New Forest cycling guides amended

Daily Echo: Cyclists taking part in a Wiggle cycling event in the New Forest Cyclists taking part in a Wiggle cycling event in the New Forest

THEY set out vital guidelines for cyclists and organisers of mass biking rides to use the New Forest safely and responsibly.

Now cycling groups, community organisations and conservation charities are drawing up blueprints to transform two documents enshrining rules enabling riders to enjoy using the the Hampshire National Park while protecting wildlife and communities living there.

Organisations are thrashing out amendments to the Cycle Event Organisers Charter and the Cycling Code of Conduct setting out advice and rules covering everything from road and animal safety measures to ensuring participants of mass events keep residents up to date with their plans and contribute to the New Forest Trust which funds conservation schemes protecting the area’s flora and fauna.

More than 20 groups met for an opening meeting coordinated by the New Forest National Park Authority to discuss initial plans which organisations declared was “very positive”.

National Park community and visitor services manager Nigel Matthews said: “Agreeing the revisions to the code of conduct and of agreeing how organisations can work together to gain a wide scale acceptance of the advice and best practice recommendations will take some time but it was good to see such a positive tone at this first meeting.”

Groups contributing include the New Forest Association, the Commoners Defence Association, the New Forest Equestrian Association, the Forestry Commission, the New Forest Tourism Association and the police.

Biking groups included British Cycling, the Cyclist’s Touring Club (CTC), Sustrans and the Cycle Working Group.

New Forest District Council public events and safety advisory group member James Knight said; “Despite their different interests there was broad agreement on most of the points raised.”

The group meets again next month [September] to build on its initial discussions and focus on the draft cycle event organiser’s charter.

Both documents are available to view online at newforestnpa.gov.uk.

Comments (7)

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9:46am Thu 1 Aug 13

Charlie-Oxbridge says...

You know what, I love cycling and I think its really great that we encourage people to get out on their bikes and experience the New Forest but... is there really a need for all these "sportiffs" and other mass cycling events? I think one charity bike a year is plenty, and a ride not a race! You dont need to go out in mass organised events you can do it by yourself or with friends. I think for those that are semi-pro and looking to get onto the tour then I am sure that the New Forest wouldnt mind having an event for that too, would make a great spectator event once a year and out of the holiday season too.
You know what, I love cycling and I think its really great that we encourage people to get out on their bikes and experience the New Forest but... is there really a need for all these "sportiffs" and other mass cycling events? I think one charity bike a year is plenty, and a ride not a race! You dont need to go out in mass organised events you can do it by yourself or with friends. I think for those that are semi-pro and looking to get onto the tour then I am sure that the New Forest wouldnt mind having an event for that too, would make a great spectator event once a year and out of the holiday season too. Charlie-Oxbridge

10:17am Thu 1 Aug 13

Frank28 says...

Mass cycling events are irregular for the New Forest. Unfortunately, for those that matter, the New Forest Ponies, they won't be complying with the guidelines! As we have already seen, cyclists are at risk from frightened animals. Event organisers must ensure they have adequate insurance to cover any incident.
Mass cycling events are irregular for the New Forest. Unfortunately, for those that matter, the New Forest Ponies, they won't be complying with the guidelines! As we have already seen, cyclists are at risk from frightened animals. Event organisers must ensure they have adequate insurance to cover any incident. Frank28

2:50pm Thu 1 Aug 13

GrahamSimmons says...

Reducing cycle events in the Forest makes no sense. It'll just drive cycle traffic towards the Jurassic coast & the Meon Valley, leaving local businesses comparatively out of pocket. The popularity of cycling is exploding, and the New Forest Trust, rather than capitalising on it, is trying to clamp down. A thousand cyclists spring up on the Forest's roads for one Sunday every few months - imagine if this was motorists. Oh wait, that's called the M25, twice a day.
Reducing cycle events in the Forest makes no sense. It'll just drive cycle traffic towards the Jurassic coast & the Meon Valley, leaving local businesses comparatively out of pocket. The popularity of cycling is exploding, and the New Forest Trust, rather than capitalising on it, is trying to clamp down. A thousand cyclists spring up on the Forest's roads for one Sunday every few months - imagine if this was motorists. Oh wait, that's called the M25, twice a day. GrahamSimmons

2:59pm Thu 1 Aug 13

Charlie-Oxbridge says...

GrahamSimmons wrote:
Reducing cycle events in the Forest makes no sense. It'll just drive cycle traffic towards the Jurassic coast & the Meon Valley, leaving local businesses comparatively out of pocket. The popularity of cycling is exploding, and the New Forest Trust, rather than capitalising on it, is trying to clamp down. A thousand cyclists spring up on the Forest's roads for one Sunday every few months - imagine if this was motorists. Oh wait, that's called the M25, twice a day.
Why do you need to enter a cycling event to go cycling in the New Forest? Just let people cycle when they want and there will be no loss of business and it will be spread out over the year rather than focused all on one day.
[quote][p][bold]GrahamSimmons[/bold] wrote: Reducing cycle events in the Forest makes no sense. It'll just drive cycle traffic towards the Jurassic coast & the Meon Valley, leaving local businesses comparatively out of pocket. The popularity of cycling is exploding, and the New Forest Trust, rather than capitalising on it, is trying to clamp down. A thousand cyclists spring up on the Forest's roads for one Sunday every few months - imagine if this was motorists. Oh wait, that's called the M25, twice a day.[/p][/quote]Why do you need to enter a cycling event to go cycling in the New Forest? Just let people cycle when they want and there will be no loss of business and it will be spread out over the year rather than focused all on one day. Charlie-Oxbridge

3:30pm Thu 1 Aug 13

GrahamSimmons says...

Charlie-Oxbridge wrote:
GrahamSimmons wrote:
Reducing cycle events in the Forest makes no sense. It'll just drive cycle traffic towards the Jurassic coast & the Meon Valley, leaving local businesses comparatively out of pocket. The popularity of cycling is exploding, and the New Forest Trust, rather than capitalising on it, is trying to clamp down. A thousand cyclists spring up on the Forest's roads for one Sunday every few months - imagine if this was motorists. Oh wait, that's called the M25, twice a day.
Why do you need to enter a cycling event to go cycling in the New Forest? Just let people cycle when they want and there will be no loss of business and it will be spread out over the year rather than focused all on one day.
I see where you're going with this, but you're ignoring the massive draw these events have on people who would otherwise cycle around their local communities rather than the Forest. People come from all over the UK to sportives here on the south coast. I'm actually a member of one of the largest cycling clubs within a ride's distance of the New Forest, and normally these events are ignored by most of our members (not much novelty in doing a large organised ride around roads you've done a hundred times before!). They don't divide the existing cyclists in the area, they cause a large addition to total cyclist numbers for the duration of the event (and subsequently a large addition in tourist expenditure at local businesses).
[quote][p][bold]Charlie-Oxbridge[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GrahamSimmons[/bold] wrote: Reducing cycle events in the Forest makes no sense. It'll just drive cycle traffic towards the Jurassic coast & the Meon Valley, leaving local businesses comparatively out of pocket. The popularity of cycling is exploding, and the New Forest Trust, rather than capitalising on it, is trying to clamp down. A thousand cyclists spring up on the Forest's roads for one Sunday every few months - imagine if this was motorists. Oh wait, that's called the M25, twice a day.[/p][/quote]Why do you need to enter a cycling event to go cycling in the New Forest? Just let people cycle when they want and there will be no loss of business and it will be spread out over the year rather than focused all on one day.[/p][/quote]I see where you're going with this, but you're ignoring the massive draw these events have on people who would otherwise cycle around their local communities rather than the Forest. People come from all over the UK to sportives here on the south coast. I'm actually a member of one of the largest cycling clubs within a ride's distance of the New Forest, and normally these events are ignored by most of our members (not much novelty in doing a large organised ride around roads you've done a hundred times before!). They don't divide the existing cyclists in the area, they cause a large addition to total cyclist numbers for the duration of the event (and subsequently a large addition in tourist expenditure at local businesses). GrahamSimmons

9:02pm Thu 1 Aug 13

Torchie1 says...

GrahamSimmons wrote:
Reducing cycle events in the Forest makes no sense. It'll just drive cycle traffic towards the Jurassic coast & the Meon Valley, leaving local businesses comparatively out of pocket. The popularity of cycling is exploding, and the New Forest Trust, rather than capitalising on it, is trying to clamp down. A thousand cyclists spring up on the Forest's roads for one Sunday every few months - imagine if this was motorists. Oh wait, that's called the M25, twice a day.
If you believe the welcome will be warmer, head for pastures new and leave the forest businesses and the residents to suffer in peace and quiet.
[quote][p][bold]GrahamSimmons[/bold] wrote: Reducing cycle events in the Forest makes no sense. It'll just drive cycle traffic towards the Jurassic coast & the Meon Valley, leaving local businesses comparatively out of pocket. The popularity of cycling is exploding, and the New Forest Trust, rather than capitalising on it, is trying to clamp down. A thousand cyclists spring up on the Forest's roads for one Sunday every few months - imagine if this was motorists. Oh wait, that's called the M25, twice a day.[/p][/quote]If you believe the welcome will be warmer, head for pastures new and leave the forest businesses and the residents to suffer in peace and quiet. Torchie1

9:23pm Thu 1 Aug 13

geoff51 says...

Great Idea! But when have any cycling Nazis ever abided by any rules or regulations aimed at controlling their as they think God given right to do as they please without thought to the effect on others.
Cyclist must stay on the designated paths not ride on the open forest and not hold mass events without the express permission of the relevant authorities.
They must always remember the fragility of the forest ecosystem does not allow for wheeled transport off road.
Great Idea! But when have any cycling Nazis ever abided by any rules or regulations aimed at controlling their as they think God given right to do as they please without thought to the effect on others. Cyclist must stay on the designated paths not ride on the open forest and not hold mass events without the express permission of the relevant authorities. They must always remember the fragility of the forest ecosystem does not allow for wheeled transport off road. geoff51

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