'Faulty car put my family in danger'

Mike Aplin and his family

The car which Mr Aplin says was sold to him with unregistered licence plates

First published in News Daily Echo: Photograph of the Author by , Education Reporter

A FAMILY claim their lives were endangered after buying a car from a dealership which they say turned out to be faulty and had an unregistered licence plate.

Dad of two Mike Aplin bought the BMW from a Southampton car dealership at the centre of a deluge of complaints by disgruntled motorists, claiming to have been sold cars not fit to drive.

After spotting the car online the 31-year-old ground maintenance worker travelled from Weymouth to buy it.

But then Mr Aplin noticed the licence plates were not the same as advertised by Woolston Car Supermarket, which shut a fortnight ago amid mounting fury over faulty cars and bouncing refund cheques. After the car’s log book, MoT and registration, failed to be posted as promised, Mr Aplin and his partner made their own inquiries.

Mr Aplin said: “It was then we found out that these plates were not registered anywhere on the DVLA database. I was beyond fuming.

“I just kept thinking they had seen me drive away in an unlicensed car with my family in it.”

Mr Aplin was forced to fit and register his own plate, but his family were then left terrified after the car lost power on a busy road just before Christmas.

They say that problems found by a garage included corroded metal brake pipes, a broken catalytic converter and a split tyre.

Mr Aplin claims Woolston Car Supermarket’s director Stan Rudgley, now operating a dealership on the Fort Wallington Industrial Estate, had last week promised a settlement by Friday.

But Mr Aplin has not heard from him since.

As reported in the Daily Echo, Mr Rudgley has repeatedly broken promises to customers to make amends.

Our journalists accompanied some of them to Mr Rudgley’s new dealership on Friday after they were promised a resolution.

Mr Rudgley kept them waiting for five hours only to briefly turn up to deliver a short statement distancing himself from responsibility.

Mr Aplin is intending to take legal action for a full refund and extra costs incurred.

When contacted last week Mr Rudgley said he was willing to reimburse the cost of the new licence plate.

But he claims the car’s plates were DVLA registered when it was driven off his forecourt.

He told the Echo: “He (Mr Aplin) knew that the licence plate needed to be transferred as it was a private number plate that had been on it.

“We put the cars original plates on it and the paperwork would need to be updated from the DVLA.”

Mr Rudgely said he was unaware of any issues with the car but that if the family sent him the paperwork he would investigate, adding he had not received any letters or legal documents from his former firm in connection with the car.

The unregistered licence plate matter has been reported to Hampshire police who said the matter would most likely be dealt with by Trading Standards.

Trading Standards are investigating. The DVLA were unable to provide a comment.

Comments (22)

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11:08am Wed 5 Feb 14

Vix1 says...

You should always do your own background checks when buying a used car. Saves so much expense and hassle in the long run and is inexpensive online. We bought a car last year with no log book, but thoroughly checked it's history, finance etc and the dealership we bought it from paid for the new log book too. All was fine and the car is great; but we wouldn't have touched it without checking it all out first! Hope you get things sorted.
You should always do your own background checks when buying a used car. Saves so much expense and hassle in the long run and is inexpensive online. We bought a car last year with no log book, but thoroughly checked it's history, finance etc and the dealership we bought it from paid for the new log book too. All was fine and the car is great; but we wouldn't have touched it without checking it all out first! Hope you get things sorted. Vix1
  • Score: 14

11:25am Wed 5 Feb 14

Inform Al says...

Bit puzzled as to why the police are not taking the licence plate issue. It would appear that a criminal offence has occured.
Bit puzzled as to why the police are not taking the licence plate issue. It would appear that a criminal offence has occured. Inform Al
  • Score: 8

11:42am Wed 5 Feb 14

massimoosti says...

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  • Score: 4

11:43am Wed 5 Feb 14

massimoosti says...

The Triggers Broom of Daily Echo journalism.
The Triggers Broom of Daily Echo journalism. massimoosti
  • Score: -2

11:55am Wed 5 Feb 14

befriendly says...

Dodgy car dealers feature quite a lot on The Sheriffs are Coming. BBC TV
Dodgy car dealers feature quite a lot on The Sheriffs are Coming. BBC TV befriendly
  • Score: 5

12:10pm Wed 5 Feb 14

gilbertratchet says...

Vix1 wrote:
You should always do your own background checks when buying a used car. Saves so much expense and hassle in the long run and is inexpensive online. We bought a car last year with no log book, but thoroughly checked it's history, finance etc and the dealership we bought it from paid for the new log book too. All was fine and the car is great; but we wouldn't have touched it without checking it all out first! Hope you get things sorted.
Quite right. It's his own fault he put his family in a car that he hadn't even bothered to look at the tyres of.
[quote][p][bold]Vix1[/bold] wrote: You should always do your own background checks when buying a used car. Saves so much expense and hassle in the long run and is inexpensive online. We bought a car last year with no log book, but thoroughly checked it's history, finance etc and the dealership we bought it from paid for the new log book too. All was fine and the car is great; but we wouldn't have touched it without checking it all out first! Hope you get things sorted.[/p][/quote]Quite right. It's his own fault he put his family in a car that he hadn't even bothered to look at the tyres of. gilbertratchet
  • Score: 13

12:31pm Wed 5 Feb 14

wwozzer says...

Your family, your responsibility. Pay for an AA inspection next time before you put your family in a second hand car you know nothing about.
Your family, your responsibility. Pay for an AA inspection next time before you put your family in a second hand car you know nothing about. wwozzer
  • Score: 15

12:33pm Wed 5 Feb 14

gilbertratchet says...

Inform Al wrote:
Bit puzzled as to why the police are not taking the licence plate issue. It would appear that a criminal offence has occured.
Maybe not. The garage can put whatever plate it wants on while the car is on the forecourt.
[quote][p][bold]Inform Al[/bold] wrote: Bit puzzled as to why the police are not taking the licence plate issue. It would appear that a criminal offence has occured.[/p][/quote]Maybe not. The garage can put whatever plate it wants on while the car is on the forecourt. gilbertratchet
  • Score: 7

12:33pm Wed 5 Feb 14

bigfella777 says...

No such thing s a cheap car
No such thing s a cheap car bigfella777
  • Score: 2

12:55pm Wed 5 Feb 14

Frank28 says...

The faults on Mr Aplin's BMW are going to land him with an enormous repair bill to get the car roadworthy, especially if he has to use genuine BMW parts. Remember, an old £15,000 car is still a £15,000 car when it comes to service and repairs.
The faults on Mr Aplin's BMW are going to land him with an enormous repair bill to get the car roadworthy, especially if he has to use genuine BMW parts. Remember, an old £15,000 car is still a £15,000 car when it comes to service and repairs. Frank28
  • Score: 6

1:06pm Wed 5 Feb 14

SilvanDryad says...

How did the buyer insure the car before driving it away? You have to state the number plate to your insurers to get new quote and cover note and they have access to DVLA data. That would have flagged up the problem immediately.
How did the buyer insure the car before driving it away? You have to state the number plate to your insurers to get new quote and cover note and they have access to DVLA data. That would have flagged up the problem immediately. SilvanDryad
  • Score: 14

1:29pm Wed 5 Feb 14

acid drop says...

sound like son of arfur daley
sound like son of arfur daley acid drop
  • Score: -3

2:23pm Wed 5 Feb 14

gilbertratchet says...

SilvanDryad wrote:
How did the buyer insure the car before driving it away? You have to state the number plate to your insurers to get new quote and cover note and they have access to DVLA data. That would have flagged up the problem immediately.
Good point. Could be that he's got a "drive any car" clause in his cover. Happens all the time. Your insurance often covers you to drive any car that isn't yours, providing the owner allows it. When you pick up a new car, you're not the registered keeper just yet, so you scrape a few days of cover under your existing policy. That's basically what the "drive any car" cover is for - to allow you to test drive new cars, and pick them up.

That said, my money is on this guy trying to pull the usual "put the car in the wife's name and drive it on my insurance" blag that is fantastic....right up until you have to make a claim.
[quote][p][bold]SilvanDryad[/bold] wrote: How did the buyer insure the car before driving it away? You have to state the number plate to your insurers to get new quote and cover note and they have access to DVLA data. That would have flagged up the problem immediately.[/p][/quote]Good point. Could be that he's got a "drive any car" clause in his cover. Happens all the time. Your insurance often covers you to drive any car that isn't yours, providing the owner allows it. When you pick up a new car, you're not the registered keeper just yet, so you scrape a few days of cover under your existing policy. That's basically what the "drive any car" cover is for - to allow you to test drive new cars, and pick them up. That said, my money is on this guy trying to pull the usual "put the car in the wife's name and drive it on my insurance" blag that is fantastic....right up until you have to make a claim. gilbertratchet
  • Score: 3

2:25pm Wed 5 Feb 14

gilbertratchet says...

Frank28 wrote:
The faults on Mr Aplin's BMW are going to land him with an enormous repair bill to get the car roadworthy, especially if he has to use genuine BMW parts. Remember, an old £15,000 car is still a £15,000 car when it comes to service and repairs.
The car in the picture is worth nowhere near that. Base model E46? Bought from this shady character, so I'm doubting it had any sort of service history let alone BMW service history. Probably worth about £2k.
[quote][p][bold]Frank28[/bold] wrote: The faults on Mr Aplin's BMW are going to land him with an enormous repair bill to get the car roadworthy, especially if he has to use genuine BMW parts. Remember, an old £15,000 car is still a £15,000 car when it comes to service and repairs.[/p][/quote]The car in the picture is worth nowhere near that. Base model E46? Bought from this shady character, so I'm doubting it had any sort of service history let alone BMW service history. Probably worth about £2k. gilbertratchet
  • Score: 0

2:27pm Wed 5 Feb 14

SotonLad says...

SilvanDryad wrote:
How did the buyer insure the car before driving it away? You have to state the number plate to your insurers to get new quote and cover note and they have access to DVLA data. That would have flagged up the problem immediately.
That's a good point - what insurance policy was in place to drive it away?

Also, why leave the garage with the car without the paperwork - V5, MOT cert, log book, etc.... Why would the garage post it on later? The buyer has to take some responsibility here - maybe it was a bargain price that has now turned out to be too good to be true!!

Get what you pay for.
[quote][p][bold]SilvanDryad[/bold] wrote: How did the buyer insure the car before driving it away? You have to state the number plate to your insurers to get new quote and cover note and they have access to DVLA data. That would have flagged up the problem immediately.[/p][/quote]That's a good point - what insurance policy was in place to drive it away? Also, why leave the garage with the car without the paperwork - V5, MOT cert, log book, etc.... Why would the garage post it on later? The buyer has to take some responsibility here - maybe it was a bargain price that has now turned out to be too good to be true!! Get what you pay for. SotonLad
  • Score: 7

2:36pm Wed 5 Feb 14

SotonLad says...

gilbertratchet wrote:
SilvanDryad wrote:
How did the buyer insure the car before driving it away? You have to state the number plate to your insurers to get new quote and cover note and they have access to DVLA data. That would have flagged up the problem immediately.
Good point. Could be that he's got a "drive any car" clause in his cover. Happens all the time. Your insurance often covers you to drive any car that isn't yours, providing the owner allows it. When you pick up a new car, you're not the registered keeper just yet, so you scrape a few days of cover under your existing policy. That's basically what the "drive any car" cover is for - to allow you to test drive new cars, and pick them up.

That said, my money is on this guy trying to pull the usual "put the car in the wife's name and drive it on my insurance" blag that is fantastic....right up until you have to make a claim.
The vehicle must still be insured in its own right though to allow someone else to drive it on their policy!
[quote][p][bold]gilbertratchet[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]SilvanDryad[/bold] wrote: How did the buyer insure the car before driving it away? You have to state the number plate to your insurers to get new quote and cover note and they have access to DVLA data. That would have flagged up the problem immediately.[/p][/quote]Good point. Could be that he's got a "drive any car" clause in his cover. Happens all the time. Your insurance often covers you to drive any car that isn't yours, providing the owner allows it. When you pick up a new car, you're not the registered keeper just yet, so you scrape a few days of cover under your existing policy. That's basically what the "drive any car" cover is for - to allow you to test drive new cars, and pick them up. That said, my money is on this guy trying to pull the usual "put the car in the wife's name and drive it on my insurance" blag that is fantastic....right up until you have to make a claim.[/p][/quote]The vehicle must still be insured in its own right though to allow someone else to drive it on their policy! SotonLad
  • Score: 5

3:09pm Wed 5 Feb 14

gilbertratchet says...

SotonLad wrote:
SilvanDryad wrote:
How did the buyer insure the car before driving it away? You have to state the number plate to your insurers to get new quote and cover note and they have access to DVLA data. That would have flagged up the problem immediately.
That's a good point - what insurance policy was in place to drive it away?

Also, why leave the garage with the car without the paperwork - V5, MOT cert, log book, etc.... Why would the garage post it on later? The buyer has to take some responsibility here - maybe it was a bargain price that has now turned out to be too good to be true!!

Get what you pay for.
Why? Because he got a BMW for a song!
[quote][p][bold]SotonLad[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]SilvanDryad[/bold] wrote: How did the buyer insure the car before driving it away? You have to state the number plate to your insurers to get new quote and cover note and they have access to DVLA data. That would have flagged up the problem immediately.[/p][/quote]That's a good point - what insurance policy was in place to drive it away? Also, why leave the garage with the car without the paperwork - V5, MOT cert, log book, etc.... Why would the garage post it on later? The buyer has to take some responsibility here - maybe it was a bargain price that has now turned out to be too good to be true!! Get what you pay for.[/p][/quote]Why? Because he got a BMW for a song! gilbertratchet
  • Score: -1

3:10pm Wed 5 Feb 14

gilbertratchet says...

SotonLad wrote:
gilbertratchet wrote:
SilvanDryad wrote:
How did the buyer insure the car before driving it away? You have to state the number plate to your insurers to get new quote and cover note and they have access to DVLA data. That would have flagged up the problem immediately.
Good point. Could be that he's got a "drive any car" clause in his cover. Happens all the time. Your insurance often covers you to drive any car that isn't yours, providing the owner allows it. When you pick up a new car, you're not the registered keeper just yet, so you scrape a few days of cover under your existing policy. That's basically what the "drive any car" cover is for - to allow you to test drive new cars, and pick them up.

That said, my money is on this guy trying to pull the usual "put the car in the wife's name and drive it on my insurance" blag that is fantastic....right up until you have to make a claim.
The vehicle must still be insured in its own right though to allow someone else to drive it on their policy!
Yep, people forget that. Like I said, great until you come to make a claim.
[quote][p][bold]SotonLad[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]gilbertratchet[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]SilvanDryad[/bold] wrote: How did the buyer insure the car before driving it away? You have to state the number plate to your insurers to get new quote and cover note and they have access to DVLA data. That would have flagged up the problem immediately.[/p][/quote]Good point. Could be that he's got a "drive any car" clause in his cover. Happens all the time. Your insurance often covers you to drive any car that isn't yours, providing the owner allows it. When you pick up a new car, you're not the registered keeper just yet, so you scrape a few days of cover under your existing policy. That's basically what the "drive any car" cover is for - to allow you to test drive new cars, and pick them up. That said, my money is on this guy trying to pull the usual "put the car in the wife's name and drive it on my insurance" blag that is fantastic....right up until you have to make a claim.[/p][/quote]The vehicle must still be insured in its own right though to allow someone else to drive it on their policy![/p][/quote]Yep, people forget that. Like I said, great until you come to make a claim. gilbertratchet
  • Score: 3

3:32pm Wed 5 Feb 14

dolomiteman says...

gilbertratchet wrote:
SotonLad wrote:
gilbertratchet wrote:
SilvanDryad wrote:
How did the buyer insure the car before driving it away? You have to state the number plate to your insurers to get new quote and cover note and they have access to DVLA data. That would have flagged up the problem immediately.
Good point. Could be that he's got a "drive any car" clause in his cover. Happens all the time. Your insurance often covers you to drive any car that isn't yours, providing the owner allows it. When you pick up a new car, you're not the registered keeper just yet, so you scrape a few days of cover under your existing policy. That's basically what the "drive any car" cover is for - to allow you to test drive new cars, and pick them up.

That said, my money is on this guy trying to pull the usual "put the car in the wife's name and drive it on my insurance" blag that is fantastic....right up until you have to make a claim.
The vehicle must still be insured in its own right though to allow someone else to drive it on their policy!
Yep, people forget that. Like I said, great until you come to make a claim.
Or until the police impound the car because it isn't insured. a DOC clause on you policy only allows you to drive a car that already has insurance, if you buy a car you own it as soon as you hand over the cash so the 'its not registered in my name yet' excuses doesn't work either.

And not all insurance polies even full comp allow driving other cars.
[quote][p][bold]gilbertratchet[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]SotonLad[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]gilbertratchet[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]SilvanDryad[/bold] wrote: How did the buyer insure the car before driving it away? You have to state the number plate to your insurers to get new quote and cover note and they have access to DVLA data. That would have flagged up the problem immediately.[/p][/quote]Good point. Could be that he's got a "drive any car" clause in his cover. Happens all the time. Your insurance often covers you to drive any car that isn't yours, providing the owner allows it. When you pick up a new car, you're not the registered keeper just yet, so you scrape a few days of cover under your existing policy. That's basically what the "drive any car" cover is for - to allow you to test drive new cars, and pick them up. That said, my money is on this guy trying to pull the usual "put the car in the wife's name and drive it on my insurance" blag that is fantastic....right up until you have to make a claim.[/p][/quote]The vehicle must still be insured in its own right though to allow someone else to drive it on their policy![/p][/quote]Yep, people forget that. Like I said, great until you come to make a claim.[/p][/quote]Or until the police impound the car because it isn't insured. a DOC clause on you policy only allows you to drive a car that already has insurance, if you buy a car you own it as soon as you hand over the cash so the 'its not registered in my name yet' excuses doesn't work either. And not all insurance polies even full comp allow driving other cars. dolomiteman
  • Score: 6

4:47pm Wed 5 Feb 14

Zexagon says...

It's definately not a legal plate on the car in they photo Shouldn't the letters be readable and at least a couple of inches high?
It's definately not a legal plate on the car in they photo Shouldn't the letters be readable and at least a couple of inches high? Zexagon
  • Score: 4

5:15pm Wed 5 Feb 14

Inform Al says...

gilbertratchet wrote:
Inform Al wrote:
Bit puzzled as to why the police are not taking the licence plate issue. It would appear that a criminal offence has occured.
Maybe not. The garage can put whatever plate it wants on while the car is on the forecourt.
And then it was driven away!
[quote][p][bold]gilbertratchet[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Inform Al[/bold] wrote: Bit puzzled as to why the police are not taking the licence plate issue. It would appear that a criminal offence has occured.[/p][/quote]Maybe not. The garage can put whatever plate it wants on while the car is on the forecourt.[/p][/quote]And then it was driven away! Inform Al
  • Score: 3

7:20pm Wed 5 Feb 14

mobydick21 says...

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zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzzzzz sorry my head hit the keyboard when I was looking at the bandwagon. mobydick21
  • Score: -2

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