Bone cell breakthrough by Southampton scientists

Daily Echo: Bone cell breakthrough by Southampton scientists Bone cell breakthrough by Southampton scientists

SCIENTISTS from Southampton have made a breakthrough in creating bone cells - using plastics found in CDs and bullet-proof windows.

Experts say the technique could lead to “revolutionary” treatment for people who have broken a bone or need a hip replacement because of osteoporosis and osteoarthritis.

The research at the University of Southampton involved researchers using polycarbonate plastic - normally used to make CDs - to manipulate human stem cells towards becoming bone cells.

The scientists were able to do this without using chemicals, which they say could offer an accessible and cheaper way of using stem cells.

Researchers also believe the discovery could lead to more medical research into how the plastic could be used in medicine.

Leader of the research team Professor Richard Oreffo said: “To generate bone cells for regenerative medicine and further medical research remains a significant challenge.

“However we have found that by harnessing surface technologies that allow the generation and ultimately scale up of human embryonic stem cells to skeletal cells, we can aid the tissue engineering process. “This is very exciting.

“Our research may offer a whole new approach to skeletal regenerative medicine.”

The research, funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, is the latest discovery by the team.

They found out in 2011 that it was possible to emboss plastic with “nanopatterns” - or tiny imprints on the surface - to create a cheaper and easier way of growing and spreading adult stem cells.

Scientists think the latest discovery could lead to new treatments for a whole range of degenerative conditions.

Dr Nikolaj Gadegaard from the University of Glasgow has worked with scientists in Southampton on other stem cell research.

He said: "Our previous collaborative research showed exciting new ways to control mesenchymal stem cell - stem cells from the bone marrow of adults - growth and differentiation on nanoscale patterns.

“This new Southampton-led discovery shows a totally different stem cell source, embryonic, also respond in a similar manner and this really starts to open this new field of discovery up.

“With more research impetus, it gives us the hope that we can go on to target a wider variety of degenerative conditions than we originally aspired to. “This result is of fundamental significance."

Comments (4)

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2:56pm Sun 17 Feb 13

Dan Soton says...

Nano's in teeth or repair ?



Seems to me, culturing adult stem cells in nanopatterned surfaces could be a perfect vehicle for growing replacement teeth or repairing damaged teeth.


Certainly looks promising for repairing bone damage caused by Fluoridation.



Congrats to all at the University of Southampton.
Nano's in teeth or repair ? Seems to me, culturing adult stem cells in nanopatterned surfaces could be a perfect vehicle for growing replacement teeth or repairing damaged teeth. Certainly looks promising for repairing bone damage caused by Fluoridation. Congrats to all at the University of Southampton. Dan Soton

3:40pm Sun 17 Feb 13

georgetheseventh says...

Yep..ok..but does that mean we now have to drive around Eastleigh 'without' bulletproof window's..eek !!
Yep..ok..but does that mean we now have to drive around Eastleigh 'without' bulletproof window's..eek !! georgetheseventh

5:11pm Sun 17 Feb 13

Dan Soton says...

georgetheseventh wrote:
Yep..ok..but does that mean we now have to drive around Eastleigh 'without' bulletproof window's..eek !!
Gold Nanoparticles are the perfect vehicles to deliver cancer drugs.



Georgetheseventh asks.. do I have to drive around Eastleigh 'without' bulletproof window's..?

Yep.. if your Eastleigh is a town in a universe the size of a pea.. :)

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Summary: Gold Nanoparticles 30x more effective on cancer cells.. less than one-tenth the clinical dose.

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"NANOBUBBLES" ADVANCE USE OF CHEMOTHERAPY DELIVERY TO CANCER CELLS.

By Shaun McKeegan.

April 15, 2012.

The nanobubbles are short-lived events that expand and burst, thus creating a small hole in the surface and allowing cancer drugs to be injected directly into the cell.

U.S. researchers are developing a promising new approach to the targeting of individual cancer cells. The technique uses light-harvesting nanoparticles to convert laser energy into “plasmonic nanobubbles,” enabling drugs to be injected directly into the cancer cells through small holes created in the surface.

RESEARCHERS CLAIM THAT THE DELIVERY OF CHEMOTHERAPY DRUGS IN THIS WAY IS UP TO 30 TIMES MORE EFFECTIVE ON CANCER CELLS THAN TRADITIONAL DRUG TREATMENTS AND REQUIRES LESS THAN ONE-TENTH THE CLINICAL DOSE.

In order to get the nanobubbles inside the target cancer cells, clusters of gold nanoparticles are created within the cells by binding an antibody to individual nanoparticles. These antibodies adhere to the cancer cells before being absorbed to create tiny pockets of nanoparticles just below the cell surface. Then the laser pulse is applied to the plasmon to create a nanobubble.

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http://tinyurl.com/b
jbtlyv
[quote][p][bold]georgetheseventh[/bold] wrote: Yep..ok..but does that mean we now have to drive around Eastleigh 'without' bulletproof window's..eek !![/p][/quote]Gold Nanoparticles are the perfect vehicles to deliver cancer drugs. Georgetheseventh asks.. do I have to drive around Eastleigh 'without' bulletproof window's..? Yep.. if your Eastleigh is a town in a universe the size of a pea.. :) - Summary: Gold Nanoparticles 30x more effective on cancer cells.. less than one-tenth the clinical dose. - "NANOBUBBLES" ADVANCE USE OF CHEMOTHERAPY DELIVERY TO CANCER CELLS. By Shaun McKeegan. April 15, 2012. The nanobubbles are short-lived events that expand and burst, thus creating a small hole in the surface and allowing cancer drugs to be injected directly into the cell. U.S. researchers are developing a promising new approach to the targeting of individual cancer cells. The technique uses light-harvesting nanoparticles to convert laser energy into “plasmonic nanobubbles,” enabling drugs to be injected directly into the cancer cells through small holes created in the surface. RESEARCHERS CLAIM THAT THE DELIVERY OF CHEMOTHERAPY DRUGS IN THIS WAY IS UP TO 30 TIMES MORE EFFECTIVE ON CANCER CELLS THAN TRADITIONAL DRUG TREATMENTS AND REQUIRES LESS THAN ONE-TENTH THE CLINICAL DOSE. In order to get the nanobubbles inside the target cancer cells, clusters of gold nanoparticles are created within the cells by binding an antibody to individual nanoparticles. These antibodies adhere to the cancer cells before being absorbed to create tiny pockets of nanoparticles just below the cell surface. Then the laser pulse is applied to the plasmon to create a nanobubble. - http://tinyurl.com/b jbtlyv Dan Soton

6:15pm Sun 17 Feb 13

Ginger_cyclist says...

Dan Soton wrote:
Nano's in teeth or repair ?



Seems to me, culturing adult stem cells in nanopatterned surfaces could be a perfect vehicle for growing replacement teeth or repairing damaged teeth.


Certainly looks promising for repairing bone damage caused by Fluoridation.



Congrats to all at the University of Southampton.
Shh, don't say that about teeth, it will put toothbrush and toothpaste manufacturers out of business, though I would like some replacement incisors as I smashed some of mine loose in a bike crash.
[quote][p][bold]Dan Soton[/bold] wrote: Nano's in teeth or repair ? Seems to me, culturing adult stem cells in nanopatterned surfaces could be a perfect vehicle for growing replacement teeth or repairing damaged teeth. Certainly looks promising for repairing bone damage caused by Fluoridation. Congrats to all at the University of Southampton.[/p][/quote]Shh, don't say that about teeth, it will put toothbrush and toothpaste manufacturers out of business, though I would like some replacement incisors as I smashed some of mine loose in a bike crash. Ginger_cyclist

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