Lyndhurst becomes Hampshire's second 'dementia friendly' shopping centre

Businesses and charities at the launch of the scheme

Businesses and charities at the launch of the scheme

First published in News Daily Echo: Photograph of the Author by , Chief Reporter, New Forest

IT is one of the biggest issues facing Britain today.

The country’s ageing population means the number of people suffering from dementia is expected to rise from 800,000 to one million by 2021.

But civic chiefs and charity bosses in Hampshire are determined to help tackle the problem by creating “dementia friendly” shopping centres across the county.

Traders joining the scheme train their staff on how to spot signs of dementia and provide sufferers with an enhanced level of customer care.

They also display special stickers in their window in a move that aims to give people with dementia the confidence to enter the store.

Fareham High Street was declared dementia-friendly at the end of last year. Now Lyndhurst’s main shopping centre has achieved a similar accolade and other towns in the New Forest are set to follow suit.

The project has been devised by Hampshire County Council and Andover Mind, which want to help dementia sufferers lead near normal lives for as long as possible.

The Lyndhurst scheme was launched by Dr Julian Lewis, Tory MP for New Forest East.

He said: “People with dementia should not feel isolated. They’re still the same person, even if their ability to recall facts and conversations isn’t what it used to be.”

Jan Brooke, the new chairman of Lyndhurst Chamber of Trade, added: “A lot more understanding will help a lot of people.”

The number of dementia sufferers in Hampshire is expected to jump from 18,500 to 24,000 by 2020 – a rise of 30 per cent.

The percentage increase in the New Forest is likely to be even greater, thanks to the exceptionally large number of pensioners living in the popular retirement area.

Di Brooks, the district council’s Cabinet member for health and leisure, joined Dr Lewis at the launch.

She said; “The prevalence of dementia in the Forest is more than twice the national average so supporting initiatives that help improve the lives of people with dementia is a priority for the council.

“I am delighted to see local shops and businesses undertake to train their staff and would encourage others to get involved.”

Comments (3)

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1:59pm Sun 23 Feb 14

charrlee says...

Neahh! Sound bytes, stickers and photos is all this type of "initiative" ever amounts to, usually.
Dementia. People with dementia either do not know they have it to deal with, or forget minutes after you tell them. So what is the point of stickers in the windows of shops?
The most significant and highly-praiseworthy aspect is that shop staff are to be trained in recognising the symptoms.
Dementia. What a stink of a word! makes you think of "demented", and "mental". A better, kinder word would perhaps be "distraction" from the French word "distrait" ie my father suffers from distraction (mon pere - un peu distrait, tu sais) rather than my dad has dementia (mon pere est retarde)!!!!!!
I love the way people try to soften the word : instead of dee-men-T-ia (with a hard "t" sound, they say di-men-sha, as they would in some posh areas.

Perhaps Ricky Gervais' "Derek" should be compulsory viewing as part of the training (Yes, I know HIS character is based on Asperger's, but other characters in the show are portraying dementia).
Neahh! Sound bytes, stickers and photos is all this type of "initiative" ever amounts to, usually. Dementia. People with dementia either do not know they have it to deal with, or forget minutes after you tell them. So what is the point of stickers in the windows of shops? The most significant and highly-praiseworthy aspect is that shop staff are to be trained in recognising the symptoms. Dementia. What a stink of a word! makes you think of "demented", and "mental". A better, kinder word would perhaps be "distraction" from the French word "distrait" ie my father suffers from distraction (mon pere - un peu distrait, tu sais) rather than my dad has dementia (mon pere est retarde)!!!!!! I love the way people try to soften the word : instead of dee-men-T-ia (with a hard "t" sound, they say di-men-sha, as they would in some posh areas. Perhaps Ricky Gervais' "Derek" should be compulsory viewing as part of the training (Yes, I know HIS character is based on Asperger's, but other characters in the show are portraying dementia). charrlee
  • Score: 1

3:10pm Sun 23 Feb 14

vpharm says...

no wonder it is a dementia hot spot, as so many people from outside the area move to the new forest & it is straining the LOCAL NHS!
Plus they are pricing out young people from homes who were born in the area!
no wonder it is a dementia hot spot, as so many people from outside the area move to the new forest & it is straining the LOCAL NHS! Plus they are pricing out young people from homes who were born in the area! vpharm
  • Score: -4

9:09pm Sun 23 Feb 14

Mousetrap says...

They may be pricing out young people in the area; but then again who are selling them to the outsiders? I have found that most houses in the area are of the type that would be out of reach to the first time buyer anyway.
They may be pricing out young people in the area; but then again who are selling them to the outsiders? I have found that most houses in the area are of the type that would be out of reach to the first time buyer anyway. Mousetrap
  • Score: 2

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