How many people still watch TV in black and white?

Daily Echo: How many people still watch TV in black and white? How many people still watch TV in black and white?

“FOR those television viewers watching the snooker in black and white the pink ball is next to the green.”

Commentator Ted Lowe's famous words may be redundant for most people in Southampton but there are still some who prefer to watch their television in antiquated black and white.

Figures released this week by TV Licensing reveal after nearly 46 years of colour transmissions, 69 black and white TV Licences are still in force in Southampton.

While many children see it is a form of technology as old as the dinosaurs across the UK, more than 13,000 households still have a black and white TV in use.

Visitors to any electronics store will be dazzled by a wall of televisions each boasting the latest in visual technology.

Some are in high-definition, some have access to the internet, a few are in 3-D, all of them are flat screens, some people even watch TV on their phones.

Despite the historic switch to digital television last year, and an increase in the sale of the latest technology, some homes in the UK just cannot bear to part with their trusty black and white television sets.

Victoria Sykes, spokesperson for TV Licensing in London and the South East, said: “It's remarkable that with the digital switchover complete, 41 per cent of UK households owning HDTVs and Britons leading the world in accessing TV content over the internet more than 13,000 households still watch their favourite programmes on a black and white telly.”

The city is in the top ten for towns in the South East where people have black and white television licenses.

The number of black and white licences issued each year has steadily been declining with the price frozen at £49 - just a little more than a third of a full TV licence at £145.50.

Television and radio technology historian John Trenouth said economics might be behind the figures.

“The continued use of black and white TV sets, despite the obstacles, is more likely to be driven by economics than by nostalgia.

“For low-income households the black and white licence fee is an attractive alternative to the full colour fee.

“There will always be a small number of users who prefer monochrome images, don't want to throw away a working piece of technology or collect old TV sets.

“Maybe these will still be around in 10 years from now when the number of black and white licences will have fallen to a few hundred - about the same number of black and white sets that were in use on the opening night of BBC television 70 years ago,” he said.

  • DO YOU still like watching Strictly Come Dancing or the snooker on black and white television? Then give Ed Stilliard a call on 023 8042 4445, or if you are connected to the internet email ed.stilliard@dailyecho.co.uk

Comments (16)

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9:05am Thu 10 Jan 13

wossit says...

Thats a good scam , they will leave you alone as they can see u have a licence and the detector van would not be able to detect wether you have a colour or Black and white television. I bet most these house with a B & W licence have satellite dish as well !!!
Thats a good scam , they will leave you alone as they can see u have a licence and the detector van would not be able to detect wether you have a colour or Black and white television. I bet most these house with a B & W licence have satellite dish as well !!! wossit
  • Score: 0

10:01am Thu 10 Jan 13

Outside of the Box says...

wossit wrote:
Thats a good scam , they will leave you alone as they can see u have a licence and the detector van would not be able to detect wether you have a colour or Black and white television. I bet most these house with a B & W licence have satellite dish as well !!!
Many years ago when I lived elsewhere I only had a B&W licence whilst a colour set, I had it for about 10 years, only when I purchased Sky did I have to get colour licence.

The detector van often caught out neighbours of mine.

I am not proud of my actions, just confirming what you have said about scamming the Beeb/licencing authority
[quote][p][bold]wossit[/bold] wrote: Thats a good scam , they will leave you alone as they can see u have a licence and the detector van would not be able to detect wether you have a colour or Black and white television. I bet most these house with a B & W licence have satellite dish as well !!![/p][/quote]Many years ago when I lived elsewhere I only had a B&W licence whilst a colour set, I had it for about 10 years, only when I purchased Sky did I have to get colour licence. The detector van often caught out neighbours of mine. I am not proud of my actions, just confirming what you have said about scamming the Beeb/licencing authority Outside of the Box
  • Score: 0

11:22am Thu 10 Jan 13

southy says...

Outside of the Box wrote:
wossit wrote:
Thats a good scam , they will leave you alone as they can see u have a licence and the detector van would not be able to detect wether you have a colour or Black and white television. I bet most these house with a B & W licence have satellite dish as well !!!
Many years ago when I lived elsewhere I only had a B&W licence whilst a colour set, I had it for about 10 years, only when I purchased Sky did I have to get colour licence.

The detector van often caught out neighbours of mine.

I am not proud of my actions, just confirming what you have said about scamming the Beeb/licencing authority
For a TV detecter van to be able to detect you it would need to be with in inches to be able to detect the oscillation of the arial, (if you don't believe me then go and get a field strenght meter and see how close you got to get before it will pick up the oscillation signal)
They only catch people by paper work and peeping though windows and them to enter your home.
[quote][p][bold]Outside of the Box[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]wossit[/bold] wrote: Thats a good scam , they will leave you alone as they can see u have a licence and the detector van would not be able to detect wether you have a colour or Black and white television. I bet most these house with a B & W licence have satellite dish as well !!![/p][/quote]Many years ago when I lived elsewhere I only had a B&W licence whilst a colour set, I had it for about 10 years, only when I purchased Sky did I have to get colour licence. The detector van often caught out neighbours of mine. I am not proud of my actions, just confirming what you have said about scamming the Beeb/licencing authority[/p][/quote]For a TV detecter van to be able to detect you it would need to be with in inches to be able to detect the oscillation of the arial, (if you don't believe me then go and get a field strenght meter and see how close you got to get before it will pick up the oscillation signal) They only catch people by paper work and peeping though windows and them to enter your home. southy
  • Score: 0

12:13pm Thu 10 Jan 13

miltonarcher says...

TV detector vans are a scam. The only way they can tell if you dont have a licence is through data bases and guess work.
TV detector vans are a scam. The only way they can tell if you dont have a licence is through data bases and guess work. miltonarcher
  • Score: 0

12:14pm Thu 10 Jan 13

X Old Bill says...

Nearly right Southy, just need to pop back to the library and read it again.

The technology DOES exist to detect a receiver (any Television receiver). It is just not as efficient as they would like one to believe.

It has nothing whatsoever to do with the aerial.

The frequency detected is not one detectable on a normal RF Field Strength meter, so you are right it would not detect that part.

Yes, records are used nowadays for the main fieldwork, but detection of emissions can be used as evidence if necessary.
Nearly right Southy, just need to pop back to the library and read it again. The technology DOES exist to detect a receiver (any Television receiver). It is just not as efficient as they would like one to believe. It has nothing whatsoever to do with the aerial. The frequency detected is not one detectable on a normal RF Field Strength meter, so you are right it would not detect that part. Yes, records are used nowadays for the main fieldwork, but detection of emissions can be used as evidence if necessary. X Old Bill
  • Score: 0

12:43pm Thu 10 Jan 13

Outside of the Box says...

southy wrote:
Outside of the Box wrote:
wossit wrote:
Thats a good scam , they will leave you alone as they can see u have a licence and the detector van would not be able to detect wether you have a colour or Black and white television. I bet most these house with a B & W licence have satellite dish as well !!!
Many years ago when I lived elsewhere I only had a B&W licence whilst a colour set, I had it for about 10 years, only when I purchased Sky did I have to get colour licence.

The detector van often caught out neighbours of mine.

I am not proud of my actions, just confirming what you have said about scamming the Beeb/licencing authority
For a TV detecter van to be able to detect you it would need to be with in inches to be able to detect the oscillation of the arial, (if you don't believe me then go and get a field strenght meter and see how close you got to get before it will pick up the oscillation signal)
They only catch people by paper work and peeping though windows and them to enter your home.
Explains why they never caught me then,,,, cheers Southy me old son, if I decide to get rid of my 50'' colour TV and Sky dish I will return to buying a B&W licence so as not to get caught whilst using my 50'' colour TV.

Can you use a B&W TV with a set top box?

I know you can't use then for receiving Skytv
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Outside of the Box[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]wossit[/bold] wrote: Thats a good scam , they will leave you alone as they can see u have a licence and the detector van would not be able to detect wether you have a colour or Black and white television. I bet most these house with a B & W licence have satellite dish as well !!![/p][/quote]Many years ago when I lived elsewhere I only had a B&W licence whilst a colour set, I had it for about 10 years, only when I purchased Sky did I have to get colour licence. The detector van often caught out neighbours of mine. I am not proud of my actions, just confirming what you have said about scamming the Beeb/licencing authority[/p][/quote]For a TV detecter van to be able to detect you it would need to be with in inches to be able to detect the oscillation of the arial, (if you don't believe me then go and get a field strenght meter and see how close you got to get before it will pick up the oscillation signal) They only catch people by paper work and peeping though windows and them to enter your home.[/p][/quote]Explains why they never caught me then,,,, cheers Southy me old son, if I decide to get rid of my 50'' colour TV and Sky dish I will return to buying a B&W licence so as not to get caught whilst using my 50'' colour TV. Can you use a B&W TV with a set top box? I know you can't use then for receiving Skytv Outside of the Box
  • Score: 0

12:50pm Thu 10 Jan 13

rickey says...

It would more interesting to discover how these people are watching their black and white TV's. They cannot use the internal tuner and the majority would have no scart or video input built in to the set therefore it would difficult to connect a free view box. They may be using a modulator / video recorder to get video in via the aerial socket but its a bit of a palaver. I agree about the detection, the detector van is more of a scare tactic with the bulk of the work done by targeting houses which are not on their database. However I never understand how they find out you have a TV as they are legally entitled to enter your home unless you invite them. You can also watch TV via your computer which is not detectable by their van and if you watch non live TV such as iPlayer you do not need a licence.
It would more interesting to discover how these people are watching their black and white TV's. They cannot use the internal tuner and the majority would have no scart or video input built in to the set therefore it would difficult to connect a free view box. They may be using a modulator / video recorder to get video in via the aerial socket but its a bit of a palaver. I agree about the detection, the detector van is more of a scare tactic with the bulk of the work done by targeting houses which are not on their database. However I never understand how they find out you have a TV as they are legally entitled to enter your home unless you invite them. You can also watch TV via your computer which is not detectable by their van and if you watch non live TV such as iPlayer you do not need a licence. rickey
  • Score: 0

12:54pm Thu 10 Jan 13

rickey says...

That's 'not' legally entitled to enter your house unless they get a warrant.
That's 'not' legally entitled to enter your house unless they get a warrant. rickey
  • Score: 0

1:56pm Thu 10 Jan 13

bazzeroz says...

TV detector vans were a myth! They were empty except for a chap sitting on a stool turning the aerial around on the roof with a handle to give the impression they were 'picking up' your signal. Its all done by data base. I remember the old tv ad with 2 blokes stood outside a house with a 'hand held device' and one bloke saying, 'They're watching Columbo and they're in their living room'. Biggest rip off in this country paying for one channel when the others are free.
TV detector vans were a myth! They were empty except for a chap sitting on a stool turning the aerial around on the roof with a handle to give the impression they were 'picking up' your signal. Its all done by data base. I remember the old tv ad with 2 blokes stood outside a house with a 'hand held device' and one bloke saying, 'They're watching Columbo and they're in their living room'. Biggest rip off in this country paying for one channel when the others are free. bazzeroz
  • Score: 0

2:17pm Thu 10 Jan 13

southy says...

X Old Bill wrote:
Nearly right Southy, just need to pop back to the library and read it again.

The technology DOES exist to detect a receiver (any Television receiver). It is just not as efficient as they would like one to believe.

It has nothing whatsoever to do with the aerial.

The frequency detected is not one detectable on a normal RF Field Strength meter, so you are right it would not detect that part.

Yes, records are used nowadays for the main fieldwork, but detection of emissions can be used as evidence if necessary.
For an arial to recieve a signal it must produce a wave form of engery, the technology that is around today still means to pick up this signal you need to be a few inches away from a recieving signal arial, if the energy is to strong then it will cut out the recieving signal and becomes a transmission arial which can be track.
Tv Detector vans was a to put fear into people in buying tv licences and not to track them, its is done by paper work and house calls, a normal RF field meter will pick it up so long it is set to the right wave frequency.
no court case as todate as used emissions as edvidence in courts for recieving a tv signal, broadcasting yes recieving no.
[quote][p][bold]X Old Bill[/bold] wrote: Nearly right Southy, just need to pop back to the library and read it again. The technology DOES exist to detect a receiver (any Television receiver). It is just not as efficient as they would like one to believe. It has nothing whatsoever to do with the aerial. The frequency detected is not one detectable on a normal RF Field Strength meter, so you are right it would not detect that part. Yes, records are used nowadays for the main fieldwork, but detection of emissions can be used as evidence if necessary.[/p][/quote]For an arial to recieve a signal it must produce a wave form of engery, the technology that is around today still means to pick up this signal you need to be a few inches away from a recieving signal arial, if the energy is to strong then it will cut out the recieving signal and becomes a transmission arial which can be track. Tv Detector vans was a to put fear into people in buying tv licences and not to track them, its is done by paper work and house calls, a normal RF field meter will pick it up so long it is set to the right wave frequency. no court case as todate as used emissions as edvidence in courts for recieving a tv signal, broadcasting yes recieving no. southy
  • Score: 0

2:22pm Thu 10 Jan 13

southy says...

rickey wrote:
That's 'not' legally entitled to enter your house unless they get a warrant.
Ricky they use a block warrant but they must be companied by a police officer.
The warrent is made out to all address that they will cover in 7 days that do not have a tv licence.
when they enter your home, they are not allowed to plug in any thing change channels, all they are allowed to do is switch the tv on if it is switch off.
[quote][p][bold]rickey[/bold] wrote: That's 'not' legally entitled to enter your house unless they get a warrant.[/p][/quote]Ricky they use a block warrant but they must be companied by a police officer. The warrent is made out to all address that they will cover in 7 days that do not have a tv licence. when they enter your home, they are not allowed to plug in any thing change channels, all they are allowed to do is switch the tv on if it is switch off. southy
  • Score: 0

3:17pm Thu 10 Jan 13

X Old Bill says...

southy wrote:
X Old Bill wrote:
Nearly right Southy, just need to pop back to the library and read it again.

The technology DOES exist to detect a receiver (any Television receiver). It is just not as efficient as they would like one to believe.

It has nothing whatsoever to do with the aerial.

The frequency detected is not one detectable on a normal RF Field Strength meter, so you are right it would not detect that part.

Yes, records are used nowadays for the main fieldwork, but detection of emissions can be used as evidence if necessary.
For an arial to recieve a signal it must produce a wave form of engery, the technology that is around today still means to pick up this signal you need to be a few inches away from a recieving signal arial, if the energy is to strong then it will cut out the recieving signal and becomes a transmission arial which can be track.
Tv Detector vans was a to put fear into people in buying tv licences and not to track them, its is done by paper work and house calls, a normal RF field meter will pick it up so long it is set to the right wave frequency.
no court case as todate as used emissions as edvidence in courts for recieving a tv signal, broadcasting yes recieving no.
You still need to go back and read it again and this time try not to pick out just the bits which you think look interesting.

When I say evidence, let me clarify: Supporting evidence to present to a Magistrate in order to get a Warrant to enter the premises. Not Primary evidence and not used for a Prosecution.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]X Old Bill[/bold] wrote: Nearly right Southy, just need to pop back to the library and read it again. The technology DOES exist to detect a receiver (any Television receiver). It is just not as efficient as they would like one to believe. It has nothing whatsoever to do with the aerial. The frequency detected is not one detectable on a normal RF Field Strength meter, so you are right it would not detect that part. Yes, records are used nowadays for the main fieldwork, but detection of emissions can be used as evidence if necessary.[/p][/quote]For an arial to recieve a signal it must produce a wave form of engery, the technology that is around today still means to pick up this signal you need to be a few inches away from a recieving signal arial, if the energy is to strong then it will cut out the recieving signal and becomes a transmission arial which can be track. Tv Detector vans was a to put fear into people in buying tv licences and not to track them, its is done by paper work and house calls, a normal RF field meter will pick it up so long it is set to the right wave frequency. no court case as todate as used emissions as edvidence in courts for recieving a tv signal, broadcasting yes recieving no.[/p][/quote]You still need to go back and read it again and this time try not to pick out just the bits which you think look interesting. When I say evidence, let me clarify: Supporting evidence to present to a Magistrate in order to get a Warrant to enter the premises. Not Primary evidence and not used for a Prosecution. X Old Bill
  • Score: 0

3:37pm Thu 10 Jan 13

kingnotail says...

southy wrote:
X Old Bill wrote:
Nearly right Southy, just need to pop back to the library and read it again.

The technology DOES exist to detect a receiver (any Television receiver). It is just not as efficient as they would like one to believe.

It has nothing whatsoever to do with the aerial.

The frequency detected is not one detectable on a normal RF Field Strength meter, so you are right it would not detect that part.

Yes, records are used nowadays for the main fieldwork, but detection of emissions can be used as evidence if necessary.
For an arial to recieve a signal it must produce a wave form of engery, the technology that is around today still means to pick up this signal you need to be a few inches away from a recieving signal arial, if the energy is to strong then it will cut out the recieving signal and becomes a transmission arial which can be track.
Tv Detector vans was a to put fear into people in buying tv licences and not to track them, its is done by paper work and house calls, a normal RF field meter will pick it up so long it is set to the right wave frequency.
no court case as todate as used emissions as edvidence in courts for recieving a tv signal, broadcasting yes recieving no.
Idiot
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]X Old Bill[/bold] wrote: Nearly right Southy, just need to pop back to the library and read it again. The technology DOES exist to detect a receiver (any Television receiver). It is just not as efficient as they would like one to believe. It has nothing whatsoever to do with the aerial. The frequency detected is not one detectable on a normal RF Field Strength meter, so you are right it would not detect that part. Yes, records are used nowadays for the main fieldwork, but detection of emissions can be used as evidence if necessary.[/p][/quote]For an arial to recieve a signal it must produce a wave form of engery, the technology that is around today still means to pick up this signal you need to be a few inches away from a recieving signal arial, if the energy is to strong then it will cut out the recieving signal and becomes a transmission arial which can be track. Tv Detector vans was a to put fear into people in buying tv licences and not to track them, its is done by paper work and house calls, a normal RF field meter will pick it up so long it is set to the right wave frequency. no court case as todate as used emissions as edvidence in courts for recieving a tv signal, broadcasting yes recieving no.[/p][/quote]Idiot kingnotail
  • Score: 0

5:27pm Thu 10 Jan 13

cantthinkofone says...

In the article's title, Ed Stillard asks:

"How many people still watch TV in black and white?"

I'm pleased to be in a position to answer this question. It's sixty-nine in Southampton, and more thank 13,000 in the UK.

No need to thank me Ed. Happy to help.
In the article's title, Ed Stillard asks: "How many people still watch TV in black and white?" I'm pleased to be in a position to answer this question. It's sixty-nine in Southampton, and more thank 13,000 in the UK. No need to thank me Ed. Happy to help. cantthinkofone
  • Score: 0

12:07am Fri 11 Jan 13

andysaints007 says...

cantthinkofone wrote:
In the article's title, Ed Stillard asks:

"How many people still watch TV in black and white?"

I'm pleased to be in a position to answer this question. It's sixty-nine in Southampton, and more thank 13,000 in the UK.

No need to thank me Ed. Happy to help.
plank
[quote][p][bold]cantthinkofone[/bold] wrote: In the article's title, Ed Stillard asks: "How many people still watch TV in black and white?" I'm pleased to be in a position to answer this question. It's sixty-nine in Southampton, and more thank 13,000 in the UK. No need to thank me Ed. Happy to help.[/p][/quote]plank andysaints007
  • Score: 0

10:14pm Fri 11 Jan 13

cantthinkofone says...

andysaints007 wrote:
cantthinkofone wrote:
In the article's title, Ed Stillard asks:

"How many people still watch TV in black and white?"

I'm pleased to be in a position to answer this question. It's sixty-nine in Southampton, and more thank 13,000 in the UK.

No need to thank me Ed. Happy to help.
plank
Well come on, I'm probably still funnier than Frankie Boyle.
[quote][p][bold]andysaints007[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cantthinkofone[/bold] wrote: In the article's title, Ed Stillard asks: "How many people still watch TV in black and white?" I'm pleased to be in a position to answer this question. It's sixty-nine in Southampton, and more thank 13,000 in the UK. No need to thank me Ed. Happy to help.[/p][/quote]plank[/p][/quote]Well come on, I'm probably still funnier than Frankie Boyle. cantthinkofone
  • Score: 0

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