Urgent fleet inspection after bus destroyed by fire

Daily Echo: Urgent fleet inspection after bus destroyed by fire Urgent fleet inspection after bus destroyed by fire

A BUS company has undertaken urgent inspection of part of its fleet after a blaze destroyed one of its vehicles.

Velvet called in five buses, the same model as the number 67 service which caught fire in Martyr Worthy near Winchester, after 45 people had to be flee minutes before the bus was engulfed in flames.

Bosses at the Eastleigh-based firm are concerned the other vehicles may have similar faults.

Managing director, Phil Stockley, confirmed that extra checks were necessary to ensure no further incidents occurred.

“We’ve brought the others in to make sure everything is in working order to hopefully avoid any such incident happening again,” he said. We’ve put on another bus to replace the one damaged yesterday so that the service can continue.

“All buses are inspected every four weeks but we brought in the ones of the same batch to carry out additional checks.”

Mr Stockley confirmed no faults had been found and that no services had to be suspended while checks were carried out.

The vehicle quickly became engulfed in flames after the bus was evacuated at Martyr Worthy at approximately 7.45am on Monday. No one was hurt.

Mr Stockley thanked his driver, who tried to tackle the blaze himself with an extinguisher after he was alerted to the fire by a student on her way to Peter Symonds College.

“Mr Stubbs is a very experienced driver, one of the first when the company first started, and is a professional to the end.”

Comments (5)

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12:52pm Wed 15 Jan 14

Niel says...

Whats the betting the cause was down to hitting too many potholes? Several times over the last few years I've seen buses and trucks with broken fuel lines, the pipes fracture due to the vibration and shock loadings hitting potholes causes, most don't ignite, simply spread a film of fuel oil on the road leaving a 'rainbow of death' behind...
Whats the betting the cause was down to hitting too many potholes? Several times over the last few years I've seen buses and trucks with broken fuel lines, the pipes fracture due to the vibration and shock loadings hitting potholes causes, most don't ignite, simply spread a film of fuel oil on the road leaving a 'rainbow of death' behind... Niel
  • Score: 1

3:57pm Wed 15 Jan 14

Ginger_cyclist says...

Niel wrote:
Whats the betting the cause was down to hitting too many potholes? Several times over the last few years I've seen buses and trucks with broken fuel lines, the pipes fracture due to the vibration and shock loadings hitting potholes causes, most don't ignite, simply spread a film of fuel oil on the road leaving a 'rainbow of death' behind...
I've heard of the airbag suspension on buses bursting due to the pot holes too, o I wouldn't be surprised that potholes cause fuel and oil lines to rupture and recently, there was a number 9 first bus broken down outside the range on Bursledon road, same model as the bus in the image above.
[quote][p][bold]Niel[/bold] wrote: Whats the betting the cause was down to hitting too many potholes? Several times over the last few years I've seen buses and trucks with broken fuel lines, the pipes fracture due to the vibration and shock loadings hitting potholes causes, most don't ignite, simply spread a film of fuel oil on the road leaving a 'rainbow of death' behind...[/p][/quote]I've heard of the airbag suspension on buses bursting due to the pot holes too, o I wouldn't be surprised that potholes cause fuel and oil lines to rupture and recently, there was a number 9 first bus broken down outside the range on Bursledon road, same model as the bus in the image above. Ginger_cyclist
  • Score: 2

12:10am Thu 16 Jan 14

Pikey Pete says...

Niel wrote:
Whats the betting the cause was down to hitting too many potholes? Several times over the last few years I've seen buses and trucks with broken fuel lines, the pipes fracture due to the vibration and shock loadings hitting potholes causes, most don't ignite, simply spread a film of fuel oil on the road leaving a 'rainbow of death' behind...
I agree...But. Most buses run on diesel which is not classed as flamable.

So I do think this theroy is incorrect. An electric fault would be more likely.
[quote][p][bold]Niel[/bold] wrote: Whats the betting the cause was down to hitting too many potholes? Several times over the last few years I've seen buses and trucks with broken fuel lines, the pipes fracture due to the vibration and shock loadings hitting potholes causes, most don't ignite, simply spread a film of fuel oil on the road leaving a 'rainbow of death' behind...[/p][/quote]I agree...But. Most buses run on diesel which is not classed as flamable. So I do think this theroy is incorrect. An electric fault would be more likely. Pikey Pete
  • Score: 3

2:24am Thu 16 Jan 14

dolomiteman says...

Niel wrote:
Whats the betting the cause was down to hitting too many potholes? Several times over the last few years I've seen buses and trucks with broken fuel lines, the pipes fracture due to the vibration and shock loadings hitting potholes causes, most don't ignite, simply spread a film of fuel oil on the road leaving a 'rainbow of death' behind...
I think you have been drinking too much fuel to make that comment, fuel lines are securely attached to the chassis with flexible line from the tank and to the engine so can not fracture due to the shock of hitting speedbumps or pot holes, in 30 years of working on vehicles I have never known a fuel line to fracture unless it is not secured or rusty, there are millions of buses and trucks on the road and one catches alight so yes it must be the potholes that caused it.
And as for ginger cyclists comment yes it was a Dennis dart, the same type as broken down outside the Range which wasn't on fire nor spilling fuel from a fractured fuel line so you point is?
[quote][p][bold]Niel[/bold] wrote: Whats the betting the cause was down to hitting too many potholes? Several times over the last few years I've seen buses and trucks with broken fuel lines, the pipes fracture due to the vibration and shock loadings hitting potholes causes, most don't ignite, simply spread a film of fuel oil on the road leaving a 'rainbow of death' behind...[/p][/quote]I think you have been drinking too much fuel to make that comment, fuel lines are securely attached to the chassis with flexible line from the tank and to the engine so can not fracture due to the shock of hitting speedbumps or pot holes, in 30 years of working on vehicles I have never known a fuel line to fracture unless it is not secured or rusty, there are millions of buses and trucks on the road and one catches alight so yes it must be the potholes that caused it. And as for ginger cyclists comment yes it was a Dennis dart, the same type as broken down outside the Range which wasn't on fire nor spilling fuel from a fractured fuel line so you point is? dolomiteman
  • Score: 0

1:45pm Thu 16 Jan 14

Niel says...

**** Pete wrote:
Niel wrote:
Whats the betting the cause was down to hitting too many potholes? Several times over the last few years I've seen buses and trucks with broken fuel lines, the pipes fracture due to the vibration and shock loadings hitting potholes causes, most don't ignite, simply spread a film of fuel oil on the road leaving a 'rainbow of death' behind...
I agree...But. Most buses run on diesel which is not classed as flamable.

So I do think this theroy is incorrect. An electric fault would be more likely.
Probably, but a number of older buses, First Bus especially, seem to be leaking derv. And derv does burn when it gets on a hot turbo!
[quote][p][bold]**** Pete[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Niel[/bold] wrote: Whats the betting the cause was down to hitting too many potholes? Several times over the last few years I've seen buses and trucks with broken fuel lines, the pipes fracture due to the vibration and shock loadings hitting potholes causes, most don't ignite, simply spread a film of fuel oil on the road leaving a 'rainbow of death' behind...[/p][/quote]I agree...But. Most buses run on diesel which is not classed as flamable. So I do think this theroy is incorrect. An electric fault would be more likely.[/p][/quote]Probably, but a number of older buses, First Bus especially, seem to be leaking derv. And derv does burn when it gets on a hot turbo! Niel
  • Score: 0

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