Anger over lack of action to reduce speed limit on A31 in New Forest

Daily Echo: The A31 The A31

A COUNCILLOR has vented his frustration at the lack of action over the A31 after his campaign to get the speed limit reduced.

Ringwood councillor Michael Thierry met with transport minister Stephen Hammond in May last year.

At the time, the minister said he was “minded” to give the go-ahead to a trial of a 50mph speed limit.

But in August, hopes were dashed as Mr Hammond said the 70mph limit would stay.

Speaking to the Daily Echo, Cllr Thierry said: “I’ve campaigned for many years for safety improvements on the A31, whether it’s been a minor bump or a fatality.

“I will continue to take that stance.

“I think the evidence is overwhelming that the A31 is a difficult road. Speed is an element there and I know that many people disagree with me.

“I’ve driven the A31 at 50mph and feel more comfortable doing that.

“People come off the end of the motorway and still have a motorway attitude.

“It does need some safety improvement and I see nothing in the pipeline and have heard nothing.

“It’s as if the meeting never took place and since then there have been incidents.

“I’m sure that there will be enquiries into last night’s incident but the A31 does need looking at seriously from Cadnam right the way along, it’s just not a road that’s conducive to that kind of speed.

“One feels very sorry for the families involved in this incident and when I heard about it I just think of the effort that’s been made to try to get something done.

“Why does it take a fatality to highlight this issue?”

South Central Ambulance Service said it sent one Rapid Response Vehicle, two ambulance crews, a Hazardous Area Response Team and three ambulance officers to the scene.

An officer from South Western Ambulance Service also attended.

One patient was taken to the Royal Bournemouth Hospital and one to Southampton General Hospital.

Desmond Swayne, MP for New Forest West, said: “I’m very concerned to hear that another person has died on that stretch of road and it must have been a ghastly experience for those stuck there.

“I hope that there’s a full analysis of exactly what happened.”

Comments (8)

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10:25am Thu 23 Jan 14

wwozzer says...

Speed is not the issue, it's people not paying attention and the stop start nature of the traffic flow.


This is from the New Forest website:

Planning and transportation review 2008

2.5 Police and Highways Agency Officers have studied that accident information available and
concluded that:
• most casualties are due to rear end collisions
• speed is not the main cause of these accidents.
• lowering the speed limit would not significantly reduce the number of recorded injury
accidents.
• consideration should be given to engineering measures to reduce the number of rear
end collisions.


I really don't understand why he's so frustrated about a problem that clearly doesn't exist......still, at least he got his name in the paper eh! ;)
Speed is not the issue, it's people not paying attention and the stop start nature of the traffic flow. This is from the New Forest website: Planning and transportation review 2008 2.5 Police and Highways Agency Officers have studied that accident information available and concluded that: • most casualties are due to rear end collisions • speed is not the main cause of these accidents. • lowering the speed limit would not significantly reduce the number of recorded injury accidents. • consideration should be given to engineering measures to reduce the number of rear end collisions. I really don't understand why he's so frustrated about a problem that clearly doesn't exist......still, at least he got his name in the paper eh! ;) wwozzer

12:12pm Thu 23 Jan 14

Hampshire Corn and Bread says...

wwozzer wrote:
Speed is not the issue, it's people not paying attention and the stop start nature of the traffic flow.


This is from the New Forest website:

Planning and transportation review 2008

2.5 Police and Highways Agency Officers have studied that accident information available and
concluded that:
• most casualties are due to rear end collisions
• speed is not the main cause of these accidents.
• lowering the speed limit would not significantly reduce the number of recorded injury
accidents.
• consideration should be given to engineering measures to reduce the number of rear
end collisions.


I really don't understand why he's so frustrated about a problem that clearly doesn't exist......still, at least he got his name in the paper eh! ;)
Whilst I generally concur with the points made (you & the report); since that time the accident rate continues & thus surely a reduction in speed whilst not significant would go some way to preventing trauma in some people's lives?
[quote][p][bold]wwozzer[/bold] wrote: Speed is not the issue, it's people not paying attention and the stop start nature of the traffic flow. This is from the New Forest website: Planning and transportation review 2008 2.5 Police and Highways Agency Officers have studied that accident information available and concluded that: • most casualties are due to rear end collisions • speed is not the main cause of these accidents. • lowering the speed limit would not significantly reduce the number of recorded injury accidents. • consideration should be given to engineering measures to reduce the number of rear end collisions. I really don't understand why he's so frustrated about a problem that clearly doesn't exist......still, at least he got his name in the paper eh! ;)[/p][/quote]Whilst I generally concur with the points made (you & the report); since that time the accident rate continues & thus surely a reduction in speed whilst not significant would go some way to preventing trauma in some people's lives? Hampshire Corn and Bread

12:19pm Thu 23 Jan 14

Mary80 says...

Its not the speed its the impatient buttholes who tailgate that causes accident, drivers are the problem they at times show they are selfish arrogant idiots putting people at risk by driving like utter nutters
Its not the speed its the impatient buttholes who tailgate that causes accident, drivers are the problem they at times show they are selfish arrogant idiots putting people at risk by driving like utter nutters Mary80

1:12pm Thu 23 Jan 14

Hampshire Corn and Bread says...

Mary80 wrote:
Its not the speed its the impatient buttholes who tailgate that causes accident, drivers are the problem they at times show they are selfish arrogant idiots putting people at risk by driving like utter nutters
And your solution to this is...........
[quote][p][bold]Mary80[/bold] wrote: Its not the speed its the impatient buttholes who tailgate that causes accident, drivers are the problem they at times show they are selfish arrogant idiots putting people at risk by driving like utter nutters[/p][/quote]And your solution to this is........... Hampshire Corn and Bread

5:35pm Thu 23 Jan 14

MPOV says...

Hampshire Corn and Bread wrote:
wwozzer wrote:
Speed is not the issue, it's people not paying attention and the stop start nature of the traffic flow.


This is from the New Forest website:

Planning and transportation review 2008

2.5 Police and Highways Agency Officers have studied that accident information available and
concluded that:
• most casualties are due to rear end collisions
• speed is not the main cause of these accidents.
• lowering the speed limit would not significantly reduce the number of recorded injury
accidents.
• consideration should be given to engineering measures to reduce the number of rear
end collisions.


I really don't understand why he's so frustrated about a problem that clearly doesn't exist......still, at least he got his name in the paper eh! ;)
Whilst I generally concur with the points made (you & the report); since that time the accident rate continues & thus surely a reduction in speed whilst not significant would go some way to preventing trauma in some people's lives?
But not many motorists take much notice of the speed limit anyway, hence all the moaning and groaning about speed cameras and police speed vans (sorry, 'speed traps', for the uneducated).
[quote][p][bold]Hampshire Corn and Bread[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]wwozzer[/bold] wrote: Speed is not the issue, it's people not paying attention and the stop start nature of the traffic flow. This is from the New Forest website: Planning and transportation review 2008 2.5 Police and Highways Agency Officers have studied that accident information available and concluded that: • most casualties are due to rear end collisions • speed is not the main cause of these accidents. • lowering the speed limit would not significantly reduce the number of recorded injury accidents. • consideration should be given to engineering measures to reduce the number of rear end collisions. I really don't understand why he's so frustrated about a problem that clearly doesn't exist......still, at least he got his name in the paper eh! ;)[/p][/quote]Whilst I generally concur with the points made (you & the report); since that time the accident rate continues & thus surely a reduction in speed whilst not significant would go some way to preventing trauma in some people's lives?[/p][/quote]But not many motorists take much notice of the speed limit anyway, hence all the moaning and groaning about speed cameras and police speed vans (sorry, 'speed traps', for the uneducated). MPOV

6:26pm Thu 23 Jan 14

good-gosh says...

It would be a shame to cut the speed on that road. It's great fun driving fast around its bends and dips, and a chance to exercise the skills of care and courteously to others on the road.
It would be a shame to cut the speed on that road. It's great fun driving fast around its bends and dips, and a chance to exercise the skills of care and courteously to others on the road. good-gosh

8:16am Fri 24 Jan 14

Crazywolf says...

This road is no problem at all at 70mph when it's quiet. The problems are a combination of the hills, which slow lorries and reduce how far ahead one can see the road, and the whole approach to the slow parts round Ringwood, starting often well before Poulner hill.

One solution could be variable speed limits, as per the M25. backed up by speed cameras at carefully placed positions, such as a few hundred yards before the brow of Poulner hill, so that people who don't know the road get some warning that there's a traffic jam just over the hill. I have had to make a very fast stop myself coming over the hill at the speed limit when there has been a longer than usual jam into Ringwood.

Another could just be more, and better, interactive road signs:" traffic jam one mile ahead" etc at least people would know they had to slow down.
This road is no problem at all at 70mph when it's quiet. The problems are a combination of the hills, which slow lorries and reduce how far ahead one can see the road, and the whole approach to the slow parts round Ringwood, starting often well before Poulner hill. One solution could be variable speed limits, as per the M25. backed up by speed cameras at carefully placed positions, such as a few hundred yards before the brow of Poulner hill, so that people who don't know the road get some warning that there's a traffic jam just over the hill. I have had to make a very fast stop myself coming over the hill at the speed limit when there has been a longer than usual jam into Ringwood. Another could just be more, and better, interactive road signs:" traffic jam one mile ahead" etc at least people would know they had to slow down. Crazywolf

10:32am Fri 24 Jan 14

good-gosh says...

What is needed is an intense simulated driving trial in difficult conditions over several hours to identify inadequate skills. I recon such a test would wipe out 3/4 of all drivers.
What is needed is an intense simulated driving trial in difficult conditions over several hours to identify inadequate skills. I recon such a test would wipe out 3/4 of all drivers. good-gosh

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