School in special measures after 'inadequate' mark

Principal Andrew Dyer.

Principal Andrew Dyer.

First published in News Daily Echo: Photograph of the Author by , Chief Reporter, New Forest

A HAMPSHIRE school has been placed in special measures after being branded inadequate – the lowest rating given by inspectors.

The Office for Standards in Education (Ofsted) has condemned the standard of teaching and the behaviour of pupils at the New Forest Academy, formerly Hardley School and Sixth-Form.

In a damning verdict on the academy’s first year, Ofsted criticises its poor GCSE results and accuses staff of not inspiring their pupils.

The education watchdog says teachers are failing to set or mark homework while spelling errors and factual mistakes in students’ work are often ignored.

The principal, Andrew Dyer, who took over at the beginning of 2008, is refusing to comment on the report.

But ward councillor Allan Glass said: “I’m astonished and bitterly disappointed. It used to be such a good school.

“They’ve got all the facilities and I can’t understand why they’re not doing better. Now they’re an academy things should be going well.”

The Ofsted inspection follows last year’s GCSE results.

According to the Department for Education only 47 per cent of pupils achieved five A* to C grades including maths and English – well below the total achieved by many other schools in the Southampton area.

Ofsted describes the pupils’ progress as “inadequate”, with many under-achieving in key subjects.

The report says: “The percentage of students attaining five or more A*-C GCSE grades was well below average in 2013. The percentage of high GCSE grades was far lower than that seen nationally.

“Teaching requires improvement because in too many lessons it is not good enough to generate rapid progress.

“There are still teachers whose lessons do not inspire students, who do not prepare work to match students’ abilities and who rarely set and mark homework.”

The 540-student campus in Long Lane, Hardley, became an academy in September 2012.

When its predecessor, Hardley School and Sixth Form, was last inspected by Ofsted in February 2012 it was deemed to require “significant” improvements.

But the latest report condemns the lack of progress, saying standards have actually declined since the site became an academy. It adds: “Year 11 students entered the predecessor school with average standards but their standards had fallen by the end of the academy’s first year. In 2013 less than half the students attained five or more GCSE A* - C grades including English and maths.”

The report says the quality of teaching needs to improve and also describes the behaviour of pupils as inadequate.

“Behaviour in lessons reflects the quality of teaching. When teaching is good the students are attentive, keen to learn, answer questions enthusiastically and contribute willingly to discussions. When students are not taught well the opposite is true.”

The report says some of the pupils resort to “low-level disruption” in class such as whistling and table-tapping.

It adds: “Outside of lessons the behaviour of a very small minority of students is not good. Horseplay goes too far or students behave inappropriately.”

Leadership and management are also criticised.

“Leaders do not have the capacity to drive the improvements that are needed for the academy to be successful in the future,” says the report.

The Daily Echo asked the academy if it wished to respond to Ofsted’s findings but calls were not returned.

The academy’s motto is “To Make Our Best Better”.

A statement on its website says: “Our aim is to create the best possible educational environment in which our students can succeed. We focus on ensuring that all students make the progress of which they are capable and that every student feels they are stretched. We are a thriving 11-18 Academy with an all-ability intake.

“Through our business and enterprise specialism we challenge and encourage every child to achieve their full potential not just in terms of academic attainment but also in relation to the many extra-curricular and community activities that are on offer here.”

Comments (57)

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10:37am Wed 5 Mar 14

Stnana says...

Why has it taken so long to recognise the problems at this school ? It has been in decline for a long time and parents have been removing children for a few years . Maybe the Echo could investigate how many children from the feeder schools are now attending the other two secondary schools on the Waterside.
Why has it taken so long to recognise the problems at this school ? It has been in decline for a long time and parents have been removing children for a few years . Maybe the Echo could investigate how many children from the feeder schools are now attending the other two secondary schools on the Waterside. Stnana
  • Score: 11

10:41am Wed 5 Mar 14

Irate Wintonian says...

Stnana wrote:
Why has it taken so long to recognise the problems at this school ? It has been in decline for a long time and parents have been removing children for a few years . Maybe the Echo could investigate how many children from the feeder schools are now attending the other two secondary schools on the Waterside.
Don't be silly! That would require proper journalism.
[quote][p][bold]Stnana[/bold] wrote: Why has it taken so long to recognise the problems at this school ? It has been in decline for a long time and parents have been removing children for a few years . Maybe the Echo could investigate how many children from the feeder schools are now attending the other two secondary schools on the Waterside.[/p][/quote]Don't be silly! That would require proper journalism. Irate Wintonian
  • Score: 4

11:13am Wed 5 Mar 14

Norwegian Saint says...

"Tis waz me ol skool bak inn ninetine hateies, neffer di mee eni arm"
"Tis waz me ol skool bak inn ninetine hateies, neffer di mee eni arm" Norwegian Saint
  • Score: 12

11:24am Wed 5 Mar 14

Zootopian says...

Irate Wintonian wrote:
Stnana wrote:
Why has it taken so long to recognise the problems at this school ? It has been in decline for a long time and parents have been removing children for a few years . Maybe the Echo could investigate how many children from the feeder schools are now attending the other two secondary schools on the Waterside.
Don't be silly! That would require proper journalism.
What a moronic comment from Wintonian.

School does badly, parents send children elsewhere. It's hardly rocket science or worthy of an investigation.
[quote][p][bold]Irate Wintonian[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Stnana[/bold] wrote: Why has it taken so long to recognise the problems at this school ? It has been in decline for a long time and parents have been removing children for a few years . Maybe the Echo could investigate how many children from the feeder schools are now attending the other two secondary schools on the Waterside.[/p][/quote]Don't be silly! That would require proper journalism.[/p][/quote]What a moronic comment from Wintonian. School does badly, parents send children elsewhere. It's hardly rocket science or worthy of an investigation. Zootopian
  • Score: -8

11:32am Wed 5 Mar 14

Murray mint says...

Norwegian Saint wrote:
"Tis waz me ol skool bak inn ninetine hateies, neffer di mee eni arm"
Me too Such a shame!
[quote][p][bold]Norwegian Saint[/bold] wrote: "Tis waz me ol skool bak inn ninetine hateies, neffer di mee eni arm"[/p][/quote]Me too Such a shame! Murray mint
  • Score: 1

11:56am Wed 5 Mar 14

From the sidelines says...

The teachers concerned should be fired, before they can be a blight on any more children's prospects.

.
The teachers concerned should be fired, before they can be a blight on any more children's prospects. . From the sidelines
  • Score: 0

12:52pm Wed 5 Mar 14

ryan_gazzan@hotmail.com says...

Was a great school back in the 1960's - almost sorry to leave !! Mr Budge was a man to respect at all time or else !! also very fond memories of Mr. Moody so tragically killed by a hit and run driver. Mr Moody used to smoke like a chimney !!
Was a great school back in the 1960's - almost sorry to leave !! Mr Budge was a man to respect at all time or else !! also very fond memories of Mr. Moody so tragically killed by a hit and run driver. Mr Moody used to smoke like a chimney !! ryan_gazzan@hotmail.com
  • Score: 5

1:16pm Wed 5 Mar 14

CeliaWithers says...

It's the leadership team who should be fired. The teachers there have had the stuffing knocked out of them and depression kicks in as the leadership team fail to support and inspire. It has to come from the top and the top is sadly lacking.
It's the leadership team who should be fired. The teachers there have had the stuffing knocked out of them and depression kicks in as the leadership team fail to support and inspire. It has to come from the top and the top is sadly lacking. CeliaWithers
  • Score: 25

1:17pm Wed 5 Mar 14

jonnyx says...

the hardley (sic) school - the name at least seems apt.
the hardley (sic) school - the name at least seems apt. jonnyx
  • Score: -1

2:08pm Wed 5 Mar 14

*K4TE* says...

...this school was awful 10 years ago when I attended it, I only did well and went on to university because I was driven to but not many others did the same ... but I can't let it go un noticed that there are some inspiring teachers at this school I had a couple of extremely brilliant teachers here. I think the few good teachers are struggling and the others who may not be as strong struggle with the EXTREMELY bad catchment area lets be honest (and I can say this I am from the area) it is surrounded by children coming from uneducated / benefit seeking familys and if this is the majority then unfortunately it seems to bring the rest of the school down ...
...this school was awful 10 years ago when I attended it, I only did well and went on to university because I was driven to but not many others did the same ... but I can't let it go un noticed that there are some inspiring teachers at this school I had a couple of extremely brilliant teachers here. I think the few good teachers are struggling and the others who may not be as strong struggle with the EXTREMELY bad catchment area lets be honest (and I can say this I am from the area) it is surrounded by children coming from uneducated / benefit seeking familys and if this is the majority then unfortunately it seems to bring the rest of the school down ... *K4TE*
  • Score: 16

2:17pm Wed 5 Mar 14

LadySam says...

When I was teacher training we were told to not correct spelling mistakes as it was 'demoralising' for students! Similarly, poor grammar was overlooked and marking in red pen not permitted. Incidentally this school was nicknamed 'Hardley Educated' for years when I lived on the Waterside. Luckily I went to Noadswood from 1979 to 1984 which was pretty good - no idea what it is like now, though.
When I was teacher training we were told to not correct spelling mistakes as it was 'demoralising' for students! Similarly, poor grammar was overlooked and marking in red pen not permitted. Incidentally this school was nicknamed 'Hardley Educated' for years when I lived on the Waterside. Luckily I went to Noadswood from 1979 to 1984 which was pretty good - no idea what it is like now, though. LadySam
  • Score: 4

2:26pm Wed 5 Mar 14

charrlee says...

I didn't know Mr Budge or Ivor Astley, but when Robert Underwood took over as headteacher in the early 80's, he continued the good work of his predescessors, and with the support of a very strong senior management team, drove the school on to great success. Many staff and pupils remember vividly the excitement we felt when Robert's unrelenting tenacity tore the school away from Hampshire's rather flaccid control and led us forward to grant-maintained status. This new freedom enabled all departments to flourish, and we were particularly pleased with a new science block and drama studio.

However, it was not failings of the staff that made Hardley a "difficult" school. The Netley View council estate had long been a pleasant place to live, and provided Hardley with a consistent supply of nice, decent kids, that school being conveniently closer than Applemore or Noadswood. But when the local authority took it into their heads to move some particularly troubled families to the Netley View estate, the problems began. Instead of the "good" influencing the families with problems, it went the other way. I'm not going to spell anymore of this out, except to say that the result was a gradual increase in the number of pupils with challenging behaviour attending Hardley. You cannot blame the pupils or the families - the local authority did not provide the necessary backup support to make the project a success.

The increase in behavioural and learning difficulties did not defeat Robert and his staff. He set up a very strong Special Needs department led by Leigh Jerwood, supported by a particularly able and dedicated team.

My goodness has Andrew Dyer had a tough act to follow, stepping in after Robert retired. And the closure of Fawley refinery will have had a serious impact.

So please ignore the usual "slag off" commenters who tend to blight this forum. They know nothing.

If new employment opportunities are created with regeneration post Fawley, and it brings new blood to the area, Hardley will rise again. Let's hope this silly renaming process gets scrapped - it's a school, not an academy! New Forest Academy sounds like a private art school!
I didn't know Mr Budge or Ivor Astley, but when Robert Underwood took over as headteacher in the early 80's, he continued the good work of his predescessors, and with the support of a very strong senior management team, drove the school on to great success. Many staff and pupils remember vividly the excitement we felt when Robert's unrelenting tenacity tore the school away from Hampshire's rather flaccid control and led us forward to grant-maintained status. This new freedom enabled all departments to flourish, and we were particularly pleased with a new science block and drama studio. However, it was not failings of the staff that made Hardley a "difficult" school. The Netley View council estate had long been a pleasant place to live, and provided Hardley with a consistent supply of nice, decent kids, that school being conveniently closer than Applemore or Noadswood. But when the local authority took it into their heads to move some particularly troubled families to the Netley View estate, the problems began. Instead of the "good" influencing the families with problems, it went the other way. I'm not going to spell anymore of this out, except to say that the result was a gradual increase in the number of pupils with challenging behaviour attending Hardley. You cannot blame the pupils or the families - the local authority did not provide the necessary backup support to make the project a success. The increase in behavioural and learning difficulties did not defeat Robert and his staff. He set up a very strong Special Needs department led by Leigh Jerwood, supported by a particularly able and dedicated team. My goodness has Andrew Dyer had a tough act to follow, stepping in after Robert retired. And the closure of Fawley refinery will have had a serious impact. So please ignore the usual "slag off" commenters who tend to blight this forum. They know nothing. If new employment opportunities are created with regeneration post Fawley, and it brings new blood to the area, Hardley will rise again. Let's hope this silly renaming process gets scrapped - it's a school, not an academy! New Forest Academy sounds like a private art school! charrlee
  • Score: 12

2:31pm Wed 5 Mar 14

Daniel Switzer says...

I attended the school starting 2007 and left 2012 and can honestly say the experience deteriorated every single year. As an express student (that has problems of its own, but that's a whole different story), I realised that there was a segregation between "express" students and "standard" students. Each year, very good teachers left, whether through their own decisions or redundancies and by the end of it, new teachers who didn't know the students well or the culture of the school started teaching us, who, in my personal opinion, didn't care about us.

I achieved good grades (1 A, 5 Bs, 3 Cs) and while teachers in certain subjects were definitely passionate about what they were teacher, there were others who just didn't care for the subject, students or school.

Sixth Form was a joke, spent a year there and I regret it. My English Literature and Language course had a substitute teacher for my substitute teacher. As pleasant as he was, he taught me and other students a book that wasn't even on the curriculum for a few months and when I entered the exam, I was in shock and awe. I could barely answer the question. Finishing up at Brockenhurst College now and the difference between teaching standards is just night and day.

Even while I was attending Years 7-10, the institute had its multitude of problems. Those familiar with this case (http://www.dailyech
o.co.uk/news/9919599
.School_worker_jaile
d_for_sexual_abuse_o
f_two_girls/?ref=rss
) should know that several complaints from students were voiced to teachers about his ethic and attitude and our comments were always thrown away. Bad students were praised for their rare case of good behaviour, good students were told to soldier on through difficult times.

I'm honestly not surprised this didn't happen sooner. “To Make Our Best Better" is a joke, they should stick with their original, before their name change, "Hardley Educated".
I attended the school starting 2007 and left 2012 and can honestly say the experience deteriorated every single year. As an express student (that has problems of its own, but that's a whole different story), I realised that there was a segregation between "express" students and "standard" students. Each year, very good teachers left, whether through their own decisions or redundancies and by the end of it, new teachers who didn't know the students well or the culture of the school started teaching us, who, in my personal opinion, didn't care about us. I achieved good grades (1 A, 5 Bs, 3 Cs) and while teachers in certain subjects were definitely passionate about what they were teacher, there were others who just didn't care for the subject, students or school. Sixth Form was a joke, spent a year there and I regret it. My English Literature and Language course had a substitute teacher for my substitute teacher. As pleasant as he was, he taught me and other students a book that wasn't even on the curriculum for a few months and when I entered the exam, I was in shock and awe. I could barely answer the question. Finishing up at Brockenhurst College now and the difference between teaching standards is just night and day. Even while I was attending Years 7-10, the institute had its multitude of problems. Those familiar with this case (http://www.dailyech o.co.uk/news/9919599 .School_worker_jaile d_for_sexual_abuse_o f_two_girls/?ref=rss ) should know that several complaints from students were voiced to teachers about his ethic and attitude and our comments were always thrown away. Bad students were praised for their rare case of good behaviour, good students were told to soldier on through difficult times. I'm honestly not surprised this didn't happen sooner. “To Make Our Best Better" is a joke, they should stick with their original, before their name change, "Hardley Educated". Daniel Switzer
  • Score: 14

2:35pm Wed 5 Mar 14

Mr_Forest says...

I know some of the teachers at this school and to me it has sounded as though cost cutting is affecting staff morale and placing them in roles they are not fully skilled to teach.

I get asked to take on more at work, but it is with the support and training required, and it is not expected for me to deliver straight away when trying to use a skills set I'm not versed in.

I think teaching more than most professions requires a positive environment to work in and I really don't think that is being fostered at this school presently. It needs a good leadership team with adequate resources to turn things around.

Of the staff I know there, they are dedicated to their jobs and always seek to provide the best educational experience. However they can only do that to the best of their ability with the skills they have!
I know some of the teachers at this school and to me it has sounded as though cost cutting is affecting staff morale and placing them in roles they are not fully skilled to teach. I get asked to take on more at work, but it is with the support and training required, and it is not expected for me to deliver straight away when trying to use a skills set I'm not versed in. I think teaching more than most professions requires a positive environment to work in and I really don't think that is being fostered at this school presently. It needs a good leadership team with adequate resources to turn things around. Of the staff I know there, they are dedicated to their jobs and always seek to provide the best educational experience. However they can only do that to the best of their ability with the skills they have! Mr_Forest
  • Score: 11

2:43pm Wed 5 Mar 14

hmw says...

Is that steam coming out of the Principal's ear?
Is that steam coming out of the Principal's ear? hmw
  • Score: 1

3:21pm Wed 5 Mar 14

CeliaWithers says...

I agree with a lot you say Dan. However, I don't think it was the fact that teachers didn't care, the vast majority of them worked tirelessly to help students, but they were constantly knocked down by threat of redundancy and lack of support. Again, I stress, the leadership MUST take responsibility for the school's inadequacies..

As for the link you posted. I do not condone the actions of this man in any way, shape or form, it is absolutely abhorent. However, there were many students in the school who had for years and years vandalised his car and verbally abused him because they didn't like the look of him. . The students who complained about him just said he gave them the creeps. There was never anything concrete at all to alert the staff that he may be a danger to students. I cared deeply about the welfare of students at Hardley and I would certainly have acted without hesitation if I suspected anything other than 'he gives me the creeps'. We must remember that no student at Hardley was involved in any of the improper acts this man is guilty of.
I agree with a lot you say Dan. However, I don't think it was the fact that teachers didn't care, the vast majority of them worked tirelessly to help students, but they were constantly knocked down by threat of redundancy and lack of support. Again, I stress, the leadership MUST take responsibility for the school's inadequacies.. As for the link you posted. I do not condone the actions of this man in any way, shape or form, it is absolutely abhorent. However, there were many students in the school who had for years and years vandalised his car and verbally abused him because they didn't like the look of him. . The students who complained about him just said he gave them the creeps. There was never anything concrete at all to alert the staff that he may be a danger to students. I cared deeply about the welfare of students at Hardley and I would certainly have acted without hesitation if I suspected anything other than 'he gives me the creeps'. We must remember that no student at Hardley was involved in any of the improper acts this man is guilty of. CeliaWithers
  • Score: -2

3:25pm Wed 5 Mar 14

el caballo santos101 says...

Norwegian Saint wrote:
"Tis waz me ol skool bak inn ninetine hateies, neffer di mee eni arm"
I waz there in da 80s nd I fought it waz gr8 den whats appened 2 it?
[quote][p][bold]Norwegian Saint[/bold] wrote: "Tis waz me ol skool bak inn ninetine hateies, neffer di mee eni arm"[/p][/quote]I waz there in da 80s nd I fought it waz gr8 den whats appened 2 it? el caballo santos101
  • Score: -2

3:33pm Wed 5 Mar 14

charrlee says...

There's something else. Don't forget what a mess 40 years of government intervention in education has caused with constant changes, none of which have ever been given long enough to take effect. Always a great "vote getter", wasn't it, when successive parties and secretaries of state promised new initiatives and massive improvements? All it did, from the 70's onwards, was to pile more and more insignificant paperwork onto an already over-burdened workforce who were still reeling from the introduction of comprehensive education, mixed ability teaching, and ROSLA (Raising Of the School Leaving Age). Many excellent teachers left the profession because they did not want to give up their after-school clubs and other pupil/teacher interaction opportunities to write pages and pages of assessments and fill in endless tick boxes! So often pupils came to see you at lunchtime and after school about all sorts of things and you had to apologise and close the door because there was suddenly all this Ofsted-driven paperwork to do.

Enough said by me! If you want proof that Ofsted and politicians have seriously damaged our education system, just consider that we used to be one of the best in Europe, and now we are something like 34th!
There's something else. Don't forget what a mess 40 years of government intervention in education has caused with constant changes, none of which have ever been given long enough to take effect. Always a great "vote getter", wasn't it, when successive parties and secretaries of state promised new initiatives and massive improvements? All it did, from the 70's onwards, was to pile more and more insignificant paperwork onto an already over-burdened workforce who were still reeling from the introduction of comprehensive education, mixed ability teaching, and ROSLA (Raising Of the School Leaving Age). Many excellent teachers left the profession because they did not want to give up their after-school clubs and other pupil/teacher interaction opportunities to write pages and pages of assessments and fill in endless tick boxes! So often pupils came to see you at lunchtime and after school about all sorts of things and you had to apologise and close the door because there was suddenly all this Ofsted-driven paperwork to do. Enough said by me! If you want proof that Ofsted and politicians have seriously damaged our education system, just consider that we used to be one of the best in Europe, and now we are something like 34th! charrlee
  • Score: 4

3:33pm Wed 5 Mar 14

Daniel Switzer says...

CeliaWithers wrote:
I agree with a lot you say Dan. However, I don't think it was the fact that teachers didn't care, the vast majority of them worked tirelessly to help students, but they were constantly knocked down by threat of redundancy and lack of support. Again, I stress, the leadership MUST take responsibility for the school's inadequacies..

As for the link you posted. I do not condone the actions of this man in any way, shape or form, it is absolutely abhorent. However, there were many students in the school who had for years and years vandalised his car and verbally abused him because they didn't like the look of him. . The students who complained about him just said he gave them the creeps. There was never anything concrete at all to alert the staff that he may be a danger to students. I cared deeply about the welfare of students at Hardley and I would certainly have acted without hesitation if I suspected anything other than 'he gives me the creeps'. We must remember that no student at Hardley was involved in any of the improper acts this man is guilty of.
There were definitely good, quality teachers at the school, some of them I considered friends more than a authoritarian figure. Obviously I didn't see it then but I can sympathise now with the threat of redundancy, I understand the consequences that will have on morale and so forth. There were definitely teachers who just did not care and whether that was the result of the terrible behaviour of a lot of students (it was hard enough having to work with my peers, I don't think I could ever teacher them), or just because it was their attitude, well, I don't know. I like to think the former.

As for the aforementioned teacher, I agree with you, certainly not condoning what he did and I was unaware of the vandalism and verbal abuse he received. Though it it easy to just say "He looks like a creep" and that's not enough to warrant a formal complaint, myself and others witnessed activity and actions that I would regard as stepping outside the "student-teacher" relationship. Nothing ever criminally wrong but enough to feel cautious.

I don't mean to paint the entire school with the same brush, the brilliant teachers that I had the pleasure of being taught by, know who they are. I'm not sure whether the management of Andrew Dyer was to blame for what I feel was the deterioration of the school's standards or whether it was down to other factors that, a student like myself, would not have noticed while attending.
[quote][p][bold]CeliaWithers[/bold] wrote: I agree with a lot you say Dan. However, I don't think it was the fact that teachers didn't care, the vast majority of them worked tirelessly to help students, but they were constantly knocked down by threat of redundancy and lack of support. Again, I stress, the leadership MUST take responsibility for the school's inadequacies.. As for the link you posted. I do not condone the actions of this man in any way, shape or form, it is absolutely abhorent. However, there were many students in the school who had for years and years vandalised his car and verbally abused him because they didn't like the look of him. . The students who complained about him just said he gave them the creeps. There was never anything concrete at all to alert the staff that he may be a danger to students. I cared deeply about the welfare of students at Hardley and I would certainly have acted without hesitation if I suspected anything other than 'he gives me the creeps'. We must remember that no student at Hardley was involved in any of the improper acts this man is guilty of.[/p][/quote]There were definitely good, quality teachers at the school, some of them I considered friends more than a authoritarian figure. Obviously I didn't see it then but I can sympathise now with the threat of redundancy, I understand the consequences that will have on morale and so forth. There were definitely teachers who just did not care and whether that was the result of the terrible behaviour of a lot of students (it was hard enough having to work with my peers, I don't think I could ever teacher them), or just because it was their attitude, well, I don't know. I like to think the former. As for the aforementioned teacher, I agree with you, certainly not condoning what he did and I was unaware of the vandalism and verbal abuse he received. Though it it easy to just say "He looks like a creep" and that's not enough to warrant a formal complaint, myself and others witnessed activity and actions that I would regard as stepping outside the "student-teacher" relationship. Nothing ever criminally wrong but enough to feel cautious. I don't mean to paint the entire school with the same brush, the brilliant teachers that I had the pleasure of being taught by, know who they are. I'm not sure whether the management of Andrew Dyer was to blame for what I feel was the deterioration of the school's standards or whether it was down to other factors that, a student like myself, would not have noticed while attending. Daniel Switzer
  • Score: 2

3:44pm Wed 5 Mar 14

eurogordi says...

First Testwood and now New Forest Academy (Hardley). Does Ofsted have a vendetta against New Forest schools? Admittedly I wasn't too surprised at Testwood having had children at the school, but I have also been involved with New Forest Academy/Hardley over the years and Andy Dyer has done his hardest to improve student achievement.

However, I believe that Ofsted should be looking at the social environment in which schools are located. New Forest Academy draws pupils from Netley View (as already mention by another poster), Heather Road and Tristan Close all of which are known to be deprived areas. There is nothing wrong with these roads or the people that live there, but they are not necessarily A*-C GCSE material.

That doesn't mean that the pupils have failed and nor has the school, which works tirelessly to support the less able under Andy Dyer's watch. It is just that this country and Ofsted want individuals to fit the education and not make the education fit the individual. For some of the pupils leaving school with a low level pass and good attendance is an achievement. Why is that not recognised?

Not everyone is capable of C+ grades, but that isn't a failure, is it? After all, the best builder who ever worked on my house ran his own business yet he couldn't read and write. His wife did the paperwork, he did the building work ... and I didn't see him as a failure although statistically he would be considered as such!
First Testwood and now New Forest Academy (Hardley). Does Ofsted have a vendetta against New Forest schools? Admittedly I wasn't too surprised at Testwood having had children at the school, but I have also been involved with New Forest Academy/Hardley over the years and Andy Dyer has done his hardest to improve student achievement. However, I believe that Ofsted should be looking at the social environment in which schools are located. New Forest Academy draws pupils from Netley View (as already mention by another poster), Heather Road and Tristan Close all of which are known to be deprived areas. There is nothing wrong with these roads or the people that live there, but they are not necessarily A*-C GCSE material. That doesn't mean that the pupils have failed and nor has the school, which works tirelessly to support the less able under Andy Dyer's watch. It is just that this country and Ofsted want individuals to fit the education and not make the education fit the individual. For some of the pupils leaving school with a low level pass and good attendance is an achievement. Why is that not recognised? Not everyone is capable of C+ grades, but that isn't a failure, is it? After all, the best builder who ever worked on my house ran his own business yet he couldn't read and write. His wife did the paperwork, he did the building work ... and I didn't see him as a failure although statistically he would be considered as such! eurogordi
  • Score: 8

4:17pm Wed 5 Mar 14

brucetheboss says...

Changing the name to New Forest Academy was suppose to magically make it a better School with no other intervention. Their whole etos is exactly that image and keeping in with Ofsted well i've seen firsthand as a parent how lacking several teachers are. My daughter tookAS level Maths and the Teacher told her she was out of her depth and to try another subject.She went on to achieve a first class honors degree in maths and now works as a business analyst in London. No credit to Hardley she done it all on her own
Changing the name to New Forest Academy was suppose to magically make it a better School with no other intervention. Their whole etos is exactly that image and keeping in with Ofsted well i've seen firsthand as a parent how lacking several teachers are. My daughter tookAS level Maths and the Teacher told her she was out of her depth and to try another subject.She went on to achieve a first class honors degree in maths and now works as a business analyst in London. No credit to Hardley she done it all on her own brucetheboss
  • Score: 4

4:57pm Wed 5 Mar 14

charrlee says...

brucetheboss wrote:
Changing the name to New Forest Academy was suppose to magically make it a better School with no other intervention. Their whole etos is exactly that image and keeping in with Ofsted well i've seen firsthand as a parent how lacking several teachers are. My daughter tookAS level Maths and the Teacher told her she was out of her depth and to try another subject.She went on to achieve a first class honors degree in maths and now works as a business analyst in London. No credit to Hardley she done it all on her own
The worst teachers create dependence, the best facilitate independence.

An art teacher once told me of a difficult girl in his class who wouldn't get on with her CSE course work, and was in danger of failing. However he encouraged her, she dismissed his advice as being wrong. So he changed his approach. He dismissed her work as inept, and told her she'd never finish. So to prove him wrong, she completed all the work and passed! Wharever it takes, buddy, whatever it takes!

So well done, Hardley!
[quote][p][bold]brucetheboss[/bold] wrote: Changing the name to New Forest Academy was suppose to magically make it a better School with no other intervention. Their whole etos is exactly that image and keeping in with Ofsted well i've seen firsthand as a parent how lacking several teachers are. My daughter tookAS level Maths and the Teacher told her she was out of her depth and to try another subject.She went on to achieve a first class honors degree in maths and now works as a business analyst in London. No credit to Hardley she done it all on her own[/p][/quote]The worst teachers create dependence, the best facilitate independence. An art teacher once told me of a difficult girl in his class who wouldn't get on with her CSE course work, and was in danger of failing. However he encouraged her, she dismissed his advice as being wrong. So he changed his approach. He dismissed her work as inept, and told her she'd never finish. So to prove him wrong, she completed all the work and passed! Wharever it takes, buddy, whatever it takes! So well done, Hardley! charrlee
  • Score: -3

5:15pm Wed 5 Mar 14

George4th says...

The Good teachers can leave a school and get jobs elsewhere, the same as you can in life generally. And, as in all walks of life, you will get left with the less able.

In the private sector you can reasonably let go of an under performer and replace them.

The big difference in Education is that it is almost impossible to sack a teacher!! So, schools can accumulate poor teachers! The Head has their hands tied and the overall performance can deteriorate.

I'm not saying that is what happened but any Head will tell you that it is extremely difficult to offload a poor teacher.............
.........
The Good teachers can leave a school and get jobs elsewhere, the same as you can in life generally. And, as in all walks of life, you will get left with the less able. In the private sector you can reasonably let go of an under performer and replace them. The big difference in Education is that it is almost impossible to sack a teacher!! So, schools can accumulate poor teachers! The Head has their hands tied and the overall performance can deteriorate. I'm not saying that is what happened but any Head will tell you that it is extremely difficult to offload a poor teacher............. ......... George4th
  • Score: 5

5:19pm Wed 5 Mar 14

charrlee says...

George4th wrote:
The Good teachers can leave a school and get jobs elsewhere, the same as you can in life generally. And, as in all walks of life, you will get left with the less able.

In the private sector you can reasonably let go of an under performer and replace them.

The big difference in Education is that it is almost impossible to sack a teacher!! So, schools can accumulate poor teachers! The Head has their hands tied and the overall performance can deteriorate.

I'm not saying that is what happened but any Head will tell you that it is extremely difficult to offload a poor teacher.............

.........
You sound like a politician. So easy to blame the teacher, isn't it?
[quote][p][bold]George4th[/bold] wrote: The Good teachers can leave a school and get jobs elsewhere, the same as you can in life generally. And, as in all walks of life, you will get left with the less able. In the private sector you can reasonably let go of an under performer and replace them. The big difference in Education is that it is almost impossible to sack a teacher!! So, schools can accumulate poor teachers! The Head has their hands tied and the overall performance can deteriorate. I'm not saying that is what happened but any Head will tell you that it is extremely difficult to offload a poor teacher............. .........[/p][/quote]You sound like a politician. So easy to blame the teacher, isn't it? charrlee
  • Score: -8

5:29pm Wed 5 Mar 14

Dusty says...

My daughter left there last year, 8 maths teachers in her final year. She failed maths, as did most others. I voiced my concerns to the head before her exams and he buried his head in the sand. Contacted my local MP, that did me no good at all. Now my daughter is in brock collage, getting A Stars and will be doing Her maths again, plus next year A level English.

The school, the head and a lot of the teachers are a disgrace.
My daughter left there last year, 8 maths teachers in her final year. She failed maths, as did most others. I voiced my concerns to the head before her exams and he buried his head in the sand. Contacted my local MP, that did me no good at all. Now my daughter is in brock collage, getting A Stars and will be doing Her maths again, plus next year A level English. The school, the head and a lot of the teachers are a disgrace. Dusty
  • Score: 3

5:30pm Wed 5 Mar 14

jonnyx says...

it must be very difficult for all schools (and indeed Ofsted) these days though, especially when the Muppet in charge (Mr gove) tells us in all seriousness that ALL schools must be above average - now i'm no mathematician, but i'm not sure how that particular edict can possibly work.
it must be very difficult for all schools (and indeed Ofsted) these days though, especially when the Muppet in charge (Mr gove) tells us in all seriousness that ALL schools must be above average - now i'm no mathematician, but i'm not sure how that particular edict can possibly work. jonnyx
  • Score: 10

5:34pm Wed 5 Mar 14

WalkingOnAWire says...

George4th wrote:
The Good teachers can leave a school and get jobs elsewhere, the same as you can in life generally. And, as in all walks of life, you will get left with the less able.

In the private sector you can reasonably let go of an under performer and replace them.

The big difference in Education is that it is almost impossible to sack a teacher!! So, schools can accumulate poor teachers! The Head has their hands tied and the overall performance can deteriorate.

I'm not saying that is what happened but any Head will tell you that it is extremely difficult to offload a poor teacher.............

.........
If you have poor teachers, does it cause you to use Unnecessary capital Letters and too many exclamation marks?

Just Asking!!!!
[quote][p][bold]George4th[/bold] wrote: The Good teachers can leave a school and get jobs elsewhere, the same as you can in life generally. And, as in all walks of life, you will get left with the less able. In the private sector you can reasonably let go of an under performer and replace them. The big difference in Education is that it is almost impossible to sack a teacher!! So, schools can accumulate poor teachers! The Head has their hands tied and the overall performance can deteriorate. I'm not saying that is what happened but any Head will tell you that it is extremely difficult to offload a poor teacher............. .........[/p][/quote]If you have poor teachers, does it cause you to use Unnecessary capital Letters and too many exclamation marks? Just Asking!!!! WalkingOnAWire
  • Score: -2

5:36pm Wed 5 Mar 14

George4th says...

charrlee wrote:
George4th wrote:
The Good teachers can leave a school and get jobs elsewhere, the same as you can in life generally. And, as in all walks of life, you will get left with the less able.

In the private sector you can reasonably let go of an under performer and replace them.

The big difference in Education is that it is almost impossible to sack a teacher!! So, schools can accumulate poor teachers! The Head has their hands tied and the overall performance can deteriorate.

I'm not saying that is what happened but any Head will tell you that it is extremely difficult to offload a poor teacher.............


.........
You sound like a politician. So easy to blame the teacher, isn't it?
:-)
As of 2010, only 18 UK teachers had been struck off for incompetence in the previous 40 years! Only 17 in the past 10 years!

Panorama did a program on it!

Everything that is controlled by a Union, under-performs......
............
[quote][p][bold]charrlee[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]George4th[/bold] wrote: The Good teachers can leave a school and get jobs elsewhere, the same as you can in life generally. And, as in all walks of life, you will get left with the less able. In the private sector you can reasonably let go of an under performer and replace them. The big difference in Education is that it is almost impossible to sack a teacher!! So, schools can accumulate poor teachers! The Head has their hands tied and the overall performance can deteriorate. I'm not saying that is what happened but any Head will tell you that it is extremely difficult to offload a poor teacher............. .........[/p][/quote]You sound like a politician. So easy to blame the teacher, isn't it?[/p][/quote]:-) As of 2010, only 18 UK teachers had been struck off for incompetence in the previous 40 years! Only 17 in the past 10 years! Panorama did a program on it! Everything that is controlled by a Union, under-performs...... ............ George4th
  • Score: 1

5:42pm Wed 5 Mar 14

MisterTom says...

Bring back Steve Baybut best history teacher ever!!
Bring back Steve Baybut best history teacher ever!! MisterTom
  • Score: 3

5:45pm Wed 5 Mar 14

Toby moth says...

attended this school up until last year and it appeared a lot of the problem was that teachers would leave and then 6 months down the line. I also have an issue with the fact that even when the school know they have done something wrong there is no apology.At the end of the day It is always going to partially the fault of the student, if they care they can put work in at home separate to the school i'm not saying i was perfect, but i accept that most of the fault was my own when it came to messing my grades up. a good school needs good teachers AND good students.
attended this school up until last year and it appeared a lot of the problem was that teachers would leave and then 6 months down the line. I also have an issue with the fact that even when the school know they have done something wrong there is no apology.At the end of the day It is always going to partially the fault of the student, if they care they can put work in at home separate to the school i'm not saying i was perfect, but i accept that most of the fault was my own when it came to messing my grades up. a good school needs good teachers AND good students. Toby moth
  • Score: 0

5:53pm Wed 5 Mar 14

Stnana says...

As I said in my first post this school has been declining for many years and anyone who has seen the exam results published every year in the Echo will be aware that they were on the slide before this Head took over. He may not have improved the situation but it is wrong to place all the blame on his shoulders. His predecessor should share it. Some of these children are almost out of control before they even start this school, anyone who has a child at one of the feeder schools will confirm this . It is quite common at one of the primary schools for children to throw chairs around a classroom, tip teachers desks over and trip other children up on the stairs. Boys have to go to the toilet in pairs, one sensible child with each badly behaved one, the good one checking the toilet after use ! At the gate you hear parents saying how they have had phone calls from teachers to tell them of extreme bad language being used against their child. If they are like this at junior school age you can just imagine what they are like at fourteen. Until the parents of the well behaved children get together and refuse to have their children in a class with those who cannot or will not behave then nothing will change.
As I said in my first post this school has been declining for many years and anyone who has seen the exam results published every year in the Echo will be aware that they were on the slide before this Head took over. He may not have improved the situation but it is wrong to place all the blame on his shoulders. His predecessor should share it. Some of these children are almost out of control before they even start this school, anyone who has a child at one of the feeder schools will confirm this . It is quite common at one of the primary schools for children to throw chairs around a classroom, tip teachers desks over and trip other children up on the stairs. Boys have to go to the toilet in pairs, one sensible child with each badly behaved one, the good one checking the toilet after use ! At the gate you hear parents saying how they have had phone calls from teachers to tell them of extreme bad language being used against their child. If they are like this at junior school age you can just imagine what they are like at fourteen. Until the parents of the well behaved children get together and refuse to have their children in a class with those who cannot or will not behave then nothing will change. Stnana
  • Score: 7

6:35pm Wed 5 Mar 14

CeliaWithers says...

It is true, a significant percentage of the children going to this school are very challenging. A teacher being observed with a well-behaved higher ability class at this school was judged as 'Good' with 'Outstanding' features, while previously judged as 'Inadequate' with a badly behaved less able class.

The boys jailed for this horrific crime went to Hardley School. Imagine having to deal with these while trying to teach a class. http://news.bbc.co.u
k/1/hi/england/hamps
hire/7906444.stm
It is true, a significant percentage of the children going to this school are very challenging. A teacher being observed with a well-behaved higher ability class at this school was judged as 'Good' with 'Outstanding' features, while previously judged as 'Inadequate' with a badly behaved less able class. The boys jailed for this horrific crime went to Hardley School. Imagine having to deal with these while trying to teach a class. http://news.bbc.co.u k/1/hi/england/hamps hire/7906444.stm CeliaWithers
  • Score: 2

6:44pm Wed 5 Mar 14

charrlee says...

WalkingOnAWire wrote:
George4th wrote:
The Good teachers can leave a school and get jobs elsewhere, the same as you can in life generally. And, as in all walks of life, you will get left with the less able.

In the private sector you can reasonably let go of an under performer and replace them.

The big difference in Education is that it is almost impossible to sack a teacher!! So, schools can accumulate poor teachers! The Head has their hands tied and the overall performance can deteriorate.

I'm not saying that is what happened but any Head will tell you that it is extremely difficult to offload a poor teacher.............


.........
If you have poor teachers, does it cause you to use Unnecessary capital Letters and too many exclamation marks?

Just Asking!!!!
It'''s wOrsE if you HavE gooD ones!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Just SayiNg!!!!!!!!!!
[quote][p][bold]WalkingOnAWire[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]George4th[/bold] wrote: The Good teachers can leave a school and get jobs elsewhere, the same as you can in life generally. And, as in all walks of life, you will get left with the less able. In the private sector you can reasonably let go of an under performer and replace them. The big difference in Education is that it is almost impossible to sack a teacher!! So, schools can accumulate poor teachers! The Head has their hands tied and the overall performance can deteriorate. I'm not saying that is what happened but any Head will tell you that it is extremely difficult to offload a poor teacher............. .........[/p][/quote]If you have poor teachers, does it cause you to use Unnecessary capital Letters and too many exclamation marks? Just Asking!!!![/p][/quote]It'''s wOrsE if you HavE gooD ones!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Just SayiNg!!!!!!!!!! charrlee
  • Score: -4

6:50pm Wed 5 Mar 14

Holbury says...

I live in long lane. The pupils excel in extremely foul language, spraying cars with fizzy drinks and generally being a nuisance and these are the youngest ones. Fortunately it's not all of them but they give the school a bad reputation and influence the good kids. Parents don't want to control them and teachers are not allowed.
I live in long lane. The pupils excel in extremely foul language, spraying cars with fizzy drinks and generally being a nuisance and these are the youngest ones. Fortunately it's not all of them but they give the school a bad reputation and influence the good kids. Parents don't want to control them and teachers are not allowed. Holbury
  • Score: 4

6:54pm Wed 5 Mar 14

charrlee says...

Stnana wrote:
As I said in my first post this school has been declining for many years and anyone who has seen the exam results published every year in the Echo will be aware that they were on the slide before this Head took over. He may not have improved the situation but it is wrong to place all the blame on his shoulders. His predecessor should share it. Some of these children are almost out of control before they even start this school, anyone who has a child at one of the feeder schools will confirm this . It is quite common at one of the primary schools for children to throw chairs around a classroom, tip teachers desks over and trip other children up on the stairs. Boys have to go to the toilet in pairs, one sensible child with each badly behaved one, the good one checking the toilet after use ! At the gate you hear parents saying how they have had phone calls from teachers to tell them of extreme bad language being used against their child. If they are like this at junior school age you can just imagine what they are like at fourteen. Until the parents of the well behaved children get together and refuse to have their children in a class with those who cannot or will not behave then nothing will change.
You seem unable to see who is fundamentally at fault! It is ALWAYS the parents. Unless the child has some form of psychological problem or disorder, a normal child should be trained and socialised in time for pre-school.
[quote][p][bold]Stnana[/bold] wrote: As I said in my first post this school has been declining for many years and anyone who has seen the exam results published every year in the Echo will be aware that they were on the slide before this Head took over. He may not have improved the situation but it is wrong to place all the blame on his shoulders. His predecessor should share it. Some of these children are almost out of control before they even start this school, anyone who has a child at one of the feeder schools will confirm this . It is quite common at one of the primary schools for children to throw chairs around a classroom, tip teachers desks over and trip other children up on the stairs. Boys have to go to the toilet in pairs, one sensible child with each badly behaved one, the good one checking the toilet after use ! At the gate you hear parents saying how they have had phone calls from teachers to tell them of extreme bad language being used against their child. If they are like this at junior school age you can just imagine what they are like at fourteen. Until the parents of the well behaved children get together and refuse to have their children in a class with those who cannot or will not behave then nothing will change.[/p][/quote]You seem unable to see who is fundamentally at fault! It is ALWAYS the parents. Unless the child has some form of psychological problem or disorder, a normal child should be trained and socialised in time for pre-school. charrlee
  • Score: 1

7:23pm Wed 5 Mar 14

Stnana says...

charrlee wrote:
Stnana wrote:
As I said in my first post this school has been declining for many years and anyone who has seen the exam results published every year in the Echo will be aware that they were on the slide before this Head took over. He may not have improved the situation but it is wrong to place all the blame on his shoulders. His predecessor should share it. Some of these children are almost out of control before they even start this school, anyone who has a child at one of the feeder schools will confirm this . It is quite common at one of the primary schools for children to throw chairs around a classroom, tip teachers desks over and trip other children up on the stairs. Boys have to go to the toilet in pairs, one sensible child with each badly behaved one, the good one checking the toilet after use ! At the gate you hear parents saying how they have had phone calls from teachers to tell them of extreme bad language being used against their child. If they are like this at junior school age you can just imagine what they are like at fourteen. Until the parents of the well behaved children get together and refuse to have their children in a class with those who cannot or will not behave then nothing will change.
You seem unable to see who is fundamentally at fault! It is ALWAYS the parents. Unless the child has some form of psychological problem or disorder, a normal child should be trained and socialised in time for pre-school.
Where did I say who was to blame ? I simply said the behaviour of some children is terrible long before they reach secondary school. As it happens I lay the blame completely at the door of parents . I have great sympathy with the teachers and even more for the well behaved children . My only criticism of the teachers is that in the eyes of the good children they appear to be rewarding the bad ones . An example of this is the quarter of an hour free time to choose whatever they like when they have managed to behave for a lesson. The children who are always well behaved get no rewards.
[quote][p][bold]charrlee[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Stnana[/bold] wrote: As I said in my first post this school has been declining for many years and anyone who has seen the exam results published every year in the Echo will be aware that they were on the slide before this Head took over. He may not have improved the situation but it is wrong to place all the blame on his shoulders. His predecessor should share it. Some of these children are almost out of control before they even start this school, anyone who has a child at one of the feeder schools will confirm this . It is quite common at one of the primary schools for children to throw chairs around a classroom, tip teachers desks over and trip other children up on the stairs. Boys have to go to the toilet in pairs, one sensible child with each badly behaved one, the good one checking the toilet after use ! At the gate you hear parents saying how they have had phone calls from teachers to tell them of extreme bad language being used against their child. If they are like this at junior school age you can just imagine what they are like at fourteen. Until the parents of the well behaved children get together and refuse to have their children in a class with those who cannot or will not behave then nothing will change.[/p][/quote]You seem unable to see who is fundamentally at fault! It is ALWAYS the parents. Unless the child has some form of psychological problem or disorder, a normal child should be trained and socialised in time for pre-school.[/p][/quote]Where did I say who was to blame ? I simply said the behaviour of some children is terrible long before they reach secondary school. As it happens I lay the blame completely at the door of parents . I have great sympathy with the teachers and even more for the well behaved children . My only criticism of the teachers is that in the eyes of the good children they appear to be rewarding the bad ones . An example of this is the quarter of an hour free time to choose whatever they like when they have managed to behave for a lesson. The children who are always well behaved get no rewards. Stnana
  • Score: 3

7:24pm Wed 5 Mar 14

brucetheboss says...

charrlee wrote:
brucetheboss wrote:
Changing the name to New Forest Academy was suppose to magically make it a better School with no other intervention. Their whole etos is exactly that image and keeping in with Ofsted well i've seen firsthand as a parent how lacking several teachers are. My daughter tookAS level Maths and the Teacher told her she was out of her depth and to try another subject.She went on to achieve a first class honors degree in maths and now works as a business analyst in London. No credit to Hardley she done it all on her own
The worst teachers create dependence, the best facilitate independence.

An art teacher once told me of a difficult girl in his class who wouldn't get on with her CSE course work, and was in danger of failing. However he encouraged her, she dismissed his advice as being wrong. So he changed his approach. He dismissed her work as inept, and told her she'd never finish. So to prove him wrong, she completed all the work and passed! Wharever it takes, buddy, whatever it takes!

So well done, Hardley!
Some individuals have drive determination and intelligence and their subsequent success's are cherry picked by sub standard Schools to boast about how good the School is. Their success isn't down to a Teacher saying your no good, your little reverse psychology theory actually doesn't work on 99% of children or people. Sorry The New Forest Academy is and has been sub standard for years.
[quote][p][bold]charrlee[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]brucetheboss[/bold] wrote: Changing the name to New Forest Academy was suppose to magically make it a better School with no other intervention. Their whole etos is exactly that image and keeping in with Ofsted well i've seen firsthand as a parent how lacking several teachers are. My daughter tookAS level Maths and the Teacher told her she was out of her depth and to try another subject.She went on to achieve a first class honors degree in maths and now works as a business analyst in London. No credit to Hardley she done it all on her own[/p][/quote]The worst teachers create dependence, the best facilitate independence. An art teacher once told me of a difficult girl in his class who wouldn't get on with her CSE course work, and was in danger of failing. However he encouraged her, she dismissed his advice as being wrong. So he changed his approach. He dismissed her work as inept, and told her she'd never finish. So to prove him wrong, she completed all the work and passed! Wharever it takes, buddy, whatever it takes! So well done, Hardley![/p][/quote]Some individuals have drive determination and intelligence and their subsequent success's are cherry picked by sub standard Schools to boast about how good the School is. Their success isn't down to a Teacher saying your no good, your little reverse psychology theory actually doesn't work on 99% of children or people. Sorry The New Forest Academy is and has been sub standard for years. brucetheboss
  • Score: 0

7:42pm Wed 5 Mar 14

solomum says...

LadySam wrote:
When I was teacher training we were told to not correct spelling mistakes as it was 'demoralising' for students! Similarly, poor grammar was overlooked and marking in red pen not permitted. Incidentally this school was nicknamed 'Hardley Educated' for years when I lived on the Waterside. Luckily I went to Noadswood from 1979 to 1984 which was pretty good - no idea what it is like now, though.
This has been the attitude for a long time in all schools. I helped out in my sons class once and was reprimanded for encouraging a child to check the spelling on a word as it would knock confidence if spelling errors were pointed out. No wonder so many youngsters now have such poor grammar and spelling. Could explain the poor level of Echo reporting too.
[quote][p][bold]LadySam[/bold] wrote: When I was teacher training we were told to not correct spelling mistakes as it was 'demoralising' for students! Similarly, poor grammar was overlooked and marking in red pen not permitted. Incidentally this school was nicknamed 'Hardley Educated' for years when I lived on the Waterside. Luckily I went to Noadswood from 1979 to 1984 which was pretty good - no idea what it is like now, though.[/p][/quote]This has been the attitude for a long time in all schools. I helped out in my sons class once and was reprimanded for encouraging a child to check the spelling on a word as it would knock confidence if spelling errors were pointed out. No wonder so many youngsters now have such poor grammar and spelling. Could explain the poor level of Echo reporting too. solomum
  • Score: 1

7:56pm Wed 5 Mar 14

VOR666 says...

Parents need to take responsibility for their child's behaviour. Teachers are responsible for learning and progress; they cannot be blamed for all the ills of society.

An additional contributory factor to this situation is the lack of good teachers in the core subjects. If Heads cannot recruit good teachers, how can they raise standards?

The change of name is not in itself supposed to improve the school. This is, of course, never going to happen. The important factor of the name change is that it came with sponsorship by the Academies Enterprise Trust. The academy chain is responsible for the school's outcomes, and is providing support to the school to overcome its challenges.
Parents need to take responsibility for their child's behaviour. Teachers are responsible for learning and progress; they cannot be blamed for all the ills of society. An additional contributory factor to this situation is the lack of good teachers in the core subjects. If Heads cannot recruit good teachers, how can they raise standards? The change of name is not in itself supposed to improve the school. This is, of course, never going to happen. The important factor of the name change is that it came with sponsorship by the Academies Enterprise Trust. The academy chain is responsible for the school's outcomes, and is providing support to the school to overcome its challenges. VOR666
  • Score: 0

8:06pm Wed 5 Mar 14

charrlee says...

Stnana wrote:
charrlee wrote:
Stnana wrote:
As I said in my first post this school has been declining for many years and anyone who has seen the exam results published every year in the Echo will be aware that they were on the slide before this Head took over. He may not have improved the situation but it is wrong to place all the blame on his shoulders. His predecessor should share it. Some of these children are almost out of control before they even start this school, anyone who has a child at one of the feeder schools will confirm this . It is quite common at one of the primary schools for children to throw chairs around a classroom, tip teachers desks over and trip other children up on the stairs. Boys have to go to the toilet in pairs, one sensible child with each badly behaved one, the good one checking the toilet after use ! At the gate you hear parents saying how they have had phone calls from teachers to tell them of extreme bad language being used against their child. If they are like this at junior school age you can just imagine what they are like at fourteen. Until the parents of the well behaved children get together and refuse to have their children in a class with those who cannot or will not behave then nothing will change.
You seem unable to see who is fundamentally at fault! It is ALWAYS the parents. Unless the child has some form of psychological problem or disorder, a normal child should be trained and socialised in time for pre-school.
Where did I say who was to blame ? I simply said the behaviour of some children is terrible long before they reach secondary school. As it happens I lay the blame completely at the door of parents . I have great sympathy with the teachers and even more for the well behaved children . My only criticism of the teachers is that in the eyes of the good children they appear to be rewarding the bad ones . An example of this is the quarter of an hour free time to choose whatever they like when they have managed to behave for a lesson. The children who are always well behaved get no rewards.
Sorry, I think I misunderstood what you were saying earlier.

I totally agree with everything you have just said. It is perverse that the behaviour of good children is taken for granted, while teachers happily jump through hoops to get a tiny scrap from a disruptive pupil. I blame the Bible : Luke 15:7
"I say unto you, that likewise joy shall be in heaven over one sinner that repenteth, more than over ninety and nine just persons, which need no repentance." ! ! !
[quote][p][bold]Stnana[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]charrlee[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Stnana[/bold] wrote: As I said in my first post this school has been declining for many years and anyone who has seen the exam results published every year in the Echo will be aware that they were on the slide before this Head took over. He may not have improved the situation but it is wrong to place all the blame on his shoulders. His predecessor should share it. Some of these children are almost out of control before they even start this school, anyone who has a child at one of the feeder schools will confirm this . It is quite common at one of the primary schools for children to throw chairs around a classroom, tip teachers desks over and trip other children up on the stairs. Boys have to go to the toilet in pairs, one sensible child with each badly behaved one, the good one checking the toilet after use ! At the gate you hear parents saying how they have had phone calls from teachers to tell them of extreme bad language being used against their child. If they are like this at junior school age you can just imagine what they are like at fourteen. Until the parents of the well behaved children get together and refuse to have their children in a class with those who cannot or will not behave then nothing will change.[/p][/quote]You seem unable to see who is fundamentally at fault! It is ALWAYS the parents. Unless the child has some form of psychological problem or disorder, a normal child should be trained and socialised in time for pre-school.[/p][/quote]Where did I say who was to blame ? I simply said the behaviour of some children is terrible long before they reach secondary school. As it happens I lay the blame completely at the door of parents . I have great sympathy with the teachers and even more for the well behaved children . My only criticism of the teachers is that in the eyes of the good children they appear to be rewarding the bad ones . An example of this is the quarter of an hour free time to choose whatever they like when they have managed to behave for a lesson. The children who are always well behaved get no rewards.[/p][/quote]Sorry, I think I misunderstood what you were saying earlier. I totally agree with everything you have just said. It is perverse that the behaviour of good children is taken for granted, while teachers happily jump through hoops to get a tiny scrap from a disruptive pupil. I blame the Bible : Luke 15:7 "I say unto you, that likewise joy shall be in heaven over one sinner that repenteth, more than over ninety and nine just persons, which need no repentance." ! ! ! charrlee
  • Score: 0

8:11pm Wed 5 Mar 14

Nicola-louise91 says...

brucetheboss wrote:
Changing the name to New Forest Academy was suppose to magically make it a better School with no other intervention. Their whole etos is exactly that image and keeping in with Ofsted well i've seen firsthand as a parent how lacking several teachers are. My daughter tookAS level Maths and the Teacher told her she was out of her depth and to try another subject.She went on to achieve a first class honors degree in maths and now works as a business analyst in London. No credit to Hardley she done it all on her own
This happened to me whilst at hardley between 2003 and 2009!! I was top of my maths and English classes getting very high C's. I asked to be moved up a set so that then I could do the higher tier paper but I was told I would struggle on the higher tier! Therefore I took the foundation level GCSE's and ended up with a very high C when if I was moved up I could have got atleast a B and been able to go on to study maths based A-levels like I wanted to!! Even Edward Magee, kept asking if I had been moved up yet! Was an absolute joke!! Hardley do not believe in their students enough to encourage them to do better!! I am now 22 with a little girl doing online college courses in administration and accountancy to get to where I wanted to be back then!!
[quote][p][bold]brucetheboss[/bold] wrote: Changing the name to New Forest Academy was suppose to magically make it a better School with no other intervention. Their whole etos is exactly that image and keeping in with Ofsted well i've seen firsthand as a parent how lacking several teachers are. My daughter tookAS level Maths and the Teacher told her she was out of her depth and to try another subject.She went on to achieve a first class honors degree in maths and now works as a business analyst in London. No credit to Hardley she done it all on her own[/p][/quote]This happened to me whilst at hardley between 2003 and 2009!! I was top of my maths and English classes getting very high C's. I asked to be moved up a set so that then I could do the higher tier paper but I was told I would struggle on the higher tier! Therefore I took the foundation level GCSE's and ended up with a very high C when if I was moved up I could have got atleast a B and been able to go on to study maths based A-levels like I wanted to!! Even Edward Magee, kept asking if I had been moved up yet! Was an absolute joke!! Hardley do not believe in their students enough to encourage them to do better!! I am now 22 with a little girl doing online college courses in administration and accountancy to get to where I wanted to be back then!! Nicola-louise91
  • Score: 0

8:24pm Wed 5 Mar 14

charrlee says...

brucetheboss wrote:
charrlee wrote:
brucetheboss wrote:
Changing the name to New Forest Academy was suppose to magically make it a better School with no other intervention. Their whole etos is exactly that image and keeping in with Ofsted well i've seen firsthand as a parent how lacking several teachers are. My daughter tookAS level Maths and the Teacher told her she was out of her depth and to try another subject.She went on to achieve a first class honors degree in maths and now works as a business analyst in London. No credit to Hardley she done it all on her own
The worst teachers create dependence, the best facilitate independence.

An art teacher once told me of a difficult girl in his class who wouldn't get on with her CSE course work, and was in danger of failing. However he encouraged her, she dismissed his advice as being wrong. So he changed his approach. He dismissed her work as inept, and told her she'd never finish. So to prove him wrong, she completed all the work and passed! Wharever it takes, buddy, whatever it takes!

So well done, Hardley!
Some individuals have drive determination and intelligence and their subsequent success's are cherry picked by sub standard Schools to boast about how good the School is. Their success isn't down to a Teacher saying your no good, your little reverse psychology theory actually doesn't work on 99% of children or people. Sorry The New Forest Academy is and has been sub standard for years.
Strange. Done the right way I've always found reverse psychology works perfectly well when needed. But then not everyone is good at being manipulative.

Some of the very worst teachers can be most effective if the class they are teaching is well-behaved and co-operative. And also some of the very best teachers will fail with classes that are determined to sabotage their efforts. Personally, I think parents of disruptive pupils should be fined, even jailed if a court can prove they have failed to discharge their responsibilities. Once a precedent is set, it would act as a deterrent - that's the theory, anyway.
[quote][p][bold]brucetheboss[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]charrlee[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]brucetheboss[/bold] wrote: Changing the name to New Forest Academy was suppose to magically make it a better School with no other intervention. Their whole etos is exactly that image and keeping in with Ofsted well i've seen firsthand as a parent how lacking several teachers are. My daughter tookAS level Maths and the Teacher told her she was out of her depth and to try another subject.She went on to achieve a first class honors degree in maths and now works as a business analyst in London. No credit to Hardley she done it all on her own[/p][/quote]The worst teachers create dependence, the best facilitate independence. An art teacher once told me of a difficult girl in his class who wouldn't get on with her CSE course work, and was in danger of failing. However he encouraged her, she dismissed his advice as being wrong. So he changed his approach. He dismissed her work as inept, and told her she'd never finish. So to prove him wrong, she completed all the work and passed! Wharever it takes, buddy, whatever it takes! So well done, Hardley![/p][/quote]Some individuals have drive determination and intelligence and their subsequent success's are cherry picked by sub standard Schools to boast about how good the School is. Their success isn't down to a Teacher saying your no good, your little reverse psychology theory actually doesn't work on 99% of children or people. Sorry The New Forest Academy is and has been sub standard for years.[/p][/quote]Strange. Done the right way I've always found reverse psychology works perfectly well when needed. But then not everyone is good at being manipulative. Some of the very worst teachers can be most effective if the class they are teaching is well-behaved and co-operative. And also some of the very best teachers will fail with classes that are determined to sabotage their efforts. Personally, I think parents of disruptive pupils should be fined, even jailed if a court can prove they have failed to discharge their responsibilities. Once a precedent is set, it would act as a deterrent - that's the theory, anyway. charrlee
  • Score: 2

8:33pm Wed 5 Mar 14

VOR666 says...

Here here, but the parents don't pay the fines and then claim 'mental health issues ' so the courts don't pursue them.
Here here, but the parents don't pay the fines and then claim 'mental health issues ' so the courts don't pursue them. VOR666
  • Score: 2

8:43pm Wed 5 Mar 14

Dig123 says...

I removed my son after 3 mths, apparently one teacher was on Ebay and playing games instead of teaching. The school never returned my calls regarding a problem with a maths teacher and when I eventually spoke to them the reply was "we have more problem children to deal with".
I removed my son after 3 mths, apparently one teacher was on Ebay and playing games instead of teaching. The school never returned my calls regarding a problem with a maths teacher and when I eventually spoke to them the reply was "we have more problem children to deal with". Dig123
  • Score: -1

9:00pm Wed 5 Mar 14

charrlee says...

Try this :
The great British education that was once the envy of the world was built on a foundation of fear. Charles Dickens will back me up! For decades you sat in silence in your lessons, listening and learning, knowing that if you spoke or misbehaved you would get one of the following punishments : the cane, the slipper, or ruler, a smack on the back of the head, cuff round the ear, chalk or board duster thrown at you, lines or detention. I believe the last is still allowed, but only if the parents give their consent!
Try this : The great British education that was once the envy of the world was built on a foundation of fear. Charles Dickens will back me up! For decades you sat in silence in your lessons, listening and learning, knowing that if you spoke or misbehaved you would get one of the following punishments : the cane, the slipper, or ruler, a smack on the back of the head, cuff round the ear, chalk or board duster thrown at you, lines or detention. I believe the last is still allowed, but only if the parents give their consent! charrlee
  • Score: 0

9:06pm Wed 5 Mar 14

brucetheboss says...

charrlee wrote:
brucetheboss wrote:
charrlee wrote:
brucetheboss wrote:
Changing the name to New Forest Academy was suppose to magically make it a better School with no other intervention. Their whole etos is exactly that image and keeping in with Ofsted well i've seen firsthand as a parent how lacking several teachers are. My daughter tookAS level Maths and the Teacher told her she was out of her depth and to try another subject.She went on to achieve a first class honors degree in maths and now works as a business analyst in London. No credit to Hardley she done it all on her own
The worst teachers create dependence, the best facilitate independence.

An art teacher once told me of a difficult girl in his class who wouldn't get on with her CSE course work, and was in danger of failing. However he encouraged her, she dismissed his advice as being wrong. So he changed his approach. He dismissed her work as inept, and told her she'd never finish. So to prove him wrong, she completed all the work and passed! Wharever it takes, buddy, whatever it takes!

So well done, Hardley!
Some individuals have drive determination and intelligence and their subsequent success's are cherry picked by sub standard Schools to boast about how good the School is. Their success isn't down to a Teacher saying your no good, your little reverse psychology theory actually doesn't work on 99% of children or people. Sorry The New Forest Academy is and has been sub standard for years.
Strange. Done the right way I've always found reverse psychology works perfectly well when needed. But then not everyone is good at being manipulative.

Some of the very worst teachers can be most effective if the class they are teaching is well-behaved and co-operative. And also some of the very best teachers will fail with classes that are determined to sabotage their efforts. Personally, I think parents of disruptive pupils should be fined, even jailed if a court can prove they have failed to discharge their responsibilities. Once a precedent is set, it would act as a deterrent - that's the theory, anyway.
You have to play with what you've got many schools have pupils basically impossible to deal with. I for one wouldn't teach, those that do I respect and I do understand it must wear even the most enthusiastic person down. I don't think fining or jailing would do much the problem is too deep.
My modest theory is the fact the work ethos has disappeared due to lack of proper jobs and the resulting dependency on state handouts. So many families are faced with a predetermined destiny as they are financially limited. The need to achieve has gone you can watch Sky, drive a Car get your PS4 without working so why try hard at School coz mum and dad don't work. If the teacher breaches my human rights or offends me I can get the upperhand by reporting them. Its a mess and its not the kids fault its the ones who make the rules up,change is needed from the top.
[quote][p][bold]charrlee[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]brucetheboss[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]charrlee[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]brucetheboss[/bold] wrote: Changing the name to New Forest Academy was suppose to magically make it a better School with no other intervention. Their whole etos is exactly that image and keeping in with Ofsted well i've seen firsthand as a parent how lacking several teachers are. My daughter tookAS level Maths and the Teacher told her she was out of her depth and to try another subject.She went on to achieve a first class honors degree in maths and now works as a business analyst in London. No credit to Hardley she done it all on her own[/p][/quote]The worst teachers create dependence, the best facilitate independence. An art teacher once told me of a difficult girl in his class who wouldn't get on with her CSE course work, and was in danger of failing. However he encouraged her, she dismissed his advice as being wrong. So he changed his approach. He dismissed her work as inept, and told her she'd never finish. So to prove him wrong, she completed all the work and passed! Wharever it takes, buddy, whatever it takes! So well done, Hardley![/p][/quote]Some individuals have drive determination and intelligence and their subsequent success's are cherry picked by sub standard Schools to boast about how good the School is. Their success isn't down to a Teacher saying your no good, your little reverse psychology theory actually doesn't work on 99% of children or people. Sorry The New Forest Academy is and has been sub standard for years.[/p][/quote]Strange. Done the right way I've always found reverse psychology works perfectly well when needed. But then not everyone is good at being manipulative. Some of the very worst teachers can be most effective if the class they are teaching is well-behaved and co-operative. And also some of the very best teachers will fail with classes that are determined to sabotage their efforts. Personally, I think parents of disruptive pupils should be fined, even jailed if a court can prove they have failed to discharge their responsibilities. Once a precedent is set, it would act as a deterrent - that's the theory, anyway.[/p][/quote]You have to play with what you've got many schools have pupils basically impossible to deal with. I for one wouldn't teach, those that do I respect and I do understand it must wear even the most enthusiastic person down. I don't think fining or jailing would do much the problem is too deep. My modest theory is the fact the work ethos has disappeared due to lack of proper jobs and the resulting dependency on state handouts. So many families are faced with a predetermined destiny as they are financially limited. The need to achieve has gone you can watch Sky, drive a Car get your PS4 without working so why try hard at School coz mum and dad don't work. If the teacher breaches my human rights or offends me I can get the upperhand by reporting them. Its a mess and its not the kids fault its the ones who make the rules up,change is needed from the top. brucetheboss
  • Score: 3

9:20pm Wed 5 Mar 14

brucetheboss says...

There's some top teachers at New forest academy as I have met them. I'm just not impressed by The School
There's some top teachers at New forest academy as I have met them. I'm just not impressed by The School brucetheboss
  • Score: 0

10:40pm Wed 5 Mar 14

charrlee says...

brucetheboss wrote:
charrlee wrote:
brucetheboss wrote:
charrlee wrote:
brucetheboss wrote:
Changing the name to New Forest Academy was suppose to magically make it a better School with no other intervention. Their whole etos is exactly that image and keeping in with Ofsted well i've seen firsthand as a parent how lacking several teachers are. My daughter tookAS level Maths and the Teacher told her she was out of her depth and to try another subject.She went on to achieve a first class honors degree in maths and now works as a business analyst in London. No credit to Hardley she done it all on her own
The worst teachers create dependence, the best facilitate independence.

An art teacher once told me of a difficult girl in his class who wouldn't get on with her CSE course work, and was in danger of failing. However he encouraged her, she dismissed his advice as being wrong. So he changed his approach. He dismissed her work as inept, and told her she'd never finish. So to prove him wrong, she completed all the work and passed! Wharever it takes, buddy, whatever it takes!

So well done, Hardley!
Some individuals have drive determination and intelligence and their subsequent success's are cherry picked by sub standard Schools to boast about how good the School is. Their success isn't down to a Teacher saying your no good, your little reverse psychology theory actually doesn't work on 99% of children or people. Sorry The New Forest Academy is and has been sub standard for years.
Strange. Done the right way I've always found reverse psychology works perfectly well when needed. But then not everyone is good at being manipulative.

Some of the very worst teachers can be most effective if the class they are teaching is well-behaved and co-operative. And also some of the very best teachers will fail with classes that are determined to sabotage their efforts. Personally, I think parents of disruptive pupils should be fined, even jailed if a court can prove they have failed to discharge their responsibilities. Once a precedent is set, it would act as a deterrent - that's the theory, anyway.
You have to play with what you've got many schools have pupils basically impossible to deal with. I for one wouldn't teach, those that do I respect and I do understand it must wear even the most enthusiastic person down. I don't think fining or jailing would do much the problem is too deep.
My modest theory is the fact the work ethos has disappeared due to lack of proper jobs and the resulting dependency on state handouts. So many families are faced with a predetermined destiny as they are financially limited. The need to achieve has gone you can watch Sky, drive a Car get your PS4 without working so why try hard at School coz mum and dad don't work. If the teacher breaches my human rights or offends me I can get the upperhand by reporting them. Its a mess and its not the kids fault its the ones who make the rules up,change is needed from the top.
Beautifully put, bruce. I wonder if you realise just how many millions of British would agree with exactly what you have said.

Why should it be so very hard to educate people in this country?

Why do I keep coming back to this story? I used to teach there. I'm retired now but, as well as some particularly negative memories, I have some very fond ones. Straight off the top of my head : Kieron Maxwell singing Blue Monday in Livingston assembly, any of Sara and Rosemary's superb productions, Roy and Freda whom staff and pupils adored, Alan Church, the foyer display for Grease (8ft cutouts of Elvis, Marilyn Monroe, Buddy Holly, and Eddie Cochran!), Carol Wilson's Gym and Dance shows, Gerry Bartlett's jokes, Mr Underwood's distinctive way of saying, "Good morning!"
[quote][p][bold]brucetheboss[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]charrlee[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]brucetheboss[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]charrlee[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]brucetheboss[/bold] wrote: Changing the name to New Forest Academy was suppose to magically make it a better School with no other intervention. Their whole etos is exactly that image and keeping in with Ofsted well i've seen firsthand as a parent how lacking several teachers are. My daughter tookAS level Maths and the Teacher told her she was out of her depth and to try another subject.She went on to achieve a first class honors degree in maths and now works as a business analyst in London. No credit to Hardley she done it all on her own[/p][/quote]The worst teachers create dependence, the best facilitate independence. An art teacher once told me of a difficult girl in his class who wouldn't get on with her CSE course work, and was in danger of failing. However he encouraged her, she dismissed his advice as being wrong. So he changed his approach. He dismissed her work as inept, and told her she'd never finish. So to prove him wrong, she completed all the work and passed! Wharever it takes, buddy, whatever it takes! So well done, Hardley![/p][/quote]Some individuals have drive determination and intelligence and their subsequent success's are cherry picked by sub standard Schools to boast about how good the School is. Their success isn't down to a Teacher saying your no good, your little reverse psychology theory actually doesn't work on 99% of children or people. Sorry The New Forest Academy is and has been sub standard for years.[/p][/quote]Strange. Done the right way I've always found reverse psychology works perfectly well when needed. But then not everyone is good at being manipulative. Some of the very worst teachers can be most effective if the class they are teaching is well-behaved and co-operative. And also some of the very best teachers will fail with classes that are determined to sabotage their efforts. Personally, I think parents of disruptive pupils should be fined, even jailed if a court can prove they have failed to discharge their responsibilities. Once a precedent is set, it would act as a deterrent - that's the theory, anyway.[/p][/quote]You have to play with what you've got many schools have pupils basically impossible to deal with. I for one wouldn't teach, those that do I respect and I do understand it must wear even the most enthusiastic person down. I don't think fining or jailing would do much the problem is too deep. My modest theory is the fact the work ethos has disappeared due to lack of proper jobs and the resulting dependency on state handouts. So many families are faced with a predetermined destiny as they are financially limited. The need to achieve has gone you can watch Sky, drive a Car get your PS4 without working so why try hard at School coz mum and dad don't work. If the teacher breaches my human rights or offends me I can get the upperhand by reporting them. Its a mess and its not the kids fault its the ones who make the rules up,change is needed from the top.[/p][/quote]Beautifully put, bruce. I wonder if you realise just how many millions of British would agree with exactly what you have said. Why should it be so very hard to educate people in this country? Why do I keep coming back to this story? I used to teach there. I'm retired now but, as well as some particularly negative memories, I have some very fond ones. Straight off the top of my head : Kieron Maxwell singing Blue Monday in Livingston assembly, any of Sara and Rosemary's superb productions, Roy and Freda whom staff and pupils adored, Alan Church, the foyer display for Grease (8ft cutouts of Elvis, Marilyn Monroe, Buddy Holly, and Eddie Cochran!), Carol Wilson's Gym and Dance shows, Gerry Bartlett's jokes, Mr Underwood's distinctive way of saying, "Good morning!" charrlee
  • Score: 2

11:25pm Wed 5 Mar 14

bigga badda boom says...

My son was really fortunate to have seen most of his secondary education under the leadership of Mr Underwood, who although not perfect, was adequate as a Headmaster, an educator & as a staff lead. My son subsequently went to Totton 6th Form for A' Levels & is now an undergraduate at a leading university. However, my son's final year was served under the 'leadership' of Andy Dyer who appeared to sit in his delusional ivory tower, no doubt peering into his narcissistic mirror, having grandiose fantasies over his professional ability as an educator & his imagined motivational influence as principal. Just as he has refused to comment on this latest Ofsted repost, he had similarly refused or ignored a letter I had written to him personally, regarding my son & his peers not having a teacher for several months prior to exam on a subject they were due to take as a GCSE. A particular year head I had copied in to my letter, acknowledged the communication & apologised on Andy Dyer's behalf for not responding. Even now, I am left feeling incredulous over his lack of professionalism at the time. It is truly disgusting he has not been vigorously challenged over his recent poor performance (its not as if everyone didn't know it was coming). He has seemingly been left to his own devices & the school now finds itself in this awful position. With regards to the pupils, (as there are anywhere else) there will be a few naughty ones & some with more serious behavioural issues, but on the whole, I believe the majority of these young people are good & they all have the potential to make positive social contributions, both now & in the future as adults - that potential does however need to be nurtured & harnessed for it to be realised. There are also some fabulously dedicated teaching staff at this school who have chosen the profession because they care about 'our children' & their education. I really want this school, teaching staff & pupils get back on track & succeed. Andy Dyer should have the decency to leave, or he ought to be released from his principal duties as he appears to not be fit for purpose. He wanted the job, he has failed & now the buck stops with him.
My son was really fortunate to have seen most of his secondary education under the leadership of Mr Underwood, who although not perfect, was adequate as a Headmaster, an educator & as a staff lead. My son subsequently went to Totton 6th Form for A' Levels & is now an undergraduate at a leading university. However, my son's final year was served under the 'leadership' of Andy Dyer who appeared to sit in his delusional ivory tower, no doubt peering into his narcissistic mirror, having grandiose fantasies over his professional ability as an educator & his imagined motivational influence as principal. Just as he has refused to comment on this latest Ofsted repost, he had similarly refused or ignored a letter I had written to him personally, regarding my son & his peers not having a teacher for several months prior to exam on a subject they were due to take as a GCSE. A particular year head I had copied in to my letter, acknowledged the communication & apologised on Andy Dyer's behalf for not responding. Even now, I am left feeling incredulous over his lack of professionalism at the time. It is truly disgusting he has not been vigorously challenged over his recent poor performance (its not as if everyone didn't know it was coming). He has seemingly been left to his own devices & the school now finds itself in this awful position. With regards to the pupils, (as there are anywhere else) there will be a few naughty ones & some with more serious behavioural issues, but on the whole, I believe the majority of these young people are good & they all have the potential to make positive social contributions, both now & in the future as adults - that potential does however need to be nurtured & harnessed for it to be realised. There are also some fabulously dedicated teaching staff at this school who have chosen the profession because they care about 'our children' & their education. I really want this school, teaching staff & pupils get back on track & succeed. Andy Dyer should have the decency to leave, or he ought to be released from his principal duties as he appears to not be fit for purpose. He wanted the job, he has failed & now the buck stops with him. bigga badda boom
  • Score: 9

3:35am Thu 6 Mar 14

Dusty says...

Oh another subject i bought up talking to Mr Dyre was the conviction of a support worker for pedophilia, he was convicted for ten years and the school never said a word about it. Choosing to brush it under the carpet, instead of telling the parents and the school trying to find out if the welfare of its pupils has been compromised. The school in my opinion thought it best to try and protect their name, instead of the best interests of the children.

We found out by rumour and then the Echo
Oh another subject i bought up talking to Mr Dyre was the conviction of a support worker for pedophilia, he was convicted for ten years and the school never said a word about it. Choosing to brush it under the carpet, instead of telling the parents and the school trying to find out if the welfare of its pupils has been compromised. The school in my opinion thought it best to try and protect their name, instead of the best interests of the children. We found out by rumour and then the Echo Dusty
  • Score: 1

4:00am Thu 6 Mar 14

charrlee says...

bigga badda boom wrote:
My son was really fortunate to have seen most of his secondary education under the leadership of Mr Underwood, who although not perfect, was adequate as a Headmaster, an educator & as a staff lead. My son subsequently went to Totton 6th Form for A' Levels & is now an undergraduate at a leading university. However, my son's final year was served under the 'leadership' of Andy Dyer who appeared to sit in his delusional ivory tower, no doubt peering into his narcissistic mirror, having grandiose fantasies over his professional ability as an educator & his imagined motivational influence as principal. Just as he has refused to comment on this latest Ofsted repost, he had similarly refused or ignored a letter I had written to him personally, regarding my son & his peers not having a teacher for several months prior to exam on a subject they were due to take as a GCSE. A particular year head I had copied in to my letter, acknowledged the communication & apologised on Andy Dyer's behalf for not responding. Even now, I am left feeling incredulous over his lack of professionalism at the time. It is truly disgusting he has not been vigorously challenged over his recent poor performance (its not as if everyone didn't know it was coming). He has seemingly been left to his own devices & the school now finds itself in this awful position. With regards to the pupils, (as there are anywhere else) there will be a few naughty ones & some with more serious behavioural issues, but on the whole, I believe the majority of these young people are good & they all have the potential to make positive social contributions, both now & in the future as adults - that potential does however need to be nurtured & harnessed for it to be realised. There are also some fabulously dedicated teaching staff at this school who have chosen the profession because they care about 'our children' & their education. I really want this school, teaching staff & pupils get back on track & succeed. Andy Dyer should have the decency to leave, or he ought to be released from his principal duties as he appears to not be fit for purpose. He wanted the job, he has failed & now the buck stops with him.
I am staggered you should refer to Bob Underwood as merely adequate - I think a lot of well-qualified people held/hold him in much higher esteem than that. During the 70's, the school was largely controlled by the Heads of Faculty, a member of staff from that time commenting, "Astley just lets them get on with it and does as he's told!" Williams, Harris, Langford, Bartlett and co were very fine teachers and managers, and if my colleague's comment was true, they certainly had that school ticking like a clock when many places, like Glen Eyre (Cantell) and Millbrook were struggling.
However, the HOFs were a bit resistant to change, so with tact, diplomacy and strength of character, Underwood took back control to move the school on. However there was a technical problem that was to bug the school permanently : the uncertainty of new leadership caused some people to send their children to Applemore and Noadswood as "known quantities", leaving Hardley exposed as an undersubscribed school. That meant we had to take expulsions from other schools if they wanted to come. We had to take the children of those Netley View problem families I mentioned earlier. Gradually the contingent of disruptive and low-ability pupils began to grow, leading to more people taking their children away, thus maintaining the "undersubscribed" status, and the steady downward spiral, as exam results began to deteriorate.
Just how do you break out of a set of circumstances like that? We know Dyer does not have the answer, and I would think Hardley's fate is sealed for the foreseeable future. If a new, dynamic headteacher is installed, and new employment opportunities together with a steadily increasing infusion of new blood in the community happens, Hardley has a future. Particularly if they change the name back to "Hardley"(hinting at a return to a time of some perceived "former glory").
[quote][p][bold]bigga badda boom[/bold] wrote: My son was really fortunate to have seen most of his secondary education under the leadership of Mr Underwood, who although not perfect, was adequate as a Headmaster, an educator & as a staff lead. My son subsequently went to Totton 6th Form for A' Levels & is now an undergraduate at a leading university. However, my son's final year was served under the 'leadership' of Andy Dyer who appeared to sit in his delusional ivory tower, no doubt peering into his narcissistic mirror, having grandiose fantasies over his professional ability as an educator & his imagined motivational influence as principal. Just as he has refused to comment on this latest Ofsted repost, he had similarly refused or ignored a letter I had written to him personally, regarding my son & his peers not having a teacher for several months prior to exam on a subject they were due to take as a GCSE. A particular year head I had copied in to my letter, acknowledged the communication & apologised on Andy Dyer's behalf for not responding. Even now, I am left feeling incredulous over his lack of professionalism at the time. It is truly disgusting he has not been vigorously challenged over his recent poor performance (its not as if everyone didn't know it was coming). He has seemingly been left to his own devices & the school now finds itself in this awful position. With regards to the pupils, (as there are anywhere else) there will be a few naughty ones & some with more serious behavioural issues, but on the whole, I believe the majority of these young people are good & they all have the potential to make positive social contributions, both now & in the future as adults - that potential does however need to be nurtured & harnessed for it to be realised. There are also some fabulously dedicated teaching staff at this school who have chosen the profession because they care about 'our children' & their education. I really want this school, teaching staff & pupils get back on track & succeed. Andy Dyer should have the decency to leave, or he ought to be released from his principal duties as he appears to not be fit for purpose. He wanted the job, he has failed & now the buck stops with him.[/p][/quote]I am staggered you should refer to Bob Underwood as merely adequate - I think a lot of well-qualified people held/hold him in much higher esteem than that. During the 70's, the school was largely controlled by the Heads of Faculty, a member of staff from that time commenting, "Astley just lets them get on with it and does as he's told!" Williams, Harris, Langford, Bartlett and co were very fine teachers and managers, and if my colleague's comment was true, they certainly had that school ticking like a clock when many places, like Glen Eyre (Cantell) and Millbrook were struggling. However, the HOFs were a bit resistant to change, so with tact, diplomacy and strength of character, Underwood took back control to move the school on. However there was a technical problem that was to bug the school permanently : the uncertainty of new leadership caused some people to send their children to Applemore and Noadswood as "known quantities", leaving Hardley exposed as an undersubscribed school. That meant we had to take expulsions from other schools if they wanted to come. We had to take the children of those Netley View problem families I mentioned earlier. Gradually the contingent of disruptive and low-ability pupils began to grow, leading to more people taking their children away, thus maintaining the "undersubscribed" status, and the steady downward spiral, as exam results began to deteriorate. Just how do you break out of a set of circumstances like that? We know Dyer does not have the answer, and I would think Hardley's fate is sealed for the foreseeable future. If a new, dynamic headteacher is installed, and new employment opportunities together with a steadily increasing infusion of new blood in the community happens, Hardley has a future. Particularly if they change the name back to "Hardley"(hinting at a return to a time of some perceived "former glory"). charrlee
  • Score: 5

1:27pm Thu 6 Mar 14

CeliaWithers says...

charrlee wrote:
bigga badda boom wrote:
My son was really fortunate to have seen most of his secondary education under the leadership of Mr Underwood, who although not perfect, was adequate as a Headmaster, an educator & as a staff lead. My son subsequently went to Totton 6th Form for A' Levels & is now an undergraduate at a leading university. However, my son's final year was served under the 'leadership' of Andy Dyer who appeared to sit in his delusional ivory tower, no doubt peering into his narcissistic mirror, having grandiose fantasies over his professional ability as an educator & his imagined motivational influence as principal. Just as he has refused to comment on this latest Ofsted repost, he had similarly refused or ignored a letter I had written to him personally, regarding my son & his peers not having a teacher for several months prior to exam on a subject they were due to take as a GCSE. A particular year head I had copied in to my letter, acknowledged the communication & apologised on Andy Dyer's behalf for not responding. Even now, I am left feeling incredulous over his lack of professionalism at the time. It is truly disgusting he has not been vigorously challenged over his recent poor performance (its not as if everyone didn't know it was coming). He has seemingly been left to his own devices & the school now finds itself in this awful position. With regards to the pupils, (as there are anywhere else) there will be a few naughty ones & some with more serious behavioural issues, but on the whole, I believe the majority of these young people are good & they all have the potential to make positive social contributions, both now & in the future as adults - that potential does however need to be nurtured & harnessed for it to be realised. There are also some fabulously dedicated teaching staff at this school who have chosen the profession because they care about 'our children' & their education. I really want this school, teaching staff & pupils get back on track & succeed. Andy Dyer should have the decency to leave, or he ought to be released from his principal duties as he appears to not be fit for purpose. He wanted the job, he has failed & now the buck stops with him.
I am staggered you should refer to Bob Underwood as merely adequate - I think a lot of well-qualified people held/hold him in much higher esteem than that. During the 70's, the school was largely controlled by the Heads of Faculty, a member of staff from that time commenting, "Astley just lets them get on with it and does as he's told!" Williams, Harris, Langford, Bartlett and co were very fine teachers and managers, and if my colleague's comment was true, they certainly had that school ticking like a clock when many places, like Glen Eyre (Cantell) and Millbrook were struggling.
However, the HOFs were a bit resistant to change, so with tact, diplomacy and strength of character, Underwood took back control to move the school on. However there was a technical problem that was to bug the school permanently : the uncertainty of new leadership caused some people to send their children to Applemore and Noadswood as "known quantities", leaving Hardley exposed as an undersubscribed school. That meant we had to take expulsions from other schools if they wanted to come. We had to take the children of those Netley View problem families I mentioned earlier. Gradually the contingent of disruptive and low-ability pupils began to grow, leading to more people taking their children away, thus maintaining the "undersubscribed" status, and the steady downward spiral, as exam results began to deteriorate.
Just how do you break out of a set of circumstances like that? We know Dyer does not have the answer, and I would think Hardley's fate is sealed for the foreseeable future. If a new, dynamic headteacher is installed, and new employment opportunities together with a steadily increasing infusion of new blood in the community happens, Hardley has a future. Particularly if they change the name back to "Hardley"(hinting at a return to a time of some perceived "former glory").
I think Bob Underwood was a good leader, but he knew when the time was right to go - Budget cuts etc. Had he stayed any longer, things may have become difficult for him too. Andy Dyer hasn't had an easy job but, as you say above, he doesn't have the answer and the time is right to find someone who does.
[quote][p][bold]charrlee[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bigga badda boom[/bold] wrote: My son was really fortunate to have seen most of his secondary education under the leadership of Mr Underwood, who although not perfect, was adequate as a Headmaster, an educator & as a staff lead. My son subsequently went to Totton 6th Form for A' Levels & is now an undergraduate at a leading university. However, my son's final year was served under the 'leadership' of Andy Dyer who appeared to sit in his delusional ivory tower, no doubt peering into his narcissistic mirror, having grandiose fantasies over his professional ability as an educator & his imagined motivational influence as principal. Just as he has refused to comment on this latest Ofsted repost, he had similarly refused or ignored a letter I had written to him personally, regarding my son & his peers not having a teacher for several months prior to exam on a subject they were due to take as a GCSE. A particular year head I had copied in to my letter, acknowledged the communication & apologised on Andy Dyer's behalf for not responding. Even now, I am left feeling incredulous over his lack of professionalism at the time. It is truly disgusting he has not been vigorously challenged over his recent poor performance (its not as if everyone didn't know it was coming). He has seemingly been left to his own devices & the school now finds itself in this awful position. With regards to the pupils, (as there are anywhere else) there will be a few naughty ones & some with more serious behavioural issues, but on the whole, I believe the majority of these young people are good & they all have the potential to make positive social contributions, both now & in the future as adults - that potential does however need to be nurtured & harnessed for it to be realised. There are also some fabulously dedicated teaching staff at this school who have chosen the profession because they care about 'our children' & their education. I really want this school, teaching staff & pupils get back on track & succeed. Andy Dyer should have the decency to leave, or he ought to be released from his principal duties as he appears to not be fit for purpose. He wanted the job, he has failed & now the buck stops with him.[/p][/quote]I am staggered you should refer to Bob Underwood as merely adequate - I think a lot of well-qualified people held/hold him in much higher esteem than that. During the 70's, the school was largely controlled by the Heads of Faculty, a member of staff from that time commenting, "Astley just lets them get on with it and does as he's told!" Williams, Harris, Langford, Bartlett and co were very fine teachers and managers, and if my colleague's comment was true, they certainly had that school ticking like a clock when many places, like Glen Eyre (Cantell) and Millbrook were struggling. However, the HOFs were a bit resistant to change, so with tact, diplomacy and strength of character, Underwood took back control to move the school on. However there was a technical problem that was to bug the school permanently : the uncertainty of new leadership caused some people to send their children to Applemore and Noadswood as "known quantities", leaving Hardley exposed as an undersubscribed school. That meant we had to take expulsions from other schools if they wanted to come. We had to take the children of those Netley View problem families I mentioned earlier. Gradually the contingent of disruptive and low-ability pupils began to grow, leading to more people taking their children away, thus maintaining the "undersubscribed" status, and the steady downward spiral, as exam results began to deteriorate. Just how do you break out of a set of circumstances like that? We know Dyer does not have the answer, and I would think Hardley's fate is sealed for the foreseeable future. If a new, dynamic headteacher is installed, and new employment opportunities together with a steadily increasing infusion of new blood in the community happens, Hardley has a future. Particularly if they change the name back to "Hardley"(hinting at a return to a time of some perceived "former glory").[/p][/quote]I think Bob Underwood was a good leader, but he knew when the time was right to go - Budget cuts etc. Had he stayed any longer, things may have become difficult for him too. Andy Dyer hasn't had an easy job but, as you say above, he doesn't have the answer and the time is right to find someone who does. CeliaWithers
  • Score: 1

7:36pm Thu 6 Mar 14

Lucyp95 says...

If it weren't for the teachers at Hardley I wouldn't be doing what I am today, getting into a great career as an medic Officer in the Army, all because they taught me the skills and knowledge. Not just academically but also how to achieve in the real world. I've come out better than most people that went to private schools!! It's not always the teachers or schools fault students fail, it can be down to family not motivating them to do well or other aspects. At the end of the day, a teacher is only human and they shouldn't be victimised for trying to help young people in the community!
If it weren't for the teachers at Hardley I wouldn't be doing what I am today, getting into a great career as an medic Officer in the Army, all because they taught me the skills and knowledge. Not just academically but also how to achieve in the real world. I've come out better than most people that went to private schools!! It's not always the teachers or schools fault students fail, it can be down to family not motivating them to do well or other aspects. At the end of the day, a teacher is only human and they shouldn't be victimised for trying to help young people in the community! Lucyp95
  • Score: 0

2:19pm Fri 7 Mar 14

Blackknight says...

Init
Init Blackknight
  • Score: -1

3:34pm Fri 7 Mar 14

Dusty says...

Thats all well and good but some gifted pupils need support from teachers to help them along. In the years my daughter was there help was lacking and the standard of teachers was poor. Eight maths teachers in her final year? She failed does my daughter take responsibility for that? All eight teachers teaching differently some not know what the last done and two from Africa and the kids could hardly understand them
Thats all well and good but some gifted pupils need support from teachers to help them along. In the years my daughter was there help was lacking and the standard of teachers was poor. Eight maths teachers in her final year? She failed does my daughter take responsibility for that? All eight teachers teaching differently some not know what the last done and two from Africa and the kids could hardly understand them Dusty
  • Score: 1

5:51pm Fri 7 Mar 14

Stnana says...

charrlee wrote:
I didn't know Mr Budge or Ivor Astley, but when Robert Underwood took over as headteacher in the early 80's, he continued the good work of his predescessors, and with the support of a very strong senior management team, drove the school on to great success. Many staff and pupils remember vividly the excitement we felt when Robert's unrelenting tenacity tore the school away from Hampshire's rather flaccid control and led us forward to grant-maintained status. This new freedom enabled all departments to flourish, and we were particularly pleased with a new science block and drama studio.

However, it was not failings of the staff that made Hardley a "difficult" school. The Netley View council estate had long been a pleasant place to live, and provided Hardley with a consistent supply of nice, decent kids, that school being conveniently closer than Applemore or Noadswood. But when the local authority took it into their heads to move some particularly troubled families to the Netley View estate, the problems began. Instead of the "good" influencing the families with problems, it went the other way. I'm not going to spell anymore of this out, except to say that the result was a gradual increase in the number of pupils with challenging behaviour attending Hardley. You cannot blame the pupils or the families - the local authority did not provide the necessary backup support to make the project a success.

The increase in behavioural and learning difficulties did not defeat Robert and his staff. He set up a very strong Special Needs department led by Leigh Jerwood, supported by a particularly able and dedicated team.

My goodness has Andrew Dyer had a tough act to follow, stepping in after Robert retired. And the closure of Fawley refinery will have had a serious impact.

So please ignore the usual "slag off" commenters who tend to blight this forum. They know nothing.

If new employment opportunities are created with regeneration post Fawley, and it brings new blood to the area, Hardley will rise again. Let's hope this silly renaming process gets scrapped - it's a school, not an academy! New Forest Academy sounds like a private art school!
I meant to challenge some of this yesterday . First of all the Fawley Refinery has NOT closed ! Secondly do you not think it strange that if grant maintained status was as good as you say the three schools on the Waterside and Totton which have gone into special measures in the last few years are the ones which chose to opt out of local authority control .The two which remained under the control of Hampshire are flourishing. I would say that those of us who were opposed to the opting out have been proved right although I admit it has taken longer than I expected .
[quote][p][bold]charrlee[/bold] wrote: I didn't know Mr Budge or Ivor Astley, but when Robert Underwood took over as headteacher in the early 80's, he continued the good work of his predescessors, and with the support of a very strong senior management team, drove the school on to great success. Many staff and pupils remember vividly the excitement we felt when Robert's unrelenting tenacity tore the school away from Hampshire's rather flaccid control and led us forward to grant-maintained status. This new freedom enabled all departments to flourish, and we were particularly pleased with a new science block and drama studio. However, it was not failings of the staff that made Hardley a "difficult" school. The Netley View council estate had long been a pleasant place to live, and provided Hardley with a consistent supply of nice, decent kids, that school being conveniently closer than Applemore or Noadswood. But when the local authority took it into their heads to move some particularly troubled families to the Netley View estate, the problems began. Instead of the "good" influencing the families with problems, it went the other way. I'm not going to spell anymore of this out, except to say that the result was a gradual increase in the number of pupils with challenging behaviour attending Hardley. You cannot blame the pupils or the families - the local authority did not provide the necessary backup support to make the project a success. The increase in behavioural and learning difficulties did not defeat Robert and his staff. He set up a very strong Special Needs department led by Leigh Jerwood, supported by a particularly able and dedicated team. My goodness has Andrew Dyer had a tough act to follow, stepping in after Robert retired. And the closure of Fawley refinery will have had a serious impact. So please ignore the usual "slag off" commenters who tend to blight this forum. They know nothing. If new employment opportunities are created with regeneration post Fawley, and it brings new blood to the area, Hardley will rise again. Let's hope this silly renaming process gets scrapped - it's a school, not an academy! New Forest Academy sounds like a private art school![/p][/quote]I meant to challenge some of this yesterday . First of all the Fawley Refinery has NOT closed ! Secondly do you not think it strange that if grant maintained status was as good as you say the three schools on the Waterside and Totton which have gone into special measures in the last few years are the ones which chose to opt out of local authority control .The two which remained under the control of Hampshire are flourishing. I would say that those of us who were opposed to the opting out have been proved right although I admit it has taken longer than I expected . Stnana
  • Score: 3

10:13am Sat 8 Mar 14

notableedingheart says...

*K4TE* wrote:
...this school was awful 10 years ago when I attended it, I only did well and went on to university because I was driven to but not many others did the same ... but I can't let it go un noticed that there are some inspiring teachers at this school I had a couple of extremely brilliant teachers here. I think the few good teachers are struggling and the others who may not be as strong struggle with the EXTREMELY bad catchment area lets be honest (and I can say this I am from the area) it is surrounded by children coming from uneducated / benefit seeking familys and if this is the majority then unfortunately it seems to bring the rest of the school down ...
Once again that august body Ofsted assesses a school based upon unreliable and invalid criteria and condemns the school as if the Teachers have the entire capacity to influence the school. At no stage will Ofsted indicate that the school is blighted by its catchment area of "no-hoper kids and parents", of Teachers demoralised by a constant inability to make a positive impact because of its client base and lack of resources, of Head Offices' on-going ignoring of the real and actual problems of this and every school with similar client bases.
In short all Ofsted does is identify a school that is not meeting Ofsted's ludicrous targets but is unable and unwilling to highlight potential and actual reasons for under-achievement. The old saying "you cannot make a silk purse from a sow's ear" should be uppermost in the "experts" from Ofsted. Notably we see that Ofsted never offer to remain behind in any under-achieving school and demonstrate how the "experts" can turn a school around. The reality is that Ofsted would kack their pants if they had to work in the same conditions and with the same constraints that confront Teachers every day of their working life.
Time for an inspectorial mob to boot Ofsted out and institute inspections based upon reality and plain talk. If the client base is "blood sucking no-good for nothing 3-4 generation benefit recipients" then any affected school should be assessed merely upon being able to get through each day without a serious assault or instance of bullying. If perchance some kids excel then those Teachers who were able to retain motivation in such demoralising conditions should be rewarded somehow. This doesn't mean that Teachers should pull up stumps and not teach, it means that teaching with such a draining client base will never, repeat never, achieve results that schools with aspirational middle class kids will achieve. This is called reality and is the model used for all competent evaluations in both public and private organisations.
I am continuously amazed that any Teachers wish to remain in such a debilitating and thankless career. It is no wonder that private schools that have a much more positive environment and a better client base are thriving.
[quote][p][bold]*K4TE*[/bold] wrote: ...this school was awful 10 years ago when I attended it, I only did well and went on to university because I was driven to but not many others did the same ... but I can't let it go un noticed that there are some inspiring teachers at this school I had a couple of extremely brilliant teachers here. I think the few good teachers are struggling and the others who may not be as strong struggle with the EXTREMELY bad catchment area lets be honest (and I can say this I am from the area) it is surrounded by children coming from uneducated / benefit seeking familys and if this is the majority then unfortunately it seems to bring the rest of the school down ...[/p][/quote]Once again that august body Ofsted assesses a school based upon unreliable and invalid criteria and condemns the school as if the Teachers have the entire capacity to influence the school. At no stage will Ofsted indicate that the school is blighted by its catchment area of "no-hoper kids and parents", of Teachers demoralised by a constant inability to make a positive impact because of its client base and lack of resources, of Head Offices' on-going ignoring of the real and actual problems of this and every school with similar client bases. In short all Ofsted does is identify a school that is not meeting Ofsted's ludicrous targets but is unable and unwilling to highlight potential and actual reasons for under-achievement. The old saying "you cannot make a silk purse from a sow's ear" should be uppermost in the "experts" from Ofsted. Notably we see that Ofsted never offer to remain behind in any under-achieving school and demonstrate how the "experts" can turn a school around. The reality is that Ofsted would kack their pants if they had to work in the same conditions and with the same constraints that confront Teachers every day of their working life. Time for an inspectorial mob to boot Ofsted out and institute inspections based upon reality and plain talk. If the client base is "blood sucking no-good for nothing 3-4 generation benefit recipients" then any affected school should be assessed merely upon being able to get through each day without a serious assault or instance of bullying. If perchance some kids excel then those Teachers who were able to retain motivation in such demoralising conditions should be rewarded somehow. This doesn't mean that Teachers should pull up stumps and not teach, it means that teaching with such a draining client base will never, repeat never, achieve results that schools with aspirational middle class kids will achieve. This is called reality and is the model used for all competent evaluations in both public and private organisations. I am continuously amazed that any Teachers wish to remain in such a debilitating and thankless career. It is no wonder that private schools that have a much more positive environment and a better client base are thriving. notableedingheart
  • Score: 2

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