Is it time for the law to catch up with scooter drivers?

Daily Echo: Is it time for the law to catch up with scooter drivers? Is it time for the law to catch up with scooter drivers?

NOWHERE in Europe has embraced mobility scooters quite like Britain.

We are the continent’s mobility scooter capital, with more than 250,000 on our streets and pavements.

They have been hailed as a boon to elderly and disabled, giving them independence they would be otherwise denied. However, all is not sweetness and light.

A series of accidents involving mobility scooters, which have left pedestrians with life changing injuries, has led to a growing feeling that the law surrounding their use should be tightened.

Campaigners have called for mobility scooter drivers to have to pass a test of their skills and be insured before they can take to the road. Those demands have been renewed in the wake of more accidents in Hampshire.

The Daily Echo reported how last Saturday a 94-year-old woman was knocked over in Romsey town centre by a scooter driver who did not stop to help her. She was left with cuts and bruises.

Earlier this year Susan Daniels was left with severe injuries after she was hit by a scooter driver in the New Forest.

She suffered a fractured knee and a ruptured tendon in her left arm after an 88-year-old man crashed into her in Station Road, New Milton.

The 69-year-old now finds it difficult to get around due to her injuries and she called for the law to be changed to stop people buying scooters without tax or insurance.

She has won some support from charities, organisations and even scooter drivers for her proposals.

James Dooley, director at the Mobility Bureau, a company which provides support and scooters to charities, said: “I think there should be a law change – it is all very loose at the moment.

“There’s a proper procedure to buying scooters and users should have an assessment done by an independent occupational therapist to ensure you are fit to use one. But the Internet has changed that.”

Kevin Fry, owner of Hampshire Mobility Services, in Romsey, carries out assessments for anyone that wants to drive a scooter but agrees that, because people can buy the vehicles over the Internet now, there is no assessment done to ensure people are able to drive them. He said: “I think there should be some kind of onus on manufacturers not to supply to people who buy on the Internet. Maybe there should be some kind of curb or protocol.”

There is broad agreement on making tests compulsory from scooter users themselves. Roy Jennings, from Freemantle, Southampton, said: “Although I don’t agree with training or testing in the Government way of thinking, I do agree that users should have some proper training given by the supplier before use, so they are aware of the laws and rules regarding using the fast machines on the pavement and within shops.”

But it may be a while before any change takes place.

A spokesman for the Department for Transport said: “We have no plans to introduce mandatory requirements for insurance cover, driver training or for registration of mobility vehicles because we have no firm evidence that their use is causing a major public safety problem.

“However, police forces have begun to record in their road casualty statistics whether a mobility vehicle has been involved in an accident on the public highway. This will, in time, give us a clearer picture.

“The department is working to obtain data on this issue from all forces by 2015.”

Comments (37)

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12:58pm Sun 6 Apr 14

saint61 says...

Heard wiggle were organising a mass New Forest RIde
Heard wiggle were organising a mass New Forest RIde saint61
  • Score: 6

1:03pm Sun 6 Apr 14

Ginger_cyclist says...

Can't exactly charge VED on them, they would come under band A since they're electric, making them VED exempt, just like electric cars and bicycles.
Can't exactly charge VED on them, they would come under band A since they're electric, making them VED exempt, just like electric cars and bicycles. Ginger_cyclist
  • Score: -1

1:23pm Sun 6 Apr 14

Torchie1 says...

When governments are constantly looking for new ways of raising revenue, a tightening of the law to capture mobility scooters could be the 'opening of the door' needed to include bicycles. No longer are bicycles a form of transport for the poor, they are a rich mans form of entertainment when the events like Wiggle are consistently sold out which shows that there is a potential source of revenue there. A few years ago the tax on diesel was low and people were encouraged to buy diesel vehicles based on the fuel,economy. When enough drivers had embraced diesel motoring the tax was hiked up and the fuel cost is now higher than petrol. Bicycles have taken off as a source of amusement with high prices being paid and this shows that the buyers can't really argue that they can't afford to contribute to the economy. Bring it on.
When governments are constantly looking for new ways of raising revenue, a tightening of the law to capture mobility scooters could be the 'opening of the door' needed to include bicycles. No longer are bicycles a form of transport for the poor, they are a rich mans form of entertainment when the events like Wiggle are consistently sold out which shows that there is a potential source of revenue there. A few years ago the tax on diesel was low and people were encouraged to buy diesel vehicles based on the fuel,economy. When enough drivers had embraced diesel motoring the tax was hiked up and the fuel cost is now higher than petrol. Bicycles have taken off as a source of amusement with high prices being paid and this shows that the buyers can't really argue that they can't afford to contribute to the economy. Bring it on. Torchie1
  • Score: 4

1:29pm Sun 6 Apr 14

Ginger_cyclist says...

Torchie1 wrote:
When governments are constantly looking for new ways of raising revenue, a tightening of the law to capture mobility scooters could be the 'opening of the door' needed to include bicycles. No longer are bicycles a form of transport for the poor, they are a rich mans form of entertainment when the events like Wiggle are consistently sold out which shows that there is a potential source of revenue there. A few years ago the tax on diesel was low and people were encouraged to buy diesel vehicles based on the fuel,economy. When enough drivers had embraced diesel motoring the tax was hiked up and the fuel cost is now higher than petrol. Bicycles have taken off as a source of amusement with high prices being paid and this shows that the buyers can't really argue that they can't afford to contribute to the economy. Bring it on.
Band A vehicles don't get charged for VED, what are you not getting about that?
[quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: When governments are constantly looking for new ways of raising revenue, a tightening of the law to capture mobility scooters could be the 'opening of the door' needed to include bicycles. No longer are bicycles a form of transport for the poor, they are a rich mans form of entertainment when the events like Wiggle are consistently sold out which shows that there is a potential source of revenue there. A few years ago the tax on diesel was low and people were encouraged to buy diesel vehicles based on the fuel,economy. When enough drivers had embraced diesel motoring the tax was hiked up and the fuel cost is now higher than petrol. Bicycles have taken off as a source of amusement with high prices being paid and this shows that the buyers can't really argue that they can't afford to contribute to the economy. Bring it on.[/p][/quote]Band A vehicles don't get charged for VED, what are you not getting about that? Ginger_cyclist
  • Score: -3

1:50pm Sun 6 Apr 14

acid drop says...

If I was hit by one of these mobility scooters, I'm afraid the rider would end up wearing it.
If I was hit by one of these mobility scooters, I'm afraid the rider would end up wearing it. acid drop
  • Score: 13

1:59pm Sun 6 Apr 14

Torchie1 says...

Ginger_cyclist wrote:
Torchie1 wrote:
When governments are constantly looking for new ways of raising revenue, a tightening of the law to capture mobility scooters could be the 'opening of the door' needed to include bicycles. No longer are bicycles a form of transport for the poor, they are a rich mans form of entertainment when the events like Wiggle are consistently sold out which shows that there is a potential source of revenue there. A few years ago the tax on diesel was low and people were encouraged to buy diesel vehicles based on the fuel,economy. When enough drivers had embraced diesel motoring the tax was hiked up and the fuel cost is now higher than petrol. Bicycles have taken off as a source of amusement with high prices being paid and this shows that the buyers can't really argue that they can't afford to contribute to the economy. Bring it on.
Band A vehicles don't get charged for VED, what are you not getting about that?
Could I just correct you in that Band A vehicles don't pay VED at the moment. The interpretation of the phrase in the previous Budget that 'all road users would contribute' is that the current 'Band A' situation will come to an end in the same way that cheap diesel did. There's a little something for you bicycle owners to 'get'.
[quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: When governments are constantly looking for new ways of raising revenue, a tightening of the law to capture mobility scooters could be the 'opening of the door' needed to include bicycles. No longer are bicycles a form of transport for the poor, they are a rich mans form of entertainment when the events like Wiggle are consistently sold out which shows that there is a potential source of revenue there. A few years ago the tax on diesel was low and people were encouraged to buy diesel vehicles based on the fuel,economy. When enough drivers had embraced diesel motoring the tax was hiked up and the fuel cost is now higher than petrol. Bicycles have taken off as a source of amusement with high prices being paid and this shows that the buyers can't really argue that they can't afford to contribute to the economy. Bring it on.[/p][/quote]Band A vehicles don't get charged for VED, what are you not getting about that?[/p][/quote]Could I just correct you in that Band A vehicles don't pay VED at the moment. The interpretation of the phrase in the previous Budget that 'all road users would contribute' is that the current 'Band A' situation will come to an end in the same way that cheap diesel did. There's a little something for you bicycle owners to 'get'. Torchie1
  • Score: 5

2:00pm Sun 6 Apr 14

Ginger_cyclist says...

Torchie1 wrote:
Ginger_cyclist wrote:
Torchie1 wrote:
When governments are constantly looking for new ways of raising revenue, a tightening of the law to capture mobility scooters could be the 'opening of the door' needed to include bicycles. No longer are bicycles a form of transport for the poor, they are a rich mans form of entertainment when the events like Wiggle are consistently sold out which shows that there is a potential source of revenue there. A few years ago the tax on diesel was low and people were encouraged to buy diesel vehicles based on the fuel,economy. When enough drivers had embraced diesel motoring the tax was hiked up and the fuel cost is now higher than petrol. Bicycles have taken off as a source of amusement with high prices being paid and this shows that the buyers can't really argue that they can't afford to contribute to the economy. Bring it on.
Band A vehicles don't get charged for VED, what are you not getting about that?
Could I just correct you in that Band A vehicles don't pay VED at the moment. The interpretation of the phrase in the previous Budget that 'all road users would contribute' is that the current 'Band A' situation will come to an end in the same way that cheap diesel did. There's a little something for you bicycle owners to 'get'.
Bicycles will still be exempt.
[quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: When governments are constantly looking for new ways of raising revenue, a tightening of the law to capture mobility scooters could be the 'opening of the door' needed to include bicycles. No longer are bicycles a form of transport for the poor, they are a rich mans form of entertainment when the events like Wiggle are consistently sold out which shows that there is a potential source of revenue there. A few years ago the tax on diesel was low and people were encouraged to buy diesel vehicles based on the fuel,economy. When enough drivers had embraced diesel motoring the tax was hiked up and the fuel cost is now higher than petrol. Bicycles have taken off as a source of amusement with high prices being paid and this shows that the buyers can't really argue that they can't afford to contribute to the economy. Bring it on.[/p][/quote]Band A vehicles don't get charged for VED, what are you not getting about that?[/p][/quote]Could I just correct you in that Band A vehicles don't pay VED at the moment. The interpretation of the phrase in the previous Budget that 'all road users would contribute' is that the current 'Band A' situation will come to an end in the same way that cheap diesel did. There's a little something for you bicycle owners to 'get'.[/p][/quote]Bicycles will still be exempt. Ginger_cyclist
  • Score: -7

2:03pm Sun 6 Apr 14

normal1965 says...

charge them with assault if they hit someone.they would take more care then
charge them with assault if they hit someone.they would take more care then normal1965
  • Score: 13

2:28pm Sun 6 Apr 14

Chas O'Bursledon says...

I use one. I use it carefully and considerately. I am insured against accidents whilst using it. I keep it well maintained. I have had people barge past me and suddenly stop. I have had people barge past people leaving a gap and walking straight I to me. I have been sworn at and had my path deliberately blocked. I am disabled not by dint of an accident but by disease. I wish it were otherwise.

I am happy for the law to insist on me carrying insurance as long as pedestrians do the same, for that is what I am. Same as you!!
I use one. I use it carefully and considerately. I am insured against accidents whilst using it. I keep it well maintained. I have had people barge past me and suddenly stop. I have had people barge past people leaving a gap and walking straight I to me. I have been sworn at and had my path deliberately blocked. I am disabled not by dint of an accident but by disease. I wish it were otherwise. I am happy for the law to insist on me carrying insurance as long as pedestrians do the same, for that is what I am. Same as you!! Chas O'Bursledon
  • Score: -4

2:46pm Sun 6 Apr 14

biggus2 says...

Unfortunately the Police are not able to do anything with the elderly/disabled delinquents who spoil it for others. They are exempt nearly all the regulations under the Disability Person Act. This exempts them for such offences of Careless or Dangerous Driving, Drink Driving any maintenance or Roadworthyness of the vehicle

A few years ago a lady was killed by a Mobility scooter in Sandown on The Isle of Wight. The Police were unable to prosecute the offender.. The Department for Transport were not interested neither was the Minister who looks after Disabled Persons. Its a bit of a hot potato and a vote looser so they won't do anything.
Unfortunately the Police are not able to do anything with the elderly/disabled delinquents who spoil it for others. They are exempt nearly all the regulations under the Disability Person Act. This exempts them for such offences of Careless or Dangerous Driving, Drink Driving any maintenance or Roadworthyness of the vehicle A few years ago a lady was killed by a Mobility scooter in Sandown on The Isle of Wight. The Police were unable to prosecute the offender.. The Department for Transport were not interested neither was the Minister who looks after Disabled Persons. Its a bit of a hot potato and a vote looser so they won't do anything. biggus2
  • Score: 3

3:01pm Sun 6 Apr 14

Torchie1 says...

Ginger_cyclist wrote:
Torchie1 wrote:
Ginger_cyclist wrote:
Torchie1 wrote:
When governments are constantly looking for new ways of raising revenue, a tightening of the law to capture mobility scooters could be the 'opening of the door' needed to include bicycles. No longer are bicycles a form of transport for the poor, they are a rich mans form of entertainment when the events like Wiggle are consistently sold out which shows that there is a potential source of revenue there. A few years ago the tax on diesel was low and people were encouraged to buy diesel vehicles based on the fuel,economy. When enough drivers had embraced diesel motoring the tax was hiked up and the fuel cost is now higher than petrol. Bicycles have taken off as a source of amusement with high prices being paid and this shows that the buyers can't really argue that they can't afford to contribute to the economy. Bring it on.
Band A vehicles don't get charged for VED, what are you not getting about that?
Could I just correct you in that Band A vehicles don't pay VED at the moment. The interpretation of the phrase in the previous Budget that 'all road users would contribute' is that the current 'Band A' situation will come to an end in the same way that cheap diesel did. There's a little something for you bicycle owners to 'get'.
Bicycles will still be exempt.
Keep telling yourself that and ask the motorists who were convinced that seat belt legislation would never be enforced for a wide variety of reasons as did motorcyclists who didn't embrace the law forcing them to wear helmets. Speed camera legislation has been questioned, challenged and again finally accepted. Lots of 'sacred cows' have been slain over the years after they were considered untouchable and you are delusional to believe it won't happen to bicycles. I know you always like to have the last word so I promise not to correct you, whatever you come up with.
[quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: When governments are constantly looking for new ways of raising revenue, a tightening of the law to capture mobility scooters could be the 'opening of the door' needed to include bicycles. No longer are bicycles a form of transport for the poor, they are a rich mans form of entertainment when the events like Wiggle are consistently sold out which shows that there is a potential source of revenue there. A few years ago the tax on diesel was low and people were encouraged to buy diesel vehicles based on the fuel,economy. When enough drivers had embraced diesel motoring the tax was hiked up and the fuel cost is now higher than petrol. Bicycles have taken off as a source of amusement with high prices being paid and this shows that the buyers can't really argue that they can't afford to contribute to the economy. Bring it on.[/p][/quote]Band A vehicles don't get charged for VED, what are you not getting about that?[/p][/quote]Could I just correct you in that Band A vehicles don't pay VED at the moment. The interpretation of the phrase in the previous Budget that 'all road users would contribute' is that the current 'Band A' situation will come to an end in the same way that cheap diesel did. There's a little something for you bicycle owners to 'get'.[/p][/quote]Bicycles will still be exempt.[/p][/quote]Keep telling yourself that and ask the motorists who were convinced that seat belt legislation would never be enforced for a wide variety of reasons as did motorcyclists who didn't embrace the law forcing them to wear helmets. Speed camera legislation has been questioned, challenged and again finally accepted. Lots of 'sacred cows' have been slain over the years after they were considered untouchable and you are delusional to believe it won't happen to bicycles. I know you always like to have the last word so I promise not to correct you, whatever you come up with. Torchie1
  • Score: 7

3:10pm Sun 6 Apr 14

mickey01 says...

in tesco it seems it is the fat people who drive these things and then ask others to get the things off the shelf for them
if they got off their fat backsides and walked around the supermarket instead of being lazy then there would be no need for them in the first place
in tesco it seems it is the fat people who drive these things and then ask others to get the things off the shelf for them if they got off their fat backsides and walked around the supermarket instead of being lazy then there would be no need for them in the first place mickey01
  • Score: 8

3:13pm Sun 6 Apr 14

wwozzer says...

I reckon none of the big three parties will ever tackle this, old people always use their vote come election time and now a lot of them have their own transport to the polling station!

There are easier ways to make these things safer like a mandatory 2mph speed limit and audible warning when on pavements.
I reckon none of the big three parties will ever tackle this, old people always use their vote come election time and now a lot of them have their own transport to the polling station! There are easier ways to make these things safer like a mandatory 2mph speed limit and audible warning when on pavements. wwozzer
  • Score: 8

3:40pm Sun 6 Apr 14

Ginger_cyclist says...

Torchie1 wrote:
Ginger_cyclist wrote:
Torchie1 wrote:
Ginger_cyclist wrote:
Torchie1 wrote:
When governments are constantly looking for new ways of raising revenue, a tightening of the law to capture mobility scooters could be the 'opening of the door' needed to include bicycles. No longer are bicycles a form of transport for the poor, they are a rich mans form of entertainment when the events like Wiggle are consistently sold out which shows that there is a potential source of revenue there. A few years ago the tax on diesel was low and people were encouraged to buy diesel vehicles based on the fuel,economy. When enough drivers had embraced diesel motoring the tax was hiked up and the fuel cost is now higher than petrol. Bicycles have taken off as a source of amusement with high prices being paid and this shows that the buyers can't really argue that they can't afford to contribute to the economy. Bring it on.
Band A vehicles don't get charged for VED, what are you not getting about that?
Could I just correct you in that Band A vehicles don't pay VED at the moment. The interpretation of the phrase in the previous Budget that 'all road users would contribute' is that the current 'Band A' situation will come to an end in the same way that cheap diesel did. There's a little something for you bicycle owners to 'get'.
Bicycles will still be exempt.
Keep telling yourself that and ask the motorists who were convinced that seat belt legislation would never be enforced for a wide variety of reasons as did motorcyclists who didn't embrace the law forcing them to wear helmets. Speed camera legislation has been questioned, challenged and again finally accepted. Lots of 'sacred cows' have been slain over the years after they were considered untouchable and you are delusional to believe it won't happen to bicycles. I know you always like to have the last word so I promise not to correct you, whatever you come up with.
They want to get more people out and keep them out of their cars for shorter journeys right? One way is to show cycling as being cheap and easy, that would no longer be possible if bicycles were to be taxed(as if they aren't taxed at purchase), it would mean children wouldn't be able to cycle because they can't pay and would mean even MORE unnecessary cars on the road, plus it wouldn't make enough revenue to be cost effective, same with mobility scooters, in other words, it would be a step backwards AND would lose more money than it made.
[quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: When governments are constantly looking for new ways of raising revenue, a tightening of the law to capture mobility scooters could be the 'opening of the door' needed to include bicycles. No longer are bicycles a form of transport for the poor, they are a rich mans form of entertainment when the events like Wiggle are consistently sold out which shows that there is a potential source of revenue there. A few years ago the tax on diesel was low and people were encouraged to buy diesel vehicles based on the fuel,economy. When enough drivers had embraced diesel motoring the tax was hiked up and the fuel cost is now higher than petrol. Bicycles have taken off as a source of amusement with high prices being paid and this shows that the buyers can't really argue that they can't afford to contribute to the economy. Bring it on.[/p][/quote]Band A vehicles don't get charged for VED, what are you not getting about that?[/p][/quote]Could I just correct you in that Band A vehicles don't pay VED at the moment. The interpretation of the phrase in the previous Budget that 'all road users would contribute' is that the current 'Band A' situation will come to an end in the same way that cheap diesel did. There's a little something for you bicycle owners to 'get'.[/p][/quote]Bicycles will still be exempt.[/p][/quote]Keep telling yourself that and ask the motorists who were convinced that seat belt legislation would never be enforced for a wide variety of reasons as did motorcyclists who didn't embrace the law forcing them to wear helmets. Speed camera legislation has been questioned, challenged and again finally accepted. Lots of 'sacred cows' have been slain over the years after they were considered untouchable and you are delusional to believe it won't happen to bicycles. I know you always like to have the last word so I promise not to correct you, whatever you come up with.[/p][/quote]They want to get more people out and keep them out of their cars for shorter journeys right? One way is to show cycling as being cheap and easy, that would no longer be possible if bicycles were to be taxed(as if they aren't taxed at purchase), it would mean children wouldn't be able to cycle because they can't pay and would mean even MORE unnecessary cars on the road, plus it wouldn't make enough revenue to be cost effective, same with mobility scooters, in other words, it would be a step backwards AND would lose more money than it made. Ginger_cyclist
  • Score: -4

3:50pm Sun 6 Apr 14

Reality-man says...

acid drop wrote:
If I was hit by one of these mobility scooters, I'm afraid the rider would end up wearing it.
Spot the hard nut
[quote][p][bold]acid drop[/bold] wrote: If I was hit by one of these mobility scooters, I'm afraid the rider would end up wearing it.[/p][/quote]Spot the hard nut Reality-man
  • Score: -6

4:09pm Sun 6 Apr 14

eurogordi says...

These scooters are a danger. I see them around the streets driven by elderly people who have a bad attitude problem and absolutely no manners. Most of the disabled people using scooters do seem to have both common sense and courtesy to other road users and pedestrians. But when i see obese people using scooters I become really angry because scooters are being bought by lazy fat people who should stop eating junk food and start exercising instead. People should only be allowed to buy scooters for genuine medical needs which should be certified by a GP.
These scooters are a danger. I see them around the streets driven by elderly people who have a bad attitude problem and absolutely no manners. Most of the disabled people using scooters do seem to have both common sense and courtesy to other road users and pedestrians. But when i see obese people using scooters I become really angry because scooters are being bought by lazy fat people who should stop eating junk food and start exercising instead. People should only be allowed to buy scooters for genuine medical needs which should be certified by a GP. eurogordi
  • Score: 6

4:56pm Sun 6 Apr 14

oldage says...

Roy jennings aka southampton bus driver ,Knows how to play the system very well always said he would screw the system well with his minor back ache ,,Filthy man in many ways
Roy jennings aka southampton bus driver ,Knows how to play the system very well always said he would screw the system well with his minor back ache ,,Filthy man in many ways oldage
  • Score: 0

5:40pm Sun 6 Apr 14

theoriginalwasp says...

saint61 wrote:
Heard wiggle were organising a mass New Forest RIde
You're hilarious.
[quote][p][bold]saint61[/bold] wrote: Heard wiggle were organising a mass New Forest RIde[/p][/quote]You're hilarious. theoriginalwasp
  • Score: 1

5:44pm Sun 6 Apr 14

theoriginalwasp says...

Chas O'Bursledon wrote:
I use one. I use it carefully and considerately. I am insured against accidents whilst using it. I keep it well maintained. I have had people barge past me and suddenly stop. I have had people barge past people leaving a gap and walking straight I to me. I have been sworn at and had my path deliberately blocked. I am disabled not by dint of an accident but by disease. I wish it were otherwise.

I am happy for the law to insist on me carrying insurance as long as pedestrians do the same, for that is what I am. Same as you!!
Pedestrians having insurance? Are you mad...
[quote][p][bold]Chas O'Bursledon[/bold] wrote: I use one. I use it carefully and considerately. I am insured against accidents whilst using it. I keep it well maintained. I have had people barge past me and suddenly stop. I have had people barge past people leaving a gap and walking straight I to me. I have been sworn at and had my path deliberately blocked. I am disabled not by dint of an accident but by disease. I wish it were otherwise. I am happy for the law to insist on me carrying insurance as long as pedestrians do the same, for that is what I am. Same as you!![/p][/quote]Pedestrians having insurance? Are you mad... theoriginalwasp
  • Score: 5

5:44pm Sun 6 Apr 14

theoriginalwasp says...

Chas O'Bursledon wrote:
I use one. I use it carefully and considerately. I am insured against accidents whilst using it. I keep it well maintained. I have had people barge past me and suddenly stop. I have had people barge past people leaving a gap and walking straight I to me. I have been sworn at and had my path deliberately blocked. I am disabled not by dint of an accident but by disease. I wish it were otherwise.

I am happy for the law to insist on me carrying insurance as long as pedestrians do the same, for that is what I am. Same as you!!
Pedestrians having insurance? Are you mad...
[quote][p][bold]Chas O'Bursledon[/bold] wrote: I use one. I use it carefully and considerately. I am insured against accidents whilst using it. I keep it well maintained. I have had people barge past me and suddenly stop. I have had people barge past people leaving a gap and walking straight I to me. I have been sworn at and had my path deliberately blocked. I am disabled not by dint of an accident but by disease. I wish it were otherwise. I am happy for the law to insist on me carrying insurance as long as pedestrians do the same, for that is what I am. Same as you!![/p][/quote]Pedestrians having insurance? Are you mad... theoriginalwasp
  • Score: 4

6:00pm Sun 6 Apr 14

country bird says...

Yes, I think its time to come down heavy on them.
they commit nasty crimes on them against people and are a noise.
Yes, I think its time to come down heavy on them. they commit nasty crimes on them against people and are a noise. country bird
  • Score: -3

6:40pm Sun 6 Apr 14

vpharm says...

I would like to see mandatory third party insurance & a licence system introduced for scooters & cyclists!
I would like to see mandatory third party insurance & a licence system introduced for scooters & cyclists! vpharm
  • Score: 0

6:44pm Sun 6 Apr 14

Ginger_cyclist says...

vpharm wrote:
I would like to see mandatory third party insurance & a licence system introduced for scooters & cyclists!
Neither of which would ever happen.
[quote][p][bold]vpharm[/bold] wrote: I would like to see mandatory third party insurance & a licence system introduced for scooters & cyclists![/p][/quote]Neither of which would ever happen. Ginger_cyclist
  • Score: 2

7:08pm Sun 6 Apr 14

Graeme Harrison says...

biggus2 wrote:
Unfortunately the Police are not able to do anything with the elderly/disabled delinquents who spoil it for others. They are exempt nearly all the regulations under the Disability Person Act. This exempts them for such offences of Careless or Dangerous Driving, Drink Driving any maintenance or Roadworthyness of the vehicle

A few years ago a lady was killed by a Mobility scooter in Sandown on The Isle of Wight. The Police were unable to prosecute the offender.. The Department for Transport were not interested neither was the Minister who looks after Disabled Persons. Its a bit of a hot potato and a vote looser so they won't do anything.
There's no such thing as the 'Disability Person Act' and there's certainly no act of Parliament that exempts the disabled from the provisions of the Road Traffic Act 1988 if they use "a mechanically propelled vehicle, intended or adapted for use on roads" (which includes electric scooters).
[quote][p][bold]biggus2[/bold] wrote: Unfortunately the Police are not able to do anything with the elderly/disabled delinquents who spoil it for others. They are exempt nearly all the regulations under the Disability Person Act. This exempts them for such offences of Careless or Dangerous Driving, Drink Driving any maintenance or Roadworthyness of the vehicle A few years ago a lady was killed by a Mobility scooter in Sandown on The Isle of Wight. The Police were unable to prosecute the offender.. The Department for Transport were not interested neither was the Minister who looks after Disabled Persons. Its a bit of a hot potato and a vote looser so they won't do anything.[/p][/quote]There's no such thing as the 'Disability Person Act' and there's certainly no act of Parliament that exempts the disabled from the provisions of the Road Traffic Act 1988 if they use "a mechanically propelled vehicle, intended or adapted for use on roads" (which includes electric scooters). Graeme Harrison
  • Score: 1

8:35pm Sun 6 Apr 14

Lockssmart says...

acid drop wrote:
If I was hit by one of these mobility scooters, I'm afraid the rider would end up wearing it.
And like a Neanderthal that you are, you would go to jail with the rest of the half wits.
[quote][p][bold]acid drop[/bold] wrote: If I was hit by one of these mobility scooters, I'm afraid the rider would end up wearing it.[/p][/quote]And like a Neanderthal that you are, you would go to jail with the rest of the half wits. Lockssmart
  • Score: -6

8:37pm Sun 6 Apr 14

Lockssmart says...

biggus2 wrote:
Unfortunately the Police are not able to do anything with the elderly/disabled delinquents who spoil it for others. They are exempt nearly all the regulations under the Disability Person Act. This exempts them for such offences of Careless or Dangerous Driving, Drink Driving any maintenance or Roadworthyness of the vehicle

A few years ago a lady was killed by a Mobility scooter in Sandown on The Isle of Wight. The Police were unable to prosecute the offender.. The Department for Transport were not interested neither was the Minister who looks after Disabled Persons. Its a bit of a hot potato and a vote looser so they won't do anything.
What a maggot you are.
[quote][p][bold]biggus2[/bold] wrote: Unfortunately the Police are not able to do anything with the elderly/disabled delinquents who spoil it for others. They are exempt nearly all the regulations under the Disability Person Act. This exempts them for such offences of Careless or Dangerous Driving, Drink Driving any maintenance or Roadworthyness of the vehicle A few years ago a lady was killed by a Mobility scooter in Sandown on The Isle of Wight. The Police were unable to prosecute the offender.. The Department for Transport were not interested neither was the Minister who looks after Disabled Persons. Its a bit of a hot potato and a vote looser so they won't do anything.[/p][/quote]What a maggot you are. Lockssmart
  • Score: -4

8:56pm Sun 6 Apr 14

loosehead says...

Four wheels,a motor & the capability of going fast enough to seriously maim an adult & possibly kill a child yet anyone can get on one & drive them around?
If a couple of savvy teenagers wake up & realise these can be souped up & they can drive them with no insurance or license then we're in trouble.
As it is some older drivers hammer along on these not caring who they hit so maybe speed governors can be put on them & if the owners haven't passed a car test then a form of test needs to be done to see if they're safe enough to drive them?
Four wheels,a motor & the capability of going fast enough to seriously maim an adult & possibly kill a child yet anyone can get on one & drive them around? If a couple of savvy teenagers wake up & realise these can be souped up & they can drive them with no insurance or license then we're in trouble. As it is some older drivers hammer along on these not caring who they hit so maybe speed governors can be put on them & if the owners haven't passed a car test then a form of test needs to be done to see if they're safe enough to drive them? loosehead
  • Score: 4

9:02pm Sun 6 Apr 14

loosehead says...

Ginger_cyclist wrote:
Torchie1 wrote:
Ginger_cyclist wrote:
Torchie1 wrote:
Ginger_cyclist wrote:
Torchie1 wrote:
When governments are constantly looking for new ways of raising revenue, a tightening of the law to capture mobility scooters could be the 'opening of the door' needed to include bicycles. No longer are bicycles a form of transport for the poor, they are a rich mans form of entertainment when the events like Wiggle are consistently sold out which shows that there is a potential source of revenue there. A few years ago the tax on diesel was low and people were encouraged to buy diesel vehicles based on the fuel,economy. When enough drivers had embraced diesel motoring the tax was hiked up and the fuel cost is now higher than petrol. Bicycles have taken off as a source of amusement with high prices being paid and this shows that the buyers can't really argue that they can't afford to contribute to the economy. Bring it on.
Band A vehicles don't get charged for VED, what are you not getting about that?
Could I just correct you in that Band A vehicles don't pay VED at the moment. The interpretation of the phrase in the previous Budget that 'all road users would contribute' is that the current 'Band A' situation will come to an end in the same way that cheap diesel did. There's a little something for you bicycle owners to 'get'.
Bicycles will still be exempt.
Keep telling yourself that and ask the motorists who were convinced that seat belt legislation would never be enforced for a wide variety of reasons as did motorcyclists who didn't embrace the law forcing them to wear helmets. Speed camera legislation has been questioned, challenged and again finally accepted. Lots of 'sacred cows' have been slain over the years after they were considered untouchable and you are delusional to believe it won't happen to bicycles. I know you always like to have the last word so I promise not to correct you, whatever you come up with.
They want to get more people out and keep them out of their cars for shorter journeys right? One way is to show cycling as being cheap and easy, that would no longer be possible if bicycles were to be taxed(as if they aren't taxed at purchase), it would mean children wouldn't be able to cycle because they can't pay and would mean even MORE unnecessary cars on the road, plus it wouldn't make enough revenue to be cost effective, same with mobility scooters, in other words, it would be a step backwards AND would lose more money than it made.
Ginger for all new cyclists /road users I believe in the Cycling proficiency test as I passed & became a Knight of the road.
I don't know what training courses there are now but anyone who hasn't passed a motorcycle test should be made to take a lesson to prove they're safe on two wheels.
I also think these mobility scooter drivers should also face a test if they've never passed a car test.
[quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: When governments are constantly looking for new ways of raising revenue, a tightening of the law to capture mobility scooters could be the 'opening of the door' needed to include bicycles. No longer are bicycles a form of transport for the poor, they are a rich mans form of entertainment when the events like Wiggle are consistently sold out which shows that there is a potential source of revenue there. A few years ago the tax on diesel was low and people were encouraged to buy diesel vehicles based on the fuel,economy. When enough drivers had embraced diesel motoring the tax was hiked up and the fuel cost is now higher than petrol. Bicycles have taken off as a source of amusement with high prices being paid and this shows that the buyers can't really argue that they can't afford to contribute to the economy. Bring it on.[/p][/quote]Band A vehicles don't get charged for VED, what are you not getting about that?[/p][/quote]Could I just correct you in that Band A vehicles don't pay VED at the moment. The interpretation of the phrase in the previous Budget that 'all road users would contribute' is that the current 'Band A' situation will come to an end in the same way that cheap diesel did. There's a little something for you bicycle owners to 'get'.[/p][/quote]Bicycles will still be exempt.[/p][/quote]Keep telling yourself that and ask the motorists who were convinced that seat belt legislation would never be enforced for a wide variety of reasons as did motorcyclists who didn't embrace the law forcing them to wear helmets. Speed camera legislation has been questioned, challenged and again finally accepted. Lots of 'sacred cows' have been slain over the years after they were considered untouchable and you are delusional to believe it won't happen to bicycles. I know you always like to have the last word so I promise not to correct you, whatever you come up with.[/p][/quote]They want to get more people out and keep them out of their cars for shorter journeys right? One way is to show cycling as being cheap and easy, that would no longer be possible if bicycles were to be taxed(as if they aren't taxed at purchase), it would mean children wouldn't be able to cycle because they can't pay and would mean even MORE unnecessary cars on the road, plus it wouldn't make enough revenue to be cost effective, same with mobility scooters, in other words, it would be a step backwards AND would lose more money than it made.[/p][/quote]Ginger for all new cyclists /road users I believe in the Cycling proficiency test as I passed & became a Knight of the road. I don't know what training courses there are now but anyone who hasn't passed a motorcycle test should be made to take a lesson to prove they're safe on two wheels. I also think these mobility scooter drivers should also face a test if they've never passed a car test. loosehead
  • Score: 1

9:51pm Sun 6 Apr 14

Ginger_cyclist says...

loosehead wrote:
Ginger_cyclist wrote:
Torchie1 wrote:
Ginger_cyclist wrote:
Torchie1 wrote:
Ginger_cyclist wrote:
Torchie1 wrote:
When governments are constantly looking for new ways of raising revenue, a tightening of the law to capture mobility scooters could be the 'opening of the door' needed to include bicycles. No longer are bicycles a form of transport for the poor, they are a rich mans form of entertainment when the events like Wiggle are consistently sold out which shows that there is a potential source of revenue there. A few years ago the tax on diesel was low and people were encouraged to buy diesel vehicles based on the fuel,economy. When enough drivers had embraced diesel motoring the tax was hiked up and the fuel cost is now higher than petrol. Bicycles have taken off as a source of amusement with high prices being paid and this shows that the buyers can't really argue that they can't afford to contribute to the economy. Bring it on.
Band A vehicles don't get charged for VED, what are you not getting about that?
Could I just correct you in that Band A vehicles don't pay VED at the moment. The interpretation of the phrase in the previous Budget that 'all road users would contribute' is that the current 'Band A' situation will come to an end in the same way that cheap diesel did. There's a little something for you bicycle owners to 'get'.
Bicycles will still be exempt.
Keep telling yourself that and ask the motorists who were convinced that seat belt legislation would never be enforced for a wide variety of reasons as did motorcyclists who didn't embrace the law forcing them to wear helmets. Speed camera legislation has been questioned, challenged and again finally accepted. Lots of 'sacred cows' have been slain over the years after they were considered untouchable and you are delusional to believe it won't happen to bicycles. I know you always like to have the last word so I promise not to correct you, whatever you come up with.
They want to get more people out and keep them out of their cars for shorter journeys right? One way is to show cycling as being cheap and easy, that would no longer be possible if bicycles were to be taxed(as if they aren't taxed at purchase), it would mean children wouldn't be able to cycle because they can't pay and would mean even MORE unnecessary cars on the road, plus it wouldn't make enough revenue to be cost effective, same with mobility scooters, in other words, it would be a step backwards AND would lose more money than it made.
Ginger for all new cyclists /road users I believe in the Cycling proficiency test as I passed & became a Knight of the road.
I don't know what training courses there are now but anyone who hasn't passed a motorcycle test should be made to take a lesson to prove they're safe on two wheels.
I also think these mobility scooter drivers should also face a test if they've never passed a car test.
Most new cyclists DO go through the bikeability training, especially children as it's now art of the curriculum... Any way, this is about mobility scooters, not cyclists, YOU turned it into another attack on cyclists, all because you picked up on me saying neither would be taxed as they're technically band A vehicles.
[quote][p][bold]loosehead[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: When governments are constantly looking for new ways of raising revenue, a tightening of the law to capture mobility scooters could be the 'opening of the door' needed to include bicycles. No longer are bicycles a form of transport for the poor, they are a rich mans form of entertainment when the events like Wiggle are consistently sold out which shows that there is a potential source of revenue there. A few years ago the tax on diesel was low and people were encouraged to buy diesel vehicles based on the fuel,economy. When enough drivers had embraced diesel motoring the tax was hiked up and the fuel cost is now higher than petrol. Bicycles have taken off as a source of amusement with high prices being paid and this shows that the buyers can't really argue that they can't afford to contribute to the economy. Bring it on.[/p][/quote]Band A vehicles don't get charged for VED, what are you not getting about that?[/p][/quote]Could I just correct you in that Band A vehicles don't pay VED at the moment. The interpretation of the phrase in the previous Budget that 'all road users would contribute' is that the current 'Band A' situation will come to an end in the same way that cheap diesel did. There's a little something for you bicycle owners to 'get'.[/p][/quote]Bicycles will still be exempt.[/p][/quote]Keep telling yourself that and ask the motorists who were convinced that seat belt legislation would never be enforced for a wide variety of reasons as did motorcyclists who didn't embrace the law forcing them to wear helmets. Speed camera legislation has been questioned, challenged and again finally accepted. Lots of 'sacred cows' have been slain over the years after they were considered untouchable and you are delusional to believe it won't happen to bicycles. I know you always like to have the last word so I promise not to correct you, whatever you come up with.[/p][/quote]They want to get more people out and keep them out of their cars for shorter journeys right? One way is to show cycling as being cheap and easy, that would no longer be possible if bicycles were to be taxed(as if they aren't taxed at purchase), it would mean children wouldn't be able to cycle because they can't pay and would mean even MORE unnecessary cars on the road, plus it wouldn't make enough revenue to be cost effective, same with mobility scooters, in other words, it would be a step backwards AND would lose more money than it made.[/p][/quote]Ginger for all new cyclists /road users I believe in the Cycling proficiency test as I passed & became a Knight of the road. I don't know what training courses there are now but anyone who hasn't passed a motorcycle test should be made to take a lesson to prove they're safe on two wheels. I also think these mobility scooter drivers should also face a test if they've never passed a car test.[/p][/quote]Most new cyclists DO go through the bikeability training, especially children as it's now art of the curriculum... Any way, this is about mobility scooters, not cyclists, YOU turned it into another attack on cyclists, all because you picked up on me saying neither would be taxed as they're technically band A vehicles. Ginger_cyclist
  • Score: -3

5:17am Mon 7 Apr 14

WalkingOnAWire says...

Torchie1 wrote:
Ginger_cyclist wrote:
Torchie1 wrote:
When governments are constantly looking for new ways of raising revenue, a tightening of the law to capture mobility scooters could be the 'opening of the door' needed to include bicycles. No longer are bicycles a form of transport for the poor, they are a rich mans form of entertainment when the events like Wiggle are consistently sold out which shows that there is a potential source of revenue there. A few years ago the tax on diesel was low and people were encouraged to buy diesel vehicles based on the fuel,economy. When enough drivers had embraced diesel motoring the tax was hiked up and the fuel cost is now higher than petrol. Bicycles have taken off as a source of amusement with high prices being paid and this shows that the buyers can't really argue that they can't afford to contribute to the economy. Bring it on.
Band A vehicles don't get charged for VED, what are you not getting about that?
Could I just correct you in that Band A vehicles don't pay VED at the moment. The interpretation of the phrase in the previous Budget that 'all road users would contribute' is that the current 'Band A' situation will come to an end in the same way that cheap diesel did. There's a little something for you bicycle owners to 'get'.
Like a lot of people, I've got a car and a bike. So sometimes I'm a motorist, and sometimes a cyclist. When I'm driving, I try to be courteous to cyclists and give them the room they need. When I'm cycling I stop at red lights and keep an eye out for pedestrians. Pretty much all of us are pedestrians most days at some point.

So it's a false dilemma, this 'cyclist vs motorist' debate. Even those of us who only drive now surely rode a bike when we were youngsters? It boils down to being considerate to other people. Evidence from all over the world shows that mixed-use roads with sensible speed limits are safer for cars as well as bikes, so car drivers actually benefit from cyclists using the roads by being less likely to be involved in a serious accident. It would be good if the 'outliers' in these debates - Torchie and Ginger Cyclist being at opposite ends of the spectrum - could be more tolerant of one another. There's room on the roads for everyone if we just exercise a bit of caution and restraint.
[quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: When governments are constantly looking for new ways of raising revenue, a tightening of the law to capture mobility scooters could be the 'opening of the door' needed to include bicycles. No longer are bicycles a form of transport for the poor, they are a rich mans form of entertainment when the events like Wiggle are consistently sold out which shows that there is a potential source of revenue there. A few years ago the tax on diesel was low and people were encouraged to buy diesel vehicles based on the fuel,economy. When enough drivers had embraced diesel motoring the tax was hiked up and the fuel cost is now higher than petrol. Bicycles have taken off as a source of amusement with high prices being paid and this shows that the buyers can't really argue that they can't afford to contribute to the economy. Bring it on.[/p][/quote]Band A vehicles don't get charged for VED, what are you not getting about that?[/p][/quote]Could I just correct you in that Band A vehicles don't pay VED at the moment. The interpretation of the phrase in the previous Budget that 'all road users would contribute' is that the current 'Band A' situation will come to an end in the same way that cheap diesel did. There's a little something for you bicycle owners to 'get'.[/p][/quote]Like a lot of people, I've got a car and a bike. So sometimes I'm a motorist, and sometimes a cyclist. When I'm driving, I try to be courteous to cyclists and give them the room they need. When I'm cycling I stop at red lights and keep an eye out for pedestrians. Pretty much all of us are pedestrians most days at some point. So it's a false dilemma, this 'cyclist vs motorist' debate. Even those of us who only drive now surely rode a bike when we were youngsters? It boils down to being considerate to other people. Evidence from all over the world shows that mixed-use roads with sensible speed limits are safer for cars as well as bikes, so car drivers actually benefit from cyclists using the roads by being less likely to be involved in a serious accident. It would be good if the 'outliers' in these debates - Torchie and Ginger Cyclist being at opposite ends of the spectrum - could be more tolerant of one another. There's room on the roads for everyone if we just exercise a bit of caution and restraint. WalkingOnAWire
  • Score: 5

6:03am Mon 7 Apr 14

loosehead says...

Ginger_cyclist wrote:
loosehead wrote:
Ginger_cyclist wrote:
Torchie1 wrote:
Ginger_cyclist wrote:
Torchie1 wrote:
Ginger_cyclist wrote:
Torchie1 wrote:
When governments are constantly looking for new ways of raising revenue, a tightening of the law to capture mobility scooters could be the 'opening of the door' needed to include bicycles. No longer are bicycles a form of transport for the poor, they are a rich mans form of entertainment when the events like Wiggle are consistently sold out which shows that there is a potential source of revenue there. A few years ago the tax on diesel was low and people were encouraged to buy diesel vehicles based on the fuel,economy. When enough drivers had embraced diesel motoring the tax was hiked up and the fuel cost is now higher than petrol. Bicycles have taken off as a source of amusement with high prices being paid and this shows that the buyers can't really argue that they can't afford to contribute to the economy. Bring it on.
Band A vehicles don't get charged for VED, what are you not getting about that?
Could I just correct you in that Band A vehicles don't pay VED at the moment. The interpretation of the phrase in the previous Budget that 'all road users would contribute' is that the current 'Band A' situation will come to an end in the same way that cheap diesel did. There's a little something for you bicycle owners to 'get'.
Bicycles will still be exempt.
Keep telling yourself that and ask the motorists who were convinced that seat belt legislation would never be enforced for a wide variety of reasons as did motorcyclists who didn't embrace the law forcing them to wear helmets. Speed camera legislation has been questioned, challenged and again finally accepted. Lots of 'sacred cows' have been slain over the years after they were considered untouchable and you are delusional to believe it won't happen to bicycles. I know you always like to have the last word so I promise not to correct you, whatever you come up with.
They want to get more people out and keep them out of their cars for shorter journeys right? One way is to show cycling as being cheap and easy, that would no longer be possible if bicycles were to be taxed(as if they aren't taxed at purchase), it would mean children wouldn't be able to cycle because they can't pay and would mean even MORE unnecessary cars on the road, plus it wouldn't make enough revenue to be cost effective, same with mobility scooters, in other words, it would be a step backwards AND would lose more money than it made.
Ginger for all new cyclists /road users I believe in the Cycling proficiency test as I passed & became a Knight of the road.
I don't know what training courses there are now but anyone who hasn't passed a motorcycle test should be made to take a lesson to prove they're safe on two wheels.
I also think these mobility scooter drivers should also face a test if they've never passed a car test.
Most new cyclists DO go through the bikeability training, especially children as it's now art of the curriculum... Any way, this is about mobility scooters, not cyclists, YOU turned it into another attack on cyclists, all because you picked up on me saying neither would be taxed as they're technically band A vehicles.
Ginger I've not attacked you I never even mentioned tax?
please read my post again.
[quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]loosehead[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: When governments are constantly looking for new ways of raising revenue, a tightening of the law to capture mobility scooters could be the 'opening of the door' needed to include bicycles. No longer are bicycles a form of transport for the poor, they are a rich mans form of entertainment when the events like Wiggle are consistently sold out which shows that there is a potential source of revenue there. A few years ago the tax on diesel was low and people were encouraged to buy diesel vehicles based on the fuel,economy. When enough drivers had embraced diesel motoring the tax was hiked up and the fuel cost is now higher than petrol. Bicycles have taken off as a source of amusement with high prices being paid and this shows that the buyers can't really argue that they can't afford to contribute to the economy. Bring it on.[/p][/quote]Band A vehicles don't get charged for VED, what are you not getting about that?[/p][/quote]Could I just correct you in that Band A vehicles don't pay VED at the moment. The interpretation of the phrase in the previous Budget that 'all road users would contribute' is that the current 'Band A' situation will come to an end in the same way that cheap diesel did. There's a little something for you bicycle owners to 'get'.[/p][/quote]Bicycles will still be exempt.[/p][/quote]Keep telling yourself that and ask the motorists who were convinced that seat belt legislation would never be enforced for a wide variety of reasons as did motorcyclists who didn't embrace the law forcing them to wear helmets. Speed camera legislation has been questioned, challenged and again finally accepted. Lots of 'sacred cows' have been slain over the years after they were considered untouchable and you are delusional to believe it won't happen to bicycles. I know you always like to have the last word so I promise not to correct you, whatever you come up with.[/p][/quote]They want to get more people out and keep them out of their cars for shorter journeys right? One way is to show cycling as being cheap and easy, that would no longer be possible if bicycles were to be taxed(as if they aren't taxed at purchase), it would mean children wouldn't be able to cycle because they can't pay and would mean even MORE unnecessary cars on the road, plus it wouldn't make enough revenue to be cost effective, same with mobility scooters, in other words, it would be a step backwards AND would lose more money than it made.[/p][/quote]Ginger for all new cyclists /road users I believe in the Cycling proficiency test as I passed & became a Knight of the road. I don't know what training courses there are now but anyone who hasn't passed a motorcycle test should be made to take a lesson to prove they're safe on two wheels. I also think these mobility scooter drivers should also face a test if they've never passed a car test.[/p][/quote]Most new cyclists DO go through the bikeability training, especially children as it's now art of the curriculum... Any way, this is about mobility scooters, not cyclists, YOU turned it into another attack on cyclists, all because you picked up on me saying neither would be taxed as they're technically band A vehicles.[/p][/quote]Ginger I've not attacked you I never even mentioned tax? please read my post again. loosehead
  • Score: 0

6:48am Mon 7 Apr 14

SotonNorth says...

In a workplace, like on a construction site for example, you tend to have to receive training to use many tools and bits of equipment. You can't just pick up a tool and start using it or jump on a dumper truck and start driving it. So why is it acceptable for somebody to jump in what is essentially a shrunken electric car and drive it with no training or proficiency? You know the answer to that. The other issue is traffic laws. Road users of all types get away with all manner of illegal and dangerous things on our roads, but enforcement of laws is so poor in this country that people can have a lifetime of doing things illegally and dangerously and get away with it, especially if they are classed as a "vulnerable road user" which makes some people believe they are above the law.
In a workplace, like on a construction site for example, you tend to have to receive training to use many tools and bits of equipment. You can't just pick up a tool and start using it or jump on a dumper truck and start driving it. So why is it acceptable for somebody to jump in what is essentially a shrunken electric car and drive it with no training or proficiency? You know the answer to that. The other issue is traffic laws. Road users of all types get away with all manner of illegal and dangerous things on our roads, but enforcement of laws is so poor in this country that people can have a lifetime of doing things illegally and dangerously and get away with it, especially if they are classed as a "vulnerable road user" which makes some people believe they are above the law. SotonNorth
  • Score: 1

6:54am Mon 7 Apr 14

skeptik says...

Oh joy, it appears that every section of society has been set at each others throats - officially sanctioned too. The poor, unemployed, disabled and on it goes, many of the above groups will be joined at some point in the lives of many. So many comments in newspapers talk of 'make them'......as though the writer is immune from joining that unfortunate band. Perhaps when they do views will be changed.
Oh joy, it appears that every section of society has been set at each others throats - officially sanctioned too. The poor, unemployed, disabled and on it goes, many of the above groups will be joined at some point in the lives of many. So many comments in newspapers talk of 'make them'......as though the writer is immune from joining that unfortunate band. Perhaps when they do views will be changed. skeptik
  • Score: 1

8:17am Mon 7 Apr 14

knowallpeter says...

In Station Road,Romsey quite often I see someone on one of these mobility scooters riding along in the middle of the road,with cars struggling to get past.Have they no code for which they have to abide by?
In Station Road,Romsey quite often I see someone on one of these mobility scooters riding along in the middle of the road,with cars struggling to get past.Have they no code for which they have to abide by? knowallpeter
  • Score: 1

9:52am Mon 7 Apr 14

skeptik says...

In the road - have seen it a few times at Woolston, the narrow pavement blocked by rows of waste bins, the young lady in her wheelchair forced onto the highway.
In the road - have seen it a few times at Woolston, the narrow pavement blocked by rows of waste bins, the young lady in her wheelchair forced onto the highway. skeptik
  • Score: 0

11:28am Mon 7 Apr 14

loosehead says...

skeptik wrote:
In the road - have seen it a few times at Woolston, the narrow pavement blocked by rows of waste bins, the young lady in her wheelchair forced onto the highway.
I have nothing against the people who drive these & for some it's an essential way to get around or they could end up house bound,
I just feel they should as with all other powered (engine) forms of transport take a test if not a qualified driver.
[quote][p][bold]skeptik[/bold] wrote: In the road - have seen it a few times at Woolston, the narrow pavement blocked by rows of waste bins, the young lady in her wheelchair forced onto the highway.[/p][/quote]I have nothing against the people who drive these & for some it's an essential way to get around or they could end up house bound, I just feel they should as with all other powered (engine) forms of transport take a test if not a qualified driver. loosehead
  • Score: 1

9:10am Tue 8 Apr 14

Dai Rear says...

skeptik wrote:
Oh joy, it appears that every section of society has been set at each others throats - officially sanctioned too. The poor, unemployed, disabled and on it goes, many of the above groups will be joined at some point in the lives of many. So many comments in newspapers talk of 'make them'......as though the writer is immune from joining that unfortunate band. Perhaps when they do views will be changed.
What a strange remark. Do you think that the views of those who don't work or are disabled are homogeneous? They're not, you know. As for "the poor" I assume you speak of people in other countries since we only have the "relatively less affluent" here. Wouldn't then, the views of poor people in Africa and Asia be coloured by national feelings?
In passing, an insurance fund could be created from a surcharge on new machines. Where a user hurts and drives away I think S 20 or 47 of the Offences Against the Person Act would work, the driving away demonstrating an awareness that the user of the scooter had been reckless. Where death results ask a Jury to consider manslaughter by gross negligence. You can't drive ANY mechanically propelled vehicle if disqualified by a court.
[quote][p][bold]skeptik[/bold] wrote: Oh joy, it appears that every section of society has been set at each others throats - officially sanctioned too. The poor, unemployed, disabled and on it goes, many of the above groups will be joined at some point in the lives of many. So many comments in newspapers talk of 'make them'......as though the writer is immune from joining that unfortunate band. Perhaps when they do views will be changed.[/p][/quote]What a strange remark. Do you think that the views of those who don't work or are disabled are homogeneous? They're not, you know. As for "the poor" I assume you speak of people in other countries since we only have the "relatively less affluent" here. Wouldn't then, the views of poor people in Africa and Asia be coloured by national feelings? In passing, an insurance fund could be created from a surcharge on new machines. Where a user hurts and drives away I think S 20 or 47 of the Offences Against the Person Act would work, the driving away demonstrating an awareness that the user of the scooter had been reckless. Where death results ask a Jury to consider manslaughter by gross negligence. You can't drive ANY mechanically propelled vehicle if disqualified by a court. Dai Rear
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