More than 50 jobs are set to be cut at colleges across Hampshire due to a drop in Government jobs

Daily Echo: Southampton City College is one of several colleges set to cut staff with 21 jobs on the line Southampton City College is one of several colleges set to cut staff with 21 jobs on the line

GOVERNMENT cutbacks are leading to a jobs cull at colleges across the south, the Daily Echo can reveal.

A Daily Echo investigation has revealed than 50 staff are being to be axed at colleges in our region as further education bosses blame savage funding cuts for the job losses.

The full impact of the drastic loss of cash to sixth forms and colleges is being labelled a “national scandal” by one principal while Liberal Democrat MP Mike Thornton admitted his own coalition government needed to look again at the policy which he said was hitting the further education sector too hard.

Daily Echo: Mike Thornton MP.

Eastleigh Lib Dem MP Mike Thornton does not agree with the Government funding cuts

In a broadside against his own party Mr Thornton said he did not agree with the move and would be doing “everything he could” to get his party to look at reinstating funding.

The job losses come at a time when pupils are finishing their GCSES and about to choose which colleges and sixth forms they want to continue their education.

More than 20 jobs are being lost at City College Southampton while up to 20 more are being axed at Eastleigh College.

The Daily Echo understands that Totton College has launched a consultation regarding redundancies although principal Mike Gaston refused to comment to the Daily Echo about how many jobs could be at risk.

City College Principal Sarah Stannard said £1.5m had been wiped off her budget in the last three years.

Daily Echo: Sarah Stannard is the new principal of City College Southampton.

Southampton City College principal Sarah Stannard

Already five posts have been cut from the college's senior leadership team and 21 staff out of 297 have been told they are at risk of redundancy.

She said: “There will be further difficult decisions ahead. However, these decisions must be made to ensure that we are financially healthy and able to continue doing the great work that we are doing in educating and training.”

She said that those at risk were being given first refusal on vacant posts and being offered any new posts that were being created.

Eastleigh College confirmed they too were currently in the process of making redundancies.

Daily Echo: Advice day for school leavers at Eastleigh College

Eastleigh College will also make redundancies

A spokesman said: “In response to the Government's ongoing reductions in college funding, the college has taken the decision to reduce its support staff numbers for 2014/15. A substantial proportion of the reduction will be by way of the removal of vacant posts, early retirements and voluntary redundancies; there will however regrettably be a small number of compulsory redundancies.”

In both cases it would be support staff who were affected by the job losses.

Itchen College principal Barry Hicks said that although no redundancies had been necessary there had been changes made to the way they deliver courses.

Peter Symonds in Winchester would not be cutting jobs but its principal Stephen Carville slammed the funding cuts for being “nothing short of a national scandal”.

Barton Peveril also confirmed they were not making any redundancies, thanks to increasing student numbers.

Principal Jonathan Prest said: “I fully support a concern which is being expressed by colleges about the pressures because students from 2016 will get fewer hours of teaching than their predecessors and that is not a great deal for them.”

Nigel Duncan, principal of Fareham College, said that they were in consultation with half a dozen staff regarding redundancies but this was more to do with certain courses recruiting fewer students, staff were being taken on to cope with the demand for teaching maths and English.

Brockhurst College in the New Forest said there were “no planned redundancies” along with Richard Taunton College, in Southampton.

Mr Thornton said he felt the funding cuts had gone too far in further education.

He told the Daily Echo: “On my visits to my local colleges I have been so very impressed with the achievement of those who were over 18 who have come back into education to learn and train.

“It is these sorts of students who are being unfairly affected. I think we need to look again at the funding issue, particularly reconsidering leaving it outside the ring-fenced education budget.”

Recent spending cuts saw the Conservative and Liberal Democrat coalition announce that the education budget would be protected for students up to the age of 16.

But consequently the further education budget has been slashed to meet the efficiency savings set out by Whitehall.

Mr Thornton admitted it was “probably too late” to affect any change for this year's budget but he would continue to lobby cabinet colleagues.

Paul Watkins from the teaching union NASUWT said although support workers jobs were being targeted that would impact on the workload of those staff left behind and in turn affect the quality of teaching for students.

“We are saddened that colleges are having to make these drastic savings as a result consequence of the purse strings being tightened by this government.”

He said that it was “difficult to stomach” any job losses in the current climate.

  •  As previously reported by the Daily Echo principals from colleges across Southampton united in their criticism of the government cuts in a hard hitting letter to education chiefs last year.

The heads of Southampton's three colleges joined forces to battle against the proposals which they fear will damage the education of hundreds of young people in the city.

They warned that if the cuts went through, disadvantaged young people would be most at risk of being forced to leave higher education before they have achieved their qualifications.

The cuts are estimated to be affecting 600 teenagers in Southampton alone and thousands more across Hampshire.

Under the proposals, the Education Funding Agency will cut funding for 18-year-olds by 17.5 per cent from September 2014.

  •  The Department for Education insisted that the changes will affect less than a fifth of students and the cuts will be capped for the next financial year.

This, they say, will mean the average reduction for a college will be 1.8 per cent instead of three per cent.

A spokesperson added: “We have ended the historic unfair funding between schools and colleges for post-16 students by putting them on the same funding rate.

“Funding has only been reduced for 18 year olds who will already have had two years of full-time education since their GCSEs, and will be capped at 2 per cent in the next financial year.”

Comments (22)

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8:06am Wed 11 Jun 14

wwozzer says...

I've heard from a very reliable source that when asked what they wanted to gain from City College most reply with "I'm only here so my mum still gets her benefits"
I've heard from a very reliable source that when asked what they wanted to gain from City College most reply with "I'm only here so my mum still gets her benefits" wwozzer
  • Score: 0

8:54am Wed 11 Jun 14

Datarater says...

I see the The Echo is getting behind the government's austerity measures - not.
I see the The Echo is getting behind the government's austerity measures - not. Datarater
  • Score: -6

9:15am Wed 11 Jun 14

derek james says...

it has to be said a lot of these staff aren't exactly overworked
it has to be said a lot of these staff aren't exactly overworked derek james
  • Score: -7

9:31am Wed 11 Jun 14

newsknight says...

Some colleges have managed their budgets better than others - Sarah Stannard & previous yachting Principal have not, sadly :-( This Government states that practical skills are required, but these cuts are at odds with that statement. Apprenticeships will suffer, and Eastern Europeans will be the answer to resulting skills shortage - again ... talk about shooting ourselves in the foot!! In any college there will be a percentage of 'full time course so parents get benefits' kids - a sign of the times, again due to Government creating a benefits nation :-(
Some colleges have managed their budgets better than others - Sarah Stannard & previous yachting Principal have not, sadly :-( This Government states that practical skills are required, but these cuts are at odds with that statement. Apprenticeships will suffer, and Eastern Europeans will be the answer to resulting skills shortage - again ... talk about shooting ourselves in the foot!! In any college there will be a percentage of 'full time course so parents get benefits' kids - a sign of the times, again due to Government creating a benefits nation :-( newsknight
  • Score: 4

10:07am Wed 11 Jun 14

southy says...

The ordinary people on the streets have very few friends in Government both local and national, What are Labour, Greens and others partys really doing about fighting for what is right nothing they are helping the government out, oh you get the few sound bites but no fight in them, like Labour had this Government over a barrel 3 times and 3 times they back away so a vote of no confidence would not happen.
And what about the TUC they should of called for a General Strike a number of times by now but they have not oh they had a few demo's when its been force on them and few minor strikes. thing should of never have got as far as they have done, more so with this weak Government.
Hope you reading this Ian you know what I am getting at.
The ordinary people on the streets have very few friends in Government both local and national, What are Labour, Greens and others partys really doing about fighting for what is right nothing they are helping the government out, oh you get the few sound bites but no fight in them, like Labour had this Government over a barrel 3 times and 3 times they back away so a vote of no confidence would not happen. And what about the TUC they should of called for a General Strike a number of times by now but they have not oh they had a few demo's when its been force on them and few minor strikes. thing should of never have got as far as they have done, more so with this weak Government. Hope you reading this Ian you know what I am getting at. southy
  • Score: -14

10:09am Wed 11 Jun 14

Dai Rear says...

Probably not great value for money but is it really of less value than giving money to Asian and African dictators to buy Mercedes & bombs (Dave's "overseas aid") -or HS2 for God's sake?
If we can't afford to keep the "Yoof" off the streets we sure as eggs can't afford these 2 great dodos from the London "elite"
Probably not great value for money but is it really of less value than giving money to Asian and African dictators to buy Mercedes & bombs (Dave's "overseas aid") -or HS2 for God's sake? If we can't afford to keep the "Yoof" off the streets we sure as eggs can't afford these 2 great dodos from the London "elite" Dai Rear
  • Score: 2

10:19am Wed 11 Jun 14

Dai Rear says...

southy wrote:
The ordinary people on the streets have very few friends in Government both local and national, What are Labour, Greens and others partys really doing about fighting for what is right nothing they are helping the government out, oh you get the few sound bites but no fight in them, like Labour had this Government over a barrel 3 times and 3 times they back away so a vote of no confidence would not happen.
And what about the TUC they should of called for a General Strike a number of times by now but they have not oh they had a few demo's when its been force on them and few minor strikes. thing should of never have got as far as they have done, more so with this weak Government.
Hope you reading this Ian you know what I am getting at.
I think Labour felt they'd need to have a few policies to offer the electorate before they triggered an election with a no confidence motion. And maybe the unions are a bit wiser than they used to be and recognise they're supposed to be in the business of helping their members not pushing them out of the trenches to be slaughtered in a General Strike on behalf of a party with nothing to offer except Rent Acts, Rationing and No Referendum.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: The ordinary people on the streets have very few friends in Government both local and national, What are Labour, Greens and others partys really doing about fighting for what is right nothing they are helping the government out, oh you get the few sound bites but no fight in them, like Labour had this Government over a barrel 3 times and 3 times they back away so a vote of no confidence would not happen. And what about the TUC they should of called for a General Strike a number of times by now but they have not oh they had a few demo's when its been force on them and few minor strikes. thing should of never have got as far as they have done, more so with this weak Government. Hope you reading this Ian you know what I am getting at.[/p][/quote]I think Labour felt they'd need to have a few policies to offer the electorate before they triggered an election with a no confidence motion. And maybe the unions are a bit wiser than they used to be and recognise they're supposed to be in the business of helping their members not pushing them out of the trenches to be slaughtered in a General Strike on behalf of a party with nothing to offer except Rent Acts, Rationing and No Referendum. Dai Rear
  • Score: 8

10:52am Wed 11 Jun 14

newsknight says...

Grab a coffee, settle down, and read this document - it marks the death of Apprenticeships basically as the Government will be offload funding of apprenticeships and training onto employers:
https://www.gov.uk/g
overnment/uploads/sy
stem/uploads/attachm
ent_data/file/302235
/bis-14-597-future-o
f-apprenticeships-in
-england-funding-ref
orm-technical-consul
tatation.pdf
:-(
Grab a coffee, settle down, and read this document - it marks the death of Apprenticeships basically as the Government will be offload funding of apprenticeships and training onto employers: https://www.gov.uk/g overnment/uploads/sy stem/uploads/attachm ent_data/file/302235 /bis-14-597-future-o f-apprenticeships-in -england-funding-ref orm-technical-consul tatation.pdf :-( newsknight
  • Score: 2

11:00am Wed 11 Jun 14

SFC4EVA says...

newsknight wrote:
Grab a coffee, settle down, and read this document - it marks the death of Apprenticeships basically as the Government will be offload funding of apprenticeships and training onto employers:
https://www.gov.uk/g

overnment/uploads/sy

stem/uploads/attachm

ent_data/file/302235

/bis-14-597-future-o

f-apprenticeships-in

-england-funding-ref

orm-technical-consul

tatation.pdf
:-(
In the same way they are trying to off-load the youth services to volunteer run organisations like Scouting, Guiding, Boys Brigade etc. With all these cut-backs Westminster must be swimming in pound notes!
[quote][p][bold]newsknight[/bold] wrote: Grab a coffee, settle down, and read this document - it marks the death of Apprenticeships basically as the Government will be offload funding of apprenticeships and training onto employers: https://www.gov.uk/g overnment/uploads/sy stem/uploads/attachm ent_data/file/302235 /bis-14-597-future-o f-apprenticeships-in -england-funding-ref orm-technical-consul tatation.pdf :-([/p][/quote]In the same way they are trying to off-load the youth services to volunteer run organisations like Scouting, Guiding, Boys Brigade etc. With all these cut-backs Westminster must be swimming in pound notes! SFC4EVA
  • Score: 1

11:38am Wed 11 Jun 14

Dai Rear says...

SFC4EVA wrote:
newsknight wrote:
Grab a coffee, settle down, and read this document - it marks the death of Apprenticeships basically as the Government will be offload funding of apprenticeships and training onto employers:
https://www.gov.uk/g


overnment/uploads/sy


stem/uploads/attachm


ent_data/file/302235


/bis-14-597-future-o


f-apprenticeships-in


-england-funding-ref


orm-technical-consul


tatation.pdf
:-(
In the same way they are trying to off-load the youth services to volunteer run organisations like Scouting, Guiding, Boys Brigade etc. With all these cut-backs Westminster must be swimming in pound notes!
No. UK Public Sector Debt is 75% of GDP. Liam Byrne was right. El Gordo had spent it. But Dave has hardly done a good job of trimming it.
[quote][p][bold]SFC4EVA[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]newsknight[/bold] wrote: Grab a coffee, settle down, and read this document - it marks the death of Apprenticeships basically as the Government will be offload funding of apprenticeships and training onto employers: https://www.gov.uk/g overnment/uploads/sy stem/uploads/attachm ent_data/file/302235 /bis-14-597-future-o f-apprenticeships-in -england-funding-ref orm-technical-consul tatation.pdf :-([/p][/quote]In the same way they are trying to off-load the youth services to volunteer run organisations like Scouting, Guiding, Boys Brigade etc. With all these cut-backs Westminster must be swimming in pound notes![/p][/quote]No. UK Public Sector Debt is 75% of GDP. Liam Byrne was right. El Gordo had spent it. But Dave has hardly done a good job of trimming it. Dai Rear
  • Score: 1

11:57am Wed 11 Jun 14

freefinker says...

southy wrote:
The ordinary people on the streets have very few friends in Government both local and national, What are Labour, Greens and others partys really doing about fighting for what is right nothing they are helping the government out, oh you get the few sound bites but no fight in them, like Labour had this Government over a barrel 3 times and 3 times they back away so a vote of no confidence would not happen.
And what about the TUC they should of called for a General Strike a number of times by now but they have not oh they had a few demo's when its been force on them and few minor strikes. thing should of never have got as far as they have done, more so with this weak Government.
Hope you reading this Ian you know what I am getting at.
.. oh yea? What 3 times were they?

As for a confidence vote, we have been there before, haven't we? The coalition would win - every time. Do you actually know when a vote of no confidence last succeeded? 1979, Callaghan's minority government - before that Ramsay MacDonald in 1929.

General Strike; do me a favour. There wasn't much solidarity and comradeship in the last one. And that was when trade unionism was strong and popular with the working class - unlike now. Oh, when was that? 1926 I believe. Didn't work then: will NEVER happen now.

You really don't have a clue, do you?
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: The ordinary people on the streets have very few friends in Government both local and national, What are Labour, Greens and others partys really doing about fighting for what is right nothing they are helping the government out, oh you get the few sound bites but no fight in them, like Labour had this Government over a barrel 3 times and 3 times they back away so a vote of no confidence would not happen. And what about the TUC they should of called for a General Strike a number of times by now but they have not oh they had a few demo's when its been force on them and few minor strikes. thing should of never have got as far as they have done, more so with this weak Government. Hope you reading this Ian you know what I am getting at.[/p][/quote].. oh yea? What 3 times were they? As for a confidence vote, we have been there before, haven't we? The coalition would win - every time. Do you actually know when a vote of no confidence last succeeded? 1979, Callaghan's minority government - before that Ramsay MacDonald in 1929. General Strike; do me a favour. There wasn't much solidarity and comradeship in the last one. And that was when trade unionism was strong and popular with the working class - unlike now. Oh, when was that? 1926 I believe. Didn't work then: will NEVER happen now. You really don't have a clue, do you? freefinker
  • Score: 10

1:13pm Wed 11 Jun 14

southy says...

Dai Rear wrote:
southy wrote:
The ordinary people on the streets have very few friends in Government both local and national, What are Labour, Greens and others partys really doing about fighting for what is right nothing they are helping the government out, oh you get the few sound bites but no fight in them, like Labour had this Government over a barrel 3 times and 3 times they back away so a vote of no confidence would not happen.
And what about the TUC they should of called for a General Strike a number of times by now but they have not oh they had a few demo's when its been force on them and few minor strikes. thing should of never have got as far as they have done, more so with this weak Government.
Hope you reading this Ian you know what I am getting at.
I think Labour felt they'd need to have a few policies to offer the electorate before they triggered an election with a no confidence motion. And maybe the unions are a bit wiser than they used to be and recognise they're supposed to be in the business of helping their members not pushing them out of the trenches to be slaughtered in a General Strike on behalf of a party with nothing to offer except Rent Acts, Rationing and No Referendum.
And they still have no real policy apart from offering the same as the Torys
[quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: The ordinary people on the streets have very few friends in Government both local and national, What are Labour, Greens and others partys really doing about fighting for what is right nothing they are helping the government out, oh you get the few sound bites but no fight in them, like Labour had this Government over a barrel 3 times and 3 times they back away so a vote of no confidence would not happen. And what about the TUC they should of called for a General Strike a number of times by now but they have not oh they had a few demo's when its been force on them and few minor strikes. thing should of never have got as far as they have done, more so with this weak Government. Hope you reading this Ian you know what I am getting at.[/p][/quote]I think Labour felt they'd need to have a few policies to offer the electorate before they triggered an election with a no confidence motion. And maybe the unions are a bit wiser than they used to be and recognise they're supposed to be in the business of helping their members not pushing them out of the trenches to be slaughtered in a General Strike on behalf of a party with nothing to offer except Rent Acts, Rationing and No Referendum.[/p][/quote]And they still have no real policy apart from offering the same as the Torys southy
  • Score: -7

2:19pm Wed 11 Jun 14

Dai Rear says...

I missed the Conservatives offering Rent Acts , rationing and no referendum, Southy, but I'll accept they do in your parallel universe.
I missed the Conservatives offering Rent Acts , rationing and no referendum, Southy, but I'll accept they do in your parallel universe. Dai Rear
  • Score: 2

3:00pm Wed 11 Jun 14

shesaint says...

wwozzer wrote:
I've heard from a very reliable source that when asked what they wanted to gain from City College most reply with "I'm only here so my mum still gets her benefits"
I work in FE and that is very often what we are told not only by pupils but parents too. However, a lot of students really do want to attend for the right reasons.
[quote][p][bold]wwozzer[/bold] wrote: I've heard from a very reliable source that when asked what they wanted to gain from City College most reply with "I'm only here so my mum still gets her benefits"[/p][/quote]I work in FE and that is very often what we are told not only by pupils but parents too. However, a lot of students really do want to attend for the right reasons. shesaint
  • Score: 5

3:36pm Wed 11 Jun 14

wwozzer says...

shesaint wrote:
wwozzer wrote:
I've heard from a very reliable source that when asked what they wanted to gain from City College most reply with "I'm only here so my mum still gets her benefits"
I work in FE and that is very often what we are told not only by pupils but parents too. However, a lot of students really do want to attend for the right reasons.
It is a shame many aren't there for the right reasons, engaged in learning and motivated to get the best out of what is an excellent facility that's had a huge amount of investment.
[quote][p][bold]shesaint[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]wwozzer[/bold] wrote: I've heard from a very reliable source that when asked what they wanted to gain from City College most reply with "I'm only here so my mum still gets her benefits"[/p][/quote]I work in FE and that is very often what we are told not only by pupils but parents too. However, a lot of students really do want to attend for the right reasons.[/p][/quote]It is a shame many aren't there for the right reasons, engaged in learning and motivated to get the best out of what is an excellent facility that's had a huge amount of investment. wwozzer
  • Score: 4

8:47pm Wed 11 Jun 14

Torchie1 says...

southy wrote:
Dai Rear wrote:
southy wrote:
The ordinary people on the streets have very few friends in Government both local and national, What are Labour, Greens and others partys really doing about fighting for what is right nothing they are helping the government out, oh you get the few sound bites but no fight in them, like Labour had this Government over a barrel 3 times and 3 times they back away so a vote of no confidence would not happen.
And what about the TUC they should of called for a General Strike a number of times by now but they have not oh they had a few demo's when its been force on them and few minor strikes. thing should of never have got as far as they have done, more so with this weak Government.
Hope you reading this Ian you know what I am getting at.
I think Labour felt they'd need to have a few policies to offer the electorate before they triggered an election with a no confidence motion. And maybe the unions are a bit wiser than they used to be and recognise they're supposed to be in the business of helping their members not pushing them out of the trenches to be slaughtered in a General Strike on behalf of a party with nothing to offer except Rent Acts, Rationing and No Referendum.
And they still have no real policy apart from offering the same as the Torys
The two largest political groups with years of experience between them are singing off the same hymn sheet, but an obscure fringe party that can't scrape together a tiny part of one per cent of any vote claims that they have the answer! At least you add a little colour and humour to the elections, it's just frustrating that Elvis loves Pets adds even more.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: The ordinary people on the streets have very few friends in Government both local and national, What are Labour, Greens and others partys really doing about fighting for what is right nothing they are helping the government out, oh you get the few sound bites but no fight in them, like Labour had this Government over a barrel 3 times and 3 times they back away so a vote of no confidence would not happen. And what about the TUC they should of called for a General Strike a number of times by now but they have not oh they had a few demo's when its been force on them and few minor strikes. thing should of never have got as far as they have done, more so with this weak Government. Hope you reading this Ian you know what I am getting at.[/p][/quote]I think Labour felt they'd need to have a few policies to offer the electorate before they triggered an election with a no confidence motion. And maybe the unions are a bit wiser than they used to be and recognise they're supposed to be in the business of helping their members not pushing them out of the trenches to be slaughtered in a General Strike on behalf of a party with nothing to offer except Rent Acts, Rationing and No Referendum.[/p][/quote]And they still have no real policy apart from offering the same as the Torys[/p][/quote]The two largest political groups with years of experience between them are singing off the same hymn sheet, but an obscure fringe party that can't scrape together a tiny part of one per cent of any vote claims that they have the answer! At least you add a little colour and humour to the elections, it's just frustrating that Elvis loves Pets adds even more. Torchie1
  • Score: 4

9:59pm Wed 11 Jun 14

fairdinkum says...

It's all part of a Tory strategy to reduce public investment in education. It's an incredibly shortsighted policy as without investment in training how can we compete in the globalised economy?. Having slashed public services for the past few years to balance the books after public funds were used to bail out the bankers in 2008-9, there will undoubtedly be a tax giveaway before the next election in the hope that people will be persuaded to vote them back in to do more damage. Meanwhile, the next generation suffers.
It's all part of a Tory strategy to reduce public investment in education. It's an incredibly shortsighted policy as without investment in training how can we compete in the globalised economy?. Having slashed public services for the past few years to balance the books after public funds were used to bail out the bankers in 2008-9, there will undoubtedly be a tax giveaway before the next election in the hope that people will be persuaded to vote them back in to do more damage. Meanwhile, the next generation suffers. fairdinkum
  • Score: -1

11:33pm Wed 11 Jun 14

Brzęczyszczykiewicz says...

newsknight wrote:
Some colleges have managed their budgets better than others - Sarah Stannard & previous yachting Principal have not, sadly :-( This Government states that practical skills are required, but these cuts are at odds with that statement. Apprenticeships will suffer, and Eastern Europeans will be the answer to resulting skills shortage - again ... talk about shooting ourselves in the foot!! In any college there will be a percentage of 'full time course so parents get benefits' kids - a sign of the times, again due to Government creating a benefits nation :-(
Similar to you, I've got two hands, two eyes, one brain. Use yours and you will not have any problems with finding a job in the UK.
[quote][p][bold]newsknight[/bold] wrote: Some colleges have managed their budgets better than others - Sarah Stannard & previous yachting Principal have not, sadly :-( This Government states that practical skills are required, but these cuts are at odds with that statement. Apprenticeships will suffer, and Eastern Europeans will be the answer to resulting skills shortage - again ... talk about shooting ourselves in the foot!! In any college there will be a percentage of 'full time course so parents get benefits' kids - a sign of the times, again due to Government creating a benefits nation :-([/p][/quote]Similar to you, I've got two hands, two eyes, one brain. Use yours and you will not have any problems with finding a job in the UK. Brzęczyszczykiewicz
  • Score: 1

1:24am Thu 12 Jun 14

southy says...

Torchie1 wrote:
southy wrote:
Dai Rear wrote:
southy wrote:
The ordinary people on the streets have very few friends in Government both local and national, What are Labour, Greens and others partys really doing about fighting for what is right nothing they are helping the government out, oh you get the few sound bites but no fight in them, like Labour had this Government over a barrel 3 times and 3 times they back away so a vote of no confidence would not happen.
And what about the TUC they should of called for a General Strike a number of times by now but they have not oh they had a few demo's when its been force on them and few minor strikes. thing should of never have got as far as they have done, more so with this weak Government.
Hope you reading this Ian you know what I am getting at.
I think Labour felt they'd need to have a few policies to offer the electorate before they triggered an election with a no confidence motion. And maybe the unions are a bit wiser than they used to be and recognise they're supposed to be in the business of helping their members not pushing them out of the trenches to be slaughtered in a General Strike on behalf of a party with nothing to offer except Rent Acts, Rationing and No Referendum.
And they still have no real policy apart from offering the same as the Torys
The two largest political groups with years of experience between them are singing off the same hymn sheet, but an obscure fringe party that can't scrape together a tiny part of one per cent of any vote claims that they have the answer! At least you add a little colour and humour to the elections, it's just frustrating that Elvis loves Pets adds even more.
yes they are even the TUSC board are to, and where as it got us, it got right back to the nearly the Victorian times, less money longer working hours poorer working conditions, why because they are controlled by the same people. having 2 partys doing nearly the same is not good for the majority.
good thing about things are slowly changing just a shame that the UK will lag behind instead of leading
[quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: The ordinary people on the streets have very few friends in Government both local and national, What are Labour, Greens and others partys really doing about fighting for what is right nothing they are helping the government out, oh you get the few sound bites but no fight in them, like Labour had this Government over a barrel 3 times and 3 times they back away so a vote of no confidence would not happen. And what about the TUC they should of called for a General Strike a number of times by now but they have not oh they had a few demo's when its been force on them and few minor strikes. thing should of never have got as far as they have done, more so with this weak Government. Hope you reading this Ian you know what I am getting at.[/p][/quote]I think Labour felt they'd need to have a few policies to offer the electorate before they triggered an election with a no confidence motion. And maybe the unions are a bit wiser than they used to be and recognise they're supposed to be in the business of helping their members not pushing them out of the trenches to be slaughtered in a General Strike on behalf of a party with nothing to offer except Rent Acts, Rationing and No Referendum.[/p][/quote]And they still have no real policy apart from offering the same as the Torys[/p][/quote]The two largest political groups with years of experience between them are singing off the same hymn sheet, but an obscure fringe party that can't scrape together a tiny part of one per cent of any vote claims that they have the answer! At least you add a little colour and humour to the elections, it's just frustrating that Elvis loves Pets adds even more.[/p][/quote]yes they are even the TUSC board are to, and where as it got us, it got right back to the nearly the Victorian times, less money longer working hours poorer working conditions, why because they are controlled by the same people. having 2 partys doing nearly the same is not good for the majority. good thing about things are slowly changing just a shame that the UK will lag behind instead of leading southy
  • Score: -4

3:32am Thu 12 Jun 14

Dai Rear says...

fairdinkum wrote:
It's all part of a Tory strategy to reduce public investment in education. It's an incredibly shortsighted policy as without investment in training how can we compete in the globalised economy?. Having slashed public services for the past few years to balance the books after public funds were used to bail out the bankers in 2008-9, there will undoubtedly be a tax giveaway before the next election in the hope that people will be persuaded to vote them back in to do more damage. Meanwhile, the next generation suffers.
I think your fears for the public sector are a little premature. It's still alive and well and looking after its employees better than ever before. But I do love the "investment" bit. Don't worry that places like Singapore achieve better for far less, the share of our taxes spent by the public sector on itself ain't reducing any time soon.
[quote][p][bold]fairdinkum[/bold] wrote: It's all part of a Tory strategy to reduce public investment in education. It's an incredibly shortsighted policy as without investment in training how can we compete in the globalised economy?. Having slashed public services for the past few years to balance the books after public funds were used to bail out the bankers in 2008-9, there will undoubtedly be a tax giveaway before the next election in the hope that people will be persuaded to vote them back in to do more damage. Meanwhile, the next generation suffers.[/p][/quote]I think your fears for the public sector are a little premature. It's still alive and well and looking after its employees better than ever before. But I do love the "investment" bit. Don't worry that places like Singapore achieve better for far less, the share of our taxes spent by the public sector on itself ain't reducing any time soon. Dai Rear
  • Score: 2

9:35am Thu 12 Jun 14

Torchie1 says...

southy wrote:
Torchie1 wrote:
southy wrote:
Dai Rear wrote:
southy wrote:
The ordinary people on the streets have very few friends in Government both local and national, What are Labour, Greens and others partys really doing about fighting for what is right nothing they are helping the government out, oh you get the few sound bites but no fight in them, like Labour had this Government over a barrel 3 times and 3 times they back away so a vote of no confidence would not happen.
And what about the TUC they should of called for a General Strike a number of times by now but they have not oh they had a few demo's when its been force on them and few minor strikes. thing should of never have got as far as they have done, more so with this weak Government.
Hope you reading this Ian you know what I am getting at.
I think Labour felt they'd need to have a few policies to offer the electorate before they triggered an election with a no confidence motion. And maybe the unions are a bit wiser than they used to be and recognise they're supposed to be in the business of helping their members not pushing them out of the trenches to be slaughtered in a General Strike on behalf of a party with nothing to offer except Rent Acts, Rationing and No Referendum.
And they still have no real policy apart from offering the same as the Torys
The two largest political groups with years of experience between them are singing off the same hymn sheet, but an obscure fringe party that can't scrape together a tiny part of one per cent of any vote claims that they have the answer! At least you add a little colour and humour to the elections, it's just frustrating that Elvis loves Pets adds even more.
yes they are even the TUSC board are to, and where as it got us, it got right back to the nearly the Victorian times, less money longer working hours poorer working conditions, why because they are controlled by the same people. having 2 partys doing nearly the same is not good for the majority.
good thing about things are slowly changing just a shame that the UK will lag behind instead of leading
It seems that you are a voice in the wilderness who's message is diametrically opposed to the rest of the country. Have you considered joining forces with other lonely warriors out there looking for warm bodies to huddle up next to?
http://theflatearths
ociety.org/cms/
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: The ordinary people on the streets have very few friends in Government both local and national, What are Labour, Greens and others partys really doing about fighting for what is right nothing they are helping the government out, oh you get the few sound bites but no fight in them, like Labour had this Government over a barrel 3 times and 3 times they back away so a vote of no confidence would not happen. And what about the TUC they should of called for a General Strike a number of times by now but they have not oh they had a few demo's when its been force on them and few minor strikes. thing should of never have got as far as they have done, more so with this weak Government. Hope you reading this Ian you know what I am getting at.[/p][/quote]I think Labour felt they'd need to have a few policies to offer the electorate before they triggered an election with a no confidence motion. And maybe the unions are a bit wiser than they used to be and recognise they're supposed to be in the business of helping their members not pushing them out of the trenches to be slaughtered in a General Strike on behalf of a party with nothing to offer except Rent Acts, Rationing and No Referendum.[/p][/quote]And they still have no real policy apart from offering the same as the Torys[/p][/quote]The two largest political groups with years of experience between them are singing off the same hymn sheet, but an obscure fringe party that can't scrape together a tiny part of one per cent of any vote claims that they have the answer! At least you add a little colour and humour to the elections, it's just frustrating that Elvis loves Pets adds even more.[/p][/quote]yes they are even the TUSC board are to, and where as it got us, it got right back to the nearly the Victorian times, less money longer working hours poorer working conditions, why because they are controlled by the same people. having 2 partys doing nearly the same is not good for the majority. good thing about things are slowly changing just a shame that the UK will lag behind instead of leading[/p][/quote]It seems that you are a voice in the wilderness who's message is diametrically opposed to the rest of the country. Have you considered joining forces with other lonely warriors out there looking for warm bodies to huddle up next to? http://theflatearths ociety.org/cms/ Torchie1
  • Score: 5

12:38pm Mon 16 Jun 14

Re: Educ8 says...

Before I post a comment I think it is important to mention I have worked directly for 2 of the college mentioned in the above article, and have been an active member of The Association of Learning Providers in Hampshire & I.O.W. (ALPHI) for the last 12 years, having come into contact with or working with the vast majority of Colleges and Training Providers in the area during that time.

The reductions in funding (mentioned above) are simply to bring funding rates in line with schools, they are not really a cut and any member of a college senior management team would be lying if they say they were not given plenty of notice of the funding change.

There are many underlying reasons why colleges are now struggling financially (a few detailed below), particularly colleges in this area.

1) There are too many colleges in the area offering similar provision, the majority of colleges in this region rely heavily on school leavers to fill classes (supporting anything from 70-90% of the colleges overall income), it is vastly competitive, and with the push for more apprentices this has reduced the overall potential number of full time learners available for the competing colleges.

2) Limited flexibility, again this applies to the majority of colleges in the area. Believe it or not there are many successful colleges in the UK with no financial issues. Notability the majority rely on school leavers for 50% or less of their annual income. These colleges have diversified and collect income from non-funded sources. In the real business world this is how you survive after all. Collecting income from courses and projects that are not propped up by government funding, working closely with businesses and providing enterprising projects that bring in income such as hairdressing salons, restaurants, vehicle workshops are a good start, but when you consider the purpose of colleges are to prepare people for ultimately the world of work (be that preparing them for a career via university or by preparing them for the workplace after college) are college environments really providing experience of the workplace (work placements are few and far between and usually for a very short period, and are simulated environments really providing an insight into reality, some will say yes, some would say no).

3) Building programmes have had a dramatic effect on the image of colleges in and around the area, with every college being encouraged to put in a bid for a multi-million pound campus redevelopment with the promise that the majority would be paid for by the tax payer. No principal in their right mind would not apply, understand the competition between colleges to attract the school leavers, the flashier the campus the more likely they are to pick the college. It has left colleges with huge loans to pay back and with income falling its not hard to realise that these loan payments will further squeeze financial positions.

The reality is that the colleges locally need to come together, colaboration is the only way forward (and this has to be fair started already), sharing service resources (HR Managment, Financial Management, I.T. Management). Closing colleges but keeping campuses, mergers and acquisitions, shared Principle ships.

I recall a conversation with a well respected Partnership Manager who was at the time working for the Learning & Skills Agency, now split into The Education Funding Agency (The government quango who are responsible for education provision for under 19 year olds) and The Skills Funding Agency (The government quango who are responsible for education provision for adults), she outlined that the problem was that the number of colleges and private training providers in the local area was extremely high in comparison to similar areas and the idea of 2 possibly 3 super colleges in the area would be the governments preferred option. It does make you wonder if the has been a sinister agenda behind some of the decisions over the past 4-5 years in terms of contract negotiations, OfSted Inspections and the departure of several high profile, long serving Principals, perhaps they had predicted themselves what was about to happen?
Before I post a comment I think it is important to mention I have worked directly for 2 of the college mentioned in the above article, and have been an active member of The Association of Learning Providers in Hampshire & I.O.W. (ALPHI) for the last 12 years, having come into contact with or working with the vast majority of Colleges and Training Providers in the area during that time. The reductions in funding (mentioned above) are simply to bring funding rates in line with schools, they are not really a cut and any member of a college senior management team would be lying if they say they were not given plenty of notice of the funding change. There are many underlying reasons why colleges are now struggling financially (a few detailed below), particularly colleges in this area. 1) There are too many colleges in the area offering similar provision, the majority of colleges in this region rely heavily on school leavers to fill classes (supporting anything from 70-90% of the colleges overall income), it is vastly competitive, and with the push for more apprentices this has reduced the overall potential number of full time learners available for the competing colleges. 2) Limited flexibility, again this applies to the majority of colleges in the area. Believe it or not there are many successful colleges in the UK with no financial issues. Notability the majority rely on school leavers for 50% or less of their annual income. These colleges have diversified and collect income from non-funded sources. In the real business world this is how you survive after all. Collecting income from courses and projects that are not propped up by government funding, working closely with businesses and providing enterprising projects that bring in income such as hairdressing salons, restaurants, vehicle workshops are a good start, but when you consider the purpose of colleges are to prepare people for ultimately the world of work (be that preparing them for a career via university or by preparing them for the workplace after college) are college environments really providing experience of the workplace (work placements are few and far between and usually for a very short period, and are simulated environments really providing an insight into reality, some will say yes, some would say no). 3) Building programmes have had a dramatic effect on the image of colleges in and around the area, with every college being encouraged to put in a bid for a multi-million pound campus redevelopment with the promise that the majority would be paid for by the tax payer. No principal in their right mind would not apply, understand the competition between colleges to attract the school leavers, the flashier the campus the more likely they are to pick the college. It has left colleges with huge loans to pay back and with income falling its not hard to realise that these loan payments will further squeeze financial positions. The reality is that the colleges locally need to come together, colaboration is the only way forward (and this has to be fair started already), sharing service resources (HR Managment, Financial Management, I.T. Management). Closing colleges but keeping campuses, mergers and acquisitions, shared Principle ships. I recall a conversation with a well respected Partnership Manager who was at the time working for the Learning & Skills Agency, now split into The Education Funding Agency (The government quango who are responsible for education provision for under 19 year olds) and The Skills Funding Agency (The government quango who are responsible for education provision for adults), she outlined that the problem was that the number of colleges and private training providers in the local area was extremely high in comparison to similar areas and the idea of 2 possibly 3 super colleges in the area would be the governments preferred option. It does make you wonder if the has been a sinister agenda behind some of the decisions over the past 4-5 years in terms of contract negotiations, OfSted Inspections and the departure of several high profile, long serving Principals, perhaps they had predicted themselves what was about to happen? Re: Educ8
  • Score: 0

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