxicated/ suffering from drug use? Contributory negligence?

That's enough clues I think.
For those who take the view that no liability exists for the pub-- read a good textbook on Tort Law- Duty of Care- was the incident reasonably foreseeable? Did the pub owe her a duty of care? Take into account she was a customer. When did they first notice she was intoxicated/ suffering from drug use? Contributory negligence? That's enough clues I think. realistic-usa
  • Score: -3

10:39pm Wed 6 Aug 14

sparkster says...

Im sorry but I too think the pub supervisor should have either called the police or a taxi to take her home, at least she would have got home safely, ok she may have done it again but now 3 children are without a mother. I too feel for the driver who has to live with this. There are those who may not share my views but I cant help feeling some help would have been in order
Im sorry but I too think the pub supervisor should have either called the police or a taxi to take her home, at least she would have got home safely, ok she may have done it again but now 3 children are without a mother. I too feel for the driver who has to live with this. There are those who may not share my views but I cant help feeling some help would have been in order sparkster
  • Score: 5

10:16am Thu 7 Aug 14

Dai Rear says...

realistic-usa wrote:
For those who take the view that no liability exists for the pub-- read a good textbook on Tort Law- Duty of Care- was the incident reasonably foreseeable? Did the pub owe her a duty of care? Take into account she was a customer. When did they first notice she was intoxicated/ suffering from drug use? Contributory negligence?

That's enough clues I think.
Possibly, but reading this newspaper account there doesn't seem to have been an indication of what was probably happening, i.e. building up the courage to do what she then did. So, predictability/fores
eeability?
[quote][p][bold]realistic-usa[/bold] wrote: For those who take the view that no liability exists for the pub-- read a good textbook on Tort Law- Duty of Care- was the incident reasonably foreseeable? Did the pub owe her a duty of care? Take into account she was a customer. When did they first notice she was intoxicated/ suffering from drug use? Contributory negligence? That's enough clues I think.[/p][/quote]Possibly, but reading this newspaper account there doesn't seem to have been an indication of what was probably happening, i.e. building up the courage to do what she then did. So, predictability/fores eeability? Dai Rear
  • Score: 4

10:24am Thu 7 Aug 14

espanuel says...

sparkster wrote:
Im sorry but I too think the pub supervisor should have either called the police or a taxi to take her home, at least she would have got home safely, ok she may have done it again but now 3 children are without a mother. I too feel for the driver who has to live with this. There are those who may not share my views but I cant help feeling some help would have been in order
Sparkster,
You are correct the reason I say that is I use to work in a public house and you as a supervisor or barman have a responsibility for customers. And it doesn't matter how much they have had to drink you have to make sure they are OK. And if they are ok when they leave that they are responsive and responsible. I know I'm probably going to get shot down for this but the Landlord is responsible for customers on his property. If he saw that a customer was not being reasonable and still served that person then his actions are wrong. The problem with calling the police is that they can hold it against when you license comes up for renewal. But there other ways to get round it (1) call an ambulance if you think they have taking drugs.
[quote][p][bold]sparkster[/bold] wrote: Im sorry but I too think the pub supervisor should have either called the police or a taxi to take her home, at least she would have got home safely, ok she may have done it again but now 3 children are without a mother. I too feel for the driver who has to live with this. There are those who may not share my views but I cant help feeling some help would have been in order[/p][/quote]Sparkster, You are correct the reason I say that is I use to work in a public house and you as a supervisor or barman have a responsibility for customers. And it doesn't matter how much they have had to drink you have to make sure they are OK. And if they are ok when they leave that they are responsive and responsible. I know I'm probably going to get shot down for this but the Landlord is responsible for customers on his property. If he saw that a customer was not being reasonable and still served that person then his actions are wrong. The problem with calling the police is that they can hold it against when you license comes up for renewal. But there other ways to get round it (1) call an ambulance if you think they have taking drugs. espanuel
  • Score: 5

11:35am Thu 7 Aug 14

Niel says...

saint robbie wrote:
The only people to blame are the NHS. Mental health is becoming a major issue that is not being dealt with correctly, people are being left to deal with issues by themselves without receiving any advice or professional support, or simply sitting on waiting list for years.
No, the NHS isn't to blame, those that have systematically dismantled the mental health provision have only been doing what those in power and influence wanted them to do. 'Care in the community' mental health care has led to numerous suicides, and murder, and without enough 'closed' safe care mental health hospitals the situation will only get worse.
[quote][p][bold]saint robbie[/bold] wrote: The only people to blame are the NHS. Mental health is becoming a major issue that is not being dealt with correctly, people are being left to deal with issues by themselves without receiving any advice or professional support, or simply sitting on waiting list for years.[/p][/quote]No, the NHS isn't to blame, those that have systematically dismantled the mental health provision have only been doing what those in power and influence wanted them to do. 'Care in the community' mental health care has led to numerous suicides, and murder, and without enough 'closed' safe care mental health hospitals the situation will only get worse. Niel
  • Score: 1

1:34pm Thu 7 Aug 14

InsideOutCat says...

Does this mean that if I run you over in my car that the manufacturer is responsible? Or if I stick my hand in the fire I can sue the chap that sold me the coal?
Does this mean that if I run you over in my car that the manufacturer is responsible? Or if I stick my hand in the fire I can sue the chap that sold me the coal? InsideOutCat
  • Score: 2

3:28pm Thu 7 Aug 14

cliffwalker says...

It is illegal to serve alcohol to someone who is already drunk. The licensee is responsible for the proper conduct of his licence and , if convicted, would be liable for a fine of up to £1000 and he/she could lose their licence.
It is illegal to serve alcohol to someone who is already drunk. The licensee is responsible for the proper conduct of his licence and , if convicted, would be liable for a fine of up to £1000 and he/she could lose their licence. cliffwalker
  • Score: 0

12:16am Fri 8 Aug 14

saint robbie says...

Huey wrote:
saint robbie wrote:
The only people to blame are the NHS. Mental health is becoming a major issue that is not being dealt with correctly, people are being left to deal with issues by themselves without receiving any advice or professional support, or simply sitting on waiting list for years.
If half of them spent less money on booze drugs and fags they could pay to see a shirink with their own money instead of burdening the nhs with their stories of depression and the like.
I dread to think how much the national nhs wage bill is for psychologists and psychiatrists alone.
That money could be spent on nurses equipment and drugs.
Ex soldiers should still get it free though.
I understand what you are saying, however my point is that you go to the NHS for help and believe that when you receive advice or guidance that it is the correct advice and guidance. This is not always the case though as there is a severe lack of understanding of mental health issues within the NHS which creates miss diagnosis, the wrong treatment, the wrong medicines etc which can ultimately make conditions worse.
Add to this the FACT that the NHS are inundated with cases and admittedly do not have the appropriate Psychologists, Psychiatrists, Therapists in place to deal with the ever increasing cases, in turn creating never ending waiting lists. Further more any good Therapists etc are finding themselves in such high demand that many are snapped up by private organisations.
I am speaking with some experience as i currently pay up to £180 per hour for my young son to be seen privately for his conditions, and no i can not really afford it but am left with little choice as it is the ONLY way i stand a chance of my son learning to manage his condition and growing up to live a relatively normal life.
[quote][p][bold]Huey[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]saint robbie[/bold] wrote: The only people to blame are the NHS. Mental health is becoming a major issue that is not being dealt with correctly, people are being left to deal with issues by themselves without receiving any advice or professional support, or simply sitting on waiting list for years.[/p][/quote]If half of them spent less money on booze drugs and fags they could pay to see a shirink with their own money instead of burdening the nhs with their stories of depression and the like. I dread to think how much the national nhs wage bill is for psychologists and psychiatrists alone. That money could be spent on nurses equipment and drugs. Ex soldiers should still get it free though.[/p][/quote]I understand what you are saying, however my point is that you go to the NHS for help and believe that when you receive advice or guidance that it is the correct advice and guidance. This is not always the case though as there is a severe lack of understanding of mental health issues within the NHS which creates miss diagnosis, the wrong treatment, the wrong medicines etc which can ultimately make conditions worse. Add to this the FACT that the NHS are inundated with cases and admittedly do not have the appropriate Psychologists, Psychiatrists, Therapists in place to deal with the ever increasing cases, in turn creating never ending waiting lists. Further more any good Therapists etc are finding themselves in such high demand that many are snapped up by private organisations. I am speaking with some experience as i currently pay up to £180 per hour for my young son to be seen privately for his conditions, and no i can not really afford it but am left with little choice as it is the ONLY way i stand a chance of my son learning to manage his condition and growing up to live a relatively normal life. saint robbie
  • Score: 2

12:52am Fri 8 Aug 14

saint robbie says...

Niel wrote:
saint robbie wrote:
The only people to blame are the NHS. Mental health is becoming a major issue that is not being dealt with correctly, people are being left to deal with issues by themselves without receiving any advice or professional support, or simply sitting on waiting list for years.
No, the NHS isn't to blame, those that have systematically dismantled the mental health provision have only been doing what those in power and influence wanted them to do. 'Care in the community' mental health care has led to numerous suicides, and murder, and without enough 'closed' safe care mental health hospitals the situation will only get worse.
Yes maybe this is true, however not all mental health issues require hospitalisation or safe care and in my opinion the lack of provision to deal with lower grade disorders at an early stage is only going to lead to children becoming a menace / danger to society in the future.
[quote][p][bold]Niel[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]saint robbie[/bold] wrote: The only people to blame are the NHS. Mental health is becoming a major issue that is not being dealt with correctly, people are being left to deal with issues by themselves without receiving any advice or professional support, or simply sitting on waiting list for years.[/p][/quote]No, the NHS isn't to blame, those that have systematically dismantled the mental health provision have only been doing what those in power and influence wanted them to do. 'Care in the community' mental health care has led to numerous suicides, and murder, and without enough 'closed' safe care mental health hospitals the situation will only get worse.[/p][/quote]Yes maybe this is true, however not all mental health issues require hospitalisation or safe care and in my opinion the lack of provision to deal with lower grade disorders at an early stage is only going to lead to children becoming a menace / danger to society in the future. saint robbie
  • Score: 3

12:06pm Sat 9 Aug 14

Kirsty666 says...

The poor children and driver is all I can say now having to live with that they have no mother and the driver feeling responsible for the rest of his life even though it wasn't his fault. I hope they all received cancelling for the matter
The poor children and driver is all I can say now having to live with that they have no mother and the driver feeling responsible for the rest of his life even though it wasn't his fault. I hope they all received cancelling for the matter Kirsty666
  • Score: 1

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