Bid to recreate daring D-day raid

From left are Jim Wilson, Ben Parkinson, Colin Hamilton, Jake Bartlett (standing) and Ricky Furgusson who plan to recreate the Cockleshell Heroes mission.

From left are Jim Wilson, Ben Parkinson, Colin Hamilton, Jake Bartlett (standing) and Ricky Furgusson who plan to recreate the Cockleshell Heroes mission.

First published in News

A Hampshire charity has today launched its attempt to recreate one of the most daring missions of World War Two.

Injured servicemen recruited by the New Milton-based Pilgrim Bandits boarded a cross-Channel ferry at the start of their bid to honour the courage shown by Royal Marine commandoes who were dubbed The Cockleshell Heroes.

They were joined by Sarah Holmes, 46, of Fareham, the great niece of one of the men who died on the raid.

She said; “It’s an absolute honour to be part of this trip and to be able to honour my very brave uncle and all his colleagues.”

The Pilgrim Bandits team embarked at Portsmouth, the same port from which members of the original mission left in 1942.

After canoeing 60 miles up the River Gironde in Nazi-occupied France, they attacked German ships anchored off Bordeaux. Several vessels were either damaged or destroyed, crippling the port for months.

Comments (3)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

6:27pm Fri 30 May 14

cliffwalker says...

The raid they're writing about here took place in December 1942. What's that got to do with D-Day?
The raid they're writing about here took place in December 1942. What's that got to do with D-Day? cliffwalker
  • Score: 1

11:58am Sat 31 May 14

southy says...

cliffwalker wrote:
The raid they're writing about here took place in December 1942. What's that got to do with D-Day?
A lot the planning for D-Day was a few years in the planning, Known vessels that hang around the channel had to be taken out long before hand making harder for them to replace.
The Cockleshells was not just Marines, even low for this raid I believe they might of been, but the Cockleshells was made up from mainly those with seamanship from the RN, RM and MN but there also was personnels from the Army and RAF in the Cockleshells, Raids all along the French channel coast was going on well before hand.
One particular Corvette was often used by the Cockleshells, it was also off the coast of the D-Day landings 2 days before and remained in the area till hour after the landings had started.
[quote][p][bold]cliffwalker[/bold] wrote: The raid they're writing about here took place in December 1942. What's that got to do with D-Day?[/p][/quote]A lot the planning for D-Day was a few years in the planning, Known vessels that hang around the channel had to be taken out long before hand making harder for them to replace. The Cockleshells was not just Marines, even low for this raid I believe they might of been, but the Cockleshells was made up from mainly those with seamanship from the RN, RM and MN but there also was personnels from the Army and RAF in the Cockleshells, Raids all along the French channel coast was going on well before hand. One particular Corvette was often used by the Cockleshells, it was also off the coast of the D-Day landings 2 days before and remained in the area till hour after the landings had started. southy
  • Score: -1

12:21pm Sat 31 May 14

Torchie1 says...

southy wrote:
cliffwalker wrote:
The raid they're writing about here took place in December 1942. What's that got to do with D-Day?
A lot the planning for D-Day was a few years in the planning, Known vessels that hang around the channel had to be taken out long before hand making harder for them to replace.
The Cockleshells was not just Marines, even low for this raid I believe they might of been, but the Cockleshells was made up from mainly those with seamanship from the RN, RM and MN but there also was personnels from the Army and RAF in the Cockleshells, Raids all along the French channel coast was going on well before hand.
One particular Corvette was often used by the Cockleshells, it was also off the coast of the D-Day landings 2 days before and remained in the area till hour after the landings had started.
The decision to cross the channel to Normandy was taken in May 1943 when the envisaged date would have been twelve months away. Take it up with the National Archives if you want to update the papers from the Trident Conference with your special insight.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cliffwalker[/bold] wrote: The raid they're writing about here took place in December 1942. What's that got to do with D-Day?[/p][/quote]A lot the planning for D-Day was a few years in the planning, Known vessels that hang around the channel had to be taken out long before hand making harder for them to replace. The Cockleshells was not just Marines, even low for this raid I believe they might of been, but the Cockleshells was made up from mainly those with seamanship from the RN, RM and MN but there also was personnels from the Army and RAF in the Cockleshells, Raids all along the French channel coast was going on well before hand. One particular Corvette was often used by the Cockleshells, it was also off the coast of the D-Day landings 2 days before and remained in the area till hour after the landings had started.[/p][/quote]The decision to cross the channel to Normandy was taken in May 1943 when the envisaged date would have been twelve months away. Take it up with the National Archives if you want to update the papers from the Trident Conference with your special insight. Torchie1
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree