Thieves made off with two racing bikes from Fair Oak garage

THIEVES broke into garages and stole two bikes worth nearly £3,000.

In Stoke Heights, Fair Oak, the thieves took a Cannondale 6 racing bike, worth £1,800, with red and white tape on the handlebars and a white saddle.

This happened between 8pm on Tuesday and 8am on Wednesday.

On the same night, thieves got into a garage in nearby Olympic Way and took a black Cube mountain bike, worth £900, that had been bought only a week ago.

Comments (8)

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10:41am Fri 9 May 14

From the sidelines says...

High time we had special sentences for bike thieves.

Off with the goolies.
High time we had special sentences for bike thieves. Off with the goolies. From the sidelines
  • Score: -2

6:09pm Fri 9 May 14

Ginger_cyclist says...

From the sidelines wrote:
High time we had special sentences for bike thieves.

Off with the goolies.
And this is why I plan on investing in a GPS tracker for my bike.
[quote][p][bold]From the sidelines[/bold] wrote: High time we had special sentences for bike thieves. Off with the goolies.[/p][/quote]And this is why I plan on investing in a GPS tracker for my bike. Ginger_cyclist
  • Score: -2

10:53am Sat 10 May 14

Torchie1 says...

Ginger_cyclist wrote:
From the sidelines wrote:
High time we had special sentences for bike thieves.

Off with the goolies.
And this is why I plan on investing in a GPS tracker for my bike.
When a bicycle is stolen it will be by children, another bicycle rider or by thieves who will look to sell it on, and who will be in the market for a stolen bicycle (complete or in parts)? With bicycles only accounting for 2% of journeys you won't have a large community to keep an eye on.
[quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]From the sidelines[/bold] wrote: High time we had special sentences for bike thieves. Off with the goolies.[/p][/quote]And this is why I plan on investing in a GPS tracker for my bike.[/p][/quote]When a bicycle is stolen it will be by children, another bicycle rider or by thieves who will look to sell it on, and who will be in the market for a stolen bicycle (complete or in parts)? With bicycles only accounting for 2% of journeys you won't have a large community to keep an eye on. Torchie1
  • Score: 0

5:40pm Sat 10 May 14

Ginger_cyclist says...

Torchie1 wrote:
Ginger_cyclist wrote:
From the sidelines wrote:
High time we had special sentences for bike thieves.

Off with the goolies.
And this is why I plan on investing in a GPS tracker for my bike.
When a bicycle is stolen it will be by children, another bicycle rider or by thieves who will look to sell it on, and who will be in the market for a stolen bicycle (complete or in parts)? With bicycles only accounting for 2% of journeys you won't have a large community to keep an eye on.
2% of RECORDED journeys, also, a good cyclist, would know not to trust people flogging expensive bikes for what is comparatively peanuts.
[quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]From the sidelines[/bold] wrote: High time we had special sentences for bike thieves. Off with the goolies.[/p][/quote]And this is why I plan on investing in a GPS tracker for my bike.[/p][/quote]When a bicycle is stolen it will be by children, another bicycle rider or by thieves who will look to sell it on, and who will be in the market for a stolen bicycle (complete or in parts)? With bicycles only accounting for 2% of journeys you won't have a large community to keep an eye on.[/p][/quote]2% of RECORDED journeys, also, a good cyclist, would know not to trust people flogging expensive bikes for what is comparatively peanuts. Ginger_cyclist
  • Score: -1

7:26pm Sat 10 May 14

Torchie1 says...

Ginger_cyclist wrote:
Torchie1 wrote:
Ginger_cyclist wrote:
From the sidelines wrote:
High time we had special sentences for bike thieves.

Off with the goolies.
And this is why I plan on investing in a GPS tracker for my bike.
When a bicycle is stolen it will be by children, another bicycle rider or by thieves who will look to sell it on, and who will be in the market for a stolen bicycle (complete or in parts)? With bicycles only accounting for 2% of journeys you won't have a large community to keep an eye on.
2% of RECORDED journeys, also, a good cyclist, would know not to trust people flogging expensive bikes for what is comparatively peanuts.
And yet the thefts continue so the thieves must be reasonably confident that there are enough bent members of the 2% club to warrant stealing them. Sadly the refusal to comply with any form of legislation means that a bicycle can be easily stolen and disposed of with little to fear from the law.
[quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]From the sidelines[/bold] wrote: High time we had special sentences for bike thieves. Off with the goolies.[/p][/quote]And this is why I plan on investing in a GPS tracker for my bike.[/p][/quote]When a bicycle is stolen it will be by children, another bicycle rider or by thieves who will look to sell it on, and who will be in the market for a stolen bicycle (complete or in parts)? With bicycles only accounting for 2% of journeys you won't have a large community to keep an eye on.[/p][/quote]2% of RECORDED journeys, also, a good cyclist, would know not to trust people flogging expensive bikes for what is comparatively peanuts.[/p][/quote]And yet the thefts continue so the thieves must be reasonably confident that there are enough bent members of the 2% club to warrant stealing them. Sadly the refusal to comply with any form of legislation means that a bicycle can be easily stolen and disposed of with little to fear from the law. Torchie1
  • Score: 0

7:55pm Sat 10 May 14

Ginger_cyclist says...

Torchie1 wrote:
Ginger_cyclist wrote:
Torchie1 wrote:
Ginger_cyclist wrote:
From the sidelines wrote:
High time we had special sentences for bike thieves.

Off with the goolies.
And this is why I plan on investing in a GPS tracker for my bike.
When a bicycle is stolen it will be by children, another bicycle rider or by thieves who will look to sell it on, and who will be in the market for a stolen bicycle (complete or in parts)? With bicycles only accounting for 2% of journeys you won't have a large community to keep an eye on.
2% of RECORDED journeys, also, a good cyclist, would know not to trust people flogging expensive bikes for what is comparatively peanuts.
And yet the thefts continue so the thieves must be reasonably confident that there are enough bent members of the 2% club to warrant stealing them. Sadly the refusal to comply with any form of legislation means that a bicycle can be easily stolen and disposed of with little to fear from the law.
You're wrong, most theives give or sell what they stole to people they know, some flog them on street corners to those who don't know much about bikes or the bike black market or they break them down into parts and use parts that don't have identifying marks for their own bikes, to sell on ebay or use them on bikes belonging to friends/family, the frames are often sold at scrap value BUT there IS something in leglislation, that can help people get their bikes back and that is the fact that every bike MUST have a unique number on the frame, essentially, it's just a VIN for bicycles, note that number down along with identifying features of the bike and when you report the theft of your bike to the police, giving them that number and the details of your bike, will increase the chances of it being returned to you, you can also, quite often, get your bikes marked by the police, my own bike has a hard to remove label, with my postcode on it AND I registered it for FREE at immobilise.com, I also have the bike insured against damage and theft, also, there are bicycle specific GPS trackers now available.
[quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]From the sidelines[/bold] wrote: High time we had special sentences for bike thieves. Off with the goolies.[/p][/quote]And this is why I plan on investing in a GPS tracker for my bike.[/p][/quote]When a bicycle is stolen it will be by children, another bicycle rider or by thieves who will look to sell it on, and who will be in the market for a stolen bicycle (complete or in parts)? With bicycles only accounting for 2% of journeys you won't have a large community to keep an eye on.[/p][/quote]2% of RECORDED journeys, also, a good cyclist, would know not to trust people flogging expensive bikes for what is comparatively peanuts.[/p][/quote]And yet the thefts continue so the thieves must be reasonably confident that there are enough bent members of the 2% club to warrant stealing them. Sadly the refusal to comply with any form of legislation means that a bicycle can be easily stolen and disposed of with little to fear from the law.[/p][/quote]You're wrong, most theives give or sell what they stole to people they know, some flog them on street corners to those who don't know much about bikes or the bike black market or they break them down into parts and use parts that don't have identifying marks for their own bikes, to sell on ebay or use them on bikes belonging to friends/family, the frames are often sold at scrap value BUT there IS something in leglislation, that can help people get their bikes back and that is the fact that every bike MUST have a unique number on the frame, essentially, it's just a VIN for bicycles, note that number down along with identifying features of the bike and when you report the theft of your bike to the police, giving them that number and the details of your bike, will increase the chances of it being returned to you, you can also, quite often, get your bikes marked by the police, my own bike has a hard to remove label, with my postcode on it AND I registered it for FREE at immobilise.com, I also have the bike insured against damage and theft, also, there are bicycle specific GPS trackers now available. Ginger_cyclist
  • Score: 0

1:26am Sun 11 May 14

Torchie1 says...

Ginger_cyclist wrote:
Torchie1 wrote:
Ginger_cyclist wrote:
Torchie1 wrote:
Ginger_cyclist wrote:
From the sidelines wrote:
High time we had special sentences for bike thieves.

Off with the goolies.
And this is why I plan on investing in a GPS tracker for my bike.
When a bicycle is stolen it will be by children, another bicycle rider or by thieves who will look to sell it on, and who will be in the market for a stolen bicycle (complete or in parts)? With bicycles only accounting for 2% of journeys you won't have a large community to keep an eye on.
2% of RECORDED journeys, also, a good cyclist, would know not to trust people flogging expensive bikes for what is comparatively peanuts.
And yet the thefts continue so the thieves must be reasonably confident that there are enough bent members of the 2% club to warrant stealing them. Sadly the refusal to comply with any form of legislation means that a bicycle can be easily stolen and disposed of with little to fear from the law.
You're wrong, most theives give or sell what they stole to people they know, some flog them on street corners to those who don't know much about bikes or the bike black market or they break them down into parts and use parts that don't have identifying marks for their own bikes, to sell on ebay or use them on bikes belonging to friends/family, the frames are often sold at scrap value BUT there IS something in leglislation, that can help people get their bikes back and that is the fact that every bike MUST have a unique number on the frame, essentially, it's just a VIN for bicycles, note that number down along with identifying features of the bike and when you report the theft of your bike to the police, giving them that number and the details of your bike, will increase the chances of it being returned to you, you can also, quite often, get your bikes marked by the police, my own bike has a hard to remove label, with my postcode on it AND I registered it for FREE at immobilise.com, I also have the bike insured against damage and theft, also, there are bicycle specific GPS trackers now available.
You are so much like Southy that I look forward to your reply. Truly the gift that keeps on giving.
[quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]From the sidelines[/bold] wrote: High time we had special sentences for bike thieves. Off with the goolies.[/p][/quote]And this is why I plan on investing in a GPS tracker for my bike.[/p][/quote]When a bicycle is stolen it will be by children, another bicycle rider or by thieves who will look to sell it on, and who will be in the market for a stolen bicycle (complete or in parts)? With bicycles only accounting for 2% of journeys you won't have a large community to keep an eye on.[/p][/quote]2% of RECORDED journeys, also, a good cyclist, would know not to trust people flogging expensive bikes for what is comparatively peanuts.[/p][/quote]And yet the thefts continue so the thieves must be reasonably confident that there are enough bent members of the 2% club to warrant stealing them. Sadly the refusal to comply with any form of legislation means that a bicycle can be easily stolen and disposed of with little to fear from the law.[/p][/quote]You're wrong, most theives give or sell what they stole to people they know, some flog them on street corners to those who don't know much about bikes or the bike black market or they break them down into parts and use parts that don't have identifying marks for their own bikes, to sell on ebay or use them on bikes belonging to friends/family, the frames are often sold at scrap value BUT there IS something in leglislation, that can help people get their bikes back and that is the fact that every bike MUST have a unique number on the frame, essentially, it's just a VIN for bicycles, note that number down along with identifying features of the bike and when you report the theft of your bike to the police, giving them that number and the details of your bike, will increase the chances of it being returned to you, you can also, quite often, get your bikes marked by the police, my own bike has a hard to remove label, with my postcode on it AND I registered it for FREE at immobilise.com, I also have the bike insured against damage and theft, also, there are bicycle specific GPS trackers now available.[/p][/quote]You are so much like Southy that I look forward to your reply. Truly the gift that keeps on giving. Torchie1
  • Score: -1

1:54am Sun 11 May 14

Ginger_cyclist says...

Torchie1 wrote:
Ginger_cyclist wrote:
Torchie1 wrote:
Ginger_cyclist wrote:
Torchie1 wrote:
Ginger_cyclist wrote:
From the sidelines wrote:
High time we had special sentences for bike thieves.

Off with the goolies.
And this is why I plan on investing in a GPS tracker for my bike.
When a bicycle is stolen it will be by children, another bicycle rider or by thieves who will look to sell it on, and who will be in the market for a stolen bicycle (complete or in parts)? With bicycles only accounting for 2% of journeys you won't have a large community to keep an eye on.
2% of RECORDED journeys, also, a good cyclist, would know not to trust people flogging expensive bikes for what is comparatively peanuts.
And yet the thefts continue so the thieves must be reasonably confident that there are enough bent members of the 2% club to warrant stealing them. Sadly the refusal to comply with any form of legislation means that a bicycle can be easily stolen and disposed of with little to fear from the law.
You're wrong, most theives give or sell what they stole to people they know, some flog them on street corners to those who don't know much about bikes or the bike black market or they break them down into parts and use parts that don't have identifying marks for their own bikes, to sell on ebay or use them on bikes belonging to friends/family, the frames are often sold at scrap value BUT there IS something in leglislation, that can help people get their bikes back and that is the fact that every bike MUST have a unique number on the frame, essentially, it's just a VIN for bicycles, note that number down along with identifying features of the bike and when you report the theft of your bike to the police, giving them that number and the details of your bike, will increase the chances of it being returned to you, you can also, quite often, get your bikes marked by the police, my own bike has a hard to remove label, with my postcode on it AND I registered it for FREE at immobilise.com, I also have the bike insured against damage and theft, also, there are bicycle specific GPS trackers now available.
You are so much like Southy that I look forward to your reply. Truly the gift that keeps on giving.
But unlike Southy, I'm far more likely to actually know what I'm talking about.

http://www.integrate
dtrackers.com/GPSTra
ck/Products.jsp

See, bicycle specific GPS trackers.
[quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]From the sidelines[/bold] wrote: High time we had special sentences for bike thieves. Off with the goolies.[/p][/quote]And this is why I plan on investing in a GPS tracker for my bike.[/p][/quote]When a bicycle is stolen it will be by children, another bicycle rider or by thieves who will look to sell it on, and who will be in the market for a stolen bicycle (complete or in parts)? With bicycles only accounting for 2% of journeys you won't have a large community to keep an eye on.[/p][/quote]2% of RECORDED journeys, also, a good cyclist, would know not to trust people flogging expensive bikes for what is comparatively peanuts.[/p][/quote]And yet the thefts continue so the thieves must be reasonably confident that there are enough bent members of the 2% club to warrant stealing them. Sadly the refusal to comply with any form of legislation means that a bicycle can be easily stolen and disposed of with little to fear from the law.[/p][/quote]You're wrong, most theives give or sell what they stole to people they know, some flog them on street corners to those who don't know much about bikes or the bike black market or they break them down into parts and use parts that don't have identifying marks for their own bikes, to sell on ebay or use them on bikes belonging to friends/family, the frames are often sold at scrap value BUT there IS something in leglislation, that can help people get their bikes back and that is the fact that every bike MUST have a unique number on the frame, essentially, it's just a VIN for bicycles, note that number down along with identifying features of the bike and when you report the theft of your bike to the police, giving them that number and the details of your bike, will increase the chances of it being returned to you, you can also, quite often, get your bikes marked by the police, my own bike has a hard to remove label, with my postcode on it AND I registered it for FREE at immobilise.com, I also have the bike insured against damage and theft, also, there are bicycle specific GPS trackers now available.[/p][/quote]You are so much like Southy that I look forward to your reply. Truly the gift that keeps on giving.[/p][/quote]But unlike Southy, I'm far more likely to actually know what I'm talking about. http://www.integrate dtrackers.com/GPSTra ck/Products.jsp See, bicycle specific GPS trackers. Ginger_cyclist
  • Score: 0

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