Iconic ponies may have been sold for burger meat

Are we eating New Forest pony in our burgers?

Are we eating New Forest pony in our burgers?

First published in News Daily Echo: Photograph of the Author by , Senior Reporter

THEY are the iconic symbols that attract thousands of tourists to Hampshire.

Ponies have been roaming the New Forest for 2,000 years, delighting visitors by wandering through the area’s villages.

Yet experts have today warned that the popular animals could end up on the plates of unsuspecting diners.

At least 200 pure-breed New Forest ponies were up for auction last year at Beaulieu Road Sales, with many destined for abattoirs because the “bottom has fallen out of the market”.

As it was revealed that scientific tests found horse meat within burgers sold by supermarkets such as Tesco, Lidl and Aldi, New Forest Verderer Colin Draper told the Daily Echo that unwanted ponies were being snapped up by English abattoirs for as little as £10.

They then sell them on to the French – where the rogue burger meat is believed to have originated.

He said: “It may well be that people are eating New Forest ponies.

“It is not something we promote.

It is a last resort but there are definitely a few that get taken to the slaughterhouse.

“The bottom has fallen out of the market since the economic slump because keeping them is an expensive hobby.”

Strict rules Mr Draper said strict live animal export rules meant horses were now taken to two British abattoirs, in Cheshire and Bristol.

Dionis McNair, a Verderer and a member of the New Forest Pony Breeders and Cattle Society, blamed the oversupply on over-breeding and changing fashion in horses.

She said: “It is a very worrying situation. We would all like the ponies to be used as riding ponies.”

To alleviate the problem, the Verderers, who represent the interests of animal owners in the Forest, have reduced the number of stallions from 40 to ten in the past four years in a bid to reduce the surplus.

Lee Hackett, from the British Horse Society, said the ponies may be attractive to abattoirs because they have less medicine in them then more domesticated horses.

He said: “It means they are more likely to legally enter the food chain. I think the problem is that there are too many horses and there are not enough nice homes for them. Supply has outstripped demand.”

Horse meat accounted for about 29 per cent of the meat content in one burger sample from Tesco, according to the study carried out by the Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI).

Professor Alan Reilly, chief executive of the FSAI, said there was no health risk but also no reasonable explanation for horse meat to be found.

Tesco, Lidl and Aldi have told food safety chiefs they have removed all implicated products from their shelves.

Comments (31)

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7:18am Thu 17 Jan 13

10 Minute Man says...

Eat local, eat organic.
Eat local, eat organic. 10 Minute Man
  • Score: 0

7:20am Thu 17 Jan 13

nedscrumpo says...

10 Minute Man wrote:
Eat local, eat organic.
I don't know about the bottom falling out of the market. I ate organic and the market fell out of my bottom!
[quote][p][bold]10 Minute Man[/bold] wrote: Eat local, eat organic.[/p][/quote]I don't know about the bottom falling out of the market. I ate organic and the market fell out of my bottom! nedscrumpo
  • Score: 0

8:02am Thu 17 Jan 13

Lockssmart says...

Hay! This is the last straw
Hay! This is the last straw Lockssmart
  • Score: 0

8:09am Thu 17 Jan 13

Linesman says...

In Europe a lot of horse meat is consumed.

As we are members of the EU and import food products from Europe, should we be surprised if it includes meat from our own New Forest ponies?

It's called, 'getting our own back'.
In Europe a lot of horse meat is consumed. As we are members of the EU and import food products from Europe, should we be surprised if it includes meat from our own New Forest ponies? It's called, 'getting our own back'. Linesman
  • Score: 0

8:20am Thu 17 Jan 13

Ozmosis says...

At least the meat isn't going to waste...
At least the meat isn't going to waste... Ozmosis
  • Score: 0

8:33am Thu 17 Jan 13

Outside of the Box says...

Apparently a new range of meatballs is being sold by supermarkets nationwide, report say they like the dogs b*****
Apparently a new range of meatballs is being sold by supermarkets nationwide, report say they like the dogs b***** Outside of the Box
  • Score: 0

8:51am Thu 17 Jan 13

Sovietobserver says...

Low on fat. High on Shergar.
Low on fat. High on Shergar. Sovietobserver
  • Score: 0

8:57am Thu 17 Jan 13

derek james says...

hamburgers is an anagram of "shergar bum"
hamburgers is an anagram of "shergar bum" derek james
  • Score: 0

9:03am Thu 17 Jan 13

Sovietobserver says...

Traces of zebra have now been discovered in Tesco barcodes.
Traces of zebra have now been discovered in Tesco barcodes. Sovietobserver
  • Score: 0

9:07am Thu 17 Jan 13

massimoosti says...

The low cost supermarkets are at fault as they asked the suppliers if they could make their burgers faster.
The low cost supermarkets are at fault as they asked the suppliers if they could make their burgers faster. massimoosti
  • Score: 0

9:10am Thu 17 Jan 13

business-guru says...

Lets not let facts get in the way of sensationalist headlines... horsemeat does not keep like beef. It has a much shorter shelf life and hence is never intentionally mixed with beef for packaged burgers. It is mixed fresh for burgers sold fresh in Europe but is not suitable for frozen burgers. So the fact that the horse meat is in those burgers shows that there has been an illegal or accident contamination. Finally is anyone saw what actually goes into pure "beef" burgers, there probably would never eat a burger again. The french eat mostly steak hache and not burgers, much healthier and nicer....
Lets not let facts get in the way of sensationalist headlines... horsemeat does not keep like beef. It has a much shorter shelf life and hence is never intentionally mixed with beef for packaged burgers. It is mixed fresh for burgers sold fresh in Europe but is not suitable for frozen burgers. So the fact that the horse meat is in those burgers shows that there has been an illegal or accident contamination. Finally is anyone saw what actually goes into pure "beef" burgers, there probably would never eat a burger again. The french eat mostly steak hache and not burgers, much healthier and nicer.... business-guru
  • Score: 0

9:13am Thu 17 Jan 13

ShellyBaldwin says...

What next? My Lidl Pony?
What next? My Lidl Pony? ShellyBaldwin
  • Score: 0

9:15am Thu 17 Jan 13

Sovietobserver says...

Glad I did not get gelded by it.
Did it give anyone the trots ?
Glad I did not get gelded by it. Did it give anyone the trots ? Sovietobserver
  • Score: 0

11:47am Thu 17 Jan 13

Torchie1 says...

"Ponies have been roaming the New Forest for 2,000 years, delighting visitors by wandering through the area’s villages. "

That would be difficult as the New Forest was only established in 1079 !
"Ponies have been roaming the New Forest for 2,000 years, delighting visitors by wandering through the area’s villages. " That would be difficult as the New Forest was only established in 1079 ! Torchie1
  • Score: 0

11:56am Thu 17 Jan 13

southy says...

Ponies have been roaming the New Forest for 2,000 years, delighting visitors by wandering through the area’s villages

Nearly 2,000 years, New forest ponys was interduce to the forest around mid medieval times, a Mountain and Moorland cross breed and is now a registered breed.
The originals ponies in this area was the Asturcon and Pottok ponies, a shared ancestry with Mountains and the Moor pony, The Asturcon and Pottok breeds was removed from the area by William I, when he turned this area into a Kings Deer Hunting ground
Ponies have been roaming the New Forest for 2,000 years, delighting visitors by wandering through the area’s villages Nearly 2,000 years, New forest ponys was interduce to the forest around mid medieval times, a Mountain and Moorland cross breed and is now a registered breed. The originals ponies in this area was the Asturcon and Pottok ponies, a shared ancestry with Mountains and the Moor pony, The Asturcon and Pottok breeds was removed from the area by William I, when he turned this area into a Kings Deer Hunting ground southy
  • Score: 0

12:05pm Thu 17 Jan 13

southy says...

massimoosti wrote:
The low cost supermarkets are at fault as they asked the suppliers if they could make their burgers faster.
Corporations Supermarkets like Tescos totally control there meat, they buy the animal at market or off the farmer, and contract a abattoir to kill, cut up and pack the meat, and put very tight conditions on the abattoir and have regular inpections. Romfords is one such abattoir.
[quote][p][bold]massimoosti[/bold] wrote: The low cost supermarkets are at fault as they asked the suppliers if they could make their burgers faster.[/p][/quote]Corporations Supermarkets like Tescos totally control there meat, they buy the animal at market or off the farmer, and contract a abattoir to kill, cut up and pack the meat, and put very tight conditions on the abattoir and have regular inpections. Romfords is one such abattoir. southy
  • Score: 0

12:27pm Thu 17 Jan 13

freefinker says...

southy wrote:
massimoosti wrote:
The low cost supermarkets are at fault as they asked the suppliers if they could make their burgers faster.
Corporations Supermarkets like Tescos totally control there meat, they buy the animal at market or off the farmer, and contract a abattoir to kill, cut up and pack the meat, and put very tight conditions on the abattoir and have regular inpections. Romfords is one such abattoir.
.. well, this very incident with horse meat ending up in beef-burgers, totally disproves your little spiel, doesn't it?

Or are you saying Tesco knowingly did it?
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]massimoosti[/bold] wrote: The low cost supermarkets are at fault as they asked the suppliers if they could make their burgers faster.[/p][/quote]Corporations Supermarkets like Tescos totally control there meat, they buy the animal at market or off the farmer, and contract a abattoir to kill, cut up and pack the meat, and put very tight conditions on the abattoir and have regular inpections. Romfords is one such abattoir.[/p][/quote].. well, this very incident with horse meat ending up in beef-burgers, totally disproves your little spiel, doesn't it? Or are you saying Tesco knowingly did it? freefinker
  • Score: 0

12:39pm Thu 17 Jan 13

espanuel says...

I ate a Tesco burger but I'm stable now.
I ate a Tesco burger but I'm stable now. espanuel
  • Score: 0

12:42pm Thu 17 Jan 13

Sovietobserver says...

To beef, or not to beef, that is the equestrian.
To beef, or not to beef, that is the equestrian. Sovietobserver
  • Score: 0

12:46pm Thu 17 Jan 13

Sovietobserver says...

espanuel wrote:
I ate a Tesco burger but I'm stable now.
Is that the trHoof ?
[quote][p][bold]espanuel[/bold] wrote: I ate a Tesco burger but I'm stable now.[/p][/quote]Is that the trHoof ? Sovietobserver
  • Score: 0

12:50pm Thu 17 Jan 13

Sovietobserver says...

I wonder if doner kebabs contain horse meat. Or is it just elephants.
I wonder if doner kebabs contain horse meat. Or is it just elephants. Sovietobserver
  • Score: 0

12:53pm Thu 17 Jan 13

Sovietobserver says...

I've just checked the burgers in my fridge.........and..
....."THEYR'E OFF ! "...
I've just checked the burgers in my fridge.........and.. ....."THEYR'E OFF ! "... Sovietobserver
  • Score: 0

1:21pm Thu 17 Jan 13

rickey says...

The only worrying thing about this whole story is that nobody knows how the horse meat got into the burgers.
If anybody is upset over the possible eating of these 'popular' animals then I suggest that they tune into lamb watch and remember those cute little lambs as they tuck into their Sunday dinner. Think about the poor old piggie, he is just food on legs and it appears that he also appears in Beefburgers.
The only worrying thing about this whole story is that nobody knows how the horse meat got into the burgers. If anybody is upset over the possible eating of these 'popular' animals then I suggest that they tune into lamb watch and remember those cute little lambs as they tuck into their Sunday dinner. Think about the poor old piggie, he is just food on legs and it appears that he also appears in Beefburgers. rickey
  • Score: 0

1:30pm Thu 17 Jan 13

southy says...

freefinker wrote:
southy wrote:
massimoosti wrote:
The low cost supermarkets are at fault as they asked the suppliers if they could make their burgers faster.
Corporations Supermarkets like Tescos totally control there meat, they buy the animal at market or off the farmer, and contract a abattoir to kill, cut up and pack the meat, and put very tight conditions on the abattoir and have regular inpections. Romfords is one such abattoir.
.. well, this very incident with horse meat ending up in beef-burgers, totally disproves your little spiel, doesn't it?

Or are you saying Tesco knowingly did it?
They very well could off known about it, making the product cheaper so bigger proffits are made, One of the things firms like Tesco enforce is when killing and cutting and packing of one kind of animal like say cow to lambs the whole abattoir is cleaned before starting the killing again and meat of one animal do not mix up with another, mixing of meats of more than one kind of animal is done after all killings and packing have been done, and again very tight conditions apply
[quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]massimoosti[/bold] wrote: The low cost supermarkets are at fault as they asked the suppliers if they could make their burgers faster.[/p][/quote]Corporations Supermarkets like Tescos totally control there meat, they buy the animal at market or off the farmer, and contract a abattoir to kill, cut up and pack the meat, and put very tight conditions on the abattoir and have regular inpections. Romfords is one such abattoir.[/p][/quote].. well, this very incident with horse meat ending up in beef-burgers, totally disproves your little spiel, doesn't it? Or are you saying Tesco knowingly did it?[/p][/quote]They very well could off known about it, making the product cheaper so bigger proffits are made, One of the things firms like Tesco enforce is when killing and cutting and packing of one kind of animal like say cow to lambs the whole abattoir is cleaned before starting the killing again and meat of one animal do not mix up with another, mixing of meats of more than one kind of animal is done after all killings and packing have been done, and again very tight conditions apply southy
  • Score: 0

1:36pm Thu 17 Jan 13

ohec says...

If we didn't have these silly sentimental feelings for horses it wouldn't be a problem, we quite happily eat anything else from a rabbit to a cow yet we object to eating horse meat, if people were aware of the contents of half the food they eat they wouldn't want to eat it again, its another case of ignorance is bliss.
If we didn't have these silly sentimental feelings for horses it wouldn't be a problem, we quite happily eat anything else from a rabbit to a cow yet we object to eating horse meat, if people were aware of the contents of half the food they eat they wouldn't want to eat it again, its another case of ignorance is bliss. ohec
  • Score: 0

1:44pm Thu 17 Jan 13

southy says...

southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
southy wrote:
massimoosti wrote:
The low cost supermarkets are at fault as they asked the suppliers if they could make their burgers faster.
Corporations Supermarkets like Tescos totally control there meat, they buy the animal at market or off the farmer, and contract a abattoir to kill, cut up and pack the meat, and put very tight conditions on the abattoir and have regular inpections. Romfords is one such abattoir.
.. well, this very incident with horse meat ending up in beef-burgers, totally disproves your little spiel, doesn't it?

Or are you saying Tesco knowingly did it?
They very well could off known about it, making the product cheaper so bigger proffits are made, One of the things firms like Tesco enforce is when killing and cutting and packing of one kind of animal like say cow to lambs the whole abattoir is cleaned before starting the killing again and meat of one animal do not mix up with another, mixing of meats of more than one kind of animal is done after all killings and packing have been done, and again very tight conditions apply
What I think as happened here is that a Tesco storeage warehouse has slip up and sent the wrong product to the wrong place, would not be the first time that Tescos admin have slip up in this way, just that most of the time it do not matter as it normally the same product just got the wrong store name on the paperwork, this was more likely for the French market unless its a speical order for the uk
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]massimoosti[/bold] wrote: The low cost supermarkets are at fault as they asked the suppliers if they could make their burgers faster.[/p][/quote]Corporations Supermarkets like Tescos totally control there meat, they buy the animal at market or off the farmer, and contract a abattoir to kill, cut up and pack the meat, and put very tight conditions on the abattoir and have regular inpections. Romfords is one such abattoir.[/p][/quote].. well, this very incident with horse meat ending up in beef-burgers, totally disproves your little spiel, doesn't it? Or are you saying Tesco knowingly did it?[/p][/quote]They very well could off known about it, making the product cheaper so bigger proffits are made, One of the things firms like Tesco enforce is when killing and cutting and packing of one kind of animal like say cow to lambs the whole abattoir is cleaned before starting the killing again and meat of one animal do not mix up with another, mixing of meats of more than one kind of animal is done after all killings and packing have been done, and again very tight conditions apply[/p][/quote]What I think as happened here is that a Tesco storeage warehouse has slip up and sent the wrong product to the wrong place, would not be the first time that Tescos admin have slip up in this way, just that most of the time it do not matter as it normally the same product just got the wrong store name on the paperwork, this was more likely for the French market unless its a speical order for the uk southy
  • Score: 0

1:54pm Thu 17 Jan 13

southy says...

ohec wrote:
If we didn't have these silly sentimental feelings for horses it wouldn't be a problem, we quite happily eat anything else from a rabbit to a cow yet we object to eating horse meat, if people were aware of the contents of half the food they eat they wouldn't want to eat it again, its another case of ignorance is bliss.
Go back about 50 years and horse meat was often on the table
[quote][p][bold]ohec[/bold] wrote: If we didn't have these silly sentimental feelings for horses it wouldn't be a problem, we quite happily eat anything else from a rabbit to a cow yet we object to eating horse meat, if people were aware of the contents of half the food they eat they wouldn't want to eat it again, its another case of ignorance is bliss.[/p][/quote]Go back about 50 years and horse meat was often on the table southy
  • Score: 0

2:25pm Thu 17 Jan 13

Sovietobserver says...

I bet the supermarket consumer relations departments are having a mare day.
I bet the supermarket consumer relations departments are having a mare day. Sovietobserver
  • Score: 0

2:36pm Thu 17 Jan 13

Sovietobserver says...

"Chiswick !", "Fresh horses !! ".......
Richard IV, your prayers have now been answered.
"Chiswick !", "Fresh horses !! "....... Richard IV, your prayers have now been answered. Sovietobserver
  • Score: 0

4:49pm Thu 17 Jan 13

huckit P says...

Not really a huge problem. Horse meat was regularly consumed in the UK during times of rationing, and I suspect at other times as well. The real problem is the general public never really knows what is in their food unless they grow it and harvest (or kill) it themselves. Even whole chickens or pieces of steak have usually be contaminated with preservative and water (for weight).
Either accept it or get yourself an allotment.
Not really a huge problem. Horse meat was regularly consumed in the UK during times of rationing, and I suspect at other times as well. The real problem is the general public never really knows what is in their food unless they grow it and harvest (or kill) it themselves. Even whole chickens or pieces of steak have usually be contaminated with preservative and water (for weight). Either accept it or get yourself an allotment. huckit P
  • Score: 0

7:52pm Thu 17 Jan 13

Fatty x Ford Worker says...

Neigh, Neigh, Hee Haw whats going on then!`
Neigh, Neigh, Hee Haw whats going on then!` Fatty x Ford Worker
  • Score: 0

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