Girl, 13, put in isolation at Ringwood School after dying her hair pink

Daily Echo: Mum removes daughter, 13, from school, after she is punished for pink hair Mum removes daughter, 13, from school, after she is punished for pink hair

A HAMPSHIRE mum has removed her daughter from school after it punished her over the colour of her hair.

Leah Halford has temporarily taken daughter Billie out of Ringwood School after discovering the 13-year-old was put in “isolation” because she dyed the ends of her hair pink.

The Year 8 pupil was pulled out of class by her head of year as a result of her new dip dye hair style.

The school has defended its disciplinary action saying it is only following its “clear” rules on the appearance of pupils which parents agree to when they send their child there.

Mum Leah, from Poulner, told the Daily Echo that it would be a few weeks until the dye washed out.

She said: “It’s not affecting her learning, having pink hair, but they’ve told me her absence will now be put down as unauthorised.

“I think it’s bullying; they are saying their pupils can’t have individuality.”

Isolation involves the pupil being put in a room alone, restricting them from mixing with any other pupils.

Leah added: “For me, isolation would be a punishment for naughty children, not for something as minimal as this.

“She is a model pupil aside from this – there have been no problems with behaviour or learning.

“Other girls go in with a full face of make-up or their skirts hitched up to their thighs.

“I’m going to get a private tutor so she can keep up with her lessons.”

Head teacher Chris Edwards said: “At Ringwood School we have very clear rules with regard to appearance and uniform which parents agree to when they send their child to the school.

“Our rules state that hair should be traditionally styled – extremes of fashion such as shaved hair, beads, braids, unnatural tints, dyes and highlights are not acceptable.

“If a student arrives at school with inappropriate uniform or appearance arrangements are made to continue with learning in isolation while contact is made with parents to arrange to resolve the problem.”

Comments (75)

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7:26am Tue 15 Jan 13

elvisimo says...

School not a fashion show and the girl is 13 years old. Suggest the mum needs to grow up.

Also is that Gok Wan in the photo?
School not a fashion show and the girl is 13 years old. Suggest the mum needs to grow up. Also is that Gok Wan in the photo? elvisimo
  • Score: -1

7:43am Tue 15 Jan 13

SPIKEISLANDTRADER says...

elvisimo wrote:
School not a fashion show and the girl is 13 years old. Suggest the mum needs to grow up.

Also is that Gok Wan in the photo?
Burkka s have to be accepted , we bend over backwards to accommodate every faith / country s tradition , so WHY the hell is PINK hair a problem . GET REAL authorities , or BAN everything no matter what religion / faith or personal taste . You can t have 1 rule for foreigners and then punish our own
[quote][p][bold]elvisimo[/bold] wrote: School not a fashion show and the girl is 13 years old. Suggest the mum needs to grow up. Also is that Gok Wan in the photo?[/p][/quote]Burkka s have to be accepted , we bend over backwards to accommodate every faith / country s tradition , so WHY the hell is PINK hair a problem . GET REAL authorities , or BAN everything no matter what religion / faith or personal taste . You can t have 1 rule for foreigners and then punish our own SPIKEISLANDTRADER
  • Score: 3

7:53am Tue 15 Jan 13

Just another reader says...

What next, if one of the kids turned up with a green Mohawk I wouldn't be impressed. She's 13, and the school rules clearly state no hair colouring so why does she think she can get away with it? Burkas are religious dress, and as much as it irks me to say it we should respect that. But pink hair? It's not a tradition.
What next, if one of the kids turned up with a green Mohawk I wouldn't be impressed. She's 13, and the school rules clearly state no hair colouring so why does she think she can get away with it? Burkas are religious dress, and as much as it irks me to say it we should respect that. But pink hair? It's not a tradition. Just another reader
  • Score: -1

8:14am Tue 15 Jan 13

SPIKEISLANDTRADER says...

Just another reader wrote:
What next, if one of the kids turned up with a green Mohawk I wouldn't be impressed. She's 13, and the school rules clearly state no hair colouring so why does she think she can get away with it? Burkas are religious dress, and as much as it irks me to say it we should respect that. But pink hair? It's not a tradition.
UNLESS you are a FOREIGNER and then authorities ALLOW anything , bone through your nose or tribal tattoo s . Its not TRADITION in England so the school need to get THEIR house in order
[quote][p][bold]Just another reader[/bold] wrote: What next, if one of the kids turned up with a green Mohawk I wouldn't be impressed. She's 13, and the school rules clearly state no hair colouring so why does she think she can get away with it? Burkas are religious dress, and as much as it irks me to say it we should respect that. But pink hair? It's not a tradition.[/p][/quote]UNLESS you are a FOREIGNER and then authorities ALLOW anything , bone through your nose or tribal tattoo s . Its not TRADITION in England so the school need to get THEIR house in order SPIKEISLANDTRADER
  • Score: 0

8:17am Tue 15 Jan 13

Stroppy_gramps says...

In my day a sound thrashing would have solved the problem.

clearly teacher should be allwed to beat the snot out of children who do not conform.

THINGS LIKE THIS ARE THE REASON WE LOST THE EMPIRE.
In my day a sound thrashing would have solved the problem. clearly teacher should be allwed to beat the snot out of children who do not conform. THINGS LIKE THIS ARE THE REASON WE LOST THE EMPIRE. Stroppy_gramps
  • Score: -1

8:27am Tue 15 Jan 13

elvisimo says...

SPIKEISLANDTRADER wrote:
elvisimo wrote: School not a fashion show and the girl is 13 years old. Suggest the mum needs to grow up. Also is that Gok Wan in the photo?
Burkka s have to be accepted , we bend over backwards to accommodate every faith / country s tradition , so WHY the hell is PINK hair a problem . GET REAL authorities , or BAN everything no matter what religion / faith or personal taste . You can t have 1 rule for foreigners and then punish our own
what religion or faith is pink hair part of?

Problem with your caps lock.
[quote][p][bold]SPIKEISLANDTRADER[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]elvisimo[/bold] wrote: School not a fashion show and the girl is 13 years old. Suggest the mum needs to grow up. Also is that Gok Wan in the photo?[/p][/quote]Burkka s have to be accepted , we bend over backwards to accommodate every faith / country s tradition , so WHY the hell is PINK hair a problem . GET REAL authorities , or BAN everything no matter what religion / faith or personal taste . You can t have 1 rule for foreigners and then punish our own[/p][/quote]what religion or faith is pink hair part of? Problem with your caps lock. elvisimo
  • Score: -1

8:27am Tue 15 Jan 13

SPIKEISLANDTRADER says...

Stroppy_gramps wrote:
In my day a sound thrashing would have solved the problem.

clearly teacher should be allwed to beat the snot out of children who do not conform.

THINGS LIKE THIS ARE THE REASON WE LOST THE EMPIRE.
Yeah and I bet they sent you up chimneys . We LOST when we let everyone and his dog TELL us what to do in our own COUNTRY , but dont offend the immigrant . Time for your Ovaltine , night night
[quote][p][bold]Stroppy_gramps[/bold] wrote: In my day a sound thrashing would have solved the problem. clearly teacher should be allwed to beat the snot out of children who do not conform. THINGS LIKE THIS ARE THE REASON WE LOST THE EMPIRE.[/p][/quote]Yeah and I bet they sent you up chimneys . We LOST when we let everyone and his dog TELL us what to do in our own COUNTRY , but dont offend the immigrant . Time for your Ovaltine , night night SPIKEISLANDTRADER
  • Score: 0

8:31am Tue 15 Jan 13

elvisimo says...

SPIKEISLANDTRADER wrote:
Stroppy_gramps wrote: In my day a sound thrashing would have solved the problem. clearly teacher should be allwed to beat the snot out of children who do not conform. THINGS LIKE THIS ARE THE REASON WE LOST THE EMPIRE.
Yeah and I bet they sent you up chimneys . We LOST when we let everyone and his dog TELL us what to do in our own COUNTRY , but dont offend the immigrant . Time for your Ovaltine , night night
oh dear - we have one of Nick Griffins brightest and finest on here. I dont the the story is anything to do with imigration no matter how far you try and steer the comments.

Please stop with the BNP drivel.
[quote][p][bold]SPIKEISLANDTRADER[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Stroppy_gramps[/bold] wrote: In my day a sound thrashing would have solved the problem. clearly teacher should be allwed to beat the snot out of children who do not conform. THINGS LIKE THIS ARE THE REASON WE LOST THE EMPIRE.[/p][/quote]Yeah and I bet they sent you up chimneys . We LOST when we let everyone and his dog TELL us what to do in our own COUNTRY , but dont offend the immigrant . Time for your Ovaltine , night night[/p][/quote]oh dear - we have one of Nick Griffins brightest and finest on here. I dont the the story is anything to do with imigration no matter how far you try and steer the comments. Please stop with the BNP drivel. elvisimo
  • Score: 0

8:34am Tue 15 Jan 13

freemantlegirl2 says...

SPIKEISLANDTRADER wrote:
Stroppy_gramps wrote:
In my day a sound thrashing would have solved the problem.

clearly teacher should be allwed to beat the snot out of children who do not conform.

THINGS LIKE THIS ARE THE REASON WE LOST THE EMPIRE.
Yeah and I bet they sent you up chimneys . We LOST when we let everyone and his dog TELL us what to do in our own COUNTRY , but dont offend the immigrant . Time for your Ovaltine , night night
think he's winding you up matey :P sadly I don't think the burkha comment is a joke, but they DON'T allow burkhas in schools only head scarves.... if you knew anything about young girls they dont wear burkhas until a certain age and even then they would probably be at an Islamic school and a head scarf is hardly 'offensive' to others is it ! only the poster it seems....


I had a conversation with my 14 year old daughter yesterday about this, not related to this article. I said that if school started allowing this then it would get out of hand. This girl is a bit dim as if she'd tied her hair up in a bun she could have hidden the ends!

I agree though, if the school has a rule then sorry but why should she be the exception.

My daughter dip dyed her hair like this in the summer holidays, it washed out before she started school. and I would never let my child bleach her hair like that as it will ruin her hair overtreating it. It also looks a bit tacky on a young girl sorry!

It's easy to solve, just either rebleach it or hide it....
[quote][p][bold]SPIKEISLANDTRADER[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Stroppy_gramps[/bold] wrote: In my day a sound thrashing would have solved the problem. clearly teacher should be allwed to beat the snot out of children who do not conform. THINGS LIKE THIS ARE THE REASON WE LOST THE EMPIRE.[/p][/quote]Yeah and I bet they sent you up chimneys . We LOST when we let everyone and his dog TELL us what to do in our own COUNTRY , but dont offend the immigrant . Time for your Ovaltine , night night[/p][/quote]think he's winding you up matey :P sadly I don't think the burkha comment is a joke, but they DON'T allow burkhas in schools only head scarves.... if you knew anything about young girls they dont wear burkhas until a certain age and even then they would probably be at an Islamic school and a head scarf is hardly 'offensive' to others is it ! only the poster it seems.... I had a conversation with my 14 year old daughter yesterday about this, not related to this article. I said that if school started allowing this then it would get out of hand. This girl is a bit dim as if she'd tied her hair up in a bun she could have hidden the ends! I agree though, if the school has a rule then sorry but why should she be the exception. My daughter dip dyed her hair like this in the summer holidays, it washed out before she started school. and I would never let my child bleach her hair like that as it will ruin her hair overtreating it. It also looks a bit tacky on a young girl sorry! It's easy to solve, just either rebleach it or hide it.... freemantlegirl2
  • Score: 0

8:36am Tue 15 Jan 13

Subject48 says...

"UNLESS you are a FOREIGNER and then authorities ALLOW anything , bone through your nose or tribal tattoo s . Its not TRADITION in England so the school need to get THEIR house in order”


Bone through their nose and tattoos!? I think you watched too much Zulu mate...

If this girls was from a family where tradition/religion dictates gaving pink hair no problem.

Believe it or not, burkka wearing is not a childs choice but the parents who follow their tradition/religion and saying no to that is not going to happen.

This girl's mum has clearly read too many heat magazines... Just feel sorry for the kid who is being warped from a young age. Shame.
"UNLESS you are a FOREIGNER and then authorities ALLOW anything , bone through your nose or tribal tattoo s . Its not TRADITION in England so the school need to get THEIR house in order” Bone through their nose and tattoos!? I think you watched too much Zulu mate... If this girls was from a family where tradition/religion dictates gaving pink hair no problem. Believe it or not, burkka wearing is not a childs choice but the parents who follow their tradition/religion and saying no to that is not going to happen. This girl's mum has clearly read too many heat magazines... Just feel sorry for the kid who is being warped from a young age. Shame. Subject48
  • Score: -1

8:40am Tue 15 Jan 13

ameliaS says...

freemantlegirl2 wrote:
SPIKEISLANDTRADER wrote:
Stroppy_gramps wrote: In my day a sound thrashing would have solved the problem. clearly teacher should be allwed to beat the snot out of children who do not conform. THINGS LIKE THIS ARE THE REASON WE LOST THE EMPIRE.
Yeah and I bet they sent you up chimneys . We LOST when we let everyone and his dog TELL us what to do in our own COUNTRY , but dont offend the immigrant . Time for your Ovaltine , night night
think he's winding you up matey :P sadly I don't think the burkha comment is a joke, but they DON'T allow burkhas in schools only head scarves.... if you knew anything about young girls they dont wear burkhas until a certain age and even then they would probably be at an Islamic school and a head scarf is hardly 'offensive' to others is it ! only the poster it seems.... I had a conversation with my 14 year old daughter yesterday about this, not related to this article. I said that if school started allowing this then it would get out of hand. This girl is a bit dim as if she'd tied her hair up in a bun she could have hidden the ends! I agree though, if the school has a rule then sorry but why should she be the exception. My daughter dip dyed her hair like this in the summer holidays, it washed out before she started school. and I would never let my child bleach her hair like that as it will ruin her hair overtreating it. It also looks a bit tacky on a young girl sorry! It's easy to solve, just either rebleach it or hide it....
JUST CUT IT OFF. These are the sort of people who go through life not wanting to conform and think that somehow rules don't apply to them. They will be putting other people's backs up for a lifetime.
[quote][p][bold]freemantlegirl2[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]SPIKEISLANDTRADER[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Stroppy_gramps[/bold] wrote: In my day a sound thrashing would have solved the problem. clearly teacher should be allwed to beat the snot out of children who do not conform. THINGS LIKE THIS ARE THE REASON WE LOST THE EMPIRE.[/p][/quote]Yeah and I bet they sent you up chimneys . We LOST when we let everyone and his dog TELL us what to do in our own COUNTRY , but dont offend the immigrant . Time for your Ovaltine , night night[/p][/quote]think he's winding you up matey :P sadly I don't think the burkha comment is a joke, but they DON'T allow burkhas in schools only head scarves.... if you knew anything about young girls they dont wear burkhas until a certain age and even then they would probably be at an Islamic school and a head scarf is hardly 'offensive' to others is it ! only the poster it seems.... I had a conversation with my 14 year old daughter yesterday about this, not related to this article. I said that if school started allowing this then it would get out of hand. This girl is a bit dim as if she'd tied her hair up in a bun she could have hidden the ends! I agree though, if the school has a rule then sorry but why should she be the exception. My daughter dip dyed her hair like this in the summer holidays, it washed out before she started school. and I would never let my child bleach her hair like that as it will ruin her hair overtreating it. It also looks a bit tacky on a young girl sorry! It's easy to solve, just either rebleach it or hide it....[/p][/quote]JUST CUT IT OFF. These are the sort of people who go through life not wanting to conform and think that somehow rules don't apply to them. They will be putting other people's backs up for a lifetime. ameliaS
  • Score: 0

8:46am Tue 15 Jan 13

Big Mac says...

Are they sat watching Jeremy Kyle in the photo, or on it?
Are they sat watching Jeremy Kyle in the photo, or on it? Big Mac
  • Score: 0

8:47am Tue 15 Jan 13

Forest Resident says...

Leah Halford clearly needs to refresh her memory of the schools uniform and dress policy which she would have been provided with prior to her daughter during the school, and no doubt reminded of at the beginning of each academic year. Uniform and dress policies are no different to what you would similarly find in the majority of workplaces, if she is so concerned about her daughters education she ought to be supporting the school rather than continuing with such irresponsible parenting.
Leah Halford clearly needs to refresh her memory of the schools uniform and dress policy which she would have been provided with prior to her daughter during the school, and no doubt reminded of at the beginning of each academic year. Uniform and dress policies are no different to what you would similarly find in the majority of workplaces, if she is so concerned about her daughters education she ought to be supporting the school rather than continuing with such irresponsible parenting. Forest Resident
  • Score: -1

8:48am Tue 15 Jan 13

Forest Resident says...

"*joining the school"
"*joining the school" Forest Resident
  • Score: 0

8:48am Tue 15 Jan 13

Taskforce 141 says...

Is it offensive? No

Is it an individuals choice? Yes

Is anybody being harmed? No

Does it hinder learning? No

Is this pathetic on behalf of the school? Yes

If pink hair is not allowed, then the following should not be allowed:

Head scarfs
Crucifixes
Highlights
any jewlery
any make up
no named brands clothes or shoes
top knots
turbans

These all make a person an individual through appearance regardless of the faith, so the students are either all sheep and look the same or they allow character to flourish...
Is it offensive? No Is it an individuals choice? Yes Is anybody being harmed? No Does it hinder learning? No Is this pathetic on behalf of the school? Yes If pink hair is not allowed, then the following should not be allowed: Head scarfs Crucifixes Highlights any jewlery any make up no named brands clothes or shoes top knots turbans These all make a person an individual through appearance regardless of the faith, so the students are either all sheep and look the same or they allow character to flourish... Taskforce 141
  • Score: 1

8:51am Tue 15 Jan 13

oldboy67 says...

trouble for the future, cause stupid mother.
trouble for the future, cause stupid mother. oldboy67
  • Score: -1

8:52am Tue 15 Jan 13

cliffwalker says...

I can't understand why this mother wants to make life difficult for her daughter. Is it some kind of perverted revenge for something she suffered herself as a child?
I can't understand why this mother wants to make life difficult for her daughter. Is it some kind of perverted revenge for something she suffered herself as a child? cliffwalker
  • Score: -1

8:59am Tue 15 Jan 13

Brusher Mills says...

Typical Daily Echo we've been hard done by photo.
Typical Daily Echo we've been hard done by photo. Brusher Mills
  • Score: 0

9:05am Tue 15 Jan 13

elvisimo says...

Taskforce 141 wrote:
Is it offensive? No Is it an individuals choice? Yes Is anybody being harmed? No Does it hinder learning? No Is this pathetic on behalf of the school? Yes If pink hair is not allowed, then the following should not be allowed: Head scarfs Crucifixes Highlights any jewlery any make up no named brands clothes or shoes top knots turbans These all make a person an individual through appearance regardless of the faith, so the students are either all sheep and look the same or they allow character to flourish...
it is to put pupils on a level playing field. Uniforms and dress codes stop the disparity between rich and poor and the associated bullying that goes on regarding what someone wears or looks like. Most of us can probably remember from our own school days.
You are there to learn not to be a discussion point. Running off to the Daily Echo is probably not the best idea either.

Turbans and head scarfs etc are to do with religious beliefs. Pink hair is not.

If the statitsics on failing literacy standards are to be believed anything that keeps the focus on learning should be aplauded. We may then benefit from fewer people leaving school who are basically unemployable.
[quote][p][bold]Taskforce 141[/bold] wrote: Is it offensive? No Is it an individuals choice? Yes Is anybody being harmed? No Does it hinder learning? No Is this pathetic on behalf of the school? Yes If pink hair is not allowed, then the following should not be allowed: Head scarfs Crucifixes Highlights any jewlery any make up no named brands clothes or shoes top knots turbans These all make a person an individual through appearance regardless of the faith, so the students are either all sheep and look the same or they allow character to flourish...[/p][/quote]it is to put pupils on a level playing field. Uniforms and dress codes stop the disparity between rich and poor and the associated bullying that goes on regarding what someone wears or looks like. Most of us can probably remember from our own school days. You are there to learn not to be a discussion point. Running off to the Daily Echo is probably not the best idea either. Turbans and head scarfs etc are to do with religious beliefs. Pink hair is not. If the statitsics on failing literacy standards are to be believed anything that keeps the focus on learning should be aplauded. We may then benefit from fewer people leaving school who are basically unemployable. elvisimo
  • Score: -1

9:21am Tue 15 Jan 13

Might SS says...

What a shame that parents don't back schools and teachers up. It is no wonder that there is so little respect around from kids towards adults who have some authority.
School rules are known when someone starts school so why blatantly ignore them.
Suggest that you cut the pink bits off, tell her to obey rules, send her back to school.
What a shame that parents don't back schools and teachers up. It is no wonder that there is so little respect around from kids towards adults who have some authority. School rules are known when someone starts school so why blatantly ignore them. Suggest that you cut the pink bits off, tell her to obey rules, send her back to school. Might SS
  • Score: -1

9:22am Tue 15 Jan 13

eurogordi says...

A few comments as follows ...

1. A burkha is NOT religious dress or required by Islam. The need for females to dress modestly is a requirement of the Koran (and also the Torah and Bible), but some Muslims have taken this to the extreme. A school would be right to refuse a burkha as it would not be part of accepted school uniform.

2. Not cutting one's hair is part of being a Sikh, with the turban introduced to keep a man's hair tied up. Although the turban has evolved into a religious symbol, it is highly debatable as to whether that was the original intention.

3. Problems with school uniform are nothing new. Back in the 1970s a friend of mind was temporarily excluded for wearing white socks. So we all started wearing white socks and the Head could not exclude us all. He realised that learning was more important than the colour of socks, my friend was allowed back to school and white socks became acceptable to the school.

4. About eight years ago my daughter was sent home from school for wearing make-up. Apart from the fact that my daughter has never work excessive make-up, she was sent home by a female teacher whose appearance was more suited to a city nightclub that a school classroom. This highlights the problem that uniform policies are only for pupils, while teachers have freedom of expression in what they wear and how they look. Although I have no experience of staff in Ringwood School, I think all schools need to look at their staff policies before penalising the pupils.
A few comments as follows ... 1. A burkha is NOT religious dress or required by Islam. The need for females to dress modestly is a requirement of the Koran (and also the Torah and Bible), but some Muslims have taken this to the extreme. A school would be right to refuse a burkha as it would not be part of accepted school uniform. 2. Not cutting one's hair is part of being a Sikh, with the turban introduced to keep a man's hair tied up. Although the turban has evolved into a religious symbol, it is highly debatable as to whether that was the original intention. 3. Problems with school uniform are nothing new. Back in the 1970s a friend of mind was temporarily excluded for wearing white socks. So we all started wearing white socks and the Head could not exclude us all. He realised that learning was more important than the colour of socks, my friend was allowed back to school and white socks became acceptable to the school. 4. About eight years ago my daughter was sent home from school for wearing make-up. Apart from the fact that my daughter has never work excessive make-up, she was sent home by a female teacher whose appearance was more suited to a city nightclub that a school classroom. This highlights the problem that uniform policies are only for pupils, while teachers have freedom of expression in what they wear and how they look. Although I have no experience of staff in Ringwood School, I think all schools need to look at their staff policies before penalising the pupils. eurogordi
  • Score: 1

9:41am Tue 15 Jan 13

MPCBOS says...

eurogordi wrote:
A few comments as follows ...

1. A burkha is NOT religious dress or required by Islam. The need for females to dress modestly is a requirement of the Koran (and also the Torah and Bible), but some Muslims have taken this to the extreme. A school would be right to refuse a burkha as it would not be part of accepted school uniform.

2. Not cutting one's hair is part of being a Sikh, with the turban introduced to keep a man's hair tied up. Although the turban has evolved into a religious symbol, it is highly debatable as to whether that was the original intention.

3. Problems with school uniform are nothing new. Back in the 1970s a friend of mind was temporarily excluded for wearing white socks. So we all started wearing white socks and the Head could not exclude us all. He realised that learning was more important than the colour of socks, my friend was allowed back to school and white socks became acceptable to the school.

4. About eight years ago my daughter was sent home from school for wearing make-up. Apart from the fact that my daughter has never work excessive make-up, she was sent home by a female teacher whose appearance was more suited to a city nightclub that a school classroom. This highlights the problem that uniform policies are only for pupils, while teachers have freedom of expression in what they wear and how they look. Although I have no experience of staff in Ringwood School, I think all schools need to look at their staff policies before penalising the pupils.
Teachers do have a dress code which includes hair colours and styles, although not as restricted as that of the pupils. I just hope this parent supports her daughters individuality in a few years when she is reaping what she has sewn. If simple school rules are an issue how will she cope with any other?
[quote][p][bold]eurogordi[/bold] wrote: A few comments as follows ... 1. A burkha is NOT religious dress or required by Islam. The need for females to dress modestly is a requirement of the Koran (and also the Torah and Bible), but some Muslims have taken this to the extreme. A school would be right to refuse a burkha as it would not be part of accepted school uniform. 2. Not cutting one's hair is part of being a Sikh, with the turban introduced to keep a man's hair tied up. Although the turban has evolved into a religious symbol, it is highly debatable as to whether that was the original intention. 3. Problems with school uniform are nothing new. Back in the 1970s a friend of mind was temporarily excluded for wearing white socks. So we all started wearing white socks and the Head could not exclude us all. He realised that learning was more important than the colour of socks, my friend was allowed back to school and white socks became acceptable to the school. 4. About eight years ago my daughter was sent home from school for wearing make-up. Apart from the fact that my daughter has never work excessive make-up, she was sent home by a female teacher whose appearance was more suited to a city nightclub that a school classroom. This highlights the problem that uniform policies are only for pupils, while teachers have freedom of expression in what they wear and how they look. Although I have no experience of staff in Ringwood School, I think all schools need to look at their staff policies before penalising the pupils.[/p][/quote]Teachers do have a dress code which includes hair colours and styles, although not as restricted as that of the pupils. I just hope this parent supports her daughters individuality in a few years when she is reaping what she has sewn. If simple school rules are an issue how will she cope with any other? MPCBOS
  • Score: -1

9:41am Tue 15 Jan 13

Sovietobserver says...

The worst kind of attention seeking parent, knows the rules, allows them to be broken, then bleats to the local newspaper. She should be ashamed of sending her daughter to school looking like that, if they can't abide by the rules now, what chance has her daughter got when she gets older.
The worst kind of attention seeking parent, knows the rules, allows them to be broken, then bleats to the local newspaper. She should be ashamed of sending her daughter to school looking like that, if they can't abide by the rules now, what chance has her daughter got when she gets older. Sovietobserver
  • Score: -1

9:43am Tue 15 Jan 13

bigfella777 says...

If a school has rules in place and then they are broken, how do you then have the right to complain especially to a newspaper.
This is all going to put a stigma on her daughter when she does go back to school.
The mother is supposed to be the adult but does not seem to be acting orr thinking like one.
I personally think pink hair looks awful but that is my opinion.
If a school has rules in place and then they are broken, how do you then have the right to complain especially to a newspaper. This is all going to put a stigma on her daughter when she does go back to school. The mother is supposed to be the adult but does not seem to be acting orr thinking like one. I personally think pink hair looks awful but that is my opinion. bigfella777
  • Score: 0

9:46am Tue 15 Jan 13

The Music Man says...

what gives this girl the right to be able to break school rules? Teachers and staff have to follow a dress-code too.

The parent is an idiot.
what gives this girl the right to be able to break school rules? Teachers and staff have to follow a dress-code too. The parent is an idiot. The Music Man
  • Score: -1

9:48am Tue 15 Jan 13

Linesman says...

What does the mother do when her daughter leaves school, gets a job and then loses it because she does not obey the rules.

School is not there just for learning the three Rs, but also to learn how to be part of a community, and to obey rules.

If a parent takes a child out of school for a holiday, the parent can be fined. I think that a trip to court for this parent would be a good idea.
What does the mother do when her daughter leaves school, gets a job and then loses it because she does not obey the rules. School is not there just for learning the three Rs, but also to learn how to be part of a community, and to obey rules. If a parent takes a child out of school for a holiday, the parent can be fined. I think that a trip to court for this parent would be a good idea. Linesman
  • Score: -1

9:50am Tue 15 Jan 13

eurogordi says...

MPCBOS wrote:
eurogordi wrote:
A few comments as follows ...

1. A burkha is NOT religious dress or required by Islam. The need for females to dress modestly is a requirement of the Koran (and also the Torah and Bible), but some Muslims have taken this to the extreme. A school would be right to refuse a burkha as it would not be part of accepted school uniform.

2. Not cutting one's hair is part of being a Sikh, with the turban introduced to keep a man's hair tied up. Although the turban has evolved into a religious symbol, it is highly debatable as to whether that was the original intention.

3. Problems with school uniform are nothing new. Back in the 1970s a friend of mind was temporarily excluded for wearing white socks. So we all started wearing white socks and the Head could not exclude us all. He realised that learning was more important than the colour of socks, my friend was allowed back to school and white socks became acceptable to the school.

4. About eight years ago my daughter was sent home from school for wearing make-up. Apart from the fact that my daughter has never work excessive make-up, she was sent home by a female teacher whose appearance was more suited to a city nightclub that a school classroom. This highlights the problem that uniform policies are only for pupils, while teachers have freedom of expression in what they wear and how they look. Although I have no experience of staff in Ringwood School, I think all schools need to look at their staff policies before penalising the pupils.
Teachers do have a dress code which includes hair colours and styles, although not as restricted as that of the pupils. I just hope this parent supports her daughters individuality in a few years when she is reaping what she has sewn. If simple school rules are an issue how will she cope with any other?
Some schools may have policies on staff appearance, but I think you will find that many more do not. Part of my employment involves visiting secondary schools in south Hampshire and, apart from my daughter's own experience, I have seen inappropriately dressed teachers time and time again while pupils are disciplined for the tiniest thing.
[quote][p][bold]MPCBOS[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]eurogordi[/bold] wrote: A few comments as follows ... 1. A burkha is NOT religious dress or required by Islam. The need for females to dress modestly is a requirement of the Koran (and also the Torah and Bible), but some Muslims have taken this to the extreme. A school would be right to refuse a burkha as it would not be part of accepted school uniform. 2. Not cutting one's hair is part of being a Sikh, with the turban introduced to keep a man's hair tied up. Although the turban has evolved into a religious symbol, it is highly debatable as to whether that was the original intention. 3. Problems with school uniform are nothing new. Back in the 1970s a friend of mind was temporarily excluded for wearing white socks. So we all started wearing white socks and the Head could not exclude us all. He realised that learning was more important than the colour of socks, my friend was allowed back to school and white socks became acceptable to the school. 4. About eight years ago my daughter was sent home from school for wearing make-up. Apart from the fact that my daughter has never work excessive make-up, she was sent home by a female teacher whose appearance was more suited to a city nightclub that a school classroom. This highlights the problem that uniform policies are only for pupils, while teachers have freedom of expression in what they wear and how they look. Although I have no experience of staff in Ringwood School, I think all schools need to look at their staff policies before penalising the pupils.[/p][/quote]Teachers do have a dress code which includes hair colours and styles, although not as restricted as that of the pupils. I just hope this parent supports her daughters individuality in a few years when she is reaping what she has sewn. If simple school rules are an issue how will she cope with any other?[/p][/quote]Some schools may have policies on staff appearance, but I think you will find that many more do not. Part of my employment involves visiting secondary schools in south Hampshire and, apart from my daughter's own experience, I have seen inappropriately dressed teachers time and time again while pupils are disciplined for the tiniest thing. eurogordi
  • Score: 1

9:51am Tue 15 Jan 13

huckit P says...

The girls mother needs to grow up and think of her daughters education first and foremost. Silly woman!
Children in school wear uniform as this is intended to remove the pressures of buying branded clothes; remove the temptation to make the place a fashion parade and treat all children the same. Individuality is shown through course work, exam results, excelling at sports etc. Dying hair, having tattoos, wearing branded clothes etc. simply shows the child (and parent) is copying or mimicking fashion, and is nothing to do with individuality.
The girls mother needs to grow up and think of her daughters education first and foremost. Silly woman! Children in school wear uniform as this is intended to remove the pressures of buying branded clothes; remove the temptation to make the place a fashion parade and treat all children the same. Individuality is shown through course work, exam results, excelling at sports etc. Dying hair, having tattoos, wearing branded clothes etc. simply shows the child (and parent) is copying or mimicking fashion, and is nothing to do with individuality. huckit P
  • Score: -1

10:06am Tue 15 Jan 13

The Music Man says...

eurogordi wrote:
MPCBOS wrote:
eurogordi wrote:
A few comments as follows ...

1. A burkha is NOT religious dress or required by Islam. The need for females to dress modestly is a requirement of the Koran (and also the Torah and Bible), but some Muslims have taken this to the extreme. A school would be right to refuse a burkha as it would not be part of accepted school uniform.

2. Not cutting one's hair is part of being a Sikh, with the turban introduced to keep a man's hair tied up. Although the turban has evolved into a religious symbol, it is highly debatable as to whether that was the original intention.

3. Problems with school uniform are nothing new. Back in the 1970s a friend of mind was temporarily excluded for wearing white socks. So we all started wearing white socks and the Head could not exclude us all. He realised that learning was more important than the colour of socks, my friend was allowed back to school and white socks became acceptable to the school.

4. About eight years ago my daughter was sent home from school for wearing make-up. Apart from the fact that my daughter has never work excessive make-up, she was sent home by a female teacher whose appearance was more suited to a city nightclub that a school classroom. This highlights the problem that uniform policies are only for pupils, while teachers have freedom of expression in what they wear and how they look. Although I have no experience of staff in Ringwood School, I think all schools need to look at their staff policies before penalising the pupils.
Teachers do have a dress code which includes hair colours and styles, although not as restricted as that of the pupils. I just hope this parent supports her daughters individuality in a few years when she is reaping what she has sewn. If simple school rules are an issue how will she cope with any other?
Some schools may have policies on staff appearance, but I think you will find that many more do not. Part of my employment involves visiting secondary schools in south Hampshire and, apart from my daughter's own experience, I have seen inappropriately dressed teachers time and time again while pupils are disciplined for the tiniest thing.
name the schools
[quote][p][bold]eurogordi[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]MPCBOS[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]eurogordi[/bold] wrote: A few comments as follows ... 1. A burkha is NOT religious dress or required by Islam. The need for females to dress modestly is a requirement of the Koran (and also the Torah and Bible), but some Muslims have taken this to the extreme. A school would be right to refuse a burkha as it would not be part of accepted school uniform. 2. Not cutting one's hair is part of being a Sikh, with the turban introduced to keep a man's hair tied up. Although the turban has evolved into a religious symbol, it is highly debatable as to whether that was the original intention. 3. Problems with school uniform are nothing new. Back in the 1970s a friend of mind was temporarily excluded for wearing white socks. So we all started wearing white socks and the Head could not exclude us all. He realised that learning was more important than the colour of socks, my friend was allowed back to school and white socks became acceptable to the school. 4. About eight years ago my daughter was sent home from school for wearing make-up. Apart from the fact that my daughter has never work excessive make-up, she was sent home by a female teacher whose appearance was more suited to a city nightclub that a school classroom. This highlights the problem that uniform policies are only for pupils, while teachers have freedom of expression in what they wear and how they look. Although I have no experience of staff in Ringwood School, I think all schools need to look at their staff policies before penalising the pupils.[/p][/quote]Teachers do have a dress code which includes hair colours and styles, although not as restricted as that of the pupils. I just hope this parent supports her daughters individuality in a few years when she is reaping what she has sewn. If simple school rules are an issue how will she cope with any other?[/p][/quote]Some schools may have policies on staff appearance, but I think you will find that many more do not. Part of my employment involves visiting secondary schools in south Hampshire and, apart from my daughter's own experience, I have seen inappropriately dressed teachers time and time again while pupils are disciplined for the tiniest thing.[/p][/quote]name the schools The Music Man
  • Score: 0

10:07am Tue 15 Jan 13

Vix1 says...

When the mother agreed to send her daughter to the school, they both agreed to abide by the rules of the school as we all do when we send our children to school.What's the problem?? School says no pink hair, end of!! Seems the mother must be a bit thick?! Either that or is just trying to get some media attention. Would love to see this girl turn up at work and defy her boss when she doesn't agree with the rules; after all school is preparation for the adult world!I don't think she will get very far if she doesn't learn to toe the line. Some rules may seem petty, but if you can't abide by the simple ones, then chances are you won't abide by the serious ones either!
When the mother agreed to send her daughter to the school, they both agreed to abide by the rules of the school as we all do when we send our children to school.What's the problem?? School says no pink hair, end of!! Seems the mother must be a bit thick?! Either that or is just trying to get some media attention. Would love to see this girl turn up at work and defy her boss when she doesn't agree with the rules; after all school is preparation for the adult world!I don't think she will get very far if she doesn't learn to toe the line. Some rules may seem petty, but if you can't abide by the simple ones, then chances are you won't abide by the serious ones either! Vix1
  • Score: -1

10:10am Tue 15 Jan 13

Sovietobserver says...

One may naively state whether learning capacity is affected by hair colour is relevant or not, but obeying instructions is. When it comes to employment there certainly is. It seems beyond the wit of many parents to realise an employer operating in a service industry plans his/her prioities on the requirements of his/her clients and not on the idiosyncrasy of the applicant. With the job situation as it is pupils had best learn quickly that non-conformity is not a job seekers best asset.
One may naively state whether learning capacity is affected by hair colour is relevant or not, but obeying instructions is. When it comes to employment there certainly is. It seems beyond the wit of many parents to realise an employer operating in a service industry plans his/her prioities on the requirements of his/her clients and not on the idiosyncrasy of the applicant. With the job situation as it is pupils had best learn quickly that non-conformity is not a job seekers best asset. Sovietobserver
  • Score: 0

10:10am Tue 15 Jan 13

business-guru says...

many missing the points here... Firstly, unless the mother is illiterate she would have be able to read the school prospectus. In which case if she did not like the rules then why did she send her child to the school ? Secondly, this girl will get no where in life if she thinks she can do as pleases and can ignore rules she has to abide by. Thirdly, a private tutor will not be able to bridge the gap of the unauthorised absence, the fact the mother thinks it will show just how ignorant she is. Finally "inclusion" is NOT isolation. Anyone who supports this stupid parents attempt to sabotage her daughters education sould return the blinkers they are wearing to the racehorse they borrowed them off.
many missing the points here... Firstly, unless the mother is illiterate she would have be able to read the school prospectus. In which case if she did not like the rules then why did she send her child to the school ? Secondly, this girl will get no where in life if she thinks she can do as pleases and can ignore rules she has to abide by. Thirdly, a private tutor will not be able to bridge the gap of the unauthorised absence, the fact the mother thinks it will show just how ignorant she is. Finally "inclusion" is NOT isolation. Anyone who supports this stupid parents attempt to sabotage her daughters education sould return the blinkers they are wearing to the racehorse they borrowed them off. business-guru
  • Score: -1

10:13am Tue 15 Jan 13

sarfhamton says...

Funny to see that a white girl with Pink hair has brought out the racists from their holes.
Funny to see that a white girl with Pink hair has brought out the racists from their holes. sarfhamton
  • Score: 1

10:13am Tue 15 Jan 13

red/whitearmy says...

Quite simple , Dont dye the hair. Parents know the dress code and rules before they send their children to it , So why bother allowing your child to dye there hair knowing that this is against the rules. It sounds like doing this to get into the paper. Where i used to work the firm had dress code to abide by it or face disciplinary action.
Quite simple , Dont dye the hair. Parents know the dress code and rules before they send their children to it , So why bother allowing your child to dye there hair knowing that this is against the rules. It sounds like doing this to get into the paper. Where i used to work the firm had dress code to abide by it or face disciplinary action. red/whitearmy
  • Score: -1

10:16am Tue 15 Jan 13

jpr:-) says...

Adrian Mole was once sent home from school for wearing red socks....so why should she be any different?
Adrian Mole was once sent home from school for wearing red socks....so why should she be any different? jpr:-)
  • Score: -1

10:19am Tue 15 Jan 13

business-guru says...

sarfhamton wrote:
Funny to see that a white girl with Pink hair has brought out the racists from their holes.
love the "burka" argument, its gets wheeled out all the time by the ignorant. Making allowances for religious attire is not an "attack" on the freedom of whites as the little-hitlers see it. I like the fact this country is diverse, I like the fact a muslim girl can attend a state school and agreements are made by governors on uniform to suit. I also like the fact that a muslim girl then has to abide by those rules just like anyone else.... so there is no argument here for "special" treatment, once the rules are agreed they have to be met.
[quote][p][bold]sarfhamton[/bold] wrote: Funny to see that a white girl with Pink hair has brought out the racists from their holes.[/p][/quote]love the "burka" argument, its gets wheeled out all the time by the ignorant. Making allowances for religious attire is not an "attack" on the freedom of whites as the little-hitlers see it. I like the fact this country is diverse, I like the fact a muslim girl can attend a state school and agreements are made by governors on uniform to suit. I also like the fact that a muslim girl then has to abide by those rules just like anyone else.... so there is no argument here for "special" treatment, once the rules are agreed they have to be met. business-guru
  • Score: -1

10:20am Tue 15 Jan 13

sparkster says...

quite right i couldnt agree more red/white army
quite right i couldnt agree more red/white army sparkster
  • Score: 0

10:33am Tue 15 Jan 13

The irate commuter says...

You've got your 15 minutes of fame ... now go away & learn the value of respect !!
You've got your 15 minutes of fame ... now go away & learn the value of respect !! The irate commuter
  • Score: -1

10:34am Tue 15 Jan 13

eurogordi says...

The Music Man wrote:
eurogordi wrote:
MPCBOS wrote:
eurogordi wrote:
A few comments as follows ...

1. A burkha is NOT religious dress or required by Islam. The need for females to dress modestly is a requirement of the Koran (and also the Torah and Bible), but some Muslims have taken this to the extreme. A school would be right to refuse a burkha as it would not be part of accepted school uniform.

2. Not cutting one's hair is part of being a Sikh, with the turban introduced to keep a man's hair tied up. Although the turban has evolved into a religious symbol, it is highly debatable as to whether that was the original intention.

3. Problems with school uniform are nothing new. Back in the 1970s a friend of mind was temporarily excluded for wearing white socks. So we all started wearing white socks and the Head could not exclude us all. He realised that learning was more important than the colour of socks, my friend was allowed back to school and white socks became acceptable to the school.

4. About eight years ago my daughter was sent home from school for wearing make-up. Apart from the fact that my daughter has never work excessive make-up, she was sent home by a female teacher whose appearance was more suited to a city nightclub that a school classroom. This highlights the problem that uniform policies are only for pupils, while teachers have freedom of expression in what they wear and how they look. Although I have no experience of staff in Ringwood School, I think all schools need to look at their staff policies before penalising the pupils.
Teachers do have a dress code which includes hair colours and styles, although not as restricted as that of the pupils. I just hope this parent supports her daughters individuality in a few years when she is reaping what she has sewn. If simple school rules are an issue how will she cope with any other?
Some schools may have policies on staff appearance, but I think you will find that many more do not. Part of my employment involves visiting secondary schools in south Hampshire and, apart from my daughter's own experience, I have seen inappropriately dressed teachers time and time again while pupils are disciplined for the tiniest thing.
name the schools
You know and I know that it would not be appropriate in my professional capacity to name individual schools on such an open forum, but if I were to meet you in person I would happily do so! I'm on annual leave today, but have just walked the dog past one such school on the edge of Southampton.
[quote][p][bold]The Music Man[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]eurogordi[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]MPCBOS[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]eurogordi[/bold] wrote: A few comments as follows ... 1. A burkha is NOT religious dress or required by Islam. The need for females to dress modestly is a requirement of the Koran (and also the Torah and Bible), but some Muslims have taken this to the extreme. A school would be right to refuse a burkha as it would not be part of accepted school uniform. 2. Not cutting one's hair is part of being a Sikh, with the turban introduced to keep a man's hair tied up. Although the turban has evolved into a religious symbol, it is highly debatable as to whether that was the original intention. 3. Problems with school uniform are nothing new. Back in the 1970s a friend of mind was temporarily excluded for wearing white socks. So we all started wearing white socks and the Head could not exclude us all. He realised that learning was more important than the colour of socks, my friend was allowed back to school and white socks became acceptable to the school. 4. About eight years ago my daughter was sent home from school for wearing make-up. Apart from the fact that my daughter has never work excessive make-up, she was sent home by a female teacher whose appearance was more suited to a city nightclub that a school classroom. This highlights the problem that uniform policies are only for pupils, while teachers have freedom of expression in what they wear and how they look. Although I have no experience of staff in Ringwood School, I think all schools need to look at their staff policies before penalising the pupils.[/p][/quote]Teachers do have a dress code which includes hair colours and styles, although not as restricted as that of the pupils. I just hope this parent supports her daughters individuality in a few years when she is reaping what she has sewn. If simple school rules are an issue how will she cope with any other?[/p][/quote]Some schools may have policies on staff appearance, but I think you will find that many more do not. Part of my employment involves visiting secondary schools in south Hampshire and, apart from my daughter's own experience, I have seen inappropriately dressed teachers time and time again while pupils are disciplined for the tiniest thing.[/p][/quote]name the schools[/p][/quote]You know and I know that it would not be appropriate in my professional capacity to name individual schools on such an open forum, but if I were to meet you in person I would happily do so! I'm on annual leave today, but have just walked the dog past one such school on the edge of Southampton. eurogordi
  • Score: 0

10:40am Tue 15 Jan 13

Tone says...

Teen challenges the rules, gets into trouble, news at ten.

However, I see many of you have been brought up as good little conformalists that never questioned authority. How very dull!
Teen challenges the rules, gets into trouble, news at ten. However, I see many of you have been brought up as good little conformalists that never questioned authority. How very dull! Tone
  • Score: 1

10:48am Tue 15 Jan 13

mrblunt says...

What does her father say about this !!
What does her father say about this !! mrblunt
  • Score: 0

11:09am Tue 15 Jan 13

chrisja says...

Stupid, stupid cow. Rules are rules and are there for a reason... Still looking at you it's little wonder you fail to understand that - enjoy prison for a few weeks as that's where you're going now you've kept your brat out if school. Lmao idiot...
Stupid, stupid cow. Rules are rules and are there for a reason... Still looking at you it's little wonder you fail to understand that - enjoy prison for a few weeks as that's where you're going now you've kept your brat out if school. Lmao idiot... chrisja
  • Score: -1

11:39am Tue 15 Jan 13

Lone Ranger. says...

13 year old kid basically dictates what she will do and her pathetic mother goes along with it.
.
Solution is ...... Dye her hair back to the straw colour it was and get the kid back to school.
.
The kid is pathetic ....... the mother is even more pathetic
13 year old kid basically dictates what she will do and her pathetic mother goes along with it. . Solution is ...... Dye her hair back to the straw colour it was and get the kid back to school. . The kid is pathetic ....... the mother is even more pathetic Lone Ranger.
  • Score: -1

11:52am Tue 15 Jan 13

dly397 says...

Tone wrote:
Teen challenges the rules, gets into trouble, news at ten. However, I see many of you have been brought up as good little conformalists that never questioned authority. How very dull!
Its one thing to question authority, and I don't think too many people will object to that. If it is done in a constructive manner, open dialogue can sometimes take place and a resolution reached.

However, its a completely different thing to openly defy it and then complain when the authority is enforced.

The mother needs to understand basic rules of respect and at least attempt to instil them in her offspring.
[quote][p][bold]Tone[/bold] wrote: Teen challenges the rules, gets into trouble, news at ten. However, I see many of you have been brought up as good little conformalists that never questioned authority. How very dull![/p][/quote]Its one thing to question authority, and I don't think too many people will object to that. If it is done in a constructive manner, open dialogue can sometimes take place and a resolution reached. However, its a completely different thing to openly defy it and then complain when the authority is enforced. The mother needs to understand basic rules of respect and at least attempt to instil them in her offspring. dly397
  • Score: -1

12:09pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Tone says...

dly397 wrote:
Tone wrote:
Teen challenges the rules, gets into trouble, news at ten. However, I see many of you have been brought up as good little conformalists that never questioned authority. How very dull!
Its one thing to question authority, and I don't think too many people will object to that. If it is done in a constructive manner, open dialogue can sometimes take place and a resolution reached.

However, its a completely different thing to openly defy it and then complain when the authority is enforced.

The mother needs to understand basic rules of respect and at least attempt to instil them in her offspring.
Openly defying rules is a teenagers prerogative and part of their natural development - pushing the boundaries to see where they fit into the grand scheme of things. The mother should have respected the schools decisions though rather than take it to the paper.
[quote][p][bold]dly397[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Tone[/bold] wrote: Teen challenges the rules, gets into trouble, news at ten. However, I see many of you have been brought up as good little conformalists that never questioned authority. How very dull![/p][/quote]Its one thing to question authority, and I don't think too many people will object to that. If it is done in a constructive manner, open dialogue can sometimes take place and a resolution reached. However, its a completely different thing to openly defy it and then complain when the authority is enforced. The mother needs to understand basic rules of respect and at least attempt to instil them in her offspring.[/p][/quote]Openly defying rules is a teenagers prerogative and part of their natural development - pushing the boundaries to see where they fit into the grand scheme of things. The mother should have respected the schools decisions though rather than take it to the paper. Tone
  • Score: -1

12:46pm Tue 15 Jan 13

MPCBOS says...

my daughter leaves school this July which is when she can do what she likes to her hair, she respects and understands her schools rules even though she may not agree say with all of them. I have also worked in two secondary schools in Southampton and know of staff that have been reprimanded for failing to follow the staff handbook on presentation and personal appearance. I daresay this mother will complain when her child ends up with bad exam results!
my daughter leaves school this July which is when she can do what she likes to her hair, she respects and understands her schools rules even though she may not agree say with all of them. I have also worked in two secondary schools in Southampton and know of staff that have been reprimanded for failing to follow the staff handbook on presentation and personal appearance. I daresay this mother will complain when her child ends up with bad exam results! MPCBOS
  • Score: -1

12:57pm Tue 15 Jan 13

kingsl says...

The school have a clear policy which shows what is and isnt acceptable. The mother chose to allow her child to break the rules. She now needs to accept the consequences or move her child to a school where pink hair is acceptable. Not rocket science is it!!
The school have a clear policy which shows what is and isnt acceptable. The mother chose to allow her child to break the rules. She now needs to accept the consequences or move her child to a school where pink hair is acceptable. Not rocket science is it!! kingsl
  • Score: -1

1:06pm Tue 15 Jan 13

business-guru says...

Tone wrote:
Teen challenges the rules, gets into trouble, news at ten.

However, I see many of you have been brought up as good little conformalists that never questioned authority. How very dull!
how very dull and how very gets-you-a-professio
nal-job-with-a-nice-
salary.
[quote][p][bold]Tone[/bold] wrote: Teen challenges the rules, gets into trouble, news at ten. However, I see many of you have been brought up as good little conformalists that never questioned authority. How very dull![/p][/quote]how very dull and how very gets-you-a-professio nal-job-with-a-nice- salary. business-guru
  • Score: -1

1:19pm Tue 15 Jan 13

dtokez says...

as someone already said why the hell should burkas be allowed but pink hair not? at least you can still see her face!
as someone already said why the hell should burkas be allowed but pink hair not? at least you can still see her face! dtokez
  • Score: 1

1:22pm Tue 15 Jan 13

jade25 says...

So its one rule for one school and one rule for another... I drive past a school every morning and most of the girls have dip dye hair, I dont see them being sent home from school!!
Every school should have the same rules!
So its one rule for one school and one rule for another... I drive past a school every morning and most of the girls have dip dye hair, I dont see them being sent home from school!! Every school should have the same rules! jade25
  • Score: 1

1:37pm Tue 15 Jan 13

sarfhamton says...

dtokez wrote:
as someone already said why the hell should burkas be allowed but pink hair not? at least you can still see her face!
As i say, its funny that pink hair brings these people out
[quote][p][bold]dtokez[/bold] wrote: as someone already said why the hell should burkas be allowed but pink hair not? at least you can still see her face![/p][/quote]As i say, its funny that pink hair brings these people out sarfhamton
  • Score: 1

2:38pm Tue 15 Jan 13

jonone says...

jade25 wrote:
So its one rule for one school and one rule for another... I drive past a school every morning and most of the girls have dip dye hair, I dont see them being sent home from school!! Every school should have the same rules!
Translation to article:

Sour-faced mum lets spoilt brat of daughter get away with what she wants.

No mention of father - exists? Or too embarrassed to be involved?
[quote][p][bold]jade25[/bold] wrote: So its one rule for one school and one rule for another... I drive past a school every morning and most of the girls have dip dye hair, I dont see them being sent home from school!! Every school should have the same rules![/p][/quote]Translation to article: Sour-faced mum lets spoilt brat of daughter get away with what she wants. No mention of father - exists? Or too embarrassed to be involved? jonone
  • Score: -1

3:05pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Subject48 says...

**** spice girls. Ruined the world with all the girl power crap.
**** spice girls. Ruined the world with all the girl power crap. Subject48
  • Score: 0

3:30pm Tue 15 Jan 13

dly397 says...

jade25 wrote:
So its one rule for one school and one rule for another... I drive past a school every morning and most of the girls have dip dye hair, I dont see them being sent home from school!! Every school should have the same rules!
They may well be being sent home, but their parents don't run to the nearest newspaper and mouth off about it, as they are probably far more intelligent.
[quote][p][bold]jade25[/bold] wrote: So its one rule for one school and one rule for another... I drive past a school every morning and most of the girls have dip dye hair, I dont see them being sent home from school!! Every school should have the same rules![/p][/quote]They may well be being sent home, but their parents don't run to the nearest newspaper and mouth off about it, as they are probably far more intelligent. dly397
  • Score: -1

3:44pm Tue 15 Jan 13

business-guru says...

jade25 wrote:
So its one rule for one school and one rule for another... I drive past a school every morning and most of the girls have dip dye hair, I dont see them being sent home from school!!
Every school should have the same rules!
uniform and dress code is a matter for the governors of each school. Governors are independent.
[quote][p][bold]jade25[/bold] wrote: So its one rule for one school and one rule for another... I drive past a school every morning and most of the girls have dip dye hair, I dont see them being sent home from school!! Every school should have the same rules![/p][/quote]uniform and dress code is a matter for the governors of each school. Governors are independent. business-guru
  • Score: 0

4:04pm Tue 15 Jan 13

mickey01 says...

why is it that these silly kids want to look different at school yet when you see them at the weekend they all look and dress the same the mother should realise that the school is for learning and if she got herself a job later in life would she let her dress against her bosses wishes i donrt think so
why is it that these silly kids want to look different at school yet when you see them at the weekend they all look and dress the same the mother should realise that the school is for learning and if she got herself a job later in life would she let her dress against her bosses wishes i donrt think so mickey01
  • Score: -1

4:24pm Tue 15 Jan 13

becksbeare says...

jade25 wrote:
So its one rule for one school and one rule for another... I drive past a school every morning and most of the girls have dip dye hair, I dont see them being sent home from school!! Every school should have the same rules!
Perhaps you could tell this mum which schools you've seen this so she can move her daughter to one of them, that way we don't have her whingeing any more. Oh, and the bleach she applied to make her hair blonde will also remove the pink, so forget private tutors and get her back to the school system that taxpayers are funding her to attend.
[quote][p][bold]jade25[/bold] wrote: So its one rule for one school and one rule for another... I drive past a school every morning and most of the girls have dip dye hair, I dont see them being sent home from school!! Every school should have the same rules![/p][/quote]Perhaps you could tell this mum which schools you've seen this so she can move her daughter to one of them, that way we don't have her whingeing any more. Oh, and the bleach she applied to make her hair blonde will also remove the pink, so forget private tutors and get her back to the school system that taxpayers are funding her to attend. becksbeare
  • Score: -1

4:45pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Just another reader says...

SPIKEISLANDTRADER wrote:
Just another reader wrote:
What next, if one of the kids turned up with a green Mohawk I wouldn't be impressed. She's 13, and the school rules clearly state no hair colouring so why does she think she can get away with it? Burkas are religious dress, and as much as it irks me to say it we should respect that. But pink hair? It's not a tradition.
UNLESS you are a FOREIGNER and then authorities ALLOW anything , bone through your nose or tribal tattoo s . Its not TRADITION in England so the school need to get THEIR house in order
HOW FUNNY, that you think that PUTTING WORDS IN CAPITAL LETTERS makes you right! My point is that the rule is in place, she broke it, the school stuck to their rules. And I've yet to see a child turn up to school with a bone through their nose or tribal tattoos. Don't get me wrong, it winds me up that burkas are allowed to be worn, they're no different to hoodies and masks in my eyes. But if you allow one kid to break any of the schools rules and get away with it, no child could ever be disciplined for any wrong doing for the fear of the teacher being accused of favouritism/racism. The rules are there for a reason, the school has set their standards and clearly intends to follow them through.
[quote][p][bold]SPIKEISLANDTRADER[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Just another reader[/bold] wrote: What next, if one of the kids turned up with a green Mohawk I wouldn't be impressed. She's 13, and the school rules clearly state no hair colouring so why does she think she can get away with it? Burkas are religious dress, and as much as it irks me to say it we should respect that. But pink hair? It's not a tradition.[/p][/quote]UNLESS you are a FOREIGNER and then authorities ALLOW anything , bone through your nose or tribal tattoo s . Its not TRADITION in England so the school need to get THEIR house in order[/p][/quote]HOW FUNNY, that you think that PUTTING WORDS IN CAPITAL LETTERS makes you right! My point is that the rule is in place, she broke it, the school stuck to their rules. And I've yet to see a child turn up to school with a bone through their nose or tribal tattoos. Don't get me wrong, it winds me up that burkas are allowed to be worn, they're no different to hoodies and masks in my eyes. But if you allow one kid to break any of the schools rules and get away with it, no child could ever be disciplined for any wrong doing for the fear of the teacher being accused of favouritism/racism. The rules are there for a reason, the school has set their standards and clearly intends to follow them through. Just another reader
  • Score: -1

4:45pm Tue 15 Jan 13

dly397 says...

becksbeare wrote:
jade25 wrote: So its one rule for one school and one rule for another... I drive past a school every morning and most of the girls have dip dye hair, I dont see them being sent home from school!! Every school should have the same rules!
Perhaps you could tell this mum which schools you've seen this so she can move her daughter to one of them, that way we don't have her whingeing any more. Oh, and the bleach she applied to make her hair blonde will also remove the pink, so forget private tutors and get her back to the school system that taxpayers are funding her to attend.
I wouldn't even bother with the bleach - just cut off the offending bits and send her back to school! Simples! Mind you, that might interfere with her human rights to individuality or some other cr@p legislation
[quote][p][bold]becksbeare[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jade25[/bold] wrote: So its one rule for one school and one rule for another... I drive past a school every morning and most of the girls have dip dye hair, I dont see them being sent home from school!! Every school should have the same rules![/p][/quote]Perhaps you could tell this mum which schools you've seen this so she can move her daughter to one of them, that way we don't have her whingeing any more. Oh, and the bleach she applied to make her hair blonde will also remove the pink, so forget private tutors and get her back to the school system that taxpayers are funding her to attend.[/p][/quote]I wouldn't even bother with the bleach - just cut off the offending bits and send her back to school! Simples! Mind you, that might interfere with her human rights to individuality or some other cr@p legislation dly397
  • Score: -1

6:17pm Tue 15 Jan 13

ameliaS says...

Why can't parents let their children be children? And where do these children get the money from for these hair treatments? I do hope it's not my money they're spending.
Why can't parents let their children be children? And where do these children get the money from for these hair treatments? I do hope it's not my money they're spending. ameliaS
  • Score: -1

6:22pm Tue 15 Jan 13

business-guru says...

dtokez wrote:
as someone already said why the hell should burkas be allowed but pink hair not? at least you can still see her face!
firstly its a burqa , not a "burka" and they are NOT allowed at that school and I am guessing they are not allowed in 99% of all secular state schools. Where on earth do you get your strange ideas from ?
[quote][p][bold]dtokez[/bold] wrote: as someone already said why the hell should burkas be allowed but pink hair not? at least you can still see her face![/p][/quote]firstly its a burqa , not a "burka" and they are NOT allowed at that school and I am guessing they are not allowed in 99% of all secular state schools. Where on earth do you get your strange ideas from ? business-guru
  • Score: -1

6:39pm Tue 15 Jan 13

MPCBOS says...

Subject48 wrote:
**** spice girls. Ruined the world with all the girl power crap.
made me chuckle!
[quote][p][bold]Subject48[/bold] wrote: **** spice girls. Ruined the world with all the girl power crap.[/p][/quote]made me chuckle! MPCBOS
  • Score: 0

6:43pm Tue 15 Jan 13

biggus2 says...

In the good old days when teachers ran the schools. A teacher would simply have cut off the offending bit of hair. Doesn't look like she's blonde either. Clearly a pushy mum who does not like being told what to do and the rules apply to everyone else except her.
I you don't like the rules go elsewhere.
In the good old days when teachers ran the schools. A teacher would simply have cut off the offending bit of hair. Doesn't look like she's blonde either. Clearly a pushy mum who does not like being told what to do and the rules apply to everyone else except her. I you don't like the rules go elsewhere. biggus2
  • Score: -1

6:48pm Tue 15 Jan 13

cliffwalker says...

mrblunt wrote:
What does her father say about this !!
I doubt if he even knows about it. Indeed he may not even know he has a daughter.
[quote][p][bold]mrblunt[/bold] wrote: What does her father say about this !![/p][/quote]I doubt if he even knows about it. Indeed he may not even know he has a daughter. cliffwalker
  • Score: 0

7:00pm Tue 15 Jan 13

SPIKEISLANDTRADER says...

Thank you all for the comments and reply s , its a better read than 50 shades of grey , or is it Pink !
Thank you all for the comments and reply s , its a better read than 50 shades of grey , or is it Pink ! SPIKEISLANDTRADER
  • Score: 0

8:50pm Tue 15 Jan 13

business-guru says...

looking forward to the echo article in a few weeks when lady chavington is prosecuted for allowing truanting.
looking forward to the echo article in a few weeks when lady chavington is prosecuted for allowing truanting. business-guru
  • Score: 0

9:16pm Tue 15 Jan 13

mberry77 says...

why is it people seem to think they can break rules and do what they hell they like?
why is it people seem to think they can break rules and do what they hell they like? mberry77
  • Score: 0

9:27pm Tue 15 Jan 13

business-guru says...

mberry77 wrote:
why is it people seem to think they can break rules and do what they hell they like?
well she can let her daughter break the rules..... and she will end up in a magistrates court.... job done.
[quote][p][bold]mberry77[/bold] wrote: why is it people seem to think they can break rules and do what they hell they like?[/p][/quote]well she can let her daughter break the rules..... and she will end up in a magistrates court.... job done. business-guru
  • Score: -1

10:43pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Tattyteddy2 says...

It comes to something when you need to educate the parent before the pupil!
What rounded parent would challenge the rules of a school at the detriment of their child's education?
It comes to something when you need to educate the parent before the pupil! What rounded parent would challenge the rules of a school at the detriment of their child's education? Tattyteddy2
  • Score: -1

12:13am Wed 16 Jan 13

JBHants says...

Ladies, Gentlemen,
The problem with this article is, this article! Daily Echo, you really need to go find something worth publishing. By publishing this article, I trust you are ridiculing the parent that is making her child truant, or are you attempting to condone both the mothers inconsiderate behaviour in allowing her daughter to attempt to break the very rules that were set to breed respect and to stop class discrimination? Either way, this is a nonsense article. The parent should NEVER have allowed her daughter to go to school like this, and certainly should not be allowing truancy because she did allow it.
As for Crucifixes - I cant get my girls to carry their lunchboxes to school, let alone crucifixes!
Most schools allow coloured hair, so long as its not too wild. Admittedly definition is missing here, but i would say pink, not being a natural hair colour could be classed as wild.
Make up - shouldnt be allowed, full stop.
Jewelry - smallest studs or sleepers should be the limit.

I wont allow my 3 girls to break the school rules, and NO OTHER parent should either.

Get a grip people, it starts with dip dyed pink hair, then lessons skipped, smoking behind the bike sheds, disrespecting teachers etc etc..... we were all young once, this is what happened then! Problem is, my generation and one before started disrespecting school rules and authority and the hippy 60's allowed it. Thats where this country went wrong!
Ladies, Gentlemen, The problem with this article is, this article! Daily Echo, you really need to go find something worth publishing. By publishing this article, I trust you are ridiculing the parent that is making her child truant, or are you attempting to condone both the mothers inconsiderate behaviour in allowing her daughter to attempt to break the very rules that were set to breed respect and to stop class discrimination? Either way, this is a nonsense article. The parent should NEVER have allowed her daughter to go to school like this, and certainly should not be allowing truancy because she did allow it. As for Crucifixes - I cant get my girls to carry their lunchboxes to school, let alone crucifixes! Most schools allow coloured hair, so long as its not too wild. Admittedly definition is missing here, but i would say pink, not being a natural hair colour could be classed as wild. Make up - shouldnt be allowed, full stop. Jewelry - smallest studs or sleepers should be the limit. I wont allow my 3 girls to break the school rules, and NO OTHER parent should either. Get a grip people, it starts with dip dyed pink hair, then lessons skipped, smoking behind the bike sheds, disrespecting teachers etc etc..... we were all young once, this is what happened then! Problem is, my generation and one before started disrespecting school rules and authority and the hippy 60's allowed it. Thats where this country went wrong! JBHants
  • Score: 0

5:31am Wed 16 Jan 13

Lionel P says...

Big Mac wrote:
Are they sat watching Jeremy Kyle in the photo, or on it?
Quite so. The school should be supported in trying bring children up to be better than their chav parents.
[quote][p][bold]Big Mac[/bold] wrote: Are they sat watching Jeremy Kyle in the photo, or on it?[/p][/quote]Quite so. The school should be supported in trying bring children up to be better than their chav parents. Lionel P
  • Score: 0

8:55am Wed 16 Jan 13

batesieboy says...

jade25 wrote:
So its one rule for one school and one rule for another... I drive past a school every morning and most of the girls have dip dye hair, I dont see them being sent home from school!!
Every school should have the same rules!
Why?
[quote][p][bold]jade25[/bold] wrote: So its one rule for one school and one rule for another... I drive past a school every morning and most of the girls have dip dye hair, I dont see them being sent home from school!! Every school should have the same rules![/p][/quote]Why? batesieboy
  • Score: 0

9:52am Wed 16 Jan 13

qwert123456 says...

To be honest dip dying your hair is not a religion so who ever said that is talking a load of rubbish. Quite frankley i think its pathetic, chavy and it doesn't abide to the school rules which clearly states "extremes of fashion e.g. shaved hair, beads, braids, unnatural tints, dyes and highlights are not acceptable in school", in which the parents and pupils have to agree and sign at the beggining of the academic year. The mother is being very irresponsible and she needs to find a better way to seek attention. Also if she thinks her daughter is a model pupil, i would not like to have my children looking up to a girl with bleached straggy hair with pink ends especially at the age of 13!
To be honest dip dying your hair is not a religion so who ever said that is talking a load of rubbish. Quite frankley i think its pathetic, chavy and it doesn't abide to the school rules which clearly states "extremes of fashion e.g. shaved hair, beads, braids, unnatural tints, dyes and highlights are not acceptable in school", in which the parents and pupils have to agree and sign at the beggining of the academic year. The mother is being very irresponsible and she needs to find a better way to seek attention. Also if she thinks her daughter is a model pupil, i would not like to have my children looking up to a girl with bleached straggy hair with pink ends especially at the age of 13! qwert123456
  • Score: 0

11:16am Wed 16 Jan 13

S!monOn says...

JBHants wrote:
Ladies, Gentlemen,
The problem with this article is, this article! Daily Echo, you really need to go find something worth publishing. By publishing this article, I trust you are ridiculing the parent that is making her child truant, or are you attempting to condone both the mothers inconsiderate behaviour in allowing her daughter to attempt to break the very rules that were set to breed respect and to stop class discrimination? Either way, this is a nonsense article. The parent should NEVER have allowed her daughter to go to school like this, and certainly should not be allowing truancy because she did allow it.
As for Crucifixes - I cant get my girls to carry their lunchboxes to school, let alone crucifixes!
Most schools allow coloured hair, so long as its not too wild. Admittedly definition is missing here, but i would say pink, not being a natural hair colour could be classed as wild.
Make up - shouldnt be allowed, full stop.
Jewelry - smallest studs or sleepers should be the limit.

I wont allow my 3 girls to break the school rules, and NO OTHER parent should either.

Get a grip people, it starts with dip dyed pink hair, then lessons skipped, smoking behind the bike sheds, disrespecting teachers etc etc..... we were all young once, this is what happened then! Problem is, my generation and one before started disrespecting school rules and authority and the hippy 60's allowed it. Thats where this country went wrong!
I don't see how the paper has done anything wrong. The mother wanted to tell her story. The paper were willing to show it.

If it wasn't worth reading then why did you bother... and comment!!!
[quote][p][bold]JBHants[/bold] wrote: Ladies, Gentlemen, The problem with this article is, this article! Daily Echo, you really need to go find something worth publishing. By publishing this article, I trust you are ridiculing the parent that is making her child truant, or are you attempting to condone both the mothers inconsiderate behaviour in allowing her daughter to attempt to break the very rules that were set to breed respect and to stop class discrimination? Either way, this is a nonsense article. The parent should NEVER have allowed her daughter to go to school like this, and certainly should not be allowing truancy because she did allow it. As for Crucifixes - I cant get my girls to carry their lunchboxes to school, let alone crucifixes! Most schools allow coloured hair, so long as its not too wild. Admittedly definition is missing here, but i would say pink, not being a natural hair colour could be classed as wild. Make up - shouldnt be allowed, full stop. Jewelry - smallest studs or sleepers should be the limit. I wont allow my 3 girls to break the school rules, and NO OTHER parent should either. Get a grip people, it starts with dip dyed pink hair, then lessons skipped, smoking behind the bike sheds, disrespecting teachers etc etc..... we were all young once, this is what happened then! Problem is, my generation and one before started disrespecting school rules and authority and the hippy 60's allowed it. Thats where this country went wrong![/p][/quote]I don't see how the paper has done anything wrong. The mother wanted to tell her story. The paper were willing to show it. If it wasn't worth reading then why did you bother... and comment!!! S!monOn
  • Score: 0

1:06pm Wed 16 Jan 13

dly397 says...

I'm assuming they told their story so as to try and garner some sympathy and 'force' the school into a rethink.

I wonder if either of them have read the comments on here (or the Mail Online, as it was on there as well yesterday) and had 2nd thoughts?

I have yet to read any comment in support of their stupidity.

Maybe the Echo could go back to them in a couple of weeks for an update?
I'm assuming they told their story so as to try and garner some sympathy and 'force' the school into a rethink. I wonder if either of them have read the comments on here (or the Mail Online, as it was on there as well yesterday) and had 2nd thoughts? I have yet to read any comment in support of their stupidity. Maybe the Echo could go back to them in a couple of weeks for an update? dly397
  • Score: 0

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