Curtain Call Awards Nominations 2012

Daily Echo: A Midsummer Night's Dream by Maskers Theatre Company A Midsummer Night's Dream by Maskers Theatre Company

THE votes are in! The Daily
Echo’s team of impartial
judges have named the
pick of the south’s amateur
theatre in the last
year.
After watching hundreds of dramas,
comedies, musicals, operas, Shakespeare
plays, youth productions and pantomimes,
they have cast their votes in each of 37
categories.
The full list of nominees are below.
Winners will be announced at a glittering
ceremony at Southampton’s De Vere
Grand Harbour Hotel on Friday January
25, 2013.
Tickets and details are available by
emailing jo.richardson@dailyecho.co.uk

Best Newcomer:

Jack Simmonds. For the original score for Jack, Oasis Youth Theatre. Jack Simmonds’ score was a brilliantly crafted aural landscape, a perfect musical exposition of the visual drama. Beth Street. Sarah Bond in Wolfsbane, Dalian Players. An impressive debut as a schoolgirl who may not be as sweet as she appears.

Ryan Grimshaw. Hanschen in Spring Awakening, Performing Arts Winchester. Irresistibly droll.

Victoria Sarker. Choreographer of Kiss Me Kate, Waterside Musical Society. Victoria graced the stage and cast with some memorable choreography. Beverley Siddle . Director of Absurd Person Singular, RAODS. Provided an entertaining evening. Alexander Curtis, Samuel Dobson & Joel Jackson. Directors of Vindice, SUSU Theatre Group. This ambitious play was the first written by Curtis who, along with his fellow debut co-directors, produced a quite extraordinary piece of theatre.

Best Supporting Actor in a Drama: Tom Byrne. Anthony Marston in And then there were None, Performing Arts Winchester. A convincing tough guy with real stage presence.

Fraser Adams. Miles in Turn of the Screw, Studio Theatre, Salisbury. A very well judged performance that doesn't disappoint when premature sophistication gives way to terror. Henry Oaster. Uriah Heep in David Copperfield, One Off Productions. A brilliant interpretation of this famous villain. Ruben Sanchez Garcia. Soldier in Chair, Maskers Theatre Company. Almost goaded nervous chuckles from audience members in this threatening role. Kevin Fraser. Joe in Great Expectations, Titchfield Festival Theatre. A delight.

Best Supporting Actress in a Drama: Chris Baker. Tattymouse in Can You Hear The Music?, Maskers Theatre Company. Very sympathetic as this deaf, resilient, bemused rodent. Frances Patterson. Miss Havisham in Great Expectations, Titchfield Festival Theatre. A magnificent interpretation of this famous character.

Tamsin Jacson. Mrs Grose in The Turn of the Screw, Studio Theatre Salisbury. Her performance helped draw the audience into James’ world of doubt and fear. Virginia Hodge. Helga in Kindertransport, Titchfield Festival Theatre. Dignified, then compellingly distressed with her daughter rejects a new life. Trish Quinlan. Nancy in Frozen, RAODS. A highly effective performance as a woman who manages to forgive the man who killed her daughter, if only to ease her own pain.

Best Supporting Actor in a Musical : Mark Hill. Adult Male in Spring Awakening, Showstoppers. He made all the parts his own, each different and all utterly believable. Joseph Warne. Elton John and various. Royal Variety Performance, Otterborne Village Hall Committee. His vocal performances were sharp and melodious.

Daniel Scott. Orin Scrivello in Little Shop of Horrors, Titchfield Festival Theatre. Perfect as the sadist dentist. Steven Lilly. Lance/Skier/Jose/Thomas in Love off the Shelf, RAODS. Leading the fun was the truly outstanding Lilly, who enriched every scene as a variety of characters. Tony Dart. Wilfred Davies in Radio Times, CCADS. Wonderful comic timing from a truly larger-than-life funny-man. Tony Doyle. Heathcliffe Bultitude in Radio Times, CCADS. He easily steals the second-act, delivering a variety of hilarious characters.

Best Supporting Actress in a Musical: Stephanie Amies. Adult Female in Spring Awakening, Showstoppers. Stephanie made every part her own and demonstrated superb acting skills.

Victoria Sarker. Lane in Kiss Me Kate, Waterside Musical Society. She took the spotlight as the gold-digging hoofer. Sue Rourke. Lina Lamont in Singin’ in The Rain, Fareham Musical Society. She enhanced her reputation with a suitably over-the-top performance. Carol Robinson. Lucy in Jekyll and Hyde, Andover Musical Theatre Company. Displayed real emotion as the tart-with-a-heart. Joanna Gradwell. Mother Abbess in The Sound of Music, RAODS. In a very strong cast, she was the most powerful performer vocally.

Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy or Comic Drama: Richard Calver. Officer Crabtree in 'Allo 'Allo, The Bursledon Players. Mangled the English language perfectly. Neil Gwynne. Various in The 39 Steps, RAODS. The 17 roles played to perfection. Peter Burton. Dad in Caught In The Net, Bishopstoke Players. Stole the show with a magnificent performance as the bemused, curmudgeonly father. Sean Ridley. Lawrence in Calendar Girls, CCADS. Charismatic, totally convincing as the nervous hospital-porter/photographer. Peter Colley. John in Calendar Girls, CCADS. From flamboyant jester through the deterioration of illness and death, the physicality of this performance was compelling and poignant. Dave Sutherland. John in Calendar Girls, Waterside Theatre Company. From lovable clown, his portrayal of John’s demise was very moving.

Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy or Comic Drama: Jennifer Hampton. Miss Mabel Chiltern in An Ideal Husband, RAODS: Jennifer Hampton played Mabel with charm, a lovely effervescence of spirit and a clarity of delivery, stealing the scenes whenever she appeared.

Meriel Shepherd. Mrs Swabb in Habeas Corpus, RAODS. Meriel Shepherd gave a wonderfully droll performance as the busybody Mrs Swabb.

Meriel Shepherd. Jan in Ladies Day, RAODS. Her performance includes drunken antics that turn quite poignant.

Katrina Humphreys. Helga in 'Allo 'Allo, The Bursledon Players. A wonderful foil for Herr Flick.

Carol Ings. Lottie/Marty in The Haunted Through Lounge And Recessed Dining Nook At Farndale Castle, Hamble Players. Natural aptitude for physical and verbal comedy with priceless expressions and brilliant caricature.

Best Supporting Actor in a Youth Production: Joey Warne. Angel Dumont Schunard in Rent, Centrestage Productions Youth Theatre. Joey was stunning as the sweet transvestite Angel, creating real depth and tenderness beneath the brashness of the role. Jonny Moulson. Gaston in Beauty and the Beast, Centrestage Productions Youth Theatre. A delightfully swaggering turn as the deluged baddie. Peter Humphreys. Mysto the Magician in The Adventures of Punch and Judy, Junior Hamble Players. A striking and effective performance as the villainous Mysto the Magician. James Gardener. White Rabbit in Alice Through the Broken Lens, Gantry Youth Theatre. A delightful mix of assurance and gentle wit. Will Jones. Bill Sykes in Oliver! RAODS Youth. Will gave a performance of immense power and menace.

Best Supporting Actress in a Youth Production: Katherine Evans. Miss Hannigan in Annie, Footlights Youth Theatre. Katherine Evans stole the limelight with her wickedly hilarious turn.

Grace Warne. Toby in The Adventures of Punch and Judy, Junior Hamble Players. Grace showed consummate skill in conveying a myriad of feelings without recourse to spoken dialogue.

Lucy Baston. Katisha in The Mikado, Debut Youth Theatre. A performance of stunning power. Megan O’Hanlon. Mr Mansfield in Smith, Titchfield Youth Theatre. Megan gave an accomplished and immensely dignified performance as the blind Magistrate. Chloe Gardiner. Mrs Meers in Thoroughly Modern Millie, RicNic. A real hoot as the sinister Mrs Meers, stealing the show.

Best Supporting Actor in a Shakespeare Play Jez Roberts. Macduff in Macbeth, SUSU. A particularly moving and dignified Macduff. Randy Vince. Leonato in Much Ado About Nothing, Royal Navy Theatre Association. An emotional performance with a fine command of the language. David Penrose. Iachimo in Cymbeline, Bench Theatre. A joy to listen to as the scheming but ultimately penitent Iachimo.

Best Supporting Actress in a Shakespeare Play: Georgie Gulliford. Adriana in The Comedy of Errors, Titchfield Festival Theatre. A delightful performance as the confused wife. Suze Avery. Puck in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Maskers Theatre Company. A very expressive, controlled and stylised white-faced clown with a good rapport with the audience.

Jane Blatch-Gainey. Dogberry in Much Ado About Nothing, Royal Navy Theatre Association. A truly original and genuinely funny portrayal of this pompous ass.

Best Lighting, Sound and Effects: Ron Seaman, Lesley Bates and Alistair Faulkner. The Turn of the Screw, Studio Theatre, Salisbury. Ron Seaman’s lighting design complements director Linda Haymon’s staging to chilling effect. Tony Neal, Lee Stoddart, Tom Ellins, Martin Stevens. Frost Nixon. CCADS. Presented at Portsmouth Historic Dockyard, this production used a massive screen to present its protagonists in memorably intense close up key moments.

Lee Stoddart and Sean Ridley. Aida, CCADS. The top-notch sound, lighting and staging help to make this show worth seeing.

Dave Edwards, George Thomas, James Mitchell, John Howell. Aladdin, Waterside Theatre Company. Top-notch production elements combined for a magical ride.

Best Choreographer: Sarah Mephan. Tracey Beaker Gets Real!, Solent Stage. The choreography stood out and added an extra dimension. Dannie Spencer. Best Little Whorehouse in Texas, Music Theatre South. The ensemble was very ably-led by, with the girls dressed-to-thrill and the boys providing eye-candy for the ladies. Lydia Thorne, Aida, CCADS. Top notch choreography. Tory East. West Side Story, Barton Peveril Sixth Form College. The dance and fight scenes made a major impact and the ballet was beautifully done. Vicky Caves and Severine Goddard. The Wedding Singer, Showstoppers. Stunning! Well drilled and imaginative.

Best Opera or Musical: Spring Awakening, Showstoppers. It flowed like the finest poetry, plucking emotions from the unwitting audience. Departure Lounge, Music Theatre South. A comedic and moving romp, with a polished delivery. Aida, CCADS. This show never made it to the West End, surprisingly, given the quality of this performance. Chess, South Downs Musical Society. What a pleasure to be treated to such a brilliant show, a ‘Knight’ to remember. Jekyll and Hyde, Andover Musical Theatre Company. Certainly did what it said on the tin, blessed with exceptionally gifted performers.

Best Musical Director: Alex ‘Teddy’ Clements. Spring Awakening, Showstoppers. Everyone delivered in this musically challenging and emotive production. Alex ‘Teddy’ Clements. Departure Lounge, Music Theatre South. With a cast of five no-one can miss a beat, and no-one did. Alan Pring. Chess, South Downe MS. A very fine orchestra – with great guitar from Dan Franks! Keziah Jacombs. The Sorcerer, Pocket G&S. Enhanced her own reputation, leading a talented seven-piece band. Jonathan Spratt. Titanic, Ringwood MS. In a first-class show, Jonathan Spratt’s orchestra gave excellent accompaniment.

Best Actor in a Drama: Neil Gwynne. Ralph in Frozen, RAODS. Energetic throughout, this character really comes alive as this serial killer comes to understand that he is damaged. Mathew Walker. Andy in Love Letters, Sway Drama Club. Amusing and surprising as this American politician who outgrows his early love.

Ian Fraser. Freddie in The Deep Blue Sea, Chesil Theatre. A vivid portrayal of a complex character. Mike Bailey. Howard Holt in Something to Hide, Waterside Theatre Company. A rather winning lothario.

Best Actress in a Drama: Katy Watkins. Hester in The Deep Blue Sea, Chesil Thetare. Nervous and anguished, but passionate and resolute. Ros Liddiard. Madeleine in The Breath of Life, Chesil Theatre. Her earthy intellectual character reveals raw edges and warmer feelings in an uncompromising style.

Mary Mitchell. Frances in The Breath of Life, Chesil Theatre. Subtly depicts her character’s attempts to take control.

Jessica Blake. Estella in Great Expectations, Titchfield Festival Theatre. Suitably haughty, but convincingly shows her characters underlying passion.

Sarah-Jayne Wareham. Mrs Robinson in The Graduate, Maskers Theatre Company. Glamorous – she shows her character’s frustration is not just sexual. Penelope Wright. Melissa in Love Letters, Sway Drama Club. A very well paced performance.

Best Actor in a Musical: Toby Hasler-Winter. Robbie in The Wedding Singer, Showstoppers. His blossoming character was touching to watch. Jez Roberts. Melchior in Spring Awakening, Showstoppers. Charismatic genius!

John-Paul McCrohon. Radames in Aida, CCADS. He created a magical connection with his co-star, generating an almost tangible frisson of excitement in an emotional performance.

John-Paul McCrohon. Sammy Shaw in Radio Times, CCADS. Superb in the lead role! Paul Rogers. Max Bialystock in The Producers, Southampton Musical Society. Paul Rogers was sensational in an excellent cast.

Best Actress in a Musical: Laura Kitching. Maria in The Sound of Music, Salisbury Amateur Operatic Society. Laura was superb in the role, like a young Julie Andrews.

Kerry Butcher. Suzy in The Marvellous Wonderettes, Music Theatre South. She exuded her shattered dreams with a touching naivety.

Helen Stoddart. Aida in Aida, CCADS. Helen’s acting and singing in an emotional performance were, without question, fit to grace any West End stage. Emma Bryant. Dot/Marie in Sunday in the Park with George, Showstoppers. An actress of rare talent, with a singing voice and looks that set her apart. Sue Rourke. Florence in Chess, South Downe Musical Society. An outstanding leading lady, her duet on the big number brought deserved applause.

Best Actor in a Comedy or Comic Drama: David Balfour. Graham in Time and Time Again, Lyndhurst Drama and Musical Society. A commanding turn as the lecherous Graham.

Chris McKenzie. Raleigh in Last Train To Nibroc, Titchfield Festival Theatre. Immersed in his character, bringing him to life with aplomb.

Jonathan Redwood. Basil in Fawlty Towers, Fareham Musical Society. He wrung every last drip of comedy from the role. Chris Davis. Professor Higgins in Pygmalion, Lymington Players. Embodied the extravagant character of the arrogant phonetics professor. Neil Brookes. Frank Doel in 84 Charing Cross Road, Lymington Players. Demure performance as formal Doel, contributed to a most convincing relationship blossoming into a charming long-distance friendship.

Best Actress in a Comedy or Comic Drama: Hollie Gallimore. Julie Briggs in Clerical Errors, Lymington Players. On-stage for virtually the whole show, Hollie’s performance surely prefaces a long and successful future in the theatre. One to watch! Christine English. Pearl in Ladies Day, RAODS. A wonderful performance that extracted the maximum value from every line. Amy Manwaring. May in Last Train To Nibroc, Titchfield Festival Theatre. Impeccable Kentucky accent, such an expressive face, brought her character to life with style. Beverley Oliver. Mrs Reece/Lady Graves/Mrs Slaughter/Mabel) in The Haunted Through Lounge and Recessed Dining Nook At Farndale Castle, Hamble Players. Inhabited her characters throughout, particularly her physicality during the poetry reading section, with hilarious result. Maggie Rose. Helene Hanff in 84 Charing Cross Road, Lymington Players. Excelled with her brash, authentic accent and feisty characterisation. Janet West. Grace in Entertaining Angels, Poulner Players. Ran the full gamut of emotions brilliantly and utterly convincingly as the feisty, haughty, yet vulnerable wife. Lisa Gilmore. Angela in My Brilliant Divorce, RAODS. Multiple characters and accents portrayed brilliantly with hilarious results.

Best Actor in a Youth Production: Harry Edelsten. Don in Summer Holiday, Encore Youth Theatre. A performance of considerable charm and assurance with the touch of the young Elvis. Josh Dennis. Tevye in Fiddler on the Roof, Stage One. Josh Dennis dominated the show, anchoring with consummate skill. Tom Chenhall. Oliver Warbucks in Annie, Footlights Youth Theatre. Delivered a performance bristling with charisma and presence. Owen Collick. Mark Cohen in Rent, Centrestage Productions Youth Theatre. Owen brought the right mix of tentativeness, tenderness and a nebbish charm to the role. Tayler Davis. The Beast in Beauty and the Beast, Centrestage Productions Youth Theatre. Tayler was a commanding presence.

Best Actress in a Youth Production: Beth Waters. Belle in Beauty and the Beast, Centrestage Productions Youth Theatre. Beth had a bold and striking stage presence. Katarina Smith and Trixie Hart. Alice and Little Alice in Alice Through a Broken Lens, Gantry Youth Theatre. They gave truly stunning performances in the dual role.

Katie Winter. Golde in Fiddler on the Roof, Stage One. A peerless performance of maturity and depth.

Rosie Mellett. Annie in Annie, Footlights Youth Theatre. Carried the burden of the production lightly on her young shoulders, giving a performance of great charm and assurance. Natalie Thorn. Charity Hope Valentine in Sweet Charity, Footlights Youth Theatre. Natalie was pure gold in the central role. Sally Britton. Genie in Disney’s Aladdin, Debut Youth Theatre. Shone as the irrepressible genie, the stunning jazzy voice, charisma and excellent poise.

Best Actor in a Shakespeare Play: Cam Bevan. Macbeth in Macbeth, Southampton University Students Union (SUSU). Excellent as the weak-willed but ultimately murderous thane. Patric Howe. Sir Toby Belch in Twelfth Night, Southsea Shakespeare Actors. On marvellously ebullient form as the irrepressible drunken knight.

Matt Gibbins. Malvolio in Twelfth Night, Southsea Shakespeare Actors. A wonderful take on the conceited steward.

Best Actress in a Shakespeare Play: Emily Prince. Isabella in Measure For Measure, Studio Theatre Salisbury. A memorably dignified and passionate performance as the blackmailed novice nun. Jess Cutting. Olivia in Twelfth Night, Southsea Shakespeare Actors. A superbly original ‘Sloanie’ Olivia. Emma Real-Davis. Lady Macbeth in Macbeth, SUSU: A forceful rendering of this manipulative and scheming social climber.

Best Performance in a Pantomime: John Lightfoot. Fetch in Bluebeard, Bishopstoke Players. Well-timed antics and a professional debut performance.

Lee Poore. The Prince in Alice in Wonderland -The Panto, Burdock Valley Players. Particularly impressive, a real talent to watch out for. Jayne Blatch-Gainey. Rex the Hairy Dogfather in Cinderella, Collingwood RSC. Canine mannerisms and physicality enhanced the visual comedy, delighting the audience. Emma Heath. Val de Morte in Cinderella, Collingwood RSC. Fiendishly wicked as domineering step-mother. Gena Famin. Puck in Bottom’s Dream, The Forty Pound Theatre Company. Highly skilled with mask and mime, great physicality as mischievous sprite Puck. Leighton Fort. Abanazar in Aladdin, Waterside Theatre Company. Magnificently evil, resonating voice and terrific physicality.

Best Pantomime: Bluebeard, Bishopstoke Players. Exceptional attention to detail and all the requisite elements for a panto. Alice in Wonderland – The Panto, Burdock Valley Players. The show boasts a quality of costumes, choreography and effects rare in a village production. Cinderella, Collingwood RSC. Jokes for the young, innuendos for the young at heart, well-choreographed musical numbers and occasional twists! Aladdin, Sway Drama Club. Original, yet faithful, version with all the elements of traditional pantomime presented in an eclectic mix. Aladdin, Waterside Theatre Company. A thoroughly entertaining pantomime enhanced by first-rate direction.

Best Set and Props: Mark Pyke and Noël Jones. Summer Holiday, Encore Youth Theatre. The double decker bus was the true star of the production, a triumph of design.

David James and Jo Burnaby. Heroes, Chesil Theatre. Admirable, bright set design and an amusing surprise from a statue of a dog. Peter Liddiard and Jo Burnaby. Breaking the Silence, Chesil Theatre. A lovely re-creation of a Soviet railway carriage turned into a family home. Alistair Faulkner, Dee Mansfield, Sarah Kirkpatrick and George Fleming. The Turn of the Screw. Studio Theatre Salisbury. Plays an effective part by recreating the atmosphere of the spooky old house. Andy M Bumfrey. Little Shop of Horrors, Titchfield Festival Theatre. The set and props were a masterpiece and managed effectively. Eddie Nias and Chris Rule. Jekyll & Hyde, Andover Musical Society. Impressively staged stabbings, slashed jugulars and gunshot on a great set.

Best Costumes: Maggie Blake, Ladies Day, RAODS. Splendid costumes allow the ladies of a fish cannery to dress up for the day at the races. Anna Lomax and Pam Hanan. The Turn of the Screw, Studio Theatre Salisbury. Another flawless element of this beautifully mounted production.

Sandie Williams, Kevin Fraser and Chris Lawrence. Great Expectations, Titchfield Festival Theatre. A fine re-creation of Dickens’ world. Shirley Lovell. Old Time Music Hall, The Worthy Players. The costumes were spectacular! Meryl, Stu & Trevor Collins. The Producers, Southampton Musical Society. A very impressive array of costumes, all hand-crafted by the talented team. Jan Sly and team, Disney’s Aladdin, Debut Youth Theatre. Stunning costumes in the Disney fashion.

Best Performance in an Opera: Allison Bradley. Anna Glavari in The Merry Widow, Winchester Operatic Society. She offered purity, clarity and a superb range. Mark Ponsford. Sergeant of Police in Pirates of Penzance, Pocket G&S. An hilariously energetic, over-the-top, camp performance. Mark Ponsford. Rev Dr Daly in The Sorcerer, Pocket G&S. Deserves an early mention for his hilarious performance.

Emily Buck. Rosalinda in Die Fledermaus, University of Portsmouth D&MS. Was simply sensational in this role and surely has the talent to go far. Lisa Axworthy. Mabel in Pirates of Penzance, Pocket G&S. A stand-out performance from a soprano of rare quality.

Best Director of a Drama: Linda Haymon. The Turn of the Screw, Studio Theatre Salisbury. Sensitive direction keeps up the tension. Paul Green. Frozen, RAODS. A daring choice that delivers with several extraordinary moments. John Petroff. Love Letters, Sway Drama Club. Cleverly exploits every detail to communicate to the audience. Peter Andrews. The Breath of Life, Chesil Theatre. His sensitive direction was rewarded by two fine performances. John-Paul McCrohon. Frost Nixon, CCADS. An unusually grand conception, well executed.

Lisbeth Rake. The Deep Blue Sea, Chesil Theatre. Shows wonderful understanding of her characters.

Best Director of a Musical or Opera: Carmel Fowles and Sam Quested. Spring Awakening, Performing Arts Winchester. Delivered a seamless show packed with enjoyable song and dance, bawdy comedy and a few serious moments. Alex Bowen. Spring Awakening, Showstoppers. He created a sensitive, not to be missed show. Adam Myers. Departure Lounge, Music Theatre South. He pulled together a comedic and moving romp. John-Paul McCrohon. Aida, CCADS. An under-performed, quality show that is well-worth seeing. John-Paul McCrohon. Chess, South Downe MS. Having impressed earlier with Aida, McCrohon scores highly again here.

David Tatnall. Pirates of Penzance, Pocket G&S. Delivers another massively enjoyable evening.

Best Director of a Comedy or Comic Drama: Richard & Sue Hackett. Last Train To Nibroc, Titchfield Festival Theatre. Exceptional direction ensured this was heart-warming, engaging, poignant and totally mesmerising.

Colin Kier. 84 Charing Cross Road, Lymington Players. Skilful direction ensured whole cast performed with great strength and subtlety, even when no dialogue. Peter Woodward, Life x3, Bench Theatre. First-rate direction created repetition of events from different viewpoints , bringing vividly to life a fascinating insight into human interactive relationships. Becky Coultas. Calendar Girls, Waterside Theatre Company. Excellent direction captured the true essence of this poignant comic drama. Kay Baker & David Humphries, The Haunted Through Lounge And Recessed Dining Nook At Farndale Castle, Hamble Players. Directorial combination ensured this was a slickly paced, dynamic production of a spoof play-within-a-play.

Best Director of a Youth Production: Pete Harding. Beauty and the Beast, Centrestage Productions Youth Theatre. Pete gave full reign to his showmanship and directorial mastery.

David Tatnall. Annie, Footlights Youth Theatre. Coaxed some astonishing performances from a cast of such tender years. Neil Gibbs. Alice Through a Broken Lens, Gantry Youth Theatre. Produced a wonderfully energetic, brilliantly conceived promenade production. Mark Wheeller Jack. Oasis Youth Theatre. Mark has proved yet again a masterful producer of visually stunning and dynamic dramas. Emma Clammer. West Side Story, Barton Peveril 6th Form College. A thoroughly deserved standing ovation was just reward for this outstanding production. Jerry Essex. We Will Rock You, Bay House College & School. Emulating the success of the West End show was a big ask, but the director pulled it off in some style.

Best Director of a Shakespeare Play: Rob and Paula Bartlett. Twelfth Night. Southsea Shakespeare Actors. A fresh, original and extremely funny staging of this sparkling comedy. Alex Bray. Macbeth. SUSU. A confident, stylish production with much to like in this gory tragedy. Philippa Sargent . Much Ado About Nothing. Royal Navy Theatre Association. A pacey, well-spoken modern-dress production with an interesting take on the story.

Youth Ensemble Award: Beauty and the Beast. Centrestage Productions Youth Theatre. An audacious, brilliantly conceived, effects laden production.

Alice Through a Broken Lens, Gantry Youth Theatre. A production of immense ambition, style and attention to detail.

Annie, Footlights Youth Theatre. A production of style and great humour that showcased some brilliant performances from its youthful cast.

Jack, Oasis Youth Theatre. A stunning, original and dynamic production that dazzles and beguiles in equal measure.

Room 13, Titchfield Youth Theatre. Everyone was fully involved. West Side Story, Barton Peveril Sixth Form College. Wonderful performances that were a credit to the college.

Production of the Year: The Deep Blue Sea. Chesil Theatre. A production that was both moving and thought-provoking.

The Turn of the Screw. Studio Theatre Salisbury. Highly effective staging of Henry James’ famous ghost story. Spring Awakening. Performing Arts Winchester. Energetic, sexy, witty, talent packed show.

Spring Awakening, Showstoppers. The production delivered soulful singing, sharp choreography and sophisticated characters in this torrid coming-of-age tale. Aida, CCADS. This show was an early-season production and set the benchmark against which every other show was judged throughout the year. Excellent! ‘Allo ‘Allo, Bursledon Players. A most ingenious production.

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