Illegal fishing nets found in River Itchen

Crackdown launched on river poachers

Crackdown launched on river poachers

First published in News

A CRACKDOWN has been launched on poachers after illegal crayfish nets were discovered in a Hampshire river.

Two trapping nets have been found in the River Itchen in Bishopstoke over the past fortnight sparking fears that the county’s internationally rare crayfish could be at serious risk.

The Environment Agency is now appealing for the public to raise the alarm if any more nets are spotted or if they witness any being left in the water.

Agency officials very rarely approve licences for trapping crayfish in Hampshire due to their low numbers within the counties waterways.

The whiteclawed crayfish is internationally rare but can still be found in the region and is the only crayfish species native to the UK, so is specially protected by UK law.

Daily Echo: A swollen River Itchen in Riverside Park.

Kerry Evans, fisheries specialist, said: “Our officers responded to a report from a member of the public to seize an illegal crayfish net on the River Itchen.

“Although many of the crayfish in our rivers today are not native to Britain, having escaped from crayfish farms, the surviving population of native crayfish in Hampshire are vulnerable to people accidently catching them when out fishing for non-native crayfish species.

“There is evidence that trapping makes the problems associated with nonnative crayfish much worse.”

She added that non-native crayfish populations in southern and central Hampshire, including the rivers Test, Itchen and Meon, are still in relatively low numbers, allowing native species to thrive.

Daily Echo:

“We want to keep it that way and so we do not wish to give licences so that we may help the population to spread”, she said.“We are grateful that the net was reported to us so we could act upon it.”

Anyone with information should contact the Environment Agency Incident Hotline on 0800 807060.

Comments (3)

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4:46pm Sat 31 May 14

normal1965 says...

yumyum
yumyum normal1965
  • Score: 0

5:47pm Sat 31 May 14

southy says...

Taking of Crayfish is only temperately ban, its not a permanent ban, fishing for crayfish with long nets is a total ban, fishing with net pots is a temp ban, it is not poaching as every one as the right to take Crayfish from rivers and streams, licences are not needed, it is only on the say so of the EA that licences are needed, when the EA as that consultation that it as promise years ago that never happen, we will see what is agreed on.
Fishermen who use to fish for Crayfish back in the Southern Waters Days of control, had an agreement to ban long netting for Crayfish, but carry on with pot netting, it was the local crayfish fisherman that stop pot fishing after realising what was happening to the numbers and it was not down to the fishing for the fall in numbers, it was because of Rainbow Trout introduction to the rivers is why the fall in numbers, and the Rainbow Trout farms and Fishery's would not apply any control on the numbers of Trout.
Careful with the EA they are trying to take every rights away from people, like in England it is legal to go on a river with a boat or canoe by ancient law, but the EA says you must have a licence.
Taking of Crayfish is only temperately ban, its not a permanent ban, fishing for crayfish with long nets is a total ban, fishing with net pots is a temp ban, it is not poaching as every one as the right to take Crayfish from rivers and streams, licences are not needed, it is only on the say so of the EA that licences are needed, when the EA as that consultation that it as promise years ago that never happen, we will see what is agreed on. Fishermen who use to fish for Crayfish back in the Southern Waters Days of control, had an agreement to ban long netting for Crayfish, but carry on with pot netting, it was the local crayfish fisherman that stop pot fishing after realising what was happening to the numbers and it was not down to the fishing for the fall in numbers, it was because of Rainbow Trout introduction to the rivers is why the fall in numbers, and the Rainbow Trout farms and Fishery's would not apply any control on the numbers of Trout. Careful with the EA they are trying to take every rights away from people, like in England it is legal to go on a river with a boat or canoe by ancient law, but the EA says you must have a licence. southy
  • Score: -6

3:38am Sun 1 Jun 14

Ginger_cyclist says...

southy wrote:
Taking of Crayfish is only temperately ban, its not a permanent ban, fishing for crayfish with long nets is a total ban, fishing with net pots is a temp ban, it is not poaching as every one as the right to take Crayfish from rivers and streams, licences are not needed, it is only on the say so of the EA that licences are needed, when the EA as that consultation that it as promise years ago that never happen, we will see what is agreed on.
Fishermen who use to fish for Crayfish back in the Southern Waters Days of control, had an agreement to ban long netting for Crayfish, but carry on with pot netting, it was the local crayfish fisherman that stop pot fishing after realising what was happening to the numbers and it was not down to the fishing for the fall in numbers, it was because of Rainbow Trout introduction to the rivers is why the fall in numbers, and the Rainbow Trout farms and Fishery's would not apply any control on the numbers of Trout.
Careful with the EA they are trying to take every rights away from people, like in England it is legal to go on a river with a boat or canoe by ancient law, but the EA says you must have a licence.
Actually, it IS legally required that you have a licence for it now, this is, as mentioned because the white claws are on the brink of extinction which is NOT a result of rainbow trout being introduced(yes they eat cray's but so do many fish such as chub and barbel), it is because signal crayfish, the invasive species, actually carry a disease that they are immune to but our white claws are incredibly succeptible to it and die from it, not only that but signals will EAT white claws, it's pretty much the same as what has happened to red squirrels, greys are bigger and fatter and survive winters better while the reds are smaller and are more likely to die in the cold weather and greys will also KILL reds.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: Taking of Crayfish is only temperately ban, its not a permanent ban, fishing for crayfish with long nets is a total ban, fishing with net pots is a temp ban, it is not poaching as every one as the right to take Crayfish from rivers and streams, licences are not needed, it is only on the say so of the EA that licences are needed, when the EA as that consultation that it as promise years ago that never happen, we will see what is agreed on. Fishermen who use to fish for Crayfish back in the Southern Waters Days of control, had an agreement to ban long netting for Crayfish, but carry on with pot netting, it was the local crayfish fisherman that stop pot fishing after realising what was happening to the numbers and it was not down to the fishing for the fall in numbers, it was because of Rainbow Trout introduction to the rivers is why the fall in numbers, and the Rainbow Trout farms and Fishery's would not apply any control on the numbers of Trout. Careful with the EA they are trying to take every rights away from people, like in England it is legal to go on a river with a boat or canoe by ancient law, but the EA says you must have a licence.[/p][/quote]Actually, it IS legally required that you have a licence for it now, this is, as mentioned because the white claws are on the brink of extinction which is NOT a result of rainbow trout being introduced(yes they eat cray's but so do many fish such as chub and barbel), it is because signal crayfish, the invasive species, actually carry a disease that they are immune to but our white claws are incredibly succeptible to it and die from it, not only that but signals will EAT white claws, it's pretty much the same as what has happened to red squirrels, greys are bigger and fatter and survive winters better while the reds are smaller and are more likely to die in the cold weather and greys will also KILL reds. Ginger_cyclist
  • Score: 0

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