Police report surge in domestic violence cases

Police report surge in domestic violence cases

Police report surge in domestic violence cases

First published in News
Last updated
Daily Echo: Photograph of the Author by , Senior reporter

DOMESTIC abuse is on the up in Hampshire, latest crime figures suggest.

Figures released by the Office for National Statistics show that a total of 25,140 domestic abuse incidents were recorded by Hampshire police during 2012-13 – a rise of 1,672 from 2007-8.

But the force says that the increase is down to better crime detection rates and its commitment to helping victims come forward.

It recorded ten murder offences throughout 2012-13 – the seventh lowest of police forces in the UK.

Hampshire police also recorded 72 firearms offences during the same period, equating to four per 100,000 people in the area.

The force had the 11th lowest number of knife and sharp instrument offences in the UK, with 365 recorded incidents.

Hampshire Constabulary says the statistics show that it is performing strongly and is in the top half of forces across the UK.

Det Supt Robert Maker, temporary head of Hampshire Constabulary’s crime standards department, said: “Hampshire and the Isle of Wight continue to be some of the safest counties of the country to live, work and visit.

"The integrity of crime statistics has recently come under scrutiny. However, we are confident that the strict audit and compliance procedures employed by Hampshire Constabulary provide reassurance that the recently released statistics on violent crime are a true reflection of our commitment to protect people from harm and our continued efforts to robustly deal with violent offenders.”

Supt Ben Snuggs added: “Domestic abuse is a key priority for Hampshire Constabulary.

“A wide variety of crimes are classified as domestic abuse-related in line with the Home Office definition. During 2013 this definition changed to include 16- and 17-year-olds and cases where coercion or control was used.

“There are many reasons why domestic abuse crimes also remain under-reported, and Hampshire Constabulary has done a lot of work this year to encourage victims, perpetrators, family members and work colleagues to speak out about domestic abuse, report it and seek help."

Sandra Horley, chief executive of national domestic violence charity Refuge, said: “Domestic violence thrives on secrecy, so no one knows its true extent.

“Refuge supports 3,000 women and children on any given day, and we know that many of them live in fear before finding the courage to ask for help.

“But these figures show that more women in Hampshire are coming forward and reporting domestic violence to the police. This is a good thing.”

Comments (9)

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2:00pm Thu 20 Feb 14

sotonboy84 says...

But the force says that the increase is down to better crime detection rates and its commitment to helping victims come forward.

The force may say it's down to better detection rates and this could be the case. But I'm sure there are many more factors and not just the one. I have a social worker friend and they have noticed an increase over time of the number of reported cases coming from Eastern European relationships. When somebody requires hospital care, a social worker is automatically involved if domestic violence is suspected. Women from these backgrounds are more likely to put up with this behaviour and expect it as part of a relationship whilst the men generally drink more alcohol, both of which are culturally acceptable in these countries.

In the UK women are more likely to report domestic violence as they know there's huge support from services for them. 50 years ago it was a different story and not talked about whilst GP's would send you to a hospital for treatment as they didn't 'deal with domestics'.
But the force says that the increase is down to better crime detection rates and its commitment to helping victims come forward. The force may say it's down to better detection rates and this could be the case. But I'm sure there are many more factors and not just the one. I have a social worker friend and they have noticed an increase over time of the number of reported cases coming from Eastern European relationships. When somebody requires hospital care, a social worker is automatically involved if domestic violence is suspected. Women from these backgrounds are more likely to put up with this behaviour and expect it as part of a relationship whilst the men generally drink more alcohol, both of which are culturally acceptable in these countries. In the UK women are more likely to report domestic violence as they know there's huge support from services for them. 50 years ago it was a different story and not talked about whilst GP's would send you to a hospital for treatment as they didn't 'deal with domestics'. sotonboy84
  • Score: 1

2:42pm Thu 20 Feb 14

George4th says...

sotonboy84 wrote:
But the force says that the increase is down to better crime detection rates and its commitment to helping victims come forward.

The force may say it's down to better detection rates and this could be the case. But I'm sure there are many more factors and not just the one. I have a social worker friend and they have noticed an increase over time of the number of reported cases coming from Eastern European relationships. When somebody requires hospital care, a social worker is automatically involved if domestic violence is suspected. Women from these backgrounds are more likely to put up with this behaviour and expect it as part of a relationship whilst the men generally drink more alcohol, both of which are culturally acceptable in these countries.

In the UK women are more likely to report domestic violence as they know there's huge support from services for them. 50 years ago it was a different story and not talked about whilst GP's would send you to a hospital for treatment as they didn't 'deal with domestics'.
For info. - 2 out of 5 cases are women on men.................
................
[quote][p][bold]sotonboy84[/bold] wrote: But the force says that the increase is down to better crime detection rates and its commitment to helping victims come forward. The force may say it's down to better detection rates and this could be the case. But I'm sure there are many more factors and not just the one. I have a social worker friend and they have noticed an increase over time of the number of reported cases coming from Eastern European relationships. When somebody requires hospital care, a social worker is automatically involved if domestic violence is suspected. Women from these backgrounds are more likely to put up with this behaviour and expect it as part of a relationship whilst the men generally drink more alcohol, both of which are culturally acceptable in these countries. In the UK women are more likely to report domestic violence as they know there's huge support from services for them. 50 years ago it was a different story and not talked about whilst GP's would send you to a hospital for treatment as they didn't 'deal with domestics'.[/p][/quote]For info. - 2 out of 5 cases are women on men................. ................ George4th
  • Score: 1

3:49pm Thu 20 Feb 14

Holly the Dog says...

Domestics also include disputes between siblings, between parents/step patents and children if over 16
Domestics also include disputes between siblings, between parents/step patents and children if over 16 Holly the Dog
  • Score: 0

3:51pm Thu 20 Feb 14

Cyber__Fug says...

If women did as they were told it would reduce domestic violence ;o)
If women did as they were told it would reduce domestic violence ;o) Cyber__Fug
  • Score: -3

6:43pm Thu 20 Feb 14

sotonboy84 says...

George4th wrote:
sotonboy84 wrote:
But the force says that the increase is down to better crime detection rates and its commitment to helping victims come forward.

The force may say it's down to better detection rates and this could be the case. But I'm sure there are many more factors and not just the one. I have a social worker friend and they have noticed an increase over time of the number of reported cases coming from Eastern European relationships. When somebody requires hospital care, a social worker is automatically involved if domestic violence is suspected. Women from these backgrounds are more likely to put up with this behaviour and expect it as part of a relationship whilst the men generally drink more alcohol, both of which are culturally acceptable in these countries.

In the UK women are more likely to report domestic violence as they know there's huge support from services for them. 50 years ago it was a different story and not talked about whilst GP's would send you to a hospital for treatment as they didn't 'deal with domestics'.
For info. - 2 out of 5 cases are women on men.................

................
Yes sorry, I just used this example as men on women. I didn't think women on men was that high but I'm not at all surprised. I believe men are less likely to report anything though, historically anyway because of a number of reasons ranging from embarrassment to feeling they won't be believed.
[quote][p][bold]George4th[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sotonboy84[/bold] wrote: But the force says that the increase is down to better crime detection rates and its commitment to helping victims come forward. The force may say it's down to better detection rates and this could be the case. But I'm sure there are many more factors and not just the one. I have a social worker friend and they have noticed an increase over time of the number of reported cases coming from Eastern European relationships. When somebody requires hospital care, a social worker is automatically involved if domestic violence is suspected. Women from these backgrounds are more likely to put up with this behaviour and expect it as part of a relationship whilst the men generally drink more alcohol, both of which are culturally acceptable in these countries. In the UK women are more likely to report domestic violence as they know there's huge support from services for them. 50 years ago it was a different story and not talked about whilst GP's would send you to a hospital for treatment as they didn't 'deal with domestics'.[/p][/quote]For info. - 2 out of 5 cases are women on men................. ................[/p][/quote]Yes sorry, I just used this example as men on women. I didn't think women on men was that high but I'm not at all surprised. I believe men are less likely to report anything though, historically anyway because of a number of reasons ranging from embarrassment to feeling they won't be believed. sotonboy84
  • Score: 1

6:56pm Thu 20 Feb 14

bigfella777 says...

that's because booze is too cheap (hic!)
that's because booze is too cheap (hic!) bigfella777
  • Score: 0

12:39am Fri 21 Feb 14

George4th says...

sotonboy84 wrote:
George4th wrote:
sotonboy84 wrote:
But the force says that the increase is down to better crime detection rates and its commitment to helping victims come forward.

The force may say it's down to better detection rates and this could be the case. But I'm sure there are many more factors and not just the one. I have a social worker friend and they have noticed an increase over time of the number of reported cases coming from Eastern European relationships. When somebody requires hospital care, a social worker is automatically involved if domestic violence is suspected. Women from these backgrounds are more likely to put up with this behaviour and expect it as part of a relationship whilst the men generally drink more alcohol, both of which are culturally acceptable in these countries.

In the UK women are more likely to report domestic violence as they know there's huge support from services for them. 50 years ago it was a different story and not talked about whilst GP's would send you to a hospital for treatment as they didn't 'deal with domestics'.
For info. - 2 out of 5 cases are women on men.................


................
Yes sorry, I just used this example as men on women. I didn't think women on men was that high but I'm not at all surprised. I believe men are less likely to report anything though, historically anyway because of a number of reasons ranging from embarrassment to feeling they won't be believed.
" I believe men are less likely to report anything though, historically anyway because of a number of reasons ranging from embarrassment to feeling they won't be believed."

You are quite correct. I've heard 6ft plus guys admit they accepted violence from there partners who were barely 5ft tall!
[quote][p][bold]sotonboy84[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]George4th[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sotonboy84[/bold] wrote: But the force says that the increase is down to better crime detection rates and its commitment to helping victims come forward. The force may say it's down to better detection rates and this could be the case. But I'm sure there are many more factors and not just the one. I have a social worker friend and they have noticed an increase over time of the number of reported cases coming from Eastern European relationships. When somebody requires hospital care, a social worker is automatically involved if domestic violence is suspected. Women from these backgrounds are more likely to put up with this behaviour and expect it as part of a relationship whilst the men generally drink more alcohol, both of which are culturally acceptable in these countries. In the UK women are more likely to report domestic violence as they know there's huge support from services for them. 50 years ago it was a different story and not talked about whilst GP's would send you to a hospital for treatment as they didn't 'deal with domestics'.[/p][/quote]For info. - 2 out of 5 cases are women on men................. ................[/p][/quote]Yes sorry, I just used this example as men on women. I didn't think women on men was that high but I'm not at all surprised. I believe men are less likely to report anything though, historically anyway because of a number of reasons ranging from embarrassment to feeling they won't be believed.[/p][/quote]" I believe men are less likely to report anything though, historically anyway because of a number of reasons ranging from embarrassment to feeling they won't be believed." You are quite correct. I've heard 6ft plus guys admit they accepted violence from there partners who were barely 5ft tall! George4th
  • Score: 0

11:02pm Fri 21 Feb 14

thesouth says...

And yet Hampshire police dispanded their dedicated domestic violence unit. No wonder the rates have risen
And yet Hampshire police dispanded their dedicated domestic violence unit. No wonder the rates have risen thesouth
  • Score: 0

6:36am Sat 22 Feb 14

notableedingheart says...

Domestic violence is a curse of out times that has been with us for 100s of years and will sadly be with us for 100s of years. However, the blunt raw total does not indicate any true sense of DV. To properly understand them we need to consider the various contexts within with the figures reside.
Unfortunately there are interests groups who will be happy to push their particular barrow in order to appear more relevant, more successful at detection or to acquire more funding and resources. These groups generally will not provide detailed discussions of the raw figures as often the figures diminish their claims or goals and so the actual types of problems within the DV arena do not obtain the optimal strategies.
As a reader pointed out ethnic or cultural influences have a bearing, the female on male is a substantially under-reported component that some interests groups will either not mention or will attempt to diminish. Another significant factor in reported DVs is the influence of impending or current Family Law matters that may be flavoured by one of the parties alleging DV by the other party with a goal of obtaining more preferential property or custody settlement.
I could list many other influences that contribute to the reported levels of DV however I think you get my message that bland raw figures tell very little about the scourge that blights most societies and only marginally assist in addressing the scourge. Sadly the Police Forces, who I strongly support, are one of the groups who push the raw figures so they may be perceived by those who control promotions, tenure and funding that the Police have achieved magnificently.
Domestic violence is a curse of out times that has been with us for 100s of years and will sadly be with us for 100s of years. However, the blunt raw total does not indicate any true sense of DV. To properly understand them we need to consider the various contexts within with the figures reside. Unfortunately there are interests groups who will be happy to push their particular barrow in order to appear more relevant, more successful at detection or to acquire more funding and resources. These groups generally will not provide detailed discussions of the raw figures as often the figures diminish their claims or goals and so the actual types of problems within the DV arena do not obtain the optimal strategies. As a reader pointed out ethnic or cultural influences have a bearing, the female on male is a substantially under-reported component that some interests groups will either not mention or will attempt to diminish. Another significant factor in reported DVs is the influence of impending or current Family Law matters that may be flavoured by one of the parties alleging DV by the other party with a goal of obtaining more preferential property or custody settlement. I could list many other influences that contribute to the reported levels of DV however I think you get my message that bland raw figures tell very little about the scourge that blights most societies and only marginally assist in addressing the scourge. Sadly the Police Forces, who I strongly support, are one of the groups who push the raw figures so they may be perceived by those who control promotions, tenure and funding that the Police have achieved magnificently. notableedingheart
  • Score: 0

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