New twist as biomass scheme delayed

Daily Echo: New twist as biomass scheme delayed New twist as biomass scheme delayed

It’s the most controversial planning issue in Southampton.

And today the proposals for a £300 million biomass plant in Southampton docks took a new twist.

Plans for the giant have been delayed.

The company behind the controversial scheme were due to put in a planning application before the end of the year.

But today it has been revealed that is unlikely to happen and proposals will not be submitted until 2013.

A spokesman for Helius, the company behind the proposed plant earmarked for Southampton docks, was unavailable for comment this morning.

The development comes just a month after the firm confirmed the design of the £300 million plant.

Three options were put to the public during the summer, and the company says that 52 per cent of respondents chose the “marine” look.

But campaigners have dismissed the statistic – saying that many people put “none of the above” on the design consultation and these results have not been included.

And in another development Southampton council Richard Williams called on Helius to reconsider the site of the plant in docks.

He claimed there were other sites in the city more suitable for the plant which Helium say will create 450 jobs to build and have 40 permanent staff.

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Proposals for the 100-megawatt wood-fired plant near homes in Freemantle and Millbrook have sparked a campaign from local residents against the scheme.

In the summer a public consultation was held before in October Herlius revealed the “marine” design as its chose look.

Three options were put to the public during consultation, and the company says that 52 per cent of respondents chose the “marine” look.

But campaigners have dismissed the statistic – saying that many people put “none of the above” on the design consultation and these results have not been included.

Protesters against the plant have also said they are not only against the location, but also the principle of the plans.

A referendum on the plans was scrapped by civic chiefs after costs spiralled from an initial £5,000 to £75,000.

A planning application had been due to be submitted to the National Infrastructure Directorate of the Planning Inspectorate before the end of the year.

Once the application is accepted, the public will be able to register as “interested parties” to make comments on the scheme, before a final decision is made by the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change – currently Liberal Democrat Ed Davey.

For all the background to the biomass controversy click here

Comments (5)

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7:17am Wed 14 Nov 12

The Wickham Man says...

Southampton needs the jobs more than ever. Bring a power station back to the city.
Southampton needs the jobs more than ever. Bring a power station back to the city. The Wickham Man
  • Score: 0

7:53am Wed 14 Nov 12

FoysCornerBoy says...

The Wickham Man wrote:
Southampton needs the jobs more than ever. Bring a power station back to the city.
Yes but I think it would be better to argue the case for jobs from new power stations by looking at the needs of and opportunities in the wider Solent region.

There is a good case for one or more sustainable (sic) biomass plant in this area; but not necessarily the 'monstrosity' currently being proposed by Helius for Southampton docks.

There is an existing power station about to be decommissioned in nearby Marchwood and I'm sure that this can be utilised to provide an alternative power supply to the City.

I'm also open to more use of wind, solar, tidal and thermal energy sources but - with the exception of a few enlightened souls in Southampton City Council and the University - there doesn't appear to be much appetite locally for these more environmental-friend
ly alternatives.
[quote][p][bold]The Wickham Man[/bold] wrote: Southampton needs the jobs more than ever. Bring a power station back to the city.[/p][/quote]Yes but I think it would be better to argue the case for jobs from new power stations by looking at the needs of and opportunities in the wider Solent region. There is a good case for one or more sustainable (sic) biomass plant in this area; but not necessarily the 'monstrosity' currently being proposed by Helius for Southampton docks. There is an existing power station about to be decommissioned in nearby Marchwood and I'm sure that this can be utilised to provide an alternative power supply to the City. I'm also open to more use of wind, solar, tidal and thermal energy sources but - with the exception of a few enlightened souls in Southampton City Council and the University - there doesn't appear to be much appetite locally for these more environmental-friend ly alternatives. FoysCornerBoy
  • Score: 0

9:01am Wed 14 Nov 12

freemantlegirl2 says...

The Wickham Man wrote:
Southampton needs the jobs more than ever. Bring a power station back to the city.
You don't even live in Southampton!!

this plant won't even provide many jobs that has aleady been pointed out dozens of times.....

When are people going to understand that biomass on this scale and burning green wood takes 25 years (per tree) to recoup the carbon footprint made! it isn't green!

Oxford have an amazing wind/solar scheme with shares bought by the community. they have sold out in a flash and it provides to a couple of thousand homes. Instead of throwing money at these schemes the government should be encouraging individual homes to produce their own/use less power - much more so than they are already. The money that has been wasted on these 'dangerous' plants (and there's been another TWO fires in the past month, is shameful...

Burning wood pellets has had very bad press and the public are being made aware of the 'false' green credentials being claimed for these plants. It's just not the case....

Helius realise this, we don't want them and they know it....
[quote][p][bold]The Wickham Man[/bold] wrote: Southampton needs the jobs more than ever. Bring a power station back to the city.[/p][/quote]You don't even live in Southampton!! this plant won't even provide many jobs that has aleady been pointed out dozens of times..... When are people going to understand that biomass on this scale and burning green wood takes 25 years (per tree) to recoup the carbon footprint made! it isn't green! Oxford have an amazing wind/solar scheme with shares bought by the community. they have sold out in a flash and it provides to a couple of thousand homes. Instead of throwing money at these schemes the government should be encouraging individual homes to produce their own/use less power - much more so than they are already. The money that has been wasted on these 'dangerous' plants (and there's been another TWO fires in the past month, is shameful... Burning wood pellets has had very bad press and the public are being made aware of the 'false' green credentials being claimed for these plants. It's just not the case.... Helius realise this, we don't want them and they know it.... freemantlegirl2
  • Score: 0

7:33pm Wed 14 Nov 12

Dan Soton says...

New Twist As Biomass Scheme Delayed.

-

The real twist is this government is winding down subsidies for large inefficient Wood Biomass plants like Helius's and favouring Wood/Coal Co-Firing, reason being burning imported trees is far worse for the climate than burning coal.

One overlooked factor, wood is a commodity, commodities are not subsidized unless you want to start a Trade War.
New Twist As Biomass Scheme Delayed. - The real twist is this government is winding down subsidies for large inefficient Wood Biomass plants like Helius's and favouring Wood/Coal Co-Firing, reason being burning imported trees is far worse for the climate than burning coal. One overlooked factor, wood is a commodity, commodities are not subsidized unless you want to start a Trade War. Dan Soton
  • Score: 0

2:07pm Tue 27 Nov 12

Dan Soton says...

Dan Soton wrote:
New Twist As Biomass Scheme Delayed.

-

The real twist is this government is winding down subsidies for large inefficient Wood Biomass plants like Helius's and favouring Wood/Coal Co-Firing, reason being burning imported trees is far worse for the climate than burning coal.

One overlooked factor, wood is a commodity, commodities are not subsidized unless you want to start a Trade War.
Saltwater Algae Biofuel.. cheerio to Helius's land grabbing, pollution generating timber/grass incinerator plans.

-



Given today's Saltwater Algae Biofuel news we can all say cheerio to Helius's land grabbing, pollution generating timber/grass incinerator plans..

hopefully all money/subsidies saved will be winging their way to the University of Southampton's (dream team’ of top scientists ) Saltwater Algae Biofuel research.

-

http://www.southampt
on.ac.uk/mediacentre
/news/2010/mar/10_32
.shtml


-


SALTWATER ALGAE VIABLE FOR BIOFUELS.

Published on November 27, 2012 at 3:53 AM.

The Algae Biomass Organization, the trade association for the U.S. algae industry today hailed the findings of a University of California at San Diego study that concludes, for the first time, that marine (saltwater) algae can be just as capable as freshwater algae in producing biofuels.

The research is documented in a peer-reviewed paper published online in the current issue of the scientific journal Algal Research.

"What this means is that you can use ocean water to grow the algae that will be used to produce biofuels. And once you can use ocean water, you are no longer limited by the constraints associated with fresh water. Ocean water is simply not a limited resource on this planet," said Stephen Mayfield, Ph.D., a professor of biology at UC San Diego, who headed the research project.

The availability of significant saltwater environments for algae production has been documented in recent years. According to a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) report, algal fuels grown in saline water from existing aquifers and recycling nutrients would be able to provide up to twice the goal for advanced biofuels set under the Energy Independence and Security Act (roughly 40 billion gallons or 20 percent of annual transportation fuel demand).

Yet until today's report, no public research had demonstrated the capability of algae to thrive in a saltwater environment.

-

http://www.azocleant
ech.com/news.aspx?ne
wsID=17635
[quote][p][bold]Dan Soton[/bold] wrote: New Twist As Biomass Scheme Delayed. - The real twist is this government is winding down subsidies for large inefficient Wood Biomass plants like Helius's and favouring Wood/Coal Co-Firing, reason being burning imported trees is far worse for the climate than burning coal. One overlooked factor, wood is a commodity, commodities are not subsidized unless you want to start a Trade War.[/p][/quote]Saltwater Algae Biofuel.. cheerio to Helius's land grabbing, pollution generating timber/grass incinerator plans. - Given today's Saltwater Algae Biofuel news we can all say cheerio to Helius's land grabbing, pollution generating timber/grass incinerator plans.. hopefully all money/subsidies saved will be winging their way to the University of Southampton's (dream team’ of top scientists ) Saltwater Algae Biofuel research. - http://www.southampt on.ac.uk/mediacentre /news/2010/mar/10_32 .shtml - SALTWATER ALGAE VIABLE FOR BIOFUELS. Published on November 27, 2012 at 3:53 AM. The Algae Biomass Organization, the trade association for the U.S. algae industry today hailed the findings of a University of California at San Diego study that concludes, for the first time, that marine (saltwater) algae can be just as capable as freshwater algae in producing biofuels. The research is documented in a peer-reviewed paper published online in the current issue of the scientific journal Algal Research. "What this means is that you can use ocean water to grow the algae that will be used to produce biofuels. And once you can use ocean water, you are no longer limited by the constraints associated with fresh water. Ocean water is simply not a limited resource on this planet," said Stephen Mayfield, Ph.D., a professor of biology at UC San Diego, who headed the research project. The availability of significant saltwater environments for algae production has been documented in recent years. According to a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) report, algal fuels grown in saline water from existing aquifers and recycling nutrients would be able to provide up to twice the goal for advanced biofuels set under the Energy Independence and Security Act (roughly 40 billion gallons or 20 percent of annual transportation fuel demand). Yet until today's report, no public research had demonstrated the capability of algae to thrive in a saltwater environment. - http://www.azocleant ech.com/news.aspx?ne wsID=17635 Dan Soton
  • Score: 0

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