Family driven to despair by damp

Daily Echo: MOULD HORROR: Samantha Simpson with son Zachary in the three-year-old’s bedroom. MOULD HORROR: Samantha Simpson with son Zachary in the three-year-old’s bedroom.

THE walls are black with damp and there’s mould growing in the corners of every room – these are the shocking conditions that a young Southampton family have to endure on a daily basis.

Now dad Colin Simpson and his wife Samantha are demanding an end to their damp nightmare that they say is making their young son Zachary ill.

The couple, who are both part-time cleaners, are pleading with housing bosses to take urgent action and find them a new home – away from their one-bedroom flat in Tangmere Drive, Lordshill.

Now their plight has been taken up by a local councillor who is pressing the landlords to ease their misery.

Mr Simpson, 32, said: “It is downright horrible, I am worried about my son’s health and my wife is on pills for depression. We feel embarrassed about it. We have to put a brave face when people come through the door. We need to be rehoused somewhere else for the sake of our family. It is really ruining my life, I hate it.”

The couple, who pay £300 a month rent, moved into the Western Challenge Housing Association flat in 2009, and say they have seen the mould spread to every wall, ceiling and window sill in their one-bedroom flat.

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The problem has got so bad that three-year-old Zachary has developed asthma and has also caught croup four times in the past two years. He now sleeps with his parents in the front room.

It has also meant that they have to regularly throw their personal belongings away because they get covered in mould – items such as photographs, toys, mattresses and a high chair have all ended in the bin.

Southampton City councillor for Coxford Don Thomas said he was shocked when he visited their flat, and he has called on Western Challenge, who own the building block, to rehome the family.

He said: “This particular Western Challenge block of flats has a history of dampness and mouldiness problems which frankly belongs back in the London 1920s slums era.

“As a matter of urgency and on health grounds Western Challenge need to move this young family out straight away, then investigate properly this repeatable problem we clearly have with this rogue building.”

A spokeswoman for Weston Challenge said they were aware of the ongoing damp and mould issue and that they were working with the tenants to resolve it. She said: “An extensive inspection of the property has been carried out and we will be meeting with the tenant to go through the results from that inspection and our recommendations.

“We are not looking at rehousing the family at the present time, but will be looking to resolve the issues.”

Comments (25)

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11:08am Wed 22 Jan 14

freemantle101 says...

Soooo many properties have this mould problem, mine does which we own - I treat it everyday by wiping the damp and spraying with mould and mildew spray - maybe they could do the same thing as if they kept it up together it wouldnt get to a point of throwing stuff away! It would sure as hell beat leaving it in the hope of getting rehoused!
Soooo many properties have this mould problem, mine does which we own - I treat it everyday by wiping the damp and spraying with mould and mildew spray - maybe they could do the same thing as if they kept it up together it wouldnt get to a point of throwing stuff away! It would sure as hell beat leaving it in the hope of getting rehoused! freemantle101

12:04pm Wed 22 Jan 14

wwozzer says...

Try paying more double that rent to a private landlord who'd kick you out just for complaining about it.
Try paying more double that rent to a private landlord who'd kick you out just for complaining about it. wwozzer

12:13pm Wed 22 Jan 14

St.Winch70 says...

wwozzer wrote:
Try paying more double that rent to a private landlord who'd kick you out just for complaining about it.
Why would someone try to do that?
[quote][p][bold]wwozzer[/bold] wrote: Try paying more double that rent to a private landlord who'd kick you out just for complaining about it.[/p][/quote]Why would someone try to do that? St.Winch70

12:25pm Wed 22 Jan 14

southy says...

the problem stems back to the build, builders allowing cement to bridge the wall cavity or/and damage damp course, its allowing the damp to cross over to the inner wall
the problem stems back to the build, builders allowing cement to bridge the wall cavity or/and damage damp course, its allowing the damp to cross over to the inner wall southy

12:28pm Wed 22 Jan 14

good-gosh says...

freemantle101 wrote:
Soooo many properties have this mould problem, mine does which we own - I treat it everyday by wiping the damp and spraying with mould and mildew spray - maybe they could do the same thing as if they kept it up together it wouldnt get to a point of throwing stuff away! It would sure as hell beat leaving it in the hope of getting rehoused!
Exactly, condensation is normal in cold rooms and mould forms naturally there. The moisture comes from cooking, laundry and perspiration and condenses on any cold wall. The practical solution is to spend 1/2 hour when a few spores appear in winter to wash the wall or ceiling with a damp sponge and disinfectant, dry thoroughly and repaint locally if discoloured.
[quote][p][bold]freemantle101[/bold] wrote: Soooo many properties have this mould problem, mine does which we own - I treat it everyday by wiping the damp and spraying with mould and mildew spray - maybe they could do the same thing as if they kept it up together it wouldnt get to a point of throwing stuff away! It would sure as hell beat leaving it in the hope of getting rehoused![/p][/quote]Exactly, condensation is normal in cold rooms and mould forms naturally there. The moisture comes from cooking, laundry and perspiration and condenses on any cold wall. The practical solution is to spend 1/2 hour when a few spores appear in winter to wash the wall or ceiling with a damp sponge and disinfectant, dry thoroughly and repaint locally if discoloured. good-gosh

12:35pm Wed 22 Jan 14

St.Winch70 says...

southy wrote:
the problem stems back to the build, builders allowing cement to bridge the wall cavity or/and damage damp course, its allowing the damp to cross over to the inner wall
This landlord has a duty of care for it's tenant, who has signed a rental agreement that clearly defines the responsibility of each party. Personally I would withhold the rental payment until the problem is sorted.
It is blatantly an historical problem with the build that should be addressed by the property owner, not the tenant.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: the problem stems back to the build, builders allowing cement to bridge the wall cavity or/and damage damp course, its allowing the damp to cross over to the inner wall[/p][/quote]This landlord has a duty of care for it's tenant, who has signed a rental agreement that clearly defines the responsibility of each party. Personally I would withhold the rental payment until the problem is sorted. It is blatantly an historical problem with the build that should be addressed by the property owner, not the tenant. St.Winch70

12:49pm Wed 22 Jan 14

southy says...

St.Winch70 wrote:
southy wrote:
the problem stems back to the build, builders allowing cement to bridge the wall cavity or/and damage damp course, its allowing the damp to cross over to the inner wall
This landlord has a duty of care for it's tenant, who has signed a rental agreement that clearly defines the responsibility of each party. Personally I would withhold the rental payment until the problem is sorted.
It is blatantly an historical problem with the build that should be addressed by the property owner, not the tenant.
I agree with you, but private landlords do not like paying out
[quote][p][bold]St.Winch70[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: the problem stems back to the build, builders allowing cement to bridge the wall cavity or/and damage damp course, its allowing the damp to cross over to the inner wall[/p][/quote]This landlord has a duty of care for it's tenant, who has signed a rental agreement that clearly defines the responsibility of each party. Personally I would withhold the rental payment until the problem is sorted. It is blatantly an historical problem with the build that should be addressed by the property owner, not the tenant.[/p][/quote]I agree with you, but private landlords do not like paying out southy

1:08pm Wed 22 Jan 14

wilsoncastaway says...

I had the same problem in my old flat. I bleached the bedroom walls and window frames, kept my widows open as much as possible and repainted often.Luckily I had the funds to do that.When I moved, the wallpaper was hanging off so badly that we were asked to remove it before we left .We did so and discovered that the corner of the flat had a half inch gap through to the outside.I could fit half my hand through it.This was after I was told that the reason we had damp was because we had 2 wardrobes in one room! A neighbour with the same problem was also told that the damp was due to their clutter.I can sympathise with the family.We lost alot of lovely furniture and clothes as well as my eldest sons first paintings due to mold.
I had the same problem in my old flat. I bleached the bedroom walls and window frames, kept my widows open as much as possible and repainted often.Luckily I had the funds to do that.When I moved, the wallpaper was hanging off so badly that we were asked to remove it before we left .We did so and discovered that the corner of the flat had a half inch gap through to the outside.I could fit half my hand through it.This was after I was told that the reason we had damp was because we had 2 wardrobes in one room! A neighbour with the same problem was also told that the damp was due to their clutter.I can sympathise with the family.We lost alot of lovely furniture and clothes as well as my eldest sons first paintings due to mold. wilsoncastaway

1:16pm Wed 22 Jan 14

Niel says...

St.Winch70 wrote:
southy wrote:
the problem stems back to the build, builders allowing cement to bridge the wall cavity or/and damage damp course, its allowing the damp to cross over to the inner wall
This landlord has a duty of care for it's tenant, who has signed a rental agreement that clearly defines the responsibility of each party. Personally I would withhold the rental payment until the problem is sorted.
It is blatantly an historical problem with the build that should be addressed by the property owner, not the tenant.
Having lived in one of those flats a lot of the damp problems come from them being refitted with double glazing and not opening the windows. If they're using any form of radiant gas heating that's just adding moisture to the place. A lot of housing suffers from this, freely circulating air and/or expensive de-humidification will prevent the problem unless there are structural issues, so that's in most cases in my experience.
[quote][p][bold]St.Winch70[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: the problem stems back to the build, builders allowing cement to bridge the wall cavity or/and damage damp course, its allowing the damp to cross over to the inner wall[/p][/quote]This landlord has a duty of care for it's tenant, who has signed a rental agreement that clearly defines the responsibility of each party. Personally I would withhold the rental payment until the problem is sorted. It is blatantly an historical problem with the build that should be addressed by the property owner, not the tenant.[/p][/quote]Having lived in one of those flats a lot of the damp problems come from them being refitted with double glazing and not opening the windows. If they're using any form of radiant gas heating that's just adding moisture to the place. A lot of housing suffers from this, freely circulating air and/or expensive de-humidification will prevent the problem unless there are structural issues, so that's in most cases in my experience. Niel

1:16pm Wed 22 Jan 14

Niel says...

St.Winch70 wrote:
southy wrote:
the problem stems back to the build, builders allowing cement to bridge the wall cavity or/and damage damp course, its allowing the damp to cross over to the inner wall
This landlord has a duty of care for it's tenant, who has signed a rental agreement that clearly defines the responsibility of each party. Personally I would withhold the rental payment until the problem is sorted.
It is blatantly an historical problem with the build that should be addressed by the property owner, not the tenant.
Having lived in one of those flats a lot of the damp problems come from them being refitted with double glazing and not opening the windows. If they're using any form of radiant gas heating that's just adding moisture to the place. A lot of housing suffers from this, freely circulating air and/or expensive de-humidification will prevent the problem unless there are structural issues, so that's in most cases in my experience.
[quote][p][bold]St.Winch70[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: the problem stems back to the build, builders allowing cement to bridge the wall cavity or/and damage damp course, its allowing the damp to cross over to the inner wall[/p][/quote]This landlord has a duty of care for it's tenant, who has signed a rental agreement that clearly defines the responsibility of each party. Personally I would withhold the rental payment until the problem is sorted. It is blatantly an historical problem with the build that should be addressed by the property owner, not the tenant.[/p][/quote]Having lived in one of those flats a lot of the damp problems come from them being refitted with double glazing and not opening the windows. If they're using any form of radiant gas heating that's just adding moisture to the place. A lot of housing suffers from this, freely circulating air and/or expensive de-humidification will prevent the problem unless there are structural issues, so that's in most cases in my experience. Niel

1:26pm Wed 22 Jan 14

southy says...

Niel wrote:
St.Winch70 wrote:
southy wrote:
the problem stems back to the build, builders allowing cement to bridge the wall cavity or/and damage damp course, its allowing the damp to cross over to the inner wall
This landlord has a duty of care for it's tenant, who has signed a rental agreement that clearly defines the responsibility of each party. Personally I would withhold the rental payment until the problem is sorted.
It is blatantly an historical problem with the build that should be addressed by the property owner, not the tenant.
Having lived in one of those flats a lot of the damp problems come from them being refitted with double glazing and not opening the windows. If they're using any form of radiant gas heating that's just adding moisture to the place. A lot of housing suffers from this, freely circulating air and/or expensive de-humidification will prevent the problem unless there are structural issues, so that's in most cases in my experience.
The issue is a lot deeper than putting in double glazing, it as not cause a problem in other places where double glazing as been fitted.
[quote][p][bold]Niel[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]St.Winch70[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: the problem stems back to the build, builders allowing cement to bridge the wall cavity or/and damage damp course, its allowing the damp to cross over to the inner wall[/p][/quote]This landlord has a duty of care for it's tenant, who has signed a rental agreement that clearly defines the responsibility of each party. Personally I would withhold the rental payment until the problem is sorted. It is blatantly an historical problem with the build that should be addressed by the property owner, not the tenant.[/p][/quote]Having lived in one of those flats a lot of the damp problems come from them being refitted with double glazing and not opening the windows. If they're using any form of radiant gas heating that's just adding moisture to the place. A lot of housing suffers from this, freely circulating air and/or expensive de-humidification will prevent the problem unless there are structural issues, so that's in most cases in my experience.[/p][/quote]The issue is a lot deeper than putting in double glazing, it as not cause a problem in other places where double glazing as been fitted. southy

2:01pm Wed 22 Jan 14

loonaloop says...

Cavity wall insulation is the main culprit nowadays. walls need to breath, Pop in a few air bricks with hit and miss louvre vents inside, treat the mould. Problem will go away thats what I did on advice from a Builder friend. so instead of bleating on do it yourself and dont expect others to. afterall its the health of the kiddies 1st no ??
Cavity wall insulation is the main culprit nowadays. walls need to breath, Pop in a few air bricks with hit and miss louvre vents inside, treat the mould. Problem will go away thats what I did on advice from a Builder friend. so instead of bleating on do it yourself and dont expect others to. afterall its the health of the kiddies 1st no ?? loonaloop

2:37pm Wed 22 Jan 14

Torchie1 says...

Niel wrote:
St.Winch70 wrote:
southy wrote:
the problem stems back to the build, builders allowing cement to bridge the wall cavity or/and damage damp course, its allowing the damp to cross over to the inner wall
This landlord has a duty of care for it's tenant, who has signed a rental agreement that clearly defines the responsibility of each party. Personally I would withhold the rental payment until the problem is sorted.
It is blatantly an historical problem with the build that should be addressed by the property owner, not the tenant.
Having lived in one of those flats a lot of the damp problems come from them being refitted with double glazing and not opening the windows. If they're using any form of radiant gas heating that's just adding moisture to the place. A lot of housing suffers from this, freely circulating air and/or expensive de-humidification will prevent the problem unless there are structural issues, so that's in most cases in my experience.
A visit to the Rentokil website will explain domestic condensation and how to avoid it, which backs up your post entirely.
[quote][p][bold]Niel[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]St.Winch70[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: the problem stems back to the build, builders allowing cement to bridge the wall cavity or/and damage damp course, its allowing the damp to cross over to the inner wall[/p][/quote]This landlord has a duty of care for it's tenant, who has signed a rental agreement that clearly defines the responsibility of each party. Personally I would withhold the rental payment until the problem is sorted. It is blatantly an historical problem with the build that should be addressed by the property owner, not the tenant.[/p][/quote]Having lived in one of those flats a lot of the damp problems come from them being refitted with double glazing and not opening the windows. If they're using any form of radiant gas heating that's just adding moisture to the place. A lot of housing suffers from this, freely circulating air and/or expensive de-humidification will prevent the problem unless there are structural issues, so that's in most cases in my experience.[/p][/quote]A visit to the Rentokil website will explain domestic condensation and how to avoid it, which backs up your post entirely. Torchie1

2:44pm Wed 22 Jan 14

St.Winch70 says...

loonaloop wrote:
Cavity wall insulation is the main culprit nowadays. walls need to breath, Pop in a few air bricks with hit and miss louvre vents inside, treat the mould. Problem will go away thats what I did on advice from a Builder friend. so instead of bleating on do it yourself and dont expect others to. afterall its the health of the kiddies 1st no ??
It's the Landlord's responsibility to maintain the property - If the couple owned it then they could get on and do it themselves.
[quote][p][bold]loonaloop[/bold] wrote: Cavity wall insulation is the main culprit nowadays. walls need to breath, Pop in a few air bricks with hit and miss louvre vents inside, treat the mould. Problem will go away thats what I did on advice from a Builder friend. so instead of bleating on do it yourself and dont expect others to. afterall its the health of the kiddies 1st no ??[/p][/quote]It's the Landlord's responsibility to maintain the property - If the couple owned it then they could get on and do it themselves. St.Winch70

3:00pm Wed 22 Jan 14

southy says...

Torchie1 wrote:
Niel wrote:
St.Winch70 wrote:
southy wrote:
the problem stems back to the build, builders allowing cement to bridge the wall cavity or/and damage damp course, its allowing the damp to cross over to the inner wall
This landlord has a duty of care for it's tenant, who has signed a rental agreement that clearly defines the responsibility of each party. Personally I would withhold the rental payment until the problem is sorted.
It is blatantly an historical problem with the build that should be addressed by the property owner, not the tenant.
Having lived in one of those flats a lot of the damp problems come from them being refitted with double glazing and not opening the windows. If they're using any form of radiant gas heating that's just adding moisture to the place. A lot of housing suffers from this, freely circulating air and/or expensive de-humidification will prevent the problem unless there are structural issues, so that's in most cases in my experience.
A visit to the Rentokil website will explain domestic condensation and how to avoid it, which backs up your post entirely.
Rentoki are a company that do not under stand buildings, another company that will blame every thing apart from the real problem, there,s been a few homes around here that have used rentokil and said the same sort of thing but it never cured a thing, your home would have to be like a shower room to get mold on the walls and ceilings, the problem is the inner wall is damp/wet which is cause though damp passing across from outer wall to the inner wall or its a leaking roof and its working its way down the wall
[quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Niel[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]St.Winch70[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: the problem stems back to the build, builders allowing cement to bridge the wall cavity or/and damage damp course, its allowing the damp to cross over to the inner wall[/p][/quote]This landlord has a duty of care for it's tenant, who has signed a rental agreement that clearly defines the responsibility of each party. Personally I would withhold the rental payment until the problem is sorted. It is blatantly an historical problem with the build that should be addressed by the property owner, not the tenant.[/p][/quote]Having lived in one of those flats a lot of the damp problems come from them being refitted with double glazing and not opening the windows. If they're using any form of radiant gas heating that's just adding moisture to the place. A lot of housing suffers from this, freely circulating air and/or expensive de-humidification will prevent the problem unless there are structural issues, so that's in most cases in my experience.[/p][/quote]A visit to the Rentokil website will explain domestic condensation and how to avoid it, which backs up your post entirely.[/p][/quote]Rentoki are a company that do not under stand buildings, another company that will blame every thing apart from the real problem, there,s been a few homes around here that have used rentokil and said the same sort of thing but it never cured a thing, your home would have to be like a shower room to get mold on the walls and ceilings, the problem is the inner wall is damp/wet which is cause though damp passing across from outer wall to the inner wall or its a leaking roof and its working its way down the wall southy

3:42pm Wed 22 Jan 14

bigfella777 says...

Why is every other tenant in the block not complaining? maybe it is the way they are living, too much steam from cooking,drying washing indoors, not enough fresh air, just hire them a dehumidifier for a week and tell them to clean it.
Why is every other tenant in the block not complaining? maybe it is the way they are living, too much steam from cooking,drying washing indoors, not enough fresh air, just hire them a dehumidifier for a week and tell them to clean it. bigfella777

4:32pm Wed 22 Jan 14

Torchie1 says...

southy wrote:
Torchie1 wrote:
Niel wrote:
St.Winch70 wrote:
southy wrote:
the problem stems back to the build, builders allowing cement to bridge the wall cavity or/and damage damp course, its allowing the damp to cross over to the inner wall
This landlord has a duty of care for it's tenant, who has signed a rental agreement that clearly defines the responsibility of each party. Personally I would withhold the rental payment until the problem is sorted.
It is blatantly an historical problem with the build that should be addressed by the property owner, not the tenant.
Having lived in one of those flats a lot of the damp problems come from them being refitted with double glazing and not opening the windows. If they're using any form of radiant gas heating that's just adding moisture to the place. A lot of housing suffers from this, freely circulating air and/or expensive de-humidification will prevent the problem unless there are structural issues, so that's in most cases in my experience.
A visit to the Rentokil website will explain domestic condensation and how to avoid it, which backs up your post entirely.
Rentoki are a company that do not under stand buildings, another company that will blame every thing apart from the real problem, there,s been a few homes around here that have used rentokil and said the same sort of thing but it never cured a thing, your home would have to be like a shower room to get mold on the walls and ceilings, the problem is the inner wall is damp/wet which is cause though damp passing across from outer wall to the inner wall or its a leaking roof and its working its way down the wall
When seeking expert advice I can look to a long standing company for an answer or I can ask a self-proclaimed expert in all matters that haunts the website of a local newspaper with his bizarre but consistently incorrect posts. It's a difficult choice.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Niel[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]St.Winch70[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: the problem stems back to the build, builders allowing cement to bridge the wall cavity or/and damage damp course, its allowing the damp to cross over to the inner wall[/p][/quote]This landlord has a duty of care for it's tenant, who has signed a rental agreement that clearly defines the responsibility of each party. Personally I would withhold the rental payment until the problem is sorted. It is blatantly an historical problem with the build that should be addressed by the property owner, not the tenant.[/p][/quote]Having lived in one of those flats a lot of the damp problems come from them being refitted with double glazing and not opening the windows. If they're using any form of radiant gas heating that's just adding moisture to the place. A lot of housing suffers from this, freely circulating air and/or expensive de-humidification will prevent the problem unless there are structural issues, so that's in most cases in my experience.[/p][/quote]A visit to the Rentokil website will explain domestic condensation and how to avoid it, which backs up your post entirely.[/p][/quote]Rentoki are a company that do not under stand buildings, another company that will blame every thing apart from the real problem, there,s been a few homes around here that have used rentokil and said the same sort of thing but it never cured a thing, your home would have to be like a shower room to get mold on the walls and ceilings, the problem is the inner wall is damp/wet which is cause though damp passing across from outer wall to the inner wall or its a leaking roof and its working its way down the wall[/p][/quote]When seeking expert advice I can look to a long standing company for an answer or I can ask a self-proclaimed expert in all matters that haunts the website of a local newspaper with his bizarre but consistently incorrect posts. It's a difficult choice. Torchie1

4:44pm Wed 22 Jan 14

wwozzer says...

St.Winch70 wrote:
wwozzer wrote:
Try paying more double that rent to a private landlord who'd kick you out just for complaining about it.
Why would someone try to do that?
Are you being facetious or dim?
[quote][p][bold]St.Winch70[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]wwozzer[/bold] wrote: Try paying more double that rent to a private landlord who'd kick you out just for complaining about it.[/p][/quote]Why would someone try to do that?[/p][/quote]Are you being facetious or dim? wwozzer

4:52pm Wed 22 Jan 14

wilsoncastaway says...

loonaloop wrote:
Cavity wall insulation is the main culprit nowadays. walls need to breath, Pop in a few air bricks with hit and miss louvre vents inside, treat the mould. Problem will go away thats what I did on advice from a Builder friend. so instead of bleating on do it yourself and dont expect others to. afterall its the health of the kiddies 1st no ??
Im pretty sure the housing association would love it if they put up a bunch of scaffolding and started knocking holes in the walls.
[quote][p][bold]loonaloop[/bold] wrote: Cavity wall insulation is the main culprit nowadays. walls need to breath, Pop in a few air bricks with hit and miss louvre vents inside, treat the mould. Problem will go away thats what I did on advice from a Builder friend. so instead of bleating on do it yourself and dont expect others to. afterall its the health of the kiddies 1st no ??[/p][/quote]Im pretty sure the housing association would love it if they put up a bunch of scaffolding and started knocking holes in the walls. wilsoncastaway

5:56pm Wed 22 Jan 14

Zexagon says...

southy wrote:
Torchie1 wrote:
Niel wrote:
St.Winch70 wrote:
southy wrote:
the problem stems back to the build, builders allowing cement to bridge the wall cavity or/and damage damp course, its allowing the damp to cross over to the inner wall
This landlord has a duty of care for it's tenant, who has signed a rental agreement that clearly defines the responsibility of each party. Personally I would withhold the rental payment until the problem is sorted.
It is blatantly an historical problem with the build that should be addressed by the property owner, not the tenant.
Having lived in one of those flats a lot of the damp problems come from them being refitted with double glazing and not opening the windows. If they're using any form of radiant gas heating that's just adding moisture to the place. A lot of housing suffers from this, freely circulating air and/or expensive de-humidification will prevent the problem unless there are structural issues, so that's in most cases in my experience.
A visit to the Rentokil website will explain domestic condensation and how to avoid it, which backs up your post entirely.
Rentoki are a company that do not under stand buildings, another company that will blame every thing apart from the real problem, there,s been a few homes around here that have used rentokil and said the same sort of thing but it never cured a thing, your home would have to be like a shower room to get mold on the walls and ceilings, the problem is the inner wall is damp/wet which is cause though damp passing across from outer wall to the inner wall or its a leaking roof and its working its way down the wall
So with all this rain why hasn't the ceiling fallen down and all the paper fallen off the walls.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Niel[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]St.Winch70[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: the problem stems back to the build, builders allowing cement to bridge the wall cavity or/and damage damp course, its allowing the damp to cross over to the inner wall[/p][/quote]This landlord has a duty of care for it's tenant, who has signed a rental agreement that clearly defines the responsibility of each party. Personally I would withhold the rental payment until the problem is sorted. It is blatantly an historical problem with the build that should be addressed by the property owner, not the tenant.[/p][/quote]Having lived in one of those flats a lot of the damp problems come from them being refitted with double glazing and not opening the windows. If they're using any form of radiant gas heating that's just adding moisture to the place. A lot of housing suffers from this, freely circulating air and/or expensive de-humidification will prevent the problem unless there are structural issues, so that's in most cases in my experience.[/p][/quote]A visit to the Rentokil website will explain domestic condensation and how to avoid it, which backs up your post entirely.[/p][/quote]Rentoki are a company that do not under stand buildings, another company that will blame every thing apart from the real problem, there,s been a few homes around here that have used rentokil and said the same sort of thing but it never cured a thing, your home would have to be like a shower room to get mold on the walls and ceilings, the problem is the inner wall is damp/wet which is cause though damp passing across from outer wall to the inner wall or its a leaking roof and its working its way down the wall[/p][/quote]So with all this rain why hasn't the ceiling fallen down and all the paper fallen off the walls. Zexagon

7:45pm Wed 22 Jan 14

greyfeather says...

I have a damp house, Why hasn't she bleached the mould off and making more effort to open windows/heat the place??! rather than letting her son become ill!
My upstairs goes mouldy in the winter, but i open windows each morning, wipe windows and sills down, and bleach mould as it appears! problem under control! something telling me they after a bigger place/house….
I have a damp house, Why hasn't she bleached the mould off and making more effort to open windows/heat the place??! rather than letting her son become ill! My upstairs goes mouldy in the winter, but i open windows each morning, wipe windows and sills down, and bleach mould as it appears! problem under control! something telling me they after a bigger place/house…. greyfeather

10:24pm Wed 22 Jan 14

BeyondImagination says...

A dehumidifier will remove the condensation. Power equivalent to a 60 watt light bulb won't break the bank.
A dehumidifier will remove the condensation. Power equivalent to a 60 watt light bulb won't break the bank. BeyondImagination

11:31pm Wed 22 Jan 14

southy says...

Torchie1 wrote:
southy wrote:
Torchie1 wrote:
Niel wrote:
St.Winch70 wrote:
southy wrote:
the problem stems back to the build, builders allowing cement to bridge the wall cavity or/and damage damp course, its allowing the damp to cross over to the inner wall
This landlord has a duty of care for it's tenant, who has signed a rental agreement that clearly defines the responsibility of each party. Personally I would withhold the rental payment until the problem is sorted.
It is blatantly an historical problem with the build that should be addressed by the property owner, not the tenant.
Having lived in one of those flats a lot of the damp problems come from them being refitted with double glazing and not opening the windows. If they're using any form of radiant gas heating that's just adding moisture to the place. A lot of housing suffers from this, freely circulating air and/or expensive de-humidification will prevent the problem unless there are structural issues, so that's in most cases in my experience.
A visit to the Rentokil website will explain domestic condensation and how to avoid it, which backs up your post entirely.
Rentoki are a company that do not under stand buildings, another company that will blame every thing apart from the real problem, there,s been a few homes around here that have used rentokil and said the same sort of thing but it never cured a thing, your home would have to be like a shower room to get mold on the walls and ceilings, the problem is the inner wall is damp/wet which is cause though damp passing across from outer wall to the inner wall or its a leaking roof and its working its way down the wall
When seeking expert advice I can look to a long standing company for an answer or I can ask a self-proclaimed expert in all matters that haunts the website of a local newspaper with his bizarre but consistently incorrect posts. It's a difficult choice.
This house had a damp problem also, and we had heard it all over the years, it was not cured till the garage was built connecting to the house, the builder of the garage he go a tool out that not only knock the cement that fell between the cavity (it lands on the brick ties linking the two wall) he scrape all the lose molter out from the bottom of the cavity, We not had a damp problem since.
You get any good builder who really knows what they are doing and they will tell you the same the cause is molter falling down the cavity when building the home it lands on the brick ties and it also builds up at the bottom of the cavity taking it above the damp course.
Don,t ask a company all they want to do is keep making money out of you, ask a good builder.
[quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Niel[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]St.Winch70[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: the problem stems back to the build, builders allowing cement to bridge the wall cavity or/and damage damp course, its allowing the damp to cross over to the inner wall[/p][/quote]This landlord has a duty of care for it's tenant, who has signed a rental agreement that clearly defines the responsibility of each party. Personally I would withhold the rental payment until the problem is sorted. It is blatantly an historical problem with the build that should be addressed by the property owner, not the tenant.[/p][/quote]Having lived in one of those flats a lot of the damp problems come from them being refitted with double glazing and not opening the windows. If they're using any form of radiant gas heating that's just adding moisture to the place. A lot of housing suffers from this, freely circulating air and/or expensive de-humidification will prevent the problem unless there are structural issues, so that's in most cases in my experience.[/p][/quote]A visit to the Rentokil website will explain domestic condensation and how to avoid it, which backs up your post entirely.[/p][/quote]Rentoki are a company that do not under stand buildings, another company that will blame every thing apart from the real problem, there,s been a few homes around here that have used rentokil and said the same sort of thing but it never cured a thing, your home would have to be like a shower room to get mold on the walls and ceilings, the problem is the inner wall is damp/wet which is cause though damp passing across from outer wall to the inner wall or its a leaking roof and its working its way down the wall[/p][/quote]When seeking expert advice I can look to a long standing company for an answer or I can ask a self-proclaimed expert in all matters that haunts the website of a local newspaper with his bizarre but consistently incorrect posts. It's a difficult choice.[/p][/quote]This house had a damp problem also, and we had heard it all over the years, it was not cured till the garage was built connecting to the house, the builder of the garage he go a tool out that not only knock the cement that fell between the cavity (it lands on the brick ties linking the two wall) he scrape all the lose molter out from the bottom of the cavity, We not had a damp problem since. You get any good builder who really knows what they are doing and they will tell you the same the cause is molter falling down the cavity when building the home it lands on the brick ties and it also builds up at the bottom of the cavity taking it above the damp course. Don,t ask a company all they want to do is keep making money out of you, ask a good builder. southy

11:32pm Wed 22 Jan 14

southy says...

BeyondImagination wrote:
A dehumidifier will remove the condensation. Power equivalent to a 60 watt light bulb won't break the bank.
But it will not stop the damp walls
[quote][p][bold]BeyondImagination[/bold] wrote: A dehumidifier will remove the condensation. Power equivalent to a 60 watt light bulb won't break the bank.[/p][/quote]But it will not stop the damp walls southy

11:40pm Wed 22 Jan 14

southy says...

Zexagon wrote:
southy wrote:
Torchie1 wrote:
Niel wrote:
St.Winch70 wrote:
southy wrote:
the problem stems back to the build, builders allowing cement to bridge the wall cavity or/and damage damp course, its allowing the damp to cross over to the inner wall
This landlord has a duty of care for it's tenant, who has signed a rental agreement that clearly defines the responsibility of each party. Personally I would withhold the rental payment until the problem is sorted.
It is blatantly an historical problem with the build that should be addressed by the property owner, not the tenant.
Having lived in one of those flats a lot of the damp problems come from them being refitted with double glazing and not opening the windows. If they're using any form of radiant gas heating that's just adding moisture to the place. A lot of housing suffers from this, freely circulating air and/or expensive de-humidification will prevent the problem unless there are structural issues, so that's in most cases in my experience.
A visit to the Rentokil website will explain domestic condensation and how to avoid it, which backs up your post entirely.
Rentoki are a company that do not under stand buildings, another company that will blame every thing apart from the real problem, there,s been a few homes around here that have used rentokil and said the same sort of thing but it never cured a thing, your home would have to be like a shower room to get mold on the walls and ceilings, the problem is the inner wall is damp/wet which is cause though damp passing across from outer wall to the inner wall or its a leaking roof and its working its way down the wall
So with all this rain why hasn't the ceiling fallen down and all the paper fallen off the walls.
Its a flat so the chances are its a flat concrete roof that,s been tared over, and ceilings don't fall very often.
If you look at the mold shape and location it will tell you if its working its way down the wall or up the wall.
[quote][p][bold]Zexagon[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Niel[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]St.Winch70[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: the problem stems back to the build, builders allowing cement to bridge the wall cavity or/and damage damp course, its allowing the damp to cross over to the inner wall[/p][/quote]This landlord has a duty of care for it's tenant, who has signed a rental agreement that clearly defines the responsibility of each party. Personally I would withhold the rental payment until the problem is sorted. It is blatantly an historical problem with the build that should be addressed by the property owner, not the tenant.[/p][/quote]Having lived in one of those flats a lot of the damp problems come from them being refitted with double glazing and not opening the windows. If they're using any form of radiant gas heating that's just adding moisture to the place. A lot of housing suffers from this, freely circulating air and/or expensive de-humidification will prevent the problem unless there are structural issues, so that's in most cases in my experience.[/p][/quote]A visit to the Rentokil website will explain domestic condensation and how to avoid it, which backs up your post entirely.[/p][/quote]Rentoki are a company that do not under stand buildings, another company that will blame every thing apart from the real problem, there,s been a few homes around here that have used rentokil and said the same sort of thing but it never cured a thing, your home would have to be like a shower room to get mold on the walls and ceilings, the problem is the inner wall is damp/wet which is cause though damp passing across from outer wall to the inner wall or its a leaking roof and its working its way down the wall[/p][/quote]So with all this rain why hasn't the ceiling fallen down and all the paper fallen off the walls.[/p][/quote]Its a flat so the chances are its a flat concrete roof that,s been tared over, and ceilings don't fall very often. If you look at the mold shape and location it will tell you if its working its way down the wall or up the wall. southy

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