Eastleigh College students in art in design showcase

Daily Echo: Chelsea Emms work was inspired by a toothbrush Chelsea Emms work was inspired by a toothbrush

FROM a dog flap to help disabled mutts to artwork inspired by a mere toothbrush – talented youngsters gave an insight into the future of art, design and technology at their end of term showcase.

Students at Eastleigh College put on a display of their work as they prepare to start university or head out into the world of work.

Daily Echo:

  • Joshua Booth with his dog flap

Those on art, design and media studies courses opened an exhibition to the public, featuring a life-size construction of an attic, newspapers and photographs of people brushing teeth.

Former pupil and award-winning illustrator Nate Kitch, who was runner up in this year’s Creative Quarter 35 art and design awards, returned to the college to launch the event.

Daily Echo:

  • Bjorn Zimmerman with his art work

Course manager Dr Sebastiane Hegarty said: “We have some exceptional art students this year and all of our applying students are progressing to university, with almost half of these to the top London universities.

“It’s been an extremely rewarding year and the quality of this exhibition is a tribute to the ambition and imagination of our students.”

Daily Echo:

  • Michael Greaves with his training dummy

Meanwhile industry bosses judged manufacturing, motor vehicle and electronic engineering students on their work, which included an eco-house design, inductive heated bike clothing, breath test ignition kit and an automatic dog flap making going out easier for disabled pooches.

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5:30pm Sat 28 Jun 14

JohnSmith73340 says...

"The truth is that nobody has, in this matter, faced the fundamental problem; which is not so much the nature of Mr. Epstein’s sculpture as the nature of any sculpture.

Sculpture is normally a public and monumental art; and the real question raised is whether any art can be public or ornamental. Granted that any artist may have a conviction that he is right, the question still remains: why should he stick it up in stone to be stared at by all the people who are certain to think he is wrong?

The truth is that the whole conception of a public monument comes down to us from times when men did not feel this immense distance between the craftsman and the crowd. If they had, they would never have set the craftsman to work solely for the crowd. In that case there would never have been any such trifles as the Parthenon or the Cathedral of Seville, let alone the more important products of the modern artists of the moment.

...It is quite true that Michelangelo knew his sculpture was all right, and would have maintained it against any rivals who should have said it was all wrong. But it is not true (and this is where the modern row begins) that even the populace regarded Michelangelo’s figure, with its bowed head and somnolent profile, as a sort of monster or merely a joke. If they thought about it, they thought it was all right, only they did not understand how right. There was not present that sharp, angry, popular feeling that it was all wrong. In other words, there was for some reason or other a community of feeling between the sculptor and the spectator, which may, in a very exact significance, be called common sense."
- G.K. Chesterton
"The truth is that nobody has, in this matter, faced the fundamental problem; which is not so much the nature of Mr. Epstein’s sculpture as the nature of any sculpture. Sculpture is normally a public and monumental art; and the real question raised is whether any art can be public or ornamental. Granted that any artist may have a conviction that he is right, the question still remains: why should he stick it up in stone to be stared at by all the people who are certain to think he is wrong? The truth is that the whole conception of a public monument comes down to us from times when men did not feel this immense distance between the craftsman and the crowd. If they had, they would never have set the craftsman to work solely for the crowd. In that case there would never have been any such trifles as the Parthenon or the Cathedral of Seville, let alone the more important products of the modern artists of the moment. ...It is quite true that Michelangelo knew his sculpture was all right, and would have maintained it against any rivals who should have said it was all wrong. But it is not true (and this is where the modern row begins) that even the populace regarded Michelangelo’s figure, with its bowed head and somnolent profile, as a sort of monster or merely a joke. If they thought about it, they thought it was all right, only they did not understand how right. There was not present that sharp, angry, popular feeling that it was all wrong. In other words, there was for some reason or other a community of feeling between the sculptor and the spectator, which may, in a very exact significance, be called common sense." - G.K. Chesterton JohnSmith73340
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