Team of experts to visit No Limits in Southampton - to learn about their service

Daily Echo: Annabel Hodgson No Limits chief executive Annabel Hodgson No Limits chief executive

AN award-winning Southampton charity will today be giving advice to a team of health experts about the expert service it provides.

Sarah Randall from the Department of Health, Kath Evans from NHS England, Eustace DeSousa from Public Health England and a representative from Healthwatch will visit No Limits to learn more about the charity’s youth information, advice, and counseling and support services.

 

They will also meet young people whose lives have been turned around by the counseling and support they have received from the charity.

The visit was arranged by youth organisations Youth Access and The Young People’s Health Partnership as public concern mounts around youth unemployment and mental health problems.

 

Daily Echo:

The Prince’s Trust, which works to tackle youth unemployment, reported that 16 per cent of young people across the south-east had experienced mental health issues as a direct result of unemployment in their annual Youth Index, published last month.

Director of Youth Access Barbara Rayment said: “The NHS and local authorities will come under immense financial pressures over the next few years. They could make huge savings by intervening more effectively in adolescence and young adulthood before problems become entrenched.

“There is an increasingly robust evidence base for the benefits of holistic youth information, advice, counselling and support service models – of which No Limits is an outstanding example. This is a service that has really listened to young people and responded to their needs. It is high time young people across the country were afforded equal access to such high quality services – they deserve it.”

No Limits offers youngsters aged 16 to 25 advice, counselling and health services at its three Southampton drop-in centres and helps vulnerable youngsters with complex health and wellbeing issues including mental health, homelessness, sexual health and unemployment. They are currently piloting new services to support young people at risk of sexual exploitation.

Last year they won The GlaxoSmithKline Impact Award, which is run in partnership with The King's Fund and recognises and rewards charities working to improve people’s health.

CEO Annabel Hodgson said: “We have seen increasing numbers of young people asking for advice and support. Young people who are anxious, in trouble or dealing with difficult circumstances often find that their health suffers.

“Advice alone often isn’t enough, young people can need ongoing support to make positive decisions and stick to them. By being available and working with any and all issues young people bring, we can really help young people to help themselves.”

For more information about No Limits, visit nolimitshelp.org.uk.

Comments (5)

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6:50am Mon 3 Feb 14

skeptik says...

Teams of experts? Strikes me that over the years and the growth of experts the problems have worsened. Will the day come when a team of experts say - all well here nothing to sort out - how would that work with self preservation?
Teams of experts? Strikes me that over the years and the growth of experts the problems have worsened. Will the day come when a team of experts say - all well here nothing to sort out - how would that work with self preservation? skeptik

6:58am Mon 3 Feb 14

TurquoiseJ says...

No limits is a brilliant resource.
No limits is a brilliant resource. TurquoiseJ

8:19am Mon 3 Feb 14

skeptik says...

Billions wasted year on year - more experts more Plc agencies soaking up fortunes to assist with youth employment. look around at the damaged infrastructure - we have many skilled trades folk out of work or struggling to find work. A sizable percentage of youth have always gone into the building and ancillary trades. Without more miles of red tape, employ master trades to instruct on the job training for youth who wish to go into the trades whilst refurbishing the nations housing stock and infrastructure - employing trades, setting up youth with a future and increasing the nations stock value and increasing cash flow in the transport and trades suppliers. Would this take cash from the big builders - one can but hope so it may return housing to a realistic value, would it put people out of work? They will howl that it will hit profit margins and therefore jobs - they will still produce shoddy new builds. The money saved in benefits and a reduction in overseas aid would set help set this up.
Billions wasted year on year - more experts more Plc agencies soaking up fortunes to assist with youth employment. look around at the damaged infrastructure - we have many skilled trades folk out of work or struggling to find work. A sizable percentage of youth have always gone into the building and ancillary trades. Without more miles of red tape, employ master trades to instruct on the job training for youth who wish to go into the trades whilst refurbishing the nations housing stock and infrastructure - employing trades, setting up youth with a future and increasing the nations stock value and increasing cash flow in the transport and trades suppliers. Would this take cash from the big builders - one can but hope so it may return housing to a realistic value, would it put people out of work? They will howl that it will hit profit margins and therefore jobs - they will still produce shoddy new builds. The money saved in benefits and a reduction in overseas aid would set help set this up. skeptik

9:33am Mon 3 Feb 14

sotonboy84 says...

skeptik wrote:
Billions wasted year on year - more experts more Plc agencies soaking up fortunes to assist with youth employment. look around at the damaged infrastructure - we have many skilled trades folk out of work or struggling to find work. A sizable percentage of youth have always gone into the building and ancillary trades. Without more miles of red tape, employ master trades to instruct on the job training for youth who wish to go into the trades whilst refurbishing the nations housing stock and infrastructure - employing trades, setting up youth with a future and increasing the nations stock value and increasing cash flow in the transport and trades suppliers. Would this take cash from the big builders - one can but hope so it may return housing to a realistic value, would it put people out of work? They will howl that it will hit profit margins and therefore jobs - they will still produce shoddy new builds. The money saved in benefits and a reduction in overseas aid would set help set this up.
I think that as a general rule, 'young people' are spoilt now. There will always be those that need more help than others and addressing mental illness etc. but for those that are unemployed, the answer should be in getting them learning a trade or contuning education rather than stuck in a safety net of all these charities and support groups which discuss and dissect why they might be unemployed rather then getting them back on their feet.

You'll find that learning a trade, being in a career and supporting yourself and engaging with your peer group in a positive environment is all people need. As good as these services can be for some, they can have the opposite effect on others and trap them in a service feeling they need the support having 'diagnosed' a number of issues.
[quote][p][bold]skeptik[/bold] wrote: Billions wasted year on year - more experts more Plc agencies soaking up fortunes to assist with youth employment. look around at the damaged infrastructure - we have many skilled trades folk out of work or struggling to find work. A sizable percentage of youth have always gone into the building and ancillary trades. Without more miles of red tape, employ master trades to instruct on the job training for youth who wish to go into the trades whilst refurbishing the nations housing stock and infrastructure - employing trades, setting up youth with a future and increasing the nations stock value and increasing cash flow in the transport and trades suppliers. Would this take cash from the big builders - one can but hope so it may return housing to a realistic value, would it put people out of work? They will howl that it will hit profit margins and therefore jobs - they will still produce shoddy new builds. The money saved in benefits and a reduction in overseas aid would set help set this up.[/p][/quote]I think that as a general rule, 'young people' are spoilt now. There will always be those that need more help than others and addressing mental illness etc. but for those that are unemployed, the answer should be in getting them learning a trade or contuning education rather than stuck in a safety net of all these charities and support groups which discuss and dissect why they might be unemployed rather then getting them back on their feet. You'll find that learning a trade, being in a career and supporting yourself and engaging with your peer group in a positive environment is all people need. As good as these services can be for some, they can have the opposite effect on others and trap them in a service feeling they need the support having 'diagnosed' a number of issues. sotonboy84

10:23am Mon 3 Feb 14

SilvanDryad says...

No Limits is a charity not a plc. (And it does a great job on little resources.)
Read the article, skeptik.
No Limits is a charity not a plc. (And it does a great job on little resources.) Read the article, skeptik. SilvanDryad

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