More tests for young drivers, demands mum after daughter's death

Yvonne Walters, left, and her late daughter, Esther

Yvonne Walters, left, and her late daughter, Esther

First published in News
Last updated
Daily Echo: Photograph of the Author by

THE mother of a Hampshire youngster who died in a crash caused by a speeding teenager has launched a campaign to curb the number of youngsters who die on the roads.

Hundreds of people have already backed the move by Yvonne Walters launched after the death of her daughter Esther.

The 17-year-old died after a car driven too fast by Richard Hadler crashed in the New Forest.

Hadler who was 19 at the time, was driving at more than 20 miles an hour above the speed limit as he drove with Esther and their other friend and colleague Dan Parker from the Sandy Balls holiday camp.

But he lost control of the Vauxhall Corsa which hit a grass verg and overturned.

Esther, who was from Sandleheath and went to South Wilts Grammar School, died in hospital of brain and neck injuries within 24 hours of the accident in 2011.

Two years ago, Hadler of Whitsbury Road, Fordingbridge, was given a 12-month prison sentence suspended for two years, ordered to carry out 200 hours’ unpaid work and given a supervision order as well as a five-year driving ban.

Now Esther’s mum, Yvonne, has set up a petition calling for an additional driving test to prevent accidents caused by inexperienced drivers.

She is calling for a ‘transitional test’ on taking ownership or hiring a motor vehicle.

“My beautiful daughter Esther had dreams like any other child of a future ahead of her.

‘Broken-hearted’ “Esther was intelligent, funny, caring and a true friend to so many whose hearts are broken without her now in their lives,” she said.

“This was an accident that could easily have been prevented and would have saved the life of my precious daughter, if the driver had knowledge of the features and capabilities of his new car.”

Mrs Walters has set up a petition, which has already attracted more than 400 signatures, at epetitions.direct.gov.uk.

Comments (40)

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8:23am Fri 2 May 14

biggus2 says...

I agree with Mrs Walters. Perhaps we should adopt what they do in Australia. that is new and young drivers are restricted on when they can drive and the power of the car. They are also restricted on the times in the evening when they can drive. So insurance companies insist on a black box to monitor driving behaviour.
I agree with Mrs Walters. Perhaps we should adopt what they do in Australia. that is new and young drivers are restricted on when they can drive and the power of the car. They are also restricted on the times in the evening when they can drive. So insurance companies insist on a black box to monitor driving behaviour. biggus2
  • Score: 21

8:34am Fri 2 May 14

sparkster says...

I agree biggus2
I agree biggus2 sparkster
  • Score: 6

8:54am Fri 2 May 14

News Fanatic says...

Young drivers should be banned from having passengers, other than motorists who have held a licence for a number of years. By doing that, it would stop people showing off their driving 'ability' to friends who may not have passed their test.
Young drivers should be banned from having passengers, other than motorists who have held a licence for a number of years. By doing that, it would stop people showing off their driving 'ability' to friends who may not have passed their test. News Fanatic
  • Score: 5

8:57am Fri 2 May 14

derek james says...

biggus2 wrote:
I agree with Mrs Walters. Perhaps we should adopt what they do in Australia. that is new and young drivers are restricted on when they can drive and the power of the car. They are also restricted on the times in the evening when they can drive. So insurance companies insist on a black box to monitor driving behaviour.
sadly if there's an idiot driving no amount of education is going to help, 20 mph over the speed limit and a pathetic sentence is not much of a deterrent .
[quote][p][bold]biggus2[/bold] wrote: I agree with Mrs Walters. Perhaps we should adopt what they do in Australia. that is new and young drivers are restricted on when they can drive and the power of the car. They are also restricted on the times in the evening when they can drive. So insurance companies insist on a black box to monitor driving behaviour.[/p][/quote]sadly if there's an idiot driving no amount of education is going to help, 20 mph over the speed limit and a pathetic sentence is not much of a deterrent . derek james
  • Score: 12

9:12am Fri 2 May 14

kiz.bartlett says...

If a younger driver decides to go fast, he or she will go fast. I don't think this is a case of Iack of education to drive but rather lack of knowledge of the repercussions when you do drive too fast. Adding something practical which deals with the dangers of the road would hopefully demonstrate the effects of driving in a certain manner.

I also agree that younger drivers tend to be inexperienced and cause more accidents, but some sort of refresher test for people who have been driving for a while I.e. 20 years. Too often I see people speeding, no use of indicators, incorrect use of roundabouts and tailgating. Most of these people are not young drivers but rather middle - aged people.

Irregardless of age or experience, everyone should be reminded that owning a car is owning a potential weapon. How you use it dictates whether it causes harm or not.
If a younger driver decides to go fast, he or she will go fast. I don't think this is a case of Iack of education to drive but rather lack of knowledge of the repercussions when you do drive too fast. Adding something practical which deals with the dangers of the road would hopefully demonstrate the effects of driving in a certain manner. I also agree that younger drivers tend to be inexperienced and cause more accidents, but some sort of refresher test for people who have been driving for a while I.e. 20 years. Too often I see people speeding, no use of indicators, incorrect use of roundabouts and tailgating. Most of these people are not young drivers but rather middle - aged people. Irregardless of age or experience, everyone should be reminded that owning a car is owning a potential weapon. How you use it dictates whether it causes harm or not. kiz.bartlett
  • Score: 17

10:32am Fri 2 May 14

now in the north says...

Sadly, all the junk they teach in schools does not teach a child about the ego...
In fact, quite the opposite, it develops the ego into larger more dangerous egos as children compete for status in their groups.
Add that to a society that can afford multiple car households etc and you have children constantly trying to be the best/fastest etc but who also have access to cars and who's insurances take care of the resposibility of the cost of damages.
these people get older, more competetive and start hanging out in brand new faster more mechanically impressive cars on car parks waiting for the next race round the town centre...
The take more and more risks, the more they get away with it. And then, they die...if lucky...if unlucky, they have to live with the guilt for a lifetime, being reminded when big events take place in their lives - of the life they deprived someone else of. And rightly so!
This backward society that teaches on the outside to accept, while teaching on the inside that you must win, be the best, mustnt lose face etc.... what ever the cost, makes me sick!
Sadly, all the junk they teach in schools does not teach a child about the ego... In fact, quite the opposite, it develops the ego into larger more dangerous egos as children compete for status in their groups. Add that to a society that can afford multiple car households etc and you have children constantly trying to be the best/fastest etc but who also have access to cars and who's insurances take care of the resposibility of the cost of damages. these people get older, more competetive and start hanging out in brand new faster more mechanically impressive cars on car parks waiting for the next race round the town centre... The take more and more risks, the more they get away with it. And then, they die...if lucky...if unlucky, they have to live with the guilt for a lifetime, being reminded when big events take place in their lives - of the life they deprived someone else of. And rightly so! This backward society that teaches on the outside to accept, while teaching on the inside that you must win, be the best, mustnt lose face etc.... what ever the cost, makes me sick! now in the north
  • Score: 3

10:45am Fri 2 May 14

good-gosh says...

It’s the cocky twerps that need to be identified and curtailed. I don’t know how to do that – perhaps it's one for the psychologists to somehow test for respect and commitment to regulation, safety and patience. And it's not just young people.
It’s the cocky twerps that need to be identified and curtailed. I don’t know how to do that – perhaps it's one for the psychologists to somehow test for respect and commitment to regulation, safety and patience. And it's not just young people. good-gosh
  • Score: 2

10:52am Fri 2 May 14

sotonbusdriver says...

The answer maybe to force the use of GREEN P PLATES, for the first 2 yrs, with a Motorway ban till you have done 1 yrs driving after test...
Also to include more instruction that is similar to Advance driving, rather than leave it up to people to be bothered..
The Advance driving opens your eye to a lot of the common mistakes, and would benefit young drivers.
Restrictions on the size and type of car you can drive for the first 2-3 yrs.. Although I personally dislike the idea when it was introduced on Motorcycles decades ago, it has reduced motorcycle accidents in the young riders..
The answer maybe to force the use of GREEN P PLATES, for the first 2 yrs, with a Motorway ban till you have done 1 yrs driving after test... Also to include more instruction that is similar to Advance driving, rather than leave it up to people to be bothered.. The Advance driving opens your eye to a lot of the common mistakes, and would benefit young drivers. Restrictions on the size and type of car you can drive for the first 2-3 yrs.. Although I personally dislike the idea when it was introduced on Motorcycles decades ago, it has reduced motorcycle accidents in the young riders.. sotonbusdriver
  • Score: 5

10:59am Fri 2 May 14

dockboy says...

It’s time for restrictions on newly qualified drivers, and just like law for motorcycles, a drivers age should be a factor.
In N Ireland all drivers, regardless of age must display an R plate (Restricted) for the first twelve months after passing their test, part of the restriction is a speed limit of 45mph.
This may have to be modified to accommodate motorways, but it would be a start.
It’s time for restrictions on newly qualified drivers, and just like law for motorcycles, a drivers age should be a factor. In N Ireland all drivers, regardless of age must display an R plate (Restricted) for the first twelve months after passing their test, part of the restriction is a speed limit of 45mph. This may have to be modified to accommodate motorways, but it would be a start. dockboy
  • Score: 6

11:12am Fri 2 May 14

From the sidelines says...

I'm sure that the driver concerned could pass any test you care to set.

The fact is that despite his ability, he chose to drive too quickly for the conditions and his ability, possibly to show off to the girl in his car.
I'm sure that the driver concerned could pass any test you care to set. The fact is that despite his ability, he chose to drive too quickly for the conditions and his ability, possibly to show off to the girl in his car. From the sidelines
  • Score: 9

11:19am Fri 2 May 14

befriendly says...

As part of their insurance young drivers should have to fit rev limiters speed limiters and a black box. It may save a few lives, but no amount of rules and regulations will over moronic mentality.
As part of their insurance young drivers should have to fit rev limiters speed limiters and a black box. It may save a few lives, but no amount of rules and regulations will over moronic mentality. befriendly
  • Score: 1

11:28am Fri 2 May 14

_watchman says...

Lets be clear that this young girl was the victim of what ultimately was discovered as a crime. I hope the young man uses his 200 hours picking litter to reflect the consequence of his foolish actions.
Lets be clear that this young girl was the victim of what ultimately was discovered as a crime. I hope the young man uses his 200 hours picking litter to reflect the consequence of his foolish actions. _watchman
  • Score: 1

11:33am Fri 2 May 14

RomseyKeith says...

kiz.bartlett wrote:
If a younger driver decides to go fast, he or she will go fast. I don't think this is a case of Iack of education to drive but rather lack of knowledge of the repercussions when you do drive too fast. Adding something practical which deals with the dangers of the road would hopefully demonstrate the effects of driving in a certain manner. I also agree that younger drivers tend to be inexperienced and cause more accidents, but some sort of refresher test for people who have been driving for a while I.e. 20 years. Too often I see people speeding, no use of indicators, incorrect use of roundabouts and tailgating. Most of these people are not young drivers but rather middle - aged people. Irregardless of age or experience, everyone should be reminded that owning a car is owning a potential weapon. How you use it dictates whether it causes harm or not.
Agreed. The majority of people who change lanes without indicating, or fail to indicate to come off a roundabout, etc that I see are middle-aged.
A refresher test every 10 years or so is probably a good idea, due to how much the Highway Code and laws of the road change over the years. I've been driving for 20 years, and a friend of mine has just started.
Looking at the graph included, it appears that new drivers aren't as bad as some would have you believe, as the injury rate in the 19-24 age group is low compared to that of every other age group, especially the 25-34 age bracket.
[quote][p][bold]kiz.bartlett[/bold] wrote: If a younger driver decides to go fast, he or she will go fast. I don't think this is a case of Iack of education to drive but rather lack of knowledge of the repercussions when you do drive too fast. Adding something practical which deals with the dangers of the road would hopefully demonstrate the effects of driving in a certain manner. I also agree that younger drivers tend to be inexperienced and cause more accidents, but some sort of refresher test for people who have been driving for a while I.e. 20 years. Too often I see people speeding, no use of indicators, incorrect use of roundabouts and tailgating. Most of these people are not young drivers but rather middle - aged people. Irregardless of age or experience, everyone should be reminded that owning a car is owning a potential weapon. How you use it dictates whether it causes harm or not.[/p][/quote]Agreed. The majority of people who change lanes without indicating, or fail to indicate to come off a roundabout, etc that I see are middle-aged. A refresher test every 10 years or so is probably a good idea, due to how much the Highway Code and laws of the road change over the years. I've been driving for 20 years, and a friend of mine has just started. Looking at the graph included, it appears that new drivers aren't as bad as some would have you believe, as the injury rate in the 19-24 age group is low compared to that of every other age group, especially the 25-34 age bracket. RomseyKeith
  • Score: 0

11:39am Fri 2 May 14

Zexagon says...

RomseyKeith wrote:
kiz.bartlett wrote:
If a younger driver decides to go fast, he or she will go fast. I don't think this is a case of Iack of education to drive but rather lack of knowledge of the repercussions when you do drive too fast. Adding something practical which deals with the dangers of the road would hopefully demonstrate the effects of driving in a certain manner. I also agree that younger drivers tend to be inexperienced and cause more accidents, but some sort of refresher test for people who have been driving for a while I.e. 20 years. Too often I see people speeding, no use of indicators, incorrect use of roundabouts and tailgating. Most of these people are not young drivers but rather middle - aged people. Irregardless of age or experience, everyone should be reminded that owning a car is owning a potential weapon. How you use it dictates whether it causes harm or not.
Agreed. The majority of people who change lanes without indicating, or fail to indicate to come off a roundabout, etc that I see are middle-aged.
A refresher test every 10 years or so is probably a good idea, due to how much the Highway Code and laws of the road change over the years. I've been driving for 20 years, and a friend of mine has just started.
Looking at the graph included, it appears that new drivers aren't as bad as some would have you believe, as the injury rate in the 19-24 age group is low compared to that of every other age group, especially the 25-34 age bracket.
Don't you think they'd indicate etc whilst doing their refresher test then completely ignore it all when they're back on the road having passed the test
[quote][p][bold]RomseyKeith[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]kiz.bartlett[/bold] wrote: If a younger driver decides to go fast, he or she will go fast. I don't think this is a case of Iack of education to drive but rather lack of knowledge of the repercussions when you do drive too fast. Adding something practical which deals with the dangers of the road would hopefully demonstrate the effects of driving in a certain manner. I also agree that younger drivers tend to be inexperienced and cause more accidents, but some sort of refresher test for people who have been driving for a while I.e. 20 years. Too often I see people speeding, no use of indicators, incorrect use of roundabouts and tailgating. Most of these people are not young drivers but rather middle - aged people. Irregardless of age or experience, everyone should be reminded that owning a car is owning a potential weapon. How you use it dictates whether it causes harm or not.[/p][/quote]Agreed. The majority of people who change lanes without indicating, or fail to indicate to come off a roundabout, etc that I see are middle-aged. A refresher test every 10 years or so is probably a good idea, due to how much the Highway Code and laws of the road change over the years. I've been driving for 20 years, and a friend of mine has just started. Looking at the graph included, it appears that new drivers aren't as bad as some would have you believe, as the injury rate in the 19-24 age group is low compared to that of every other age group, especially the 25-34 age bracket.[/p][/quote]Don't you think they'd indicate etc whilst doing their refresher test then completely ignore it all when they're back on the road having passed the test Zexagon
  • Score: 3

11:52am Fri 2 May 14

Charlie Bucket says...

News Fanatic wrote:
Young drivers should be banned from having passengers, other than motorists who have held a licence for a number of years. By doing that, it would stop people showing off their driving 'ability' to friends who may not have passed their test.
Unworkable and impractical.
[quote][p][bold]News Fanatic[/bold] wrote: Young drivers should be banned from having passengers, other than motorists who have held a licence for a number of years. By doing that, it would stop people showing off their driving 'ability' to friends who may not have passed their test.[/p][/quote]Unworkable and impractical. Charlie Bucket
  • Score: 6

12:21pm Fri 2 May 14

RomseyKeith says...

Zexagon wrote:
RomseyKeith wrote:
kiz.bartlett wrote: If a younger driver decides to go fast, he or she will go fast. I don't think this is a case of Iack of education to drive but rather lack of knowledge of the repercussions when you do drive too fast. Adding something practical which deals with the dangers of the road would hopefully demonstrate the effects of driving in a certain manner. I also agree that younger drivers tend to be inexperienced and cause more accidents, but some sort of refresher test for people who have been driving for a while I.e. 20 years. Too often I see people speeding, no use of indicators, incorrect use of roundabouts and tailgating. Most of these people are not young drivers but rather middle - aged people. Irregardless of age or experience, everyone should be reminded that owning a car is owning a potential weapon. How you use it dictates whether it causes harm or not.
Agreed. The majority of people who change lanes without indicating, or fail to indicate to come off a roundabout, etc that I see are middle-aged. A refresher test every 10 years or so is probably a good idea, due to how much the Highway Code and laws of the road change over the years. I've been driving for 20 years, and a friend of mine has just started. Looking at the graph included, it appears that new drivers aren't as bad as some would have you believe, as the injury rate in the 19-24 age group is low compared to that of every other age group, especially the 25-34 age bracket.
Don't you think they'd indicate etc whilst doing their refresher test then completely ignore it all when they're back on the road having passed the test
True. But indicating is just an example. The rules of the road change too, and the refresher course could still help open people's eyes to the changes that occur.
You are correct though that it is individual choice at the end of the day, regardless of law and testing. All the suggested restrictions and testing on new drivers would only inhibit the law-abiding. It would not have stopped this hot head from driving 20 above the limit, as he chose to flounce this law despite the signs informing of the speed limit.
[quote][p][bold]Zexagon[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RomseyKeith[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]kiz.bartlett[/bold] wrote: If a younger driver decides to go fast, he or she will go fast. I don't think this is a case of Iack of education to drive but rather lack of knowledge of the repercussions when you do drive too fast. Adding something practical which deals with the dangers of the road would hopefully demonstrate the effects of driving in a certain manner. I also agree that younger drivers tend to be inexperienced and cause more accidents, but some sort of refresher test for people who have been driving for a while I.e. 20 years. Too often I see people speeding, no use of indicators, incorrect use of roundabouts and tailgating. Most of these people are not young drivers but rather middle - aged people. Irregardless of age or experience, everyone should be reminded that owning a car is owning a potential weapon. How you use it dictates whether it causes harm or not.[/p][/quote]Agreed. The majority of people who change lanes without indicating, or fail to indicate to come off a roundabout, etc that I see are middle-aged. A refresher test every 10 years or so is probably a good idea, due to how much the Highway Code and laws of the road change over the years. I've been driving for 20 years, and a friend of mine has just started. Looking at the graph included, it appears that new drivers aren't as bad as some would have you believe, as the injury rate in the 19-24 age group is low compared to that of every other age group, especially the 25-34 age bracket.[/p][/quote]Don't you think they'd indicate etc whilst doing their refresher test then completely ignore it all when they're back on the road having passed the test[/p][/quote]True. But indicating is just an example. The rules of the road change too, and the refresher course could still help open people's eyes to the changes that occur. You are correct though that it is individual choice at the end of the day, regardless of law and testing. All the suggested restrictions and testing on new drivers would only inhibit the law-abiding. It would not have stopped this hot head from driving 20 above the limit, as he chose to flounce this law despite the signs informing of the speed limit. RomseyKeith
  • Score: 1

12:38pm Fri 2 May 14

Floodie says...

Sorry but I am 22 I drive a volvo v70 T5 with 260 bhp, never been caught speeding and I do not drive like an utter idiot however there are people who do, regardless of adding.more tests restrictions etc will not stop those who want to drive like children from doing so, why should I be restricted on the car I can drive because.of a minority? People die every day however the media makes it their mission to publicise and prosecute the young at any chance they can along with motorcycle deaths yes it is a tragedy however you will not change this.with rules and tests, there will always be ways round this I feel for any family who loses a loved one through the idiots who.don't realise they are driving over 1ton of metal a death trap on wheels, absolute power corrupts absolutely comes to mind
Sorry but I am 22 I drive a volvo v70 T5 with 260 bhp, never been caught speeding and I do not drive like an utter idiot however there are people who do, regardless of adding.more tests restrictions etc will not stop those who want to drive like children from doing so, why should I be restricted on the car I can drive because.of a minority? People die every day however the media makes it their mission to publicise and prosecute the young at any chance they can along with motorcycle deaths yes it is a tragedy however you will not change this.with rules and tests, there will always be ways round this I feel for any family who loses a loved one through the idiots who.don't realise they are driving over 1ton of metal a death trap on wheels, absolute power corrupts absolutely comes to mind Floodie
  • Score: 1

12:50pm Fri 2 May 14

Zexagon says...

RomseyKeith wrote:
Zexagon wrote:
RomseyKeith wrote:
kiz.bartlett wrote: If a younger driver decides to go fast, he or she will go fast. I don't think this is a case of Iack of education to drive but rather lack of knowledge of the repercussions when you do drive too fast. Adding something practical which deals with the dangers of the road would hopefully demonstrate the effects of driving in a certain manner. I also agree that younger drivers tend to be inexperienced and cause more accidents, but some sort of refresher test for people who have been driving for a while I.e. 20 years. Too often I see people speeding, no use of indicators, incorrect use of roundabouts and tailgating. Most of these people are not young drivers but rather middle - aged people. Irregardless of age or experience, everyone should be reminded that owning a car is owning a potential weapon. How you use it dictates whether it causes harm or not.
Agreed. The majority of people who change lanes without indicating, or fail to indicate to come off a roundabout, etc that I see are middle-aged. A refresher test every 10 years or so is probably a good idea, due to how much the Highway Code and laws of the road change over the years. I've been driving for 20 years, and a friend of mine has just started. Looking at the graph included, it appears that new drivers aren't as bad as some would have you believe, as the injury rate in the 19-24 age group is low compared to that of every other age group, especially the 25-34 age bracket.
Don't you think they'd indicate etc whilst doing their refresher test then completely ignore it all when they're back on the road having passed the test
True. But indicating is just an example. The rules of the road change too, and the refresher course could still help open people's eyes to the changes that occur.
You are correct though that it is individual choice at the end of the day, regardless of law and testing. All the suggested restrictions and testing on new drivers would only inhibit the law-abiding. It would not have stopped this hot head from driving 20 above the limit, as he chose to flounce this law despite the signs informing of the speed limit.
Yeah true, don't think you'll stop nippers being nippers.
[quote][p][bold]RomseyKeith[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Zexagon[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RomseyKeith[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]kiz.bartlett[/bold] wrote: If a younger driver decides to go fast, he or she will go fast. I don't think this is a case of Iack of education to drive but rather lack of knowledge of the repercussions when you do drive too fast. Adding something practical which deals with the dangers of the road would hopefully demonstrate the effects of driving in a certain manner. I also agree that younger drivers tend to be inexperienced and cause more accidents, but some sort of refresher test for people who have been driving for a while I.e. 20 years. Too often I see people speeding, no use of indicators, incorrect use of roundabouts and tailgating. Most of these people are not young drivers but rather middle - aged people. Irregardless of age or experience, everyone should be reminded that owning a car is owning a potential weapon. How you use it dictates whether it causes harm or not.[/p][/quote]Agreed. The majority of people who change lanes without indicating, or fail to indicate to come off a roundabout, etc that I see are middle-aged. A refresher test every 10 years or so is probably a good idea, due to how much the Highway Code and laws of the road change over the years. I've been driving for 20 years, and a friend of mine has just started. Looking at the graph included, it appears that new drivers aren't as bad as some would have you believe, as the injury rate in the 19-24 age group is low compared to that of every other age group, especially the 25-34 age bracket.[/p][/quote]Don't you think they'd indicate etc whilst doing their refresher test then completely ignore it all when they're back on the road having passed the test[/p][/quote]True. But indicating is just an example. The rules of the road change too, and the refresher course could still help open people's eyes to the changes that occur. You are correct though that it is individual choice at the end of the day, regardless of law and testing. All the suggested restrictions and testing on new drivers would only inhibit the law-abiding. It would not have stopped this hot head from driving 20 above the limit, as he chose to flounce this law despite the signs informing of the speed limit.[/p][/quote]Yeah true, don't think you'll stop nippers being nippers. Zexagon
  • Score: 1

1:55pm Fri 2 May 14

southamptonadi says...

I'm not sure changing the rules is the answer. The real answer may lay in the punishment. A suspended sentence and some community service, if you really want drivers of all types and ages then a prison sentence should be mandatory, if they prove the level of driving fell below a certain level.

This should prevent idiots driving like idiots.

If it's from one mistake then this kind of sentence is fine, but speeding and crashing, not really a mistake but an accident waiting to happen
I'm not sure changing the rules is the answer. The real answer may lay in the punishment. A suspended sentence and some community service, if you really want drivers of all types and ages then a prison sentence should be mandatory, if they prove the level of driving fell below a certain level. This should prevent idiots driving like idiots. If it's from one mistake then this kind of sentence is fine, but speeding and crashing, not really a mistake but an accident waiting to happen southamptonadi
  • Score: 2

2:28pm Fri 2 May 14

Torchie1 says...

Zexagon wrote:
RomseyKeith wrote:
kiz.bartlett wrote:
If a younger driver decides to go fast, he or she will go fast. I don't think this is a case of Iack of education to drive but rather lack of knowledge of the repercussions when you do drive too fast. Adding something practical which deals with the dangers of the road would hopefully demonstrate the effects of driving in a certain manner. I also agree that younger drivers tend to be inexperienced and cause more accidents, but some sort of refresher test for people who have been driving for a while I.e. 20 years. Too often I see people speeding, no use of indicators, incorrect use of roundabouts and tailgating. Most of these people are not young drivers but rather middle - aged people. Irregardless of age or experience, everyone should be reminded that owning a car is owning a potential weapon. How you use it dictates whether it causes harm or not.
Agreed. The majority of people who change lanes without indicating, or fail to indicate to come off a roundabout, etc that I see are middle-aged.
A refresher test every 10 years or so is probably a good idea, due to how much the Highway Code and laws of the road change over the years. I've been driving for 20 years, and a friend of mine has just started.
Looking at the graph included, it appears that new drivers aren't as bad as some would have you believe, as the injury rate in the 19-24 age group is low compared to that of every other age group, especially the 25-34 age bracket.
Don't you think they'd indicate etc whilst doing their refresher test then completely ignore it all when they're back on the road having passed the test
Is the use of indicators a legal requirement or is the person behind driving so close that they were caught out by the move of the driver in front? The onus is more on the follower to be far enough behind not to be caught out by anything that happens in front of them, and as for indicators on roundabouts, the potential combinations of which turning the vehicle could take and which lane it could use makes it pointless to use an indicator. If you know a Police patrol car driver, ask them how difficult it is to prosecute for an incident on a roundabout. It's far better for you to decide when it's safe rather than rely on someone elses interpretation of when to indicate for their particular move on what could be a strange roundabout layout that they haven't used before.
[quote][p][bold]Zexagon[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RomseyKeith[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]kiz.bartlett[/bold] wrote: If a younger driver decides to go fast, he or she will go fast. I don't think this is a case of Iack of education to drive but rather lack of knowledge of the repercussions when you do drive too fast. Adding something practical which deals with the dangers of the road would hopefully demonstrate the effects of driving in a certain manner. I also agree that younger drivers tend to be inexperienced and cause more accidents, but some sort of refresher test for people who have been driving for a while I.e. 20 years. Too often I see people speeding, no use of indicators, incorrect use of roundabouts and tailgating. Most of these people are not young drivers but rather middle - aged people. Irregardless of age or experience, everyone should be reminded that owning a car is owning a potential weapon. How you use it dictates whether it causes harm or not.[/p][/quote]Agreed. The majority of people who change lanes without indicating, or fail to indicate to come off a roundabout, etc that I see are middle-aged. A refresher test every 10 years or so is probably a good idea, due to how much the Highway Code and laws of the road change over the years. I've been driving for 20 years, and a friend of mine has just started. Looking at the graph included, it appears that new drivers aren't as bad as some would have you believe, as the injury rate in the 19-24 age group is low compared to that of every other age group, especially the 25-34 age bracket.[/p][/quote]Don't you think they'd indicate etc whilst doing their refresher test then completely ignore it all when they're back on the road having passed the test[/p][/quote]Is the use of indicators a legal requirement or is the person behind driving so close that they were caught out by the move of the driver in front? The onus is more on the follower to be far enough behind not to be caught out by anything that happens in front of them, and as for indicators on roundabouts, the potential combinations of which turning the vehicle could take and which lane it could use makes it pointless to use an indicator. If you know a Police patrol car driver, ask them how difficult it is to prosecute for an incident on a roundabout. It's far better for you to decide when it's safe rather than rely on someone elses interpretation of when to indicate for their particular move on what could be a strange roundabout layout that they haven't used before. Torchie1
  • Score: 0

2:43pm Fri 2 May 14

Laura94 says...

Torchie1 wrote:
Zexagon wrote:
RomseyKeith wrote:
kiz.bartlett wrote:
If a younger driver decides to go fast, he or she will go fast. I don't think this is a case of Iack of education to drive but rather lack of knowledge of the repercussions when you do drive too fast. Adding something practical which deals with the dangers of the road would hopefully demonstrate the effects of driving in a certain manner. I also agree that younger drivers tend to be inexperienced and cause more accidents, but some sort of refresher test for people who have been driving for a while I.e. 20 years. Too often I see people speeding, no use of indicators, incorrect use of roundabouts and tailgating. Most of these people are not young drivers but rather middle - aged people. Irregardless of age or experience, everyone should be reminded that owning a car is owning a potential weapon. How you use it dictates whether it causes harm or not.
Agreed. The majority of people who change lanes without indicating, or fail to indicate to come off a roundabout, etc that I see are middle-aged.
A refresher test every 10 years or so is probably a good idea, due to how much the Highway Code and laws of the road change over the years. I've been driving for 20 years, and a friend of mine has just started.
Looking at the graph included, it appears that new drivers aren't as bad as some would have you believe, as the injury rate in the 19-24 age group is low compared to that of every other age group, especially the 25-34 age bracket.
Don't you think they'd indicate etc whilst doing their refresher test then completely ignore it all when they're back on the road having passed the test
Is the use of indicators a legal requirement or is the person behind driving so close that they were caught out by the move of the driver in front? The onus is more on the follower to be far enough behind not to be caught out by anything that happens in front of them, and as for indicators on roundabouts, the potential combinations of which turning the vehicle could take and which lane it could use makes it pointless to use an indicator. If you know a Police patrol car driver, ask them how difficult it is to prosecute for an incident on a roundabout. It's far better for you to decide when it's safe rather than rely on someone elses interpretation of when to indicate for their particular move on what could be a strange roundabout layout that they haven't used before.
Can I just say, for pedestrians crossing at roundabouts, using the indicator is vital to be able to cross the road
[quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Zexagon[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RomseyKeith[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]kiz.bartlett[/bold] wrote: If a younger driver decides to go fast, he or she will go fast. I don't think this is a case of Iack of education to drive but rather lack of knowledge of the repercussions when you do drive too fast. Adding something practical which deals with the dangers of the road would hopefully demonstrate the effects of driving in a certain manner. I also agree that younger drivers tend to be inexperienced and cause more accidents, but some sort of refresher test for people who have been driving for a while I.e. 20 years. Too often I see people speeding, no use of indicators, incorrect use of roundabouts and tailgating. Most of these people are not young drivers but rather middle - aged people. Irregardless of age or experience, everyone should be reminded that owning a car is owning a potential weapon. How you use it dictates whether it causes harm or not.[/p][/quote]Agreed. The majority of people who change lanes without indicating, or fail to indicate to come off a roundabout, etc that I see are middle-aged. A refresher test every 10 years or so is probably a good idea, due to how much the Highway Code and laws of the road change over the years. I've been driving for 20 years, and a friend of mine has just started. Looking at the graph included, it appears that new drivers aren't as bad as some would have you believe, as the injury rate in the 19-24 age group is low compared to that of every other age group, especially the 25-34 age bracket.[/p][/quote]Don't you think they'd indicate etc whilst doing their refresher test then completely ignore it all when they're back on the road having passed the test[/p][/quote]Is the use of indicators a legal requirement or is the person behind driving so close that they were caught out by the move of the driver in front? The onus is more on the follower to be far enough behind not to be caught out by anything that happens in front of them, and as for indicators on roundabouts, the potential combinations of which turning the vehicle could take and which lane it could use makes it pointless to use an indicator. If you know a Police patrol car driver, ask them how difficult it is to prosecute for an incident on a roundabout. It's far better for you to decide when it's safe rather than rely on someone elses interpretation of when to indicate for their particular move on what could be a strange roundabout layout that they haven't used before.[/p][/quote]Can I just say, for pedestrians crossing at roundabouts, using the indicator is vital to be able to cross the road Laura94
  • Score: 1

2:45pm Fri 2 May 14

Laura94 says...

biggus2 wrote:
I agree with Mrs Walters. Perhaps we should adopt what they do in Australia. that is new and young drivers are restricted on when they can drive and the power of the car. They are also restricted on the times in the evening when they can drive. So insurance companies insist on a black box to monitor driving behaviour.
What about people who work the evenings, I finish work sometimes up to 11;45 pm, what are we supposed to do, walk home? I would feel a lot safer driving home at that time of night.
[quote][p][bold]biggus2[/bold] wrote: I agree with Mrs Walters. Perhaps we should adopt what they do in Australia. that is new and young drivers are restricted on when they can drive and the power of the car. They are also restricted on the times in the evening when they can drive. So insurance companies insist on a black box to monitor driving behaviour.[/p][/quote]What about people who work the evenings, I finish work sometimes up to 11;45 pm, what are we supposed to do, walk home? I would feel a lot safer driving home at that time of night. Laura94
  • Score: 0

2:47pm Fri 2 May 14

Laura94 says...

befriendly wrote:
As part of their insurance young drivers should have to fit rev limiters speed limiters and a black box. It may save a few lives, but no amount of rules and regulations will over moronic mentality.
Why don't we fit all cars with it.That way no one will be discriminated
[quote][p][bold]befriendly[/bold] wrote: As part of their insurance young drivers should have to fit rev limiters speed limiters and a black box. It may save a few lives, but no amount of rules and regulations will over moronic mentality.[/p][/quote]Why don't we fit all cars with it.That way no one will be discriminated Laura94
  • Score: 0

3:07pm Fri 2 May 14

Zootopian says...

RomseyKeith wrote:
kiz.bartlett wrote:
If a younger driver decides to go fast, he or she will go fast. I don't think this is a case of Iack of education to drive but rather lack of knowledge of the repercussions when you do drive too fast. Adding something practical which deals with the dangers of the road would hopefully demonstrate the effects of driving in a certain manner. I also agree that younger drivers tend to be inexperienced and cause more accidents, but some sort of refresher test for people who have been driving for a while I.e. 20 years. Too often I see people speeding, no use of indicators, incorrect use of roundabouts and tailgating. Most of these people are not young drivers but rather middle - aged people. Irregardless of age or experience, everyone should be reminded that owning a car is owning a potential weapon. How you use it dictates whether it causes harm or not.
Agreed. The majority of people who change lanes without indicating, or fail to indicate to come off a roundabout, etc that I see are middle-aged.
A refresher test every 10 years or so is probably a good idea, due to how much the Highway Code and laws of the road change over the years. I've been driving for 20 years, and a friend of mine has just started.
Looking at the graph included, it appears that new drivers aren't as bad as some would have you believe, as the injury rate in the 19-24 age group is low compared to that of every other age group, especially the 25-34 age bracket.
I think you need to take another look at the graph....

The deaths in the first two age brackets to include drivers are way above every other age group.
[quote][p][bold]RomseyKeith[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]kiz.bartlett[/bold] wrote: If a younger driver decides to go fast, he or she will go fast. I don't think this is a case of Iack of education to drive but rather lack of knowledge of the repercussions when you do drive too fast. Adding something practical which deals with the dangers of the road would hopefully demonstrate the effects of driving in a certain manner. I also agree that younger drivers tend to be inexperienced and cause more accidents, but some sort of refresher test for people who have been driving for a while I.e. 20 years. Too often I see people speeding, no use of indicators, incorrect use of roundabouts and tailgating. Most of these people are not young drivers but rather middle - aged people. Irregardless of age or experience, everyone should be reminded that owning a car is owning a potential weapon. How you use it dictates whether it causes harm or not.[/p][/quote]Agreed. The majority of people who change lanes without indicating, or fail to indicate to come off a roundabout, etc that I see are middle-aged. A refresher test every 10 years or so is probably a good idea, due to how much the Highway Code and laws of the road change over the years. I've been driving for 20 years, and a friend of mine has just started. Looking at the graph included, it appears that new drivers aren't as bad as some would have you believe, as the injury rate in the 19-24 age group is low compared to that of every other age group, especially the 25-34 age bracket.[/p][/quote]I think you need to take another look at the graph.... The deaths in the first two age brackets to include drivers are way above every other age group. Zootopian
  • Score: 1

3:14pm Fri 2 May 14

RomseyKeith says...

Laura94 wrote:
Torchie1 wrote:
Zexagon wrote:
RomseyKeith wrote:
kiz.bartlett wrote: If a younger driver decides to go fast, he or she will go fast. I don't think this is a case of Iack of education to drive but rather lack of knowledge of the repercussions when you do drive too fast. Adding something practical which deals with the dangers of the road would hopefully demonstrate the effects of driving in a certain manner. I also agree that younger drivers tend to be inexperienced and cause more accidents, but some sort of refresher test for people who have been driving for a while I.e. 20 years. Too often I see people speeding, no use of indicators, incorrect use of roundabouts and tailgating. Most of these people are not young drivers but rather middle - aged people. Irregardless of age or experience, everyone should be reminded that owning a car is owning a potential weapon. How you use it dictates whether it causes harm or not.
Agreed. The majority of people who change lanes without indicating, or fail to indicate to come off a roundabout, etc that I see are middle-aged. A refresher test every 10 years or so is probably a good idea, due to how much the Highway Code and laws of the road change over the years. I've been driving for 20 years, and a friend of mine has just started. Looking at the graph included, it appears that new drivers aren't as bad as some would have you believe, as the injury rate in the 19-24 age group is low compared to that of every other age group, especially the 25-34 age bracket.
Don't you think they'd indicate etc whilst doing their refresher test then completely ignore it all when they're back on the road having passed the test
Is the use of indicators a legal requirement or is the person behind driving so close that they were caught out by the move of the driver in front? The onus is more on the follower to be far enough behind not to be caught out by anything that happens in front of them, and as for indicators on roundabouts, the potential combinations of which turning the vehicle could take and which lane it could use makes it pointless to use an indicator. If you know a Police patrol car driver, ask them how difficult it is to prosecute for an incident on a roundabout. It's far better for you to decide when it's safe rather than rely on someone elses interpretation of when to indicate for their particular move on what could be a strange roundabout layout that they haven't used before.
Can I just say, for pedestrians crossing at roundabouts, using the indicator is vital to be able to cross the road
And you'd fail your Test if you didn't use indicators on roundabouts or for turning off the road. They aren't just for the driver behind. Pedestrians, cyclists, etc. It is a simple flick of a lever, by your hand on the wheel next to that lever. Such a simple action that few take because they are too selfish, ignorant or incompetent a driver to do just that.
It is in the Highway Code, and regardless of whether the police would prosecute for this or not, whatever happened to doing it out of respect and consideration for others on the road.
[quote][p][bold]Laura94[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Zexagon[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RomseyKeith[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]kiz.bartlett[/bold] wrote: If a younger driver decides to go fast, he or she will go fast. I don't think this is a case of Iack of education to drive but rather lack of knowledge of the repercussions when you do drive too fast. Adding something practical which deals with the dangers of the road would hopefully demonstrate the effects of driving in a certain manner. I also agree that younger drivers tend to be inexperienced and cause more accidents, but some sort of refresher test for people who have been driving for a while I.e. 20 years. Too often I see people speeding, no use of indicators, incorrect use of roundabouts and tailgating. Most of these people are not young drivers but rather middle - aged people. Irregardless of age or experience, everyone should be reminded that owning a car is owning a potential weapon. How you use it dictates whether it causes harm or not.[/p][/quote]Agreed. The majority of people who change lanes without indicating, or fail to indicate to come off a roundabout, etc that I see are middle-aged. A refresher test every 10 years or so is probably a good idea, due to how much the Highway Code and laws of the road change over the years. I've been driving for 20 years, and a friend of mine has just started. Looking at the graph included, it appears that new drivers aren't as bad as some would have you believe, as the injury rate in the 19-24 age group is low compared to that of every other age group, especially the 25-34 age bracket.[/p][/quote]Don't you think they'd indicate etc whilst doing their refresher test then completely ignore it all when they're back on the road having passed the test[/p][/quote]Is the use of indicators a legal requirement or is the person behind driving so close that they were caught out by the move of the driver in front? The onus is more on the follower to be far enough behind not to be caught out by anything that happens in front of them, and as for indicators on roundabouts, the potential combinations of which turning the vehicle could take and which lane it could use makes it pointless to use an indicator. If you know a Police patrol car driver, ask them how difficult it is to prosecute for an incident on a roundabout. It's far better for you to decide when it's safe rather than rely on someone elses interpretation of when to indicate for their particular move on what could be a strange roundabout layout that they haven't used before.[/p][/quote]Can I just say, for pedestrians crossing at roundabouts, using the indicator is vital to be able to cross the road[/p][/quote]And you'd fail your Test if you didn't use indicators on roundabouts or for turning off the road. They aren't just for the driver behind. Pedestrians, cyclists, etc. It is a simple flick of a lever, by your hand on the wheel next to that lever. Such a simple action that few take because they are too selfish, ignorant or incompetent a driver to do just that. It is in the Highway Code, and regardless of whether the police would prosecute for this or not, whatever happened to doing it out of respect and consideration for others on the road. RomseyKeith
  • Score: 1

3:17pm Fri 2 May 14

Ginger_cyclist says...

Sit young drivers through a number of videos of REAL collisions and such to show them why they shouldn't do certain things like speeding or using the phone.
Sit young drivers through a number of videos of REAL collisions and such to show them why they shouldn't do certain things like speeding or using the phone. Ginger_cyclist
  • Score: 1

3:18pm Fri 2 May 14

Ginger_cyclist says...

Ginger_cyclist wrote:
Sit young drivers through a number of videos of REAL collisions and such to show them why they shouldn't do certain things like speeding or using the phone.
And yes, I would gladly sit through those videos, otherwise I wouldn't have mentioned it.
[quote][p][bold]Ginger_cyclist[/bold] wrote: Sit young drivers through a number of videos of REAL collisions and such to show them why they shouldn't do certain things like speeding or using the phone.[/p][/quote]And yes, I would gladly sit through those videos, otherwise I wouldn't have mentioned it. Ginger_cyclist
  • Score: 0

3:23pm Fri 2 May 14

countrywench says...

What scares me most is seeing a youngster in the fast lane of the motorway in a beat up car , that probably doesn't have side impact bars , doesn't have airbags , and is mostly held together by tape and rust ..
It's more than likely got a small engine to keep insurance down .
And they are driving it as fast as it can possibly go ..in the fast lane ..
They have no idea that their little car will not protect them in an accident , they have no idea that an old small car will not hold the road , esp in bad conditions ..
I to would like to see new drivers cars limited to 45mph and have a green P plate on them for a year ..
What scares me most is seeing a youngster in the fast lane of the motorway in a beat up car , that probably doesn't have side impact bars , doesn't have airbags , and is mostly held together by tape and rust .. It's more than likely got a small engine to keep insurance down . And they are driving it as fast as it can possibly go ..in the fast lane .. They have no idea that their little car will not protect them in an accident , they have no idea that an old small car will not hold the road , esp in bad conditions .. I to would like to see new drivers cars limited to 45mph and have a green P plate on them for a year .. countrywench
  • Score: 0

3:35pm Fri 2 May 14

Shirley_Girl says...

Zootopian wrote:
RomseyKeith wrote:
kiz.bartlett wrote: If a younger driver decides to go fast, he or she will go fast. I don't think this is a case of Iack of education to drive but rather lack of knowledge of the repercussions when you do drive too fast. Adding something practical which deals with the dangers of the road would hopefully demonstrate the effects of driving in a certain manner. I also agree that younger drivers tend to be inexperienced and cause more accidents, but some sort of refresher test for people who have been driving for a while I.e. 20 years. Too often I see people speeding, no use of indicators, incorrect use of roundabouts and tailgating. Most of these people are not young drivers but rather middle - aged people. Irregardless of age or experience, everyone should be reminded that owning a car is owning a potential weapon. How you use it dictates whether it causes harm or not.
Agreed. The majority of people who change lanes without indicating, or fail to indicate to come off a roundabout, etc that I see are middle-aged. A refresher test every 10 years or so is probably a good idea, due to how much the Highway Code and laws of the road change over the years. I've been driving for 20 years, and a friend of mine has just started. Looking at the graph included, it appears that new drivers aren't as bad as some would have you believe, as the injury rate in the 19-24 age group is low compared to that of every other age group, especially the 25-34 age bracket.
I think you need to take another look at the graph.... The deaths in the first two age brackets to include drivers are way above every other age group.
Actually no, quite a lot of 20-24 year olds (and even some in the 15-19 bracket) can drive....

Although admittedly there are probably fewer drivers in these age groups- we should probably show the number of injuries/deaths vs total number of drivers in each bracket. But, i'm over thinking it maybe, its just an article on the DE!
[quote][p][bold]Zootopian[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RomseyKeith[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]kiz.bartlett[/bold] wrote: If a younger driver decides to go fast, he or she will go fast. I don't think this is a case of Iack of education to drive but rather lack of knowledge of the repercussions when you do drive too fast. Adding something practical which deals with the dangers of the road would hopefully demonstrate the effects of driving in a certain manner. I also agree that younger drivers tend to be inexperienced and cause more accidents, but some sort of refresher test for people who have been driving for a while I.e. 20 years. Too often I see people speeding, no use of indicators, incorrect use of roundabouts and tailgating. Most of these people are not young drivers but rather middle - aged people. Irregardless of age or experience, everyone should be reminded that owning a car is owning a potential weapon. How you use it dictates whether it causes harm or not.[/p][/quote]Agreed. The majority of people who change lanes without indicating, or fail to indicate to come off a roundabout, etc that I see are middle-aged. A refresher test every 10 years or so is probably a good idea, due to how much the Highway Code and laws of the road change over the years. I've been driving for 20 years, and a friend of mine has just started. Looking at the graph included, it appears that new drivers aren't as bad as some would have you believe, as the injury rate in the 19-24 age group is low compared to that of every other age group, especially the 25-34 age bracket.[/p][/quote]I think you need to take another look at the graph.... The deaths in the first two age brackets to include drivers are way above every other age group.[/p][/quote]Actually no, quite a lot of 20-24 year olds (and even some in the 15-19 bracket) can drive.... Although admittedly there are probably fewer drivers in these age groups- we should probably show the number of injuries/deaths vs total number of drivers in each bracket. But, i'm over thinking it maybe, its just an article on the DE! Shirley_Girl
  • Score: 0

3:45pm Fri 2 May 14

RomseyKeith says...

Shirley_Girl wrote:
Zootopian wrote:
RomseyKeith wrote:
kiz.bartlett wrote: If a younger driver decides to go fast, he or she will go fast. I don't think this is a case of Iack of education to drive but rather lack of knowledge of the repercussions when you do drive too fast. Adding something practical which deals with the dangers of the road would hopefully demonstrate the effects of driving in a certain manner. I also agree that younger drivers tend to be inexperienced and cause more accidents, but some sort of refresher test for people who have been driving for a while I.e. 20 years. Too often I see people speeding, no use of indicators, incorrect use of roundabouts and tailgating. Most of these people are not young drivers but rather middle - aged people. Irregardless of age or experience, everyone should be reminded that owning a car is owning a potential weapon. How you use it dictates whether it causes harm or not.
Agreed. The majority of people who change lanes without indicating, or fail to indicate to come off a roundabout, etc that I see are middle-aged. A refresher test every 10 years or so is probably a good idea, due to how much the Highway Code and laws of the road change over the years. I've been driving for 20 years, and a friend of mine has just started. Looking at the graph included, it appears that new drivers aren't as bad as some would have you believe, as the injury rate in the 19-24 age group is low compared to that of every other age group, especially the 25-34 age bracket.
I think you need to take another look at the graph.... The deaths in the first two age brackets to include drivers are way above every other age group.
Actually no, quite a lot of 20-24 year olds (and even some in the 15-19 bracket) can drive.... Although admittedly there are probably fewer drivers in these age groups- we should probably show the number of injuries/deaths vs total number of drivers in each bracket. But, i'm over thinking it maybe, its just an article on the DE!
Well said, Shirley. In the words of that great philosopher Homer Simpson, "You can come up with statstics to prove anything. Forty percent of all people know that".
Without knowing the number of drivers within those age groups it is not an accurate or fair representation.
[quote][p][bold]Shirley_Girl[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Zootopian[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RomseyKeith[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]kiz.bartlett[/bold] wrote: If a younger driver decides to go fast, he or she will go fast. I don't think this is a case of Iack of education to drive but rather lack of knowledge of the repercussions when you do drive too fast. Adding something practical which deals with the dangers of the road would hopefully demonstrate the effects of driving in a certain manner. I also agree that younger drivers tend to be inexperienced and cause more accidents, but some sort of refresher test for people who have been driving for a while I.e. 20 years. Too often I see people speeding, no use of indicators, incorrect use of roundabouts and tailgating. Most of these people are not young drivers but rather middle - aged people. Irregardless of age or experience, everyone should be reminded that owning a car is owning a potential weapon. How you use it dictates whether it causes harm or not.[/p][/quote]Agreed. The majority of people who change lanes without indicating, or fail to indicate to come off a roundabout, etc that I see are middle-aged. A refresher test every 10 years or so is probably a good idea, due to how much the Highway Code and laws of the road change over the years. I've been driving for 20 years, and a friend of mine has just started. Looking at the graph included, it appears that new drivers aren't as bad as some would have you believe, as the injury rate in the 19-24 age group is low compared to that of every other age group, especially the 25-34 age bracket.[/p][/quote]I think you need to take another look at the graph.... The deaths in the first two age brackets to include drivers are way above every other age group.[/p][/quote]Actually no, quite a lot of 20-24 year olds (and even some in the 15-19 bracket) can drive.... Although admittedly there are probably fewer drivers in these age groups- we should probably show the number of injuries/deaths vs total number of drivers in each bracket. But, i'm over thinking it maybe, its just an article on the DE![/p][/quote]Well said, Shirley. In the words of that great philosopher Homer Simpson, "You can come up with statstics to prove anything. Forty percent of all people know that". Without knowing the number of drivers within those age groups it is not an accurate or fair representation. RomseyKeith
  • Score: 1

6:06pm Fri 2 May 14

southy says...

This this dying age the technology is there to have all cars fitted with a electronic speed limiter and road speed transmitter for that road that car is on to enforce the road speed.
This this dying age the technology is there to have all cars fitted with a electronic speed limiter and road speed transmitter for that road that car is on to enforce the road speed. southy
  • Score: 0

6:28pm Fri 2 May 14

wilson castaway says...

I passed my driving test in March.Im 34.The driving skills of people are absolutely shocking.Roundabouts are where I see the most mistakes.Driving round outside, indicater flashing left but not coming off till the last exit is the most common.I do think people should have a refresher every ten years, or a theory test and hazard perception.Im not in any way a pefect driver but its the basics that people get wrong.And an inexperienced driver would presume that person is leaving the roundabout.Give way to the right, if theres not enough time for a pedestrian to cross the road then you shouldnt pull out at a junction into traffic.Amber means slow down and stop, not excellerate to beat the red.
I passed my driving test in March.Im 34.The driving skills of people are absolutely shocking.Roundabouts are where I see the most mistakes.Driving round outside, indicater flashing left but not coming off till the last exit is the most common.I do think people should have a refresher every ten years, or a theory test and hazard perception.Im not in any way a pefect driver but its the basics that people get wrong.And an inexperienced driver would presume that person is leaving the roundabout.Give way to the right, if theres not enough time for a pedestrian to cross the road then you shouldnt pull out at a junction into traffic.Amber means slow down and stop, not excellerate to beat the red. wilson castaway
  • Score: 0

7:01pm Fri 2 May 14

Charlie Bucket says...

southy wrote:
This this dying age the technology is there to have all cars fitted with a electronic speed limiter and road speed transmitter for that road that car is on to enforce the road speed.
Not really a great idea. A better idea - one that many companies are pursuing - is making the car more aware of dangers around it. Simply stopping them going over a certain speed will eventually end in disaster.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: This this dying age the technology is there to have all cars fitted with a electronic speed limiter and road speed transmitter for that road that car is on to enforce the road speed.[/p][/quote]Not really a great idea. A better idea - one that many companies are pursuing - is making the car more aware of dangers around it. Simply stopping them going over a certain speed will eventually end in disaster. Charlie Bucket
  • Score: 0

7:04pm Fri 2 May 14

southamptonadi says...

RomseyKeith wrote:
Shirley_Girl wrote:
Zootopian wrote:
RomseyKeith wrote:
kiz.bartlett wrote: If a younger driver decides to go fast, he or she will go fast. I don't think this is a case of Iack of education to drive but rather lack of knowledge of the repercussions when you do drive too fast. Adding something practical which deals with the dangers of the road would hopefully demonstrate the effects of driving in a certain manner. I also agree that younger drivers tend to be inexperienced and cause more accidents, but some sort of refresher test for people who have been driving for a while I.e. 20 years. Too often I see people speeding, no use of indicators, incorrect use of roundabouts and tailgating. Most of these people are not young drivers but rather middle - aged people. Irregardless of age or experience, everyone should be reminded that owning a car is owning a potential weapon. How you use it dictates whether it causes harm or not.
Agreed. The majority of people who change lanes without indicating, or fail to indicate to come off a roundabout, etc that I see are middle-aged. A refresher test every 10 years or so is probably a good idea, due to how much the Highway Code and laws of the road change over the years. I've been driving for 20 years, and a friend of mine has just started. Looking at the graph included, it appears that new drivers aren't as bad as some would have you believe, as the injury rate in the 19-24 age group is low compared to that of every other age group, especially the 25-34 age bracket.
I think you need to take another look at the graph.... The deaths in the first two age brackets to include drivers are way above every other age group.
Actually no, quite a lot of 20-24 year olds (and even some in the 15-19 bracket) can drive.... Although admittedly there are probably fewer drivers in these age groups- we should probably show the number of injuries/deaths vs total number of drivers in each bracket. But, i'm over thinking it maybe, its just an article on the DE!
Well said, Shirley. In the words of that great philosopher Homer Simpson, "You can come up with statstics to prove anything. Forty percent of all people know that".
Without knowing the number of drivers within those age groups it is not an accurate or fair representation.
Yes that graph says

Road deaths by age
Ages of people killed due to injuries sustained in road accidents in 2009.

It does not in anyway say about the age of the driver, how many of those casualties were cyclists, pedestrians or passengers in cars being driven by older people. Or in a car that was the innocent vehicle in a fatal crash caused by an older driver.

When I say older I mean older than 25.

There were 91 deaths under 15 year olds they were not driving, I hope.

In 2011 412 deaths were caused by drivers 17 - 24 which covers the two red columns now that is slightly less than the 659 that graph suggests.

There were around 4800 road deaths in that year according to the DfT.
[quote][p][bold]RomseyKeith[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Shirley_Girl[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Zootopian[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RomseyKeith[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]kiz.bartlett[/bold] wrote: If a younger driver decides to go fast, he or she will go fast. I don't think this is a case of Iack of education to drive but rather lack of knowledge of the repercussions when you do drive too fast. Adding something practical which deals with the dangers of the road would hopefully demonstrate the effects of driving in a certain manner. I also agree that younger drivers tend to be inexperienced and cause more accidents, but some sort of refresher test for people who have been driving for a while I.e. 20 years. Too often I see people speeding, no use of indicators, incorrect use of roundabouts and tailgating. Most of these people are not young drivers but rather middle - aged people. Irregardless of age or experience, everyone should be reminded that owning a car is owning a potential weapon. How you use it dictates whether it causes harm or not.[/p][/quote]Agreed. The majority of people who change lanes without indicating, or fail to indicate to come off a roundabout, etc that I see are middle-aged. A refresher test every 10 years or so is probably a good idea, due to how much the Highway Code and laws of the road change over the years. I've been driving for 20 years, and a friend of mine has just started. Looking at the graph included, it appears that new drivers aren't as bad as some would have you believe, as the injury rate in the 19-24 age group is low compared to that of every other age group, especially the 25-34 age bracket.[/p][/quote]I think you need to take another look at the graph.... The deaths in the first two age brackets to include drivers are way above every other age group.[/p][/quote]Actually no, quite a lot of 20-24 year olds (and even some in the 15-19 bracket) can drive.... Although admittedly there are probably fewer drivers in these age groups- we should probably show the number of injuries/deaths vs total number of drivers in each bracket. But, i'm over thinking it maybe, its just an article on the DE![/p][/quote]Well said, Shirley. In the words of that great philosopher Homer Simpson, "You can come up with statstics to prove anything. Forty percent of all people know that". Without knowing the number of drivers within those age groups it is not an accurate or fair representation.[/p][/quote]Yes that graph says Road deaths by age Ages of people killed due to injuries sustained in road accidents in 2009. It does not in anyway say about the age of the driver, how many of those casualties were cyclists, pedestrians or passengers in cars being driven by older people. Or in a car that was the innocent vehicle in a fatal crash caused by an older driver. When I say older I mean older than 25. There were 91 deaths under 15 year olds they were not driving, I hope. In 2011 412 deaths were caused by drivers 17 - 24 which covers the two red columns now that is slightly less than the 659 that graph suggests. There were around 4800 road deaths in that year according to the DfT. southamptonadi
  • Score: 0

8:13pm Fri 2 May 14

03alpe01 says...

befriendly wrote:
As part of their insurance young drivers should have to fit rev limiters speed limiters and a black box. It may save a few lives, but no amount of rules and regulations will over moronic mentality.
This is optional at the moment. Black boxes have their upsides in that they make insurance cheaper for the young driver. That said, I don't get why it's always young drivers who get the blame for everything. Yes, they are inexperienced but old people drive like idiots too. I actually think that learners should be allowed on the motorway, if only during non-busy times of the day. Driving on the motorway for the first time can be a daunting experience. I also think that there should be a set time between when you start learning and when you can take your test and a minimum amount of lessons.
[quote][p][bold]befriendly[/bold] wrote: As part of their insurance young drivers should have to fit rev limiters speed limiters and a black box. It may save a few lives, but no amount of rules and regulations will over moronic mentality.[/p][/quote]This is optional at the moment. Black boxes have their upsides in that they make insurance cheaper for the young driver. That said, I don't get why it's always young drivers who get the blame for everything. Yes, they are inexperienced but old people drive like idiots too. I actually think that learners should be allowed on the motorway, if only during non-busy times of the day. Driving on the motorway for the first time can be a daunting experience. I also think that there should be a set time between when you start learning and when you can take your test and a minimum amount of lessons. 03alpe01
  • Score: 0

11:31pm Fri 2 May 14

Stubs says...

I think women are the safest drivers after passing their test. It's always boy racers in their stupid silly bat Mobil cars that drive like a nutter. I think half the time they think their driving on a racing track.
I think women are the safest drivers after passing their test. It's always boy racers in their stupid silly bat Mobil cars that drive like a nutter. I think half the time they think their driving on a racing track. Stubs
  • Score: -1

8:57am Sat 3 May 14

From the sidelines says...

The report doesn't say what charge was laid against the driver.

20mph above the speed limit, and losing control, suggests the driving was dangerous. And a death was caused.

The sentence seems rather lenient for Causing Death by Dangerous Driving, so I wonder if a lesser charge was actually laid.

I wonder if the full force of the law was actually applied, and whether setting an example would encourage other drivers to think before they act.
The report doesn't say what charge was laid against the driver. 20mph above the speed limit, and losing control, suggests the driving was dangerous. And a death was caused. The sentence seems rather lenient for Causing Death by Dangerous Driving, so I wonder if a lesser charge was actually laid. I wonder if the full force of the law was actually applied, and whether setting an example would encourage other drivers to think before they act. From the sidelines
  • Score: 1

9:25am Sat 3 May 14

Charlie Bucket says...

From the sidelines wrote:
The report doesn't say what charge was laid against the driver.

20mph above the speed limit, and losing control, suggests the driving was dangerous. And a death was caused.

The sentence seems rather lenient for Causing Death by Dangerous Driving, so I wonder if a lesser charge was actually laid.

I wonder if the full force of the law was actually applied, and whether setting an example would encourage other drivers to think before they act.
20mph over may or may not be dangerous driving, depending on what the speed limit was.
[quote][p][bold]From the sidelines[/bold] wrote: The report doesn't say what charge was laid against the driver. 20mph above the speed limit, and losing control, suggests the driving was dangerous. And a death was caused. The sentence seems rather lenient for Causing Death by Dangerous Driving, so I wonder if a lesser charge was actually laid. I wonder if the full force of the law was actually applied, and whether setting an example would encourage other drivers to think before they act.[/p][/quote]20mph over may or may not be dangerous driving, depending on what the speed limit was. Charlie Bucket
  • Score: 1

7:23pm Sun 4 May 14

southy says...

Charlie Bucket wrote:
southy wrote:
This this dying age the technology is there to have all cars fitted with a electronic speed limiter and road speed transmitter for that road that car is on to enforce the road speed.
Not really a great idea. A better idea - one that many companies are pursuing - is making the car more aware of dangers around it. Simply stopping them going over a certain speed will eventually end in disaster.
well yes and no, what if your car in a 20 mph zone and could not go faster than 22mph would that not be safer for unprotected people on the streets like some one crossing a road or that cyclist, to be hit at 20 there chances are very good, much better than a person doing 40 in a 20 zone.
all technology should be used.
[quote][p][bold]Charlie Bucket[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: This this dying age the technology is there to have all cars fitted with a electronic speed limiter and road speed transmitter for that road that car is on to enforce the road speed.[/p][/quote]Not really a great idea. A better idea - one that many companies are pursuing - is making the car more aware of dangers around it. Simply stopping them going over a certain speed will eventually end in disaster.[/p][/quote]well yes and no, what if your car in a 20 mph zone and could not go faster than 22mph would that not be safer for unprotected people on the streets like some one crossing a road or that cyclist, to be hit at 20 there chances are very good, much better than a person doing 40 in a 20 zone. all technology should be used. southy
  • Score: 1

8:53pm Sun 4 May 14

Charlie Bucket says...

southy wrote:
Charlie Bucket wrote:
southy wrote:
This this dying age the technology is there to have all cars fitted with a electronic speed limiter and road speed transmitter for that road that car is on to enforce the road speed.
Not really a great idea. A better idea - one that many companies are pursuing - is making the car more aware of dangers around it. Simply stopping them going over a certain speed will eventually end in disaster.
well yes and no, what if your car in a 20 mph zone and could not go faster than 22mph would that not be safer for unprotected people on the streets like some one crossing a road or that cyclist, to be hit at 20 there chances are very good, much better than a person doing 40 in a 20 zone.
all technology should be used.
Cars are already being developed that can automatically sense a hazard, and adjust the speed accordingly. Simply having the car unable to go over a certain speed is failing to understand the problem, and will eventually cause an accident.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Charlie Bucket[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: This this dying age the technology is there to have all cars fitted with a electronic speed limiter and road speed transmitter for that road that car is on to enforce the road speed.[/p][/quote]Not really a great idea. A better idea - one that many companies are pursuing - is making the car more aware of dangers around it. Simply stopping them going over a certain speed will eventually end in disaster.[/p][/quote]well yes and no, what if your car in a 20 mph zone and could not go faster than 22mph would that not be safer for unprotected people on the streets like some one crossing a road or that cyclist, to be hit at 20 there chances are very good, much better than a person doing 40 in a 20 zone. all technology should be used.[/p][/quote]Cars are already being developed that can automatically sense a hazard, and adjust the speed accordingly. Simply having the car unable to go over a certain speed is failing to understand the problem, and will eventually cause an accident. Charlie Bucket
  • Score: 0

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