Motorcyclist killed in crash with horse named as Daniel Robins from Bournemouth

Daily Echo: Motorcyclist killed in crash with horse named as Daniel Robins Motorcyclist killed in crash with horse named as Daniel Robins

THE MOTORCYCLIST killed after a collision between his bike and a horse on a major road has been identified.

Daniel Robins, 31, of Alumhurst Road, Bournemouth, died following a crash on the A31 on Wednesday evening.

Daniel was one of two riders who were involved in a collision with a horse on the westbound carriageway near Picket Post around 6.15pm.

The second rider, a 47-year-old man from Broadstone, remains in hospital in a serious condition.

Prior to the collision, both riders were held in a queue of traffic while police responded to reports of a horse loose on the carriageway. Officers were advising motorists to proceed with caution regarding the possibility of animals in the carriageway.

This element of the incident was referred by Hampshire Constabulary to the Independent Police Complaints Commission and we await its decision on how it will be investigated.

The collision is being investigated by the Road Death Investigation team and anyone with information about it is asked to contact them at Eastleigh police station on 101, quoting Operation Hedingham.

Comments (17)

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1:52pm Fri 24 Jan 14

newsknight says...

Firstly - sincere condolences, this was a tragic accident :-( Secondly, since another pony was loose on this road the following day - has a thorough check of the fenceline (which prevents forest ponies wandering onto the road) been carried out? With the rainfall having loosened the ground (and posts easily pushed over by ponies) I fear another accident if the fence posts/wires are not thoroughly checked...who is responsible for this?
Firstly - sincere condolences, this was a tragic accident :-( Secondly, since another pony was loose on this road the following day - has a thorough check of the fenceline (which prevents forest ponies wandering onto the road) been carried out? With the rainfall having loosened the ground (and posts easily pushed over by ponies) I fear another accident if the fence posts/wires are not thoroughly checked...who is responsible for this? newsknight
  • Score: 20

2:08pm Fri 24 Jan 14

Just another reader says...

The highways agency are responsible for the fences.
The highways agency are responsible for the fences. Just another reader
  • Score: 8

3:51pm Fri 24 Jan 14

loosehead says...

So are these just wild ponies or are they owned by someone?
I feel for the riders family but can the owners be held responsible for not keeping their animals in a secure place off of the roads?
I don't know the law but surely this accident could have been avoided?
So are these just wild ponies or are they owned by someone? I feel for the riders family but can the owners be held responsible for not keeping their animals in a secure place off of the roads? I don't know the law but surely this accident could have been avoided? loosehead
  • Score: -4

5:24pm Fri 24 Jan 14

downfader says...

loosehead wrote:
So are these just wild ponies or are they owned by someone?
I feel for the riders family but can the owners be held responsible for not keeping their animals in a secure place off of the roads?
I don't know the law but surely this accident could have been avoided?
Technically the wild ponies are owned. They're allowed out to graze as its good for controlling the foliage. As said above bad weather can cause the fence to come down, as can any number of other things (like it being rotten, or vandalised)
[quote][p][bold]loosehead[/bold] wrote: So are these just wild ponies or are they owned by someone? I feel for the riders family but can the owners be held responsible for not keeping their animals in a secure place off of the roads? I don't know the law but surely this accident could have been avoided?[/p][/quote]Technically the wild ponies are owned. They're allowed out to graze as its good for controlling the foliage. As said above bad weather can cause the fence to come down, as can any number of other things (like it being rotten, or vandalised) downfader
  • Score: 2

5:30pm Fri 24 Jan 14

Linesman says...

loosehead wrote:
So are these just wild ponies or are they owned by someone?
I feel for the riders family but can the owners be held responsible for not keeping their animals in a secure place off of the roads?
I don't know the law but surely this accident could have been avoided?
As you appeared so knowledgeable about the New Forest when you were commenting about Dibden Bay, I would have thought that you would have had some knowledge of New Forest Ponies, their ownership, the round-ups, forest rights etc etc.

I
[quote][p][bold]loosehead[/bold] wrote: So are these just wild ponies or are they owned by someone? I feel for the riders family but can the owners be held responsible for not keeping their animals in a secure place off of the roads? I don't know the law but surely this accident could have been avoided?[/p][/quote]As you appeared so knowledgeable about the New Forest when you were commenting about Dibden Bay, I would have thought that you would have had some knowledge of New Forest Ponies, their ownership, the round-ups, forest rights etc etc. I Linesman
  • Score: -6

5:34pm Fri 24 Jan 14

loosehead says...

I apologise to the family of this poor person as my post was about something entirely different.
I only know of the Marchwood Military port & Dibden,Fawley areas so Please accept my apology for mixing up this tragic event with cycling please please forgive my insensitivety!
I apologise to the family of this poor person as my post was about something entirely different. I only know of the Marchwood Military port & Dibden,Fawley areas so Please accept my apology for mixing up this tragic event with cycling please please forgive my insensitivety! loosehead
  • Score: 13

5:47pm Fri 24 Jan 14

Sir Ad E Noid says...

loosehead wrote:
So are these just wild ponies or are they owned by someone?
I feel for the riders family but can the owners be held responsible for not keeping their animals in a secure place off of the roads?
I don't know the law but surely this accident could have been avoided?
The ponies are owned by Commoners. They are responsible for their health and welfare. They are not responsible for preventing them escaping from the confines of the Forest . I suspect, but don't know, that either the Highways Agency or similar, or, the Forestry Commission is responsible for the security of the Fence line.
[quote][p][bold]loosehead[/bold] wrote: So are these just wild ponies or are they owned by someone? I feel for the riders family but can the owners be held responsible for not keeping their animals in a secure place off of the roads? I don't know the law but surely this accident could have been avoided?[/p][/quote]The ponies are owned by Commoners. They are responsible for their health and welfare. They are not responsible for preventing them escaping from the confines of the Forest . I suspect, but don't know, that either the Highways Agency or similar, or, the Forestry Commission is responsible for the security of the Fence line. Sir Ad E Noid
  • Score: 1

6:38pm Fri 24 Jan 14

derek james says...

loosehead wrote:
So are these just wild ponies or are they owned by someone?
I feel for the riders family but can the owners be held responsible for not keeping their animals in a secure place off of the roads?
I don't know the law but surely this accident could have been avoided?
as far as i know the law is a horse can do any damage to a car on the road and the owner is immune from prosecution, this is an old law that hasn't been updated, additionally in the new forest ponies have right of way
[quote][p][bold]loosehead[/bold] wrote: So are these just wild ponies or are they owned by someone? I feel for the riders family but can the owners be held responsible for not keeping their animals in a secure place off of the roads? I don't know the law but surely this accident could have been avoided?[/p][/quote]as far as i know the law is a horse can do any damage to a car on the road and the owner is immune from prosecution, this is an old law that hasn't been updated, additionally in the new forest ponies have right of way derek james
  • Score: -1

6:51pm Fri 24 Jan 14

Somer123 says...

Derek James that certainly isn't entirely true. All responsible horse owners will hold Public liability insurance for somewhere in the region of £5 million. Horses can cause a lot of damage and the owners most certainly are not immune. The forest run ponies on the National park are a different situation, whereby even if the pony has run out in front of the car, it is always the drivers fault and compensation for the value of the pony will be sought via the National Famers Union. I used to work in the local NFU office where they processed such claims. I wouldnt think that the A31 accident would apply as the Forestry commision has a legal responsibility to ensure stock is kept within the forest boundaries. Infact all owners of livestock are legally responsible for keeping their stock in.
Derek James that certainly isn't entirely true. All responsible horse owners will hold Public liability insurance for somewhere in the region of £5 million. Horses can cause a lot of damage and the owners most certainly are not immune. The forest run ponies on the National park are a different situation, whereby even if the pony has run out in front of the car, it is always the drivers fault and compensation for the value of the pony will be sought via the National Famers Union. I used to work in the local NFU office where they processed such claims. I wouldnt think that the A31 accident would apply as the Forestry commision has a legal responsibility to ensure stock is kept within the forest boundaries. Infact all owners of livestock are legally responsible for keeping their stock in. Somer123
  • Score: 0

7:07pm Fri 24 Jan 14

FDMarshall says...

Somer123 wrote:
Derek James that certainly isn't entirely true. All responsible horse owners will hold Public liability insurance for somewhere in the region of £5 million. Horses can cause a lot of damage and the owners most certainly are not immune. The forest run ponies on the National park are a different situation, whereby even if the pony has run out in front of the car, it is always the drivers fault and compensation for the value of the pony will be sought via the National Famers Union. I used to work in the local NFU office where they processed such claims. I wouldnt think that the A31 accident would apply as the Forestry commision has a legal responsibility to ensure stock is kept within the forest boundaries. Infact all owners of livestock are legally responsible for keeping their stock in.
I thought the forest ponies were like deer and belonged to the queen???
[quote][p][bold]Somer123[/bold] wrote: Derek James that certainly isn't entirely true. All responsible horse owners will hold Public liability insurance for somewhere in the region of £5 million. Horses can cause a lot of damage and the owners most certainly are not immune. The forest run ponies on the National park are a different situation, whereby even if the pony has run out in front of the car, it is always the drivers fault and compensation for the value of the pony will be sought via the National Famers Union. I used to work in the local NFU office where they processed such claims. I wouldnt think that the A31 accident would apply as the Forestry commision has a legal responsibility to ensure stock is kept within the forest boundaries. Infact all owners of livestock are legally responsible for keeping their stock in.[/p][/quote]I thought the forest ponies were like deer and belonged to the queen??? FDMarshall
  • Score: -4

7:24pm Fri 24 Jan 14

Linesman says...

Somer123 wrote:
Derek James that certainly isn't entirely true. All responsible horse owners will hold Public liability insurance for somewhere in the region of £5 million. Horses can cause a lot of damage and the owners most certainly are not immune. The forest run ponies on the National park are a different situation, whereby even if the pony has run out in front of the car, it is always the drivers fault and compensation for the value of the pony will be sought via the National Famers Union. I used to work in the local NFU office where they processed such claims. I wouldnt think that the A31 accident would apply as the Forestry commision has a legal responsibility to ensure stock is kept within the forest boundaries. Infact all owners of livestock are legally responsible for keeping their stock in.
Can you give an example of where an owner would be responsible for damage done by a forest pony?

As there has never been a season where each and every forest pony has been rounded up, claimed by its owner and branded, who would a person sue if they suffered this type of damage from a horse that had not been branded?
[quote][p][bold]Somer123[/bold] wrote: Derek James that certainly isn't entirely true. All responsible horse owners will hold Public liability insurance for somewhere in the region of £5 million. Horses can cause a lot of damage and the owners most certainly are not immune. The forest run ponies on the National park are a different situation, whereby even if the pony has run out in front of the car, it is always the drivers fault and compensation for the value of the pony will be sought via the National Famers Union. I used to work in the local NFU office where they processed such claims. I wouldnt think that the A31 accident would apply as the Forestry commision has a legal responsibility to ensure stock is kept within the forest boundaries. Infact all owners of livestock are legally responsible for keeping their stock in.[/p][/quote]Can you give an example of where an owner would be responsible for damage done by a forest pony? As there has never been a season where each and every forest pony has been rounded up, claimed by its owner and branded, who would a person sue if they suffered this type of damage from a horse that had not been branded? Linesman
  • Score: 0

7:47pm Fri 24 Jan 14

derek james says...

Somer123 wrote:
Derek James that certainly isn't entirely true. All responsible horse owners will hold Public liability insurance for somewhere in the region of £5 million. Horses can cause a lot of damage and the owners most certainly are not immune. The forest run ponies on the National park are a different situation, whereby even if the pony has run out in front of the car, it is always the drivers fault and compensation for the value of the pony will be sought via the National Famers Union. I used to work in the local NFU office where they processed such claims. I wouldnt think that the A31 accident would apply as the Forestry commision has a legal responsibility to ensure stock is kept within the forest boundaries. Infact all owners of livestock are legally responsible for keeping their stock in.
i'm not an expert on the law but if a horse kicks a car it is classed as an "act of god" and the police aren't interested unless someone is injured, you would have to claim off their insurance (if they have it )of the horse owner and you would have to prove negligence which might mean the horse shouldn't have been on the road as it had a history of kicking cars. you would probably have to have a witness, or the owner could say the horse was spooked by a pheasant for example suddenly flying out of the bushes.as a lot of horses seem to be ridden by young girls possibly with no insurance the odds would appear stacked against the motorist
[quote][p][bold]Somer123[/bold] wrote: Derek James that certainly isn't entirely true. All responsible horse owners will hold Public liability insurance for somewhere in the region of £5 million. Horses can cause a lot of damage and the owners most certainly are not immune. The forest run ponies on the National park are a different situation, whereby even if the pony has run out in front of the car, it is always the drivers fault and compensation for the value of the pony will be sought via the National Famers Union. I used to work in the local NFU office where they processed such claims. I wouldnt think that the A31 accident would apply as the Forestry commision has a legal responsibility to ensure stock is kept within the forest boundaries. Infact all owners of livestock are legally responsible for keeping their stock in.[/p][/quote]i'm not an expert on the law but if a horse kicks a car it is classed as an "act of god" and the police aren't interested unless someone is injured, you would have to claim off their insurance (if they have it )of the horse owner and you would have to prove negligence which might mean the horse shouldn't have been on the road as it had a history of kicking cars. you would probably have to have a witness, or the owner could say the horse was spooked by a pheasant for example suddenly flying out of the bushes.as a lot of horses seem to be ridden by young girls possibly with no insurance the odds would appear stacked against the motorist derek james
  • Score: -1

8:20pm Fri 24 Jan 14

ME ME ME 123 says...

There is some confusion here. NF Ponies are owned by someone and are annually rounded up 'drift' once a year to be checked at least. They should indeed be kept within the confines of the forest fences, however, as previously mentioned, with rain age and vandalism at times the fences become weak and vulnerable. Horse riders on the road are not free from law suits WE do indeed insure both ourselves, our horses and of course for public liability. We are not fortunate enough to be covered by the Gods, in fact my horse insurance is twice what I pay for my car insurance. Condolences to all families who have lost in this tragic accident.
There is some confusion here. NF Ponies are owned by someone and are annually rounded up 'drift' once a year to be checked at least. They should indeed be kept within the confines of the forest fences, however, as previously mentioned, with rain age and vandalism at times the fences become weak and vulnerable. Horse riders on the road are not free from law suits WE do indeed insure both ourselves, our horses and of course for public liability. We are not fortunate enough to be covered by the Gods, in fact my horse insurance is twice what I pay for my car insurance. Condolences to all families who have lost in this tragic accident. ME ME ME 123
  • Score: 1

9:24pm Fri 24 Jan 14

derek james says...

ME ME ME 123 wrote:
There is some confusion here. NF Ponies are owned by someone and are annually rounded up 'drift' once a year to be checked at least. They should indeed be kept within the confines of the forest fences, however, as previously mentioned, with rain age and vandalism at times the fences become weak and vulnerable. Horse riders on the road are not free from law suits WE do indeed insure both ourselves, our horses and of course for public liability. We are not fortunate enough to be covered by the Gods, in fact my horse insurance is twice what I pay for my car insurance. Condolences to all families who have lost in this tragic accident.
public liability is not like car insurance and is paid with the principles of the laws of tort or delict so if your horse damages a car for the reasons previously mentioned ,the motorist will have a harder time claiming
[quote][p][bold]ME ME ME 123[/bold] wrote: There is some confusion here. NF Ponies are owned by someone and are annually rounded up 'drift' once a year to be checked at least. They should indeed be kept within the confines of the forest fences, however, as previously mentioned, with rain age and vandalism at times the fences become weak and vulnerable. Horse riders on the road are not free from law suits WE do indeed insure both ourselves, our horses and of course for public liability. We are not fortunate enough to be covered by the Gods, in fact my horse insurance is twice what I pay for my car insurance. Condolences to all families who have lost in this tragic accident.[/p][/quote]public liability is not like car insurance and is paid with the principles of the laws of tort or delict so if your horse damages a car for the reasons previously mentioned ,the motorist will have a harder time claiming derek james
  • Score: 1

11:01pm Fri 24 Jan 14

Hotsy373 says...

Refer to the 3 part test in Animals Act 1971, which is probably the most poorly written Act of its time. Tragedy for all concerned.
Refer to the 3 part test in Animals Act 1971, which is probably the most poorly written Act of its time. Tragedy for all concerned. Hotsy373
  • Score: 2

8:11am Sat 25 Jan 14

Linesman says...

There are parts of the New Forest where the roads are fenced to prevent animals straying onto them, but the vast majority are not fenced.

In the unfenced areas the speed limit is clearly marked as 40mph (or less) in an attempt to minimise the chances of an accident, and so prevent injury to both livestock and motorist.

In these areas, the animals, be they horses, cows or donkeys (termed domestic animals as opposed to wild animals) have 'right of way.' If a motorist hits them, then the motorist is in the wrong because it is assumed that they have greater intelligence than the animals, and should have taken more care.

Where it is comparatively easy to establish the ownership of cows and donkeys, if a horse has not been branded, then it is far more difficult.
There are parts of the New Forest where the roads are fenced to prevent animals straying onto them, but the vast majority are not fenced. In the unfenced areas the speed limit is clearly marked as 40mph (or less) in an attempt to minimise the chances of an accident, and so prevent injury to both livestock and motorist. In these areas, the animals, be they horses, cows or donkeys (termed domestic animals as opposed to wild animals) have 'right of way.' If a motorist hits them, then the motorist is in the wrong because it is assumed that they have greater intelligence than the animals, and should have taken more care. Where it is comparatively easy to establish the ownership of cows and donkeys, if a horse has not been branded, then it is far more difficult. Linesman
  • Score: 0

11:38am Sat 25 Jan 14

espanuel says...

What I would like to know is what happened to the horse? did it run off or was it injured. Did they find the horse.
What I would like to know is what happened to the horse? did it run off or was it injured. Did they find the horse. espanuel
  • Score: 1

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