Rider David Horton lost life after cyclist spooked horse in New Forest

Rider lost life after cyclist spooked horse

David Horton

Rider lost life after cyclist spooked horse

First published in News Daily Echo: Photograph of the Author by

HE was a highly-experienced rider who had been around horses all his life.

Well-known businessman David Horton loved to trek through the Hampshire countryside on an animal that had competed at Hickstead, home of British show jumping.

But one of their regular rides ended in tragedy after the horse, Ace, was spooked by a cyclist.

Mr Horton was thrown from the saddle when the animal reacted to the bike coming up behind him, an inquest was told.

The 64-year-old father of two was taken to Southampton General Hospital but died after developing blood clots and suffering a cardiac arrest.

Speaking after the inquest his widow Jane, also 64, said the cyclist was using an unauthorised route across the New Forest when the accident happened in September last year. She urged cycling enthusiasts to stick to official paths and give horses a wide berth to prevent any similar tragedies.

Mrs Horton added: “The bike came down a hill and approached David at speed from behind. Cyclists are supposed to use gravel tracks but this one was riding along one of the Forest tracks made by ponies.

“Cyclists need to be more aware of the way horses react if they’re approached in the wrong way and in the wrong place. David had ridden all his life and Ace had taken part in competitions – but horses are a flight animal.”

Her comments come amid increasing controversy over the problems being caused by the ever-increasing number of cyclists using the Forest, including the thousands of riders who take part in the Wiggle events.

Critics claim the two-wheeled “invasion” of the Forest is putting people at risk.

The accident involved a lone cyclist who was riding near Mr Horton’s home and business at Decoy Pond Farm, near Beaulieu.

Mrs Horton said her husband told her “I’m fine, don’t make a fuss” but was airlifted to hospital.

Consultant pathologist Dr Adrian Bateman told the inquest that Mr Horton suffered fractures to his ribs, spine and pelvis in the accident.

H e added: “ H e seemed to be getting better but became unwell again. He had obvious breathing difficulties and suffered a cardiac arrest from which he could not be resuscitated.”

Mrs Horton told coroner Keith Wiseman: “His death was a big shock.

At 4.30pm on the day he died they were still telling us that they could sort everything out. But he passed away at 7pm. We were absolutely overwhelmed by the tremendous care he received in hospital. They could not have been more caring.”

Mr Wiseman said Mr Horton’s medical problems were triggered by the fall and recorded a verdict of accidental death.

Comments (40)

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6:23am Fri 17 Jan 14

Norwegian Saint says...

Let the cyclist v car driver v motorcyclist v tractor v truck v lorry v ramblers v horse rider arguements begin!
OR
Maybe just accept we live in a World where sad stories like this occur.
Let the cyclist v car driver v motorcyclist v tractor v truck v lorry v ramblers v horse rider arguements begin! OR Maybe just accept we live in a World where sad stories like this occur. Norwegian Saint
  • Score: -31

7:44am Fri 17 Jan 14

bullet93 says...

you cant blame the cyclist theres no rules on where you can and cannot ride accidents happen 9/10 people that get chucked off a horse prob get up with a sore arse just this man was very unfortunate when your time is up theres nothing you can do to prevent it
you cant blame the cyclist theres no rules on where you can and cannot ride accidents happen 9/10 people that get chucked off a horse prob get up with a sore arse just this man was very unfortunate when your time is up theres nothing you can do to prevent it bullet93
  • Score: -62

7:50am Fri 17 Jan 14

Ellwood says...

Norwegian Saint wrote:
Let the cyclist v car driver v motorcyclist v tractor v truck v lorry v ramblers v horse rider arguements begin!
OR
Maybe just accept we live in a World where sad stories like this occur.
....................
......one thing that is a clear certainty regarding this tragic loss of life NS, and this is, that it absolutely should not be viewed and 'accepted' as just another sad story. That approach will not do & is just NOT acceptable.
If the road users of the New Forest fail to grasp this, then we will continue to read of such incidents...it's that simple.
[quote][p][bold]Norwegian Saint[/bold] wrote: Let the cyclist v car driver v motorcyclist v tractor v truck v lorry v ramblers v horse rider arguements begin! OR Maybe just accept we live in a World where sad stories like this occur.[/p][/quote].................... ......one thing that is a clear certainty regarding this tragic loss of life NS, and this is, that it absolutely should not be viewed and 'accepted' as just another sad story. That approach will not do & is just NOT acceptable. If the road users of the New Forest fail to grasp this, then we will continue to read of such incidents...it's that simple. Ellwood
  • Score: 45

7:52am Fri 17 Jan 14

Ellwood says...

PS ....and before anyone says it................ro
ads....tracks, bridleways.... it matters not.
PS ....and before anyone says it................ro ads....tracks, bridleways.... it matters not. Ellwood
  • Score: 24

8:35am Fri 17 Jan 14

AFrustratedCyclist says...

An unfortunate accident and a very sad loss of life.
An unfortunate accident and a very sad loss of life. AFrustratedCyclist
  • Score: -8

8:41am Fri 17 Jan 14

Norwegian Saint says...

Ellwood wrote:
Norwegian Saint wrote: Let the cyclist v car driver v motorcyclist v tractor v truck v lorry v ramblers v horse rider arguements begin! OR Maybe just accept we live in a World where sad stories like this occur.
.................... ......one thing that is a clear certainty regarding this tragic loss of life NS, and this is, that it absolutely should not be viewed and 'accepted' as just another sad story. That approach will not do & is just NOT acceptable. If the road users of the New Forest fail to grasp this, then we will continue to read of such incidents...it's that simple.
I agree! BUT what can be done apart from telling the story and hopefully prevent it happening again?
I was born and bred in the forest not far from this accident and it is a huge shame for any loss of life, human or animal. I am trying to point out that just about everyday there is a story regarding cyclists or drivers when the real shame is somebody loses thier life or a loved one.
[quote][p][bold]Ellwood[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Norwegian Saint[/bold] wrote: Let the cyclist v car driver v motorcyclist v tractor v truck v lorry v ramblers v horse rider arguements begin! OR Maybe just accept we live in a World where sad stories like this occur.[/p][/quote].................... ......one thing that is a clear certainty regarding this tragic loss of life NS, and this is, that it absolutely should not be viewed and 'accepted' as just another sad story. That approach will not do & is just NOT acceptable. If the road users of the New Forest fail to grasp this, then we will continue to read of such incidents...it's that simple.[/p][/quote]I agree! BUT what can be done apart from telling the story and hopefully prevent it happening again? I was born and bred in the forest not far from this accident and it is a huge shame for any loss of life, human or animal. I am trying to point out that just about everyday there is a story regarding cyclists or drivers when the real shame is somebody loses thier life or a loved one. Norwegian Saint
  • Score: 12

9:01am Fri 17 Jan 14

Ellwood says...

..........NS, I was borne within 'spitting distance' of the Forest myself....have worked in and around the area most of my life. In that time I have seen the attitude of visitors and residents become more and more blaze in regard to respecting the Forest environment and other users of the area.
If we chalk this incident down to the level of a statistic and view the parties involved as just so much collateral, then we are heading for years of the same.
I have read with interest the arguments & comments from both sides of the issue in regard to safety and the New Forest....my view is that an awful lot of people are speaking their mind but not many are listening........den
ial of responsibility is not an option here.
As clichéd as it might sound....we (the users of the Forest) are 'all in this together' when it comes to the issue of safety of ourselves and others....incidents like these don't just happen to someone else.
..........NS, I was borne within 'spitting distance' of the Forest myself....have worked in and around the area most of my life. In that time I have seen the attitude of visitors and residents become more and more blaze in regard to respecting the Forest environment and other users of the area. If we chalk this incident down to the level of a statistic and view the parties involved as just so much collateral, then we are heading for years of the same. I have read with interest the arguments & comments from both sides of the issue in regard to safety and the New Forest....my view is that an awful lot of people are speaking their mind but not many are listening........den ial of responsibility is not an option here. As clichéd as it might sound....we (the users of the Forest) are 'all in this together' when it comes to the issue of safety of ourselves and others....incidents like these don't just happen to someone else. Ellwood
  • Score: 32

9:01am Fri 17 Jan 14

PeterM says...

A very sad loss of life, but no mention of whether the horse rider was wearing a helmet or not.

I can guarantee that had it been a cycling fatality then this would have been mentioned in the article.
A very sad loss of life, but no mention of whether the horse rider was wearing a helmet or not. I can guarantee that had it been a cycling fatality then this would have been mentioned in the article. PeterM
  • Score: -22

9:33am Fri 17 Jan 14

From the sidelines says...

"the cyclist was using an unauthorised route across the New Forest" - really? Who authorises cycling routes, and who prohibits alternatives?

Has *anyone* got a grasp of the relevant law?
"the cyclist was using an unauthorised route across the New Forest" - really? Who authorises cycling routes, and who prohibits alternatives? Has *anyone* got a grasp of the relevant law? From the sidelines
  • Score: -16

10:19am Fri 17 Jan 14

Frank28 says...

Cyclists must be respectful of animals and horseriders, as required in the Highway Code.
Cyclists must be respectful of animals and horseriders, as required in the Highway Code. Frank28
  • Score: 44

10:41am Fri 17 Jan 14

george h says...

Frank28 wrote:
Cyclists must be respectful of animals and horseriders, as required in the Highway Code.
True!

Except this didn't occur on a highway. Or a road for that matter.
[quote][p][bold]Frank28[/bold] wrote: Cyclists must be respectful of animals and horseriders, as required in the Highway Code.[/p][/quote]True! Except this didn't occur on a highway. Or a road for that matter. george h
  • Score: -19

10:46am Fri 17 Jan 14

southamptonadi says...

My sincere condolences to the widow and her family. I will respect her feelings. Why the echo had to mention the wiggle is beyond me, totally irelevent and will only fuel the wrong type of comments.
My sincere condolences to the widow and her family. I will respect her feelings. Why the echo had to mention the wiggle is beyond me, totally irelevent and will only fuel the wrong type of comments. southamptonadi
  • Score: 15

11:08am Fri 17 Jan 14

Linesman says...

Ellwood wrote:
..........NS, I was borne within 'spitting distance' of the Forest myself....have worked in and around the area most of my life. In that time I have seen the attitude of visitors and residents become more and more blaze in regard to respecting the Forest environment and other users of the area.
If we chalk this incident down to the level of a statistic and view the parties involved as just so much collateral, then we are heading for years of the same.
I have read with interest the arguments & comments from both sides of the issue in regard to safety and the New Forest....my view is that an awful lot of people are speaking their mind but not many are listening........den

ial of responsibility is not an option here.
As clichéd as it might sound....we (the users of the Forest) are 'all in this together' when it comes to the issue of safety of ourselves and others....incidents like these don't just happen to someone else.
borne?
[quote][p][bold]Ellwood[/bold] wrote: ..........NS, I was borne within 'spitting distance' of the Forest myself....have worked in and around the area most of my life. In that time I have seen the attitude of visitors and residents become more and more blaze in regard to respecting the Forest environment and other users of the area. If we chalk this incident down to the level of a statistic and view the parties involved as just so much collateral, then we are heading for years of the same. I have read with interest the arguments & comments from both sides of the issue in regard to safety and the New Forest....my view is that an awful lot of people are speaking their mind but not many are listening........den ial of responsibility is not an option here. As clichéd as it might sound....we (the users of the Forest) are 'all in this together' when it comes to the issue of safety of ourselves and others....incidents like these don't just happen to someone else.[/p][/quote]borne? Linesman
  • Score: -13

11:11am Fri 17 Jan 14

camerajuan says...

Ellwood wrote:
Norwegian Saint wrote:
Let the cyclist v car driver v motorcyclist v tractor v truck v lorry v ramblers v horse rider arguements begin!
OR
Maybe just accept we live in a World where sad stories like this occur.
....................

......one thing that is a clear certainty regarding this tragic loss of life NS, and this is, that it absolutely should not be viewed and 'accepted' as just another sad story. That approach will not do & is just NOT acceptable.
If the road users of the New Forest fail to grasp this, then we will continue to read of such incidents...it's that simple.
I think you have it right. Its the same on all types of road and for all road users.There's been too many deaths and injuries on the roads recently and it has to stop.

Horrible accident and my sincerest condolences to the family.
[quote][p][bold]Ellwood[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Norwegian Saint[/bold] wrote: Let the cyclist v car driver v motorcyclist v tractor v truck v lorry v ramblers v horse rider arguements begin! OR Maybe just accept we live in a World where sad stories like this occur.[/p][/quote].................... ......one thing that is a clear certainty regarding this tragic loss of life NS, and this is, that it absolutely should not be viewed and 'accepted' as just another sad story. That approach will not do & is just NOT acceptable. If the road users of the New Forest fail to grasp this, then we will continue to read of such incidents...it's that simple.[/p][/quote]I think you have it right. Its the same on all types of road and for all road users.There's been too many deaths and injuries on the roads recently and it has to stop. Horrible accident and my sincerest condolences to the family. camerajuan
  • Score: 16

11:24am Fri 17 Jan 14

Ellwood says...

Linesman wrote:
Ellwood wrote:
..........NS, I was borne within 'spitting distance' of the Forest myself....have worked in and around the area most of my life. In that time I have seen the attitude of visitors and residents become more and more blaze in regard to respecting the Forest environment and other users of the area.
If we chalk this incident down to the level of a statistic and view the parties involved as just so much collateral, then we are heading for years of the same.
I have read with interest the arguments & comments from both sides of the issue in regard to safety and the New Forest....my view is that an awful lot of people are speaking their mind but not many are listening........den


ial of responsibility is not an option here.
As clichéd as it might sound....we (the users of the Forest) are 'all in this together' when it comes to the issue of safety of ourselves and others....incidents like these don't just happen to someone else.
borne?
.........spelling error.
[quote][p][bold]Linesman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ellwood[/bold] wrote: ..........NS, I was borne within 'spitting distance' of the Forest myself....have worked in and around the area most of my life. In that time I have seen the attitude of visitors and residents become more and more blaze in regard to respecting the Forest environment and other users of the area. If we chalk this incident down to the level of a statistic and view the parties involved as just so much collateral, then we are heading for years of the same. I have read with interest the arguments & comments from both sides of the issue in regard to safety and the New Forest....my view is that an awful lot of people are speaking their mind but not many are listening........den ial of responsibility is not an option here. As clichéd as it might sound....we (the users of the Forest) are 'all in this together' when it comes to the issue of safety of ourselves and others....incidents like these don't just happen to someone else.[/p][/quote]borne?[/p][/quote].........spelling error. Ellwood
  • Score: 12

1:04pm Fri 17 Jan 14

SteveParsons says...

Really surprised that the anti cycling brigade hasnt been on here more slating the cyclists.

However their are specific tracks/roads and pathways in the forest to accommodate cyclists that we use and anyone who puts any thought into it can find this on the web.

We often pass horses/ponys and donkeys with little or no reaction from them. Again its an unfortunate accident and these things do happen.
Really surprised that the anti cycling brigade hasnt been on here more slating the cyclists. However their are specific tracks/roads and pathways in the forest to accommodate cyclists that we use and anyone who puts any thought into it can find this on the web. We often pass horses/ponys and donkeys with little or no reaction from them. Again its an unfortunate accident and these things do happen. SteveParsons
  • Score: 3

2:09pm Fri 17 Jan 14

General Grievance says...

southamptonadi wrote:
My sincere condolences to the widow and her family. I will respect her feelings. Why the echo had to mention the wiggle is beyond me, totally irelevent and will only fuel the wrong type of comments.
Shameful trying to link the two but not unexpected from the Echo. Detracts from the sensible thoughts and advice from the poor chaps widow at a very difficult time.
[quote][p][bold]southamptonadi[/bold] wrote: My sincere condolences to the widow and her family. I will respect her feelings. Why the echo had to mention the wiggle is beyond me, totally irelevent and will only fuel the wrong type of comments.[/p][/quote]Shameful trying to link the two but not unexpected from the Echo. Detracts from the sensible thoughts and advice from the poor chaps widow at a very difficult time. General Grievance
  • Score: 9

2:32pm Fri 17 Jan 14

Niel says...

Horses are spooked by all sorts of things, as any horse rider can tell you, so being aware saves lives, hopefully this 'news' will filter down so others don't spook them.

Riding different motorcycles I find the modern overly quiet machine's are more of a problem to horses than my older and clearly audible bikes, if the horse has enough prior warning AND the rider allows it to turn its head to look at the source of the noise most simply ignore you as no threat, sudden noise close up, like a virtually silent bicycle is where most of the danger lies.
Horses are spooked by all sorts of things, as any horse rider can tell you, so being aware saves lives, hopefully this 'news' will filter down so others don't spook them. Riding different motorcycles I find the modern overly quiet machine's are more of a problem to horses than my older and clearly audible bikes, if the horse has enough prior warning AND the rider allows it to turn its head to look at the source of the noise most simply ignore you as no threat, sudden noise close up, like a virtually silent bicycle is where most of the danger lies. Niel
  • Score: 35

2:35pm Fri 17 Jan 14

ranger_bob says...

Just to play Devil's Advocate for a while, let's look at the facts.

Mr Wiseman said Mr Horton’s medical problems were triggered by the fall and recorded a verdict of accidental death.

At no point is the fall attributed to the cyclist by the coroner. We only have the wife's word that it was caused by the cyclist. Horses are incredibly flighted creatures and can be spooked by weather, birds or anything (including a cyclist).

This was an absolute tragedy and I wish the family well, but let's stop the finger pointing for a change as none of us was there and none of us know what really happened.
Just to play Devil's Advocate for a while, let's look at the facts. Mr Wiseman said Mr Horton’s medical problems were triggered by the fall and recorded a verdict of accidental death. At no point is the fall attributed to the cyclist by the coroner. We only have the wife's word that it was caused by the cyclist. Horses are incredibly flighted creatures and can be spooked by weather, birds or anything (including a cyclist). This was an absolute tragedy and I wish the family well, but let's stop the finger pointing for a change as none of us was there and none of us know what really happened. ranger_bob
  • Score: 8

3:42pm Fri 17 Jan 14

Jesus_02 says...

I’ve said this before and I will continue to do so... Comments sections should not be included for such articles. The majority of people commenting do have possession of the full facts and judgment is invariably arbitrarily passed regardless of the feelings of those involved. The story itself (Mrs Horton comments included) is enough to raise awareness of he vulnerability of horse riders.

Condolences to Mr Hortons family
I’ve said this before and I will continue to do so... Comments sections should not be included for such articles. The majority of people commenting do have possession of the full facts and judgment is invariably arbitrarily passed regardless of the feelings of those involved. The story itself (Mrs Horton comments included) is enough to raise awareness of he vulnerability of horse riders. Condolences to Mr Hortons family Jesus_02
  • Score: -7

4:02pm Fri 17 Jan 14

ranger_bob says...

Jesus_02 wrote:
I’ve said this before and I will continue to do so... Comments sections should not be included for such articles. The majority of people commenting do have possession of the full facts and judgment is invariably arbitrarily passed regardless of the feelings of those involved. The story itself (Mrs Horton comments included) is enough to raise awareness of he vulnerability of horse riders.

Condolences to Mr Hortons family
Yet you chose to comment???????
[quote][p][bold]Jesus_02[/bold] wrote: I’ve said this before and I will continue to do so... Comments sections should not be included for such articles. The majority of people commenting do have possession of the full facts and judgment is invariably arbitrarily passed regardless of the feelings of those involved. The story itself (Mrs Horton comments included) is enough to raise awareness of he vulnerability of horse riders. Condolences to Mr Hortons family[/p][/quote]Yet you chose to comment??????? ranger_bob
  • Score: 20

6:26pm Fri 17 Jan 14

cagiva_kid says...

RIP David. So sorry to hear you had to leave your family in such a terrible way, but I remember well how you enjoyed life 40 years ago and I bet you were still living life to the full right to the end. My condolences to the family. Chris
RIP David. So sorry to hear you had to leave your family in such a terrible way, but I remember well how you enjoyed life 40 years ago and I bet you were still living life to the full right to the end. My condolences to the family. Chris cagiva_kid
  • Score: 9

6:27pm Fri 17 Jan 14

Baybrit says...

AFrustratedCyclist wrote:
An unfortunate accident and a very sad loss of life.
No AFC, not an unfortunate accident, another example of the arrogance of a cyclist. Did you not read?.....the cyclist was "using an unauthorised route" and "approached David at speed from behind'" The cyclist was where they should not have been and travelling at speed. Anybody with a brain and an ounce of sense and decency knows to take special care around horses. And, furthermore, there is nothing in the article to suggest that the cyclist even bothered to stop, they probably just pedalled away without a thought
for anybody else.
[quote][p][bold]AFrustratedCyclist[/bold] wrote: An unfortunate accident and a very sad loss of life.[/p][/quote]No AFC, not an unfortunate accident, another example of the arrogance of a cyclist. Did you not read?.....the cyclist was "using an unauthorised route" and "approached David at speed from behind'" The cyclist was where they should not have been and travelling at speed. Anybody with a brain and an ounce of sense and decency knows to take special care around horses. And, furthermore, there is nothing in the article to suggest that the cyclist even bothered to stop, they probably just pedalled away without a thought for anybody else. Baybrit
  • Score: -14

8:35pm Fri 17 Jan 14

geoff51 says...

Baybrit wrote:
AFrustratedCyclist wrote:
An unfortunate accident and a very sad loss of life.
No AFC, not an unfortunate accident, another example of the arrogance of a cyclist. Did you not read?.....the cyclist was "using an unauthorised route" and "approached David at speed from behind'" The cyclist was where they should not have been and travelling at speed. Anybody with a brain and an ounce of sense and decency knows to take special care around horses. And, furthermore, there is nothing in the article to suggest that the cyclist even bothered to stop, they probably just pedalled away without a thought
for anybody else.
Thankfully someone has realised that the idiot on the cycle was not using the designated cycle path and as usual was cycling with no regard to other users and the fact that horses are living creatures that can been easily spooked.
Hopefully this cyclist can be found and prosecuted for causing death by dangerous cycling.
My sympathies are with the horse rider as from personal experience I know that there are too many townies with no respect for the forest and its polite way of coexisting with all types of users.
[quote][p][bold]Baybrit[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]AFrustratedCyclist[/bold] wrote: An unfortunate accident and a very sad loss of life.[/p][/quote]No AFC, not an unfortunate accident, another example of the arrogance of a cyclist. Did you not read?.....the cyclist was "using an unauthorised route" and "approached David at speed from behind'" The cyclist was where they should not have been and travelling at speed. Anybody with a brain and an ounce of sense and decency knows to take special care around horses. And, furthermore, there is nothing in the article to suggest that the cyclist even bothered to stop, they probably just pedalled away without a thought for anybody else.[/p][/quote]Thankfully someone has realised that the idiot on the cycle was not using the designated cycle path and as usual was cycling with no regard to other users and the fact that horses are living creatures that can been easily spooked. Hopefully this cyclist can be found and prosecuted for causing death by dangerous cycling. My sympathies are with the horse rider as from personal experience I know that there are too many townies with no respect for the forest and its polite way of coexisting with all types of users. geoff51
  • Score: -11

9:39pm Fri 17 Jan 14

Ginger_cyclist says...

Baybrit wrote:
AFrustratedCyclist wrote:
An unfortunate accident and a very sad loss of life.
No AFC, not an unfortunate accident, another example of the arrogance of a cyclist. Did you not read?.....the cyclist was "using an unauthorised route" and "approached David at speed from behind'" The cyclist was where they should not have been and travelling at speed. Anybody with a brain and an ounce of sense and decency knows to take special care around horses. And, furthermore, there is nothing in the article to suggest that the cyclist even bothered to stop, they probably just pedalled away without a thought
for anybody else.
Are these trails used by horse riders in the forest classed as bridleways? If so, then cyclist are legally allowed to use them, though I must emphasize this point of mine, if you are using a bridleway while cycling or even if you're on the road and you come across a horse and rider, SLOW THE HELL DOWN, approach with caution and speak to the horse and rider so they know you're there and mean them no harm, if the animal looks like it might spook, stop altogether and get off and let the rider regain control, they will then most likely let you walk past, then make sure to walk to a reasonable istance before getting back on the bike, if it's a 2 lane road, then slow down a bit and use the FULL width of the road to pass the horse, if the horse is approaching from in front, again, slow down, if it starts to spook, stop and get off until the animal has gone past, if the horse throws the rider, make sure they're ok and if you need to, get them away from the animal in case it tramples them and then call for medical assistance and if they're conscious, ask the rider if there's anyone who you can call to come collect the horse for them if they're not able to call them.
Enough sense for you?
[quote][p][bold]Baybrit[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]AFrustratedCyclist[/bold] wrote: An unfortunate accident and a very sad loss of life.[/p][/quote]No AFC, not an unfortunate accident, another example of the arrogance of a cyclist. Did you not read?.....the cyclist was "using an unauthorised route" and "approached David at speed from behind'" The cyclist was where they should not have been and travelling at speed. Anybody with a brain and an ounce of sense and decency knows to take special care around horses. And, furthermore, there is nothing in the article to suggest that the cyclist even bothered to stop, they probably just pedalled away without a thought for anybody else.[/p][/quote]Are these trails used by horse riders in the forest classed as bridleways? If so, then cyclist are legally allowed to use them, though I must emphasize this point of mine, if you are using a bridleway while cycling or even if you're on the road and you come across a horse and rider, SLOW THE HELL DOWN, approach with caution and speak to the horse and rider so they know you're there and mean them no harm, if the animal looks like it might spook, stop altogether and get off and let the rider regain control, they will then most likely let you walk past, then make sure to walk to a reasonable istance before getting back on the bike, if it's a 2 lane road, then slow down a bit and use the FULL width of the road to pass the horse, if the horse is approaching from in front, again, slow down, if it starts to spook, stop and get off until the animal has gone past, if the horse throws the rider, make sure they're ok and if you need to, get them away from the animal in case it tramples them and then call for medical assistance and if they're conscious, ask the rider if there's anyone who you can call to come collect the horse for them if they're not able to call them. Enough sense for you? Ginger_cyclist
  • Score: 11

10:13pm Fri 17 Jan 14

geoff51 says...

Ginger_cyclist wrote:
Baybrit wrote:
AFrustratedCyclist wrote:
An unfortunate accident and a very sad loss of life.
No AFC, not an unfortunate accident, another example of the arrogance of a cyclist. Did you not read?.....the cyclist was "using an unauthorised route" and "approached David at speed from behind'" The cyclist was where they should not have been and travelling at speed. Anybody with a brain and an ounce of sense and decency knows to take special care around horses. And, furthermore, there is nothing in the article to suggest that the cyclist even bothered to stop, they probably just pedalled away without a thought
for anybody else.
Are these trails used by horse riders in the forest classed as bridleways? If so, then cyclist are legally allowed to use them, though I must emphasize this point of mine, if you are using a bridleway while cycling or even if you're on the road and you come across a horse and rider, SLOW THE HELL DOWN, approach with caution and speak to the horse and rider so they know you're there and mean them no harm, if the animal looks like it might spook, stop altogether and get off and let the rider regain control, they will then most likely let you walk past, then make sure to walk to a reasonable istance before getting back on the bike, if it's a 2 lane road, then slow down a bit and use the FULL width of the road to pass the horse, if the horse is approaching from in front, again, slow down, if it starts to spook, stop and get off until the animal has gone past, if the horse throws the rider, make sure they're ok and if you need to, get them away from the animal in case it tramples them and then call for medical assistance and if they're conscious, ask the rider if there's anyone who you can call to come collect the horse for them if they're not able to call them.
Enough sense for you?
There is a lot of sense in what you say about the approach to horses in the forest, but I must correct you as to the definition of Bridleways.
Bridleways are designate pathways that are one step above pathways in that they have no obstruction such as stiles to impede the access of horses and horse drawn vehicles.
This rider was using one of the many tracks that are created by the ponies in their crossings of the forest and are forbidden to be used by wheeled vehicles.
All bridleways are designated by the relevant local authority.
[quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Baybrit[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]AFrustratedCyclist[/bold] wrote: An unfortunate accident and a very sad loss of life.[/p][/quote]No AFC, not an unfortunate accident, another example of the arrogance of a cyclist. Did you not read?.....the cyclist was "using an unauthorised route" and "approached David at speed from behind'" The cyclist was where they should not have been and travelling at speed. Anybody with a brain and an ounce of sense and decency knows to take special care around horses. And, furthermore, there is nothing in the article to suggest that the cyclist even bothered to stop, they probably just pedalled away without a thought for anybody else.[/p][/quote]Are these trails used by horse riders in the forest classed as bridleways? If so, then cyclist are legally allowed to use them, though I must emphasize this point of mine, if you are using a bridleway while cycling or even if you're on the road and you come across a horse and rider, SLOW THE HELL DOWN, approach with caution and speak to the horse and rider so they know you're there and mean them no harm, if the animal looks like it might spook, stop altogether and get off and let the rider regain control, they will then most likely let you walk past, then make sure to walk to a reasonable istance before getting back on the bike, if it's a 2 lane road, then slow down a bit and use the FULL width of the road to pass the horse, if the horse is approaching from in front, again, slow down, if it starts to spook, stop and get off until the animal has gone past, if the horse throws the rider, make sure they're ok and if you need to, get them away from the animal in case it tramples them and then call for medical assistance and if they're conscious, ask the rider if there's anyone who you can call to come collect the horse for them if they're not able to call them. Enough sense for you?[/p][/quote]There is a lot of sense in what you say about the approach to horses in the forest, but I must correct you as to the definition of Bridleways. Bridleways are designate pathways that are one step above pathways in that they have no obstruction such as stiles to impede the access of horses and horse drawn vehicles. This rider was using one of the many tracks that are created by the ponies in their crossings of the forest and are forbidden to be used by wheeled vehicles. All bridleways are designated by the relevant local authority. geoff51
  • Score: 6

10:41pm Fri 17 Jan 14

Ginger_cyclist says...

geoff51 wrote:
Ginger_cyclist wrote:
Baybrit wrote:
AFrustratedCyclist wrote:
An unfortunate accident and a very sad loss of life.
No AFC, not an unfortunate accident, another example of the arrogance of a cyclist. Did you not read?.....the cyclist was "using an unauthorised route" and "approached David at speed from behind'" The cyclist was where they should not have been and travelling at speed. Anybody with a brain and an ounce of sense and decency knows to take special care around horses. And, furthermore, there is nothing in the article to suggest that the cyclist even bothered to stop, they probably just pedalled away without a thought
for anybody else.
Are these trails used by horse riders in the forest classed as bridleways? If so, then cyclist are legally allowed to use them, though I must emphasize this point of mine, if you are using a bridleway while cycling or even if you're on the road and you come across a horse and rider, SLOW THE HELL DOWN, approach with caution and speak to the horse and rider so they know you're there and mean them no harm, if the animal looks like it might spook, stop altogether and get off and let the rider regain control, they will then most likely let you walk past, then make sure to walk to a reasonable istance before getting back on the bike, if it's a 2 lane road, then slow down a bit and use the FULL width of the road to pass the horse, if the horse is approaching from in front, again, slow down, if it starts to spook, stop and get off until the animal has gone past, if the horse throws the rider, make sure they're ok and if you need to, get them away from the animal in case it tramples them and then call for medical assistance and if they're conscious, ask the rider if there's anyone who you can call to come collect the horse for them if they're not able to call them.
Enough sense for you?
There is a lot of sense in what you say about the approach to horses in the forest, but I must correct you as to the definition of Bridleways.
Bridleways are designate pathways that are one step above pathways in that they have no obstruction such as stiles to impede the access of horses and horse drawn vehicles.
This rider was using one of the many tracks that are created by the ponies in their crossings of the forest and are forbidden to be used by wheeled vehicles.
All bridleways are designated by the relevant local authority.
Well thank you for putting me right, I did ask after all though most local authorities allow bicycles access to bridleways under the law of the land but obviously the authority responsible for the forest decided to enact a bylaw that prohibits cyclists from such tracks, national and local cycle routes often go along bridleways but if you're prohibited from going somewhere, you don't go there.
[quote][p][bold]geoff51[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Baybrit[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]AFrustratedCyclist[/bold] wrote: An unfortunate accident and a very sad loss of life.[/p][/quote]No AFC, not an unfortunate accident, another example of the arrogance of a cyclist. Did you not read?.....the cyclist was "using an unauthorised route" and "approached David at speed from behind'" The cyclist was where they should not have been and travelling at speed. Anybody with a brain and an ounce of sense and decency knows to take special care around horses. And, furthermore, there is nothing in the article to suggest that the cyclist even bothered to stop, they probably just pedalled away without a thought for anybody else.[/p][/quote]Are these trails used by horse riders in the forest classed as bridleways? If so, then cyclist are legally allowed to use them, though I must emphasize this point of mine, if you are using a bridleway while cycling or even if you're on the road and you come across a horse and rider, SLOW THE HELL DOWN, approach with caution and speak to the horse and rider so they know you're there and mean them no harm, if the animal looks like it might spook, stop altogether and get off and let the rider regain control, they will then most likely let you walk past, then make sure to walk to a reasonable istance before getting back on the bike, if it's a 2 lane road, then slow down a bit and use the FULL width of the road to pass the horse, if the horse is approaching from in front, again, slow down, if it starts to spook, stop and get off until the animal has gone past, if the horse throws the rider, make sure they're ok and if you need to, get them away from the animal in case it tramples them and then call for medical assistance and if they're conscious, ask the rider if there's anyone who you can call to come collect the horse for them if they're not able to call them. Enough sense for you?[/p][/quote]There is a lot of sense in what you say about the approach to horses in the forest, but I must correct you as to the definition of Bridleways. Bridleways are designate pathways that are one step above pathways in that they have no obstruction such as stiles to impede the access of horses and horse drawn vehicles. This rider was using one of the many tracks that are created by the ponies in their crossings of the forest and are forbidden to be used by wheeled vehicles. All bridleways are designated by the relevant local authority.[/p][/quote]Well thank you for putting me right, I did ask after all though most local authorities allow bicycles access to bridleways under the law of the land but obviously the authority responsible for the forest decided to enact a bylaw that prohibits cyclists from such tracks, national and local cycle routes often go along bridleways but if you're prohibited from going somewhere, you don't go there. Ginger_cyclist
  • Score: 6

9:18am Sat 18 Jan 14

deanboyce says...

Very sad loss of life. As a horse rider and mountain bike rider I understand the arguments from both sides. However, the main point is that horses are animals and as such they get spooked very easily as would dogs or cats if scared, and they bolt. Even when I am out walking on foot cyclists coming up from behind at speed totally scare the s..t out of me let alone animals. All it takes is for the cyclist to shout ahead that they are approaching and ensure the rider has heard them. If the rider does not turn round or acknowledge they have heard, the cyclists should slow down or better still get off until they passed the horse and continue with their cycle ride. Its as simple as that and then these types of accidents would reduce considerably. If everyone just had a little more thought for others and look at potential harm when going about their hobbies, we would not be reading sad stories like these. My thoughts are with the family
Very sad loss of life. As a horse rider and mountain bike rider I understand the arguments from both sides. However, the main point is that horses are animals and as such they get spooked very easily as would dogs or cats if scared, and they bolt. Even when I am out walking on foot cyclists coming up from behind at speed totally scare the s..t out of me let alone animals. All it takes is for the cyclist to shout ahead that they are approaching and ensure the rider has heard them. If the rider does not turn round or acknowledge they have heard, the cyclists should slow down or better still get off until they passed the horse and continue with their cycle ride. Its as simple as that and then these types of accidents would reduce considerably. If everyone just had a little more thought for others and look at potential harm when going about their hobbies, we would not be reading sad stories like these. My thoughts are with the family deanboyce
  • Score: 7

9:33am Sat 18 Jan 14

PeterM says...

Rather than requoting one of the above replies, I just want to clarify something about bridleways and bicycles.

Following the 1968 Countryside Act cyclists have been allowed to use legally defined bridleways. However, Councils are not obliged to provide fir cyclists to use them so they can be full of ruts and potholes, navigable by horse but difficult on a bicycle.

It would appear that this very sad incident occurred on a track that the ponies had created themselves, rather than one the local authority designated as one.
Rather than requoting one of the above replies, I just want to clarify something about bridleways and bicycles. Following the 1968 Countryside Act cyclists have been allowed to use legally defined bridleways. However, Councils are not obliged to provide fir cyclists to use them so they can be full of ruts and potholes, navigable by horse but difficult on a bicycle. It would appear that this very sad incident occurred on a track that the ponies had created themselves, rather than one the local authority designated as one. PeterM
  • Score: 0

12:05pm Sat 18 Jan 14

Equine expert says...

Niel wrote:
Horses are spooked by all sorts of things, as any horse rider can tell you, so being aware saves lives, hopefully this 'news' will filter down so others don't spook them.

Riding different motorcycles I find the modern overly quiet machine's are more of a problem to horses than my older and clearly audible bikes, if the horse has enough prior warning AND the rider allows it to turn its head to look at the source of the noise most simply ignore you as no threat, sudden noise close up, like a virtually silent bicycle is where most of the danger lies.
The problem with cyclists passing horses is that the cyclist is normally silent and if the cyclist is overtaking the horse is frightened by the sudden appearance of the cyclist. The onus is on the cyclist to make other road users aware of his presence and to pass slow and wide. Failure to do so could make the cyclist personally liable (financially) for any resulting damage.
[quote][p][bold]Niel[/bold] wrote: Horses are spooked by all sorts of things, as any horse rider can tell you, so being aware saves lives, hopefully this 'news' will filter down so others don't spook them. Riding different motorcycles I find the modern overly quiet machine's are more of a problem to horses than my older and clearly audible bikes, if the horse has enough prior warning AND the rider allows it to turn its head to look at the source of the noise most simply ignore you as no threat, sudden noise close up, like a virtually silent bicycle is where most of the danger lies.[/p][/quote]The problem with cyclists passing horses is that the cyclist is normally silent and if the cyclist is overtaking the horse is frightened by the sudden appearance of the cyclist. The onus is on the cyclist to make other road users aware of his presence and to pass slow and wide. Failure to do so could make the cyclist personally liable (financially) for any resulting damage. Equine expert
  • Score: 7

12:45pm Sat 18 Jan 14

Forest Resident says...

PeterM wrote:
Rather than requoting one of the above replies, I just want to clarify something about bridleways and bicycles.

Following the 1968 Countryside Act cyclists have been allowed to use legally defined bridleways. However, Councils are not obliged to provide fir cyclists to use them so they can be full of ruts and potholes, navigable by horse but difficult on a bicycle.

It would appear that this very sad incident occurred on a track that the ponies had created themselves, rather than one the local authority designated as one.
Yes, I've been doing a little reading on the same subject, indeed the New Forest NPA and the Forestry Commission both concede on their respective websites (in very small print) that bridleways in the New Forest ARE perfectly legal for cyclists to utilise, the only stumbling block being that paths defined as bridleways are not always marked, on a map or otherwise. Furthermore, in the vicinity of Decoy Pond Farm where the incident occurred there are numerous unmarked bridleways which I only discovered after trawling through various relevant documents on Hampshire County Councils website, just because a path may give the visible appearance of a pony track does not preclude it from being a bridleway which is legally accessible by bicycle.

It's not particularly clear from this article who was actually present when the incident occurred, so it's difficult to know how it was ascertained that the cyclist allegedly approached silently and at speed. Whilst I sympathise with the family of the deceased, if they were not actually there when it took place how can they be certain of events and/or the exact location? The coroner is not quoted as having made any qualified comment or judgement in this respect of this so in effect there is no finding of any guilt or negligence by the cyclist.

I do of course agree that cyclists should approach horses and riders with extreme caution and try to make them aware of their slow and wide approach, likewise motorists should do similar when passing cyclists on New Forest roads. If everyone gave each other a little time, respect, and consideration for their safety regardless of chosen transport method then I'm sure there would be far less of the anti cycling sentiment in the region, Then again, the Echo doesn't help matters by deliberately and unjustifiably linking this unfortunate accidental death to well organised and attended on road cycling events such as those run by Wiggle.
[quote][p][bold]PeterM[/bold] wrote: Rather than requoting one of the above replies, I just want to clarify something about bridleways and bicycles. Following the 1968 Countryside Act cyclists have been allowed to use legally defined bridleways. However, Councils are not obliged to provide fir cyclists to use them so they can be full of ruts and potholes, navigable by horse but difficult on a bicycle. It would appear that this very sad incident occurred on a track that the ponies had created themselves, rather than one the local authority designated as one.[/p][/quote]Yes, I've been doing a little reading on the same subject, indeed the New Forest NPA and the Forestry Commission both concede on their respective websites (in very small print) that bridleways in the New Forest ARE perfectly legal for cyclists to utilise, the only stumbling block being that paths defined as bridleways are not always marked, on a map or otherwise. Furthermore, in the vicinity of Decoy Pond Farm where the incident occurred there are numerous unmarked bridleways which I only discovered after trawling through various relevant documents on Hampshire County Councils website, just because a path may give the visible appearance of a pony track does not preclude it from being a bridleway which is legally accessible by bicycle. It's not particularly clear from this article who was actually present when the incident occurred, so it's difficult to know how it was ascertained that the cyclist allegedly approached silently and at speed. Whilst I sympathise with the family of the deceased, if they were not actually there when it took place how can they be certain of events and/or the exact location? The coroner is not quoted as having made any qualified comment or judgement in this respect of this so in effect there is no finding of any guilt or negligence by the cyclist. I do of course agree that cyclists should approach horses and riders with extreme caution and try to make them aware of their slow and wide approach, likewise motorists should do similar when passing cyclists on New Forest roads. If everyone gave each other a little time, respect, and consideration for their safety regardless of chosen transport method then I'm sure there would be far less of the anti cycling sentiment in the region, Then again, the Echo doesn't help matters by deliberately and unjustifiably linking this unfortunate accidental death to well organised and attended on road cycling events such as those run by Wiggle. Forest Resident
  • Score: 10

2:41pm Sat 18 Jan 14

Mary80 says...

If you see a horse coming as your driving on a path why not just stop i know how easily a horse can suddenly lash out if feeling threatened
If you see a horse coming as your driving on a path why not just stop i know how easily a horse can suddenly lash out if feeling threatened Mary80
  • Score: 4

1:05pm Mon 20 Jan 14

phatamy86 says...

Cycling on the open forest is actually prohibited by the forestry commission, and can carry a penalty fine of upto £500. The only authorised routes through the new forest are on designated cycle routes, which are the wide gravel pathways through the enclosures. Cycling across the open heathland etc is not allowed, such as the area where this accident occurred.
However, I will say that many people are totally unaware of this rule due to lack of signage by the forestry commission and national park authority, which I think is something that definitely needs to be addressed.

My horse took off with me days before David's accident because a cyclist came up behind me; again, taking the courtesy of calling out a 'hello' to let the horse and rider know you are there doesn't take any effort.

The first paragraph of this link outlines where you can and can't cycle; http://www.newforest
npa.gov.uk/cycling_r
outes
Cycling on the open forest is actually prohibited by the forestry commission, and can carry a penalty fine of upto £500. The only authorised routes through the new forest are on designated cycle routes, which are the wide gravel pathways through the enclosures. Cycling across the open heathland etc is not allowed, such as the area where this accident occurred. However, I will say that many people are totally unaware of this rule due to lack of signage by the forestry commission and national park authority, which I think is something that definitely needs to be addressed. My horse took off with me days before David's accident because a cyclist came up behind me; again, taking the courtesy of calling out a 'hello' to let the horse and rider know you are there doesn't take any effort. The first paragraph of this link outlines where you can and can't cycle; http://www.newforest npa.gov.uk/cycling_r outes phatamy86
  • Score: 5

1:07pm Mon 20 Jan 14

phatamy86 says...

PeterM wrote:
A very sad loss of life, but no mention of whether the horse rider was wearing a helmet or not.

I can guarantee that had it been a cycling fatality then this would have been mentioned in the article.
He wore a helmet and no head injuries were sustained, it was abdominal area which lead to complications
[quote][p][bold]PeterM[/bold] wrote: A very sad loss of life, but no mention of whether the horse rider was wearing a helmet or not. I can guarantee that had it been a cycling fatality then this would have been mentioned in the article.[/p][/quote]He wore a helmet and no head injuries were sustained, it was abdominal area which lead to complications phatamy86
  • Score: 5

1:08pm Mon 20 Jan 14

phatamy86 says...

bullet93 wrote:
you cant blame the cyclist theres no rules on where you can and cannot ride accidents happen 9/10 people that get chucked off a horse prob get up with a sore arse just this man was very unfortunate when your time is up theres nothing you can do to prevent it
See link for legal cycle routes; http://www.newforest
npa.gov.uk/cycling_r
outes
you are not permitted to cycle on open forest, where this accident occurred, though there is no signage in the forest to enforce this.
[quote][p][bold]bullet93[/bold] wrote: you cant blame the cyclist theres no rules on where you can and cannot ride accidents happen 9/10 people that get chucked off a horse prob get up with a sore arse just this man was very unfortunate when your time is up theres nothing you can do to prevent it[/p][/quote]See link for legal cycle routes; http://www.newforest npa.gov.uk/cycling_r outes you are not permitted to cycle on open forest, where this accident occurred, though there is no signage in the forest to enforce this. phatamy86
  • Score: 3

1:12pm Mon 20 Jan 14

phatamy86 says...

geoff51 wrote:
Ginger_cyclist wrote:
Baybrit wrote:
AFrustratedCyclist wrote:
An unfortunate accident and a very sad loss of life.
No AFC, not an unfortunate accident, another example of the arrogance of a cyclist. Did you not read?.....the cyclist was "using an unauthorised route" and "approached David at speed from behind'" The cyclist was where they should not have been and travelling at speed. Anybody with a brain and an ounce of sense and decency knows to take special care around horses. And, furthermore, there is nothing in the article to suggest that the cyclist even bothered to stop, they probably just pedalled away without a thought
for anybody else.
Are these trails used by horse riders in the forest classed as bridleways? If so, then cyclist are legally allowed to use them, though I must emphasize this point of mine, if you are using a bridleway while cycling or even if you're on the road and you come across a horse and rider, SLOW THE HELL DOWN, approach with caution and speak to the horse and rider so they know you're there and mean them no harm, if the animal looks like it might spook, stop altogether and get off and let the rider regain control, they will then most likely let you walk past, then make sure to walk to a reasonable istance before getting back on the bike, if it's a 2 lane road, then slow down a bit and use the FULL width of the road to pass the horse, if the horse is approaching from in front, again, slow down, if it starts to spook, stop and get off until the animal has gone past, if the horse throws the rider, make sure they're ok and if you need to, get them away from the animal in case it tramples them and then call for medical assistance and if they're conscious, ask the rider if there's anyone who you can call to come collect the horse for them if they're not able to call them.
Enough sense for you?
There is a lot of sense in what you say about the approach to horses in the forest, but I must correct you as to the definition of Bridleways.
Bridleways are designate pathways that are one step above pathways in that they have no obstruction such as stiles to impede the access of horses and horse drawn vehicles.
This rider was using one of the many tracks that are created by the ponies in their crossings of the forest and are forbidden to be used by wheeled vehicles.
All bridleways are designated by the relevant local authority.
http://www.newforest
npa.gov.uk/cycling_r
outes
legal cycle routes outlined in the first paragraph...
[quote][p][bold]geoff51[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Baybrit[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]AFrustratedCyclist[/bold] wrote: An unfortunate accident and a very sad loss of life.[/p][/quote]No AFC, not an unfortunate accident, another example of the arrogance of a cyclist. Did you not read?.....the cyclist was "using an unauthorised route" and "approached David at speed from behind'" The cyclist was where they should not have been and travelling at speed. Anybody with a brain and an ounce of sense and decency knows to take special care around horses. And, furthermore, there is nothing in the article to suggest that the cyclist even bothered to stop, they probably just pedalled away without a thought for anybody else.[/p][/quote]Are these trails used by horse riders in the forest classed as bridleways? If so, then cyclist are legally allowed to use them, though I must emphasize this point of mine, if you are using a bridleway while cycling or even if you're on the road and you come across a horse and rider, SLOW THE HELL DOWN, approach with caution and speak to the horse and rider so they know you're there and mean them no harm, if the animal looks like it might spook, stop altogether and get off and let the rider regain control, they will then most likely let you walk past, then make sure to walk to a reasonable istance before getting back on the bike, if it's a 2 lane road, then slow down a bit and use the FULL width of the road to pass the horse, if the horse is approaching from in front, again, slow down, if it starts to spook, stop and get off until the animal has gone past, if the horse throws the rider, make sure they're ok and if you need to, get them away from the animal in case it tramples them and then call for medical assistance and if they're conscious, ask the rider if there's anyone who you can call to come collect the horse for them if they're not able to call them. Enough sense for you?[/p][/quote]There is a lot of sense in what you say about the approach to horses in the forest, but I must correct you as to the definition of Bridleways. Bridleways are designate pathways that are one step above pathways in that they have no obstruction such as stiles to impede the access of horses and horse drawn vehicles. This rider was using one of the many tracks that are created by the ponies in their crossings of the forest and are forbidden to be used by wheeled vehicles. All bridleways are designated by the relevant local authority.[/p][/quote]http://www.newforest npa.gov.uk/cycling_r outes legal cycle routes outlined in the first paragraph... phatamy86
  • Score: 3

3:14pm Tue 21 Jan 14

S Pance says...

bullet93 wrote:
you cant blame the cyclist theres no rules on where you can and cannot ride accidents happen 9/10 people that get chucked off a horse prob get up with a sore arse just this man was very unfortunate when your time is up theres nothing you can do to prevent it
Yes there are rules. The cyclist was on a horse track where he shouldn't have been.
[quote][p][bold]bullet93[/bold] wrote: you cant blame the cyclist theres no rules on where you can and cannot ride accidents happen 9/10 people that get chucked off a horse prob get up with a sore arse just this man was very unfortunate when your time is up theres nothing you can do to prevent it[/p][/quote]Yes there are rules. The cyclist was on a horse track where he shouldn't have been. S Pance
  • Score: 1

3:21pm Tue 21 Jan 14

S Pance says...

bullet93 wrote:
you cant blame the cyclist theres no rules on where you can and cannot ride accidents happen 9/10 people that get chucked off a horse prob get up with a sore arse just this man was very unfortunate when your time is up theres nothing you can do to prevent it
It was a Forestry Commission track and you are not permitted to cycle on these under any circumstances.

See:

"You are welcome to cycle on public roads, byways open to all traffic, public bridleways, restricted bridleways, and dedicated cycle routes. You are NOT permitted to ride over the Open Forest, or on Forestry Commission tracks which are not dedicated cycle routes. Cycling on public footpaths is also NOT permitted."

http://www.newforest
npa.gov.uk/info/2004
5/things_to_do/36/cy
cling/4
[quote][p][bold]bullet93[/bold] wrote: you cant blame the cyclist theres no rules on where you can and cannot ride accidents happen 9/10 people that get chucked off a horse prob get up with a sore arse just this man was very unfortunate when your time is up theres nothing you can do to prevent it[/p][/quote]It was a Forestry Commission track and you are not permitted to cycle on these under any circumstances. See: "You are welcome to cycle on public roads, byways open to all traffic, public bridleways, restricted bridleways, and dedicated cycle routes. You are NOT permitted to ride over the Open Forest, or on Forestry Commission tracks which are not dedicated cycle routes. Cycling on public footpaths is also NOT permitted." http://www.newforest npa.gov.uk/info/2004 5/things_to_do/36/cy cling/4 S Pance
  • Score: 2

8:43pm Tue 21 Jan 14

Ginger_cyclist says...

S Pance wrote:
bullet93 wrote:
you cant blame the cyclist theres no rules on where you can and cannot ride accidents happen 9/10 people that get chucked off a horse prob get up with a sore arse just this man was very unfortunate when your time is up theres nothing you can do to prevent it
It was a Forestry Commission track and you are not permitted to cycle on these under any circumstances.

See:

"You are welcome to cycle on public roads, byways open to all traffic, public bridleways, restricted bridleways, and dedicated cycle routes. You are NOT permitted to ride over the Open Forest, or on Forestry Commission tracks which are not dedicated cycle routes. Cycling on public footpaths is also NOT permitted."

http://www.newforest

npa.gov.uk/info/2004

5/things_to_do/36/cy

cling/4
How many of these tracks are sign posted as such though?
[quote][p][bold]S Pance[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bullet93[/bold] wrote: you cant blame the cyclist theres no rules on where you can and cannot ride accidents happen 9/10 people that get chucked off a horse prob get up with a sore arse just this man was very unfortunate when your time is up theres nothing you can do to prevent it[/p][/quote]It was a Forestry Commission track and you are not permitted to cycle on these under any circumstances. See: "You are welcome to cycle on public roads, byways open to all traffic, public bridleways, restricted bridleways, and dedicated cycle routes. You are NOT permitted to ride over the Open Forest, or on Forestry Commission tracks which are not dedicated cycle routes. Cycling on public footpaths is also NOT permitted." http://www.newforest npa.gov.uk/info/2004 5/things_to_do/36/cy cling/4[/p][/quote]How many of these tracks are sign posted as such though? Ginger_cyclist
  • Score: 0

3:31pm Sun 2 Feb 14

Reconciler says...

bullet93 wrote:
you cant blame the cyclist theres no rules on where you can and cannot ride accidents happen 9/10 people that get chucked off a horse prob get up with a sore arse just this man was very unfortunate when your time is up theres nothing you can do to prevent it
There are indeed very strict rules about where cyclists may and may not ride within the New Forest National Park. Look them up and obey them. If this cyclist had done so the horse rider would still be alive. Keep to the designated cycle routes.
[quote][p][bold]bullet93[/bold] wrote: you cant blame the cyclist theres no rules on where you can and cannot ride accidents happen 9/10 people that get chucked off a horse prob get up with a sore arse just this man was very unfortunate when your time is up theres nothing you can do to prevent it[/p][/quote]There are indeed very strict rules about where cyclists may and may not ride within the New Forest National Park. Look them up and obey them. If this cyclist had done so the horse rider would still be alive. Keep to the designated cycle routes. Reconciler
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