Slump in affordable home builds in Hampshire continues

Daily Echo: These affordable homes in the Meon Valley were among just 840 built in Hampshire last year These affordable homes in the Meon Valley were among just 840 built in Hampshire last year

HOUSEBUILDING is still in a slump in Hampshire, the Daily Echo can reveal.

The number of “affordable homes” being built fell from 1,940 in the year the Coalition came to power to 840 last year – a fall of 57 per cent.

In Southampton, 240 cheaper properties were completed in 2013-14, down 53 per cent on the 510 built in 2010-11.

It is a similar story in Fareham (down from 170 to 40), Test Valley (down from 240 to 120) and Winchester (down from 130 to 90).

The Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) has claimed its record on affordable housing since 2010 was a “clear success story”.

It trumpeted that nearly 200,000 such homes – available at lower rents or for shared ownership – had been built, including 1,330 in Southampton.

But figures seen by the Daily Echo show that means only 240 were completed in 2013-14, which in turn means the annual tally is still falling.

In 2012-13, 270 were completed in Southampton, itself less than the 310 built in 2011-12 and the 510 in the general election year.

In fact, 240 is the lowest annual total for more than a decade, stretching back to the 160 built in the city in 2001-02.

Ministers were sharply criticised for axing many housing programmes when they came to power, causing the number of completions to drop dramatically.

Meanwhile, local councils remain barred from borrowing money to build homes, as the Government relies on the private sector to step in.

The issue is rising up the political agenda in places such as Southampton, where there are 15,000 people on the housing waiting list.

Emma Reynolds, for Labour, said: “We have repeatedly called for action on housing supply, particularly on the need for more affordable homes, but this government has failed to act.

“Under David Cameron, the number of homes built has fallen to the lowest level in peacetime since the 1920s.”

But Kris Hopkins, the housing minister said: “Our affordable house-building efforts are a clear success story, with nearly 200,000 new affordable homes delivered since April 2010.

“It means families have new homes available to them, whether to rent at an affordable rate or to buy through our shared ownership schemes.”

Across England, 41,654 affordable homes were built last year – well down on the 53,172 in the year before the last general election.

Comments (17)

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6:49am Mon 30 Jun 14

Dai Rear says...

Has anyone calculated the number of public housing starts that would have been necessary just to accommodate the immigration flood admitted to the UK between 1997 and 2010?
Has anyone calculated the number of public housing starts that would have been necessary just to accommodate the immigration flood admitted to the UK between 1997 and 2010? Dai Rear
  • Score: 9

7:06am Mon 30 Jun 14

jonone says...

Dai Rear wrote:
Has anyone calculated the number of public housing starts that would have been necessary just to accommodate the immigration flood admitted to the UK between 1997 and 2010?
No, most immigrants have either bought or rented privately, contrary to far right opinion.
[quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: Has anyone calculated the number of public housing starts that would have been necessary just to accommodate the immigration flood admitted to the UK between 1997 and 2010?[/p][/quote]No, most immigrants have either bought or rented privately, contrary to far right opinion. jonone
  • Score: -5

7:38am Mon 30 Jun 14

Linesman says...

Dai Rear wrote:
Has anyone calculated the number of public housing starts that would have been necessary just to accommodate the immigration flood admitted to the UK between 1997 and 2010?
There is always someone who wants to introduce the racial theme.

I bet you voted UKIP.
[quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: Has anyone calculated the number of public housing starts that would have been necessary just to accommodate the immigration flood admitted to the UK between 1997 and 2010?[/p][/quote]There is always someone who wants to introduce the racial theme. I bet you voted UKIP. Linesman
  • Score: -7

7:38am Mon 30 Jun 14

Linesman says...

Dai Rear wrote:
Has anyone calculated the number of public housing starts that would have been necessary just to accommodate the immigration flood admitted to the UK between 1997 and 2010?
There is always someone who wants to introduce the racial theme.

I bet you voted UKIP.
[quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: Has anyone calculated the number of public housing starts that would have been necessary just to accommodate the immigration flood admitted to the UK between 1997 and 2010?[/p][/quote]There is always someone who wants to introduce the racial theme. I bet you voted UKIP. Linesman
  • Score: -5

7:45am Mon 30 Jun 14

jen1 says...

Linesman wrote:
Dai Rear wrote:
Has anyone calculated the number of public housing starts that would have been necessary just to accommodate the immigration flood admitted to the UK between 1997 and 2010?
There is always someone who wants to introduce the racial theme.

I bet you voted UKIP.
I don't see any mention of race in the post you quoted. It seems it's you that has decided to play the race card. Immigration is a valid point and a very good reason why we are so short of jobs, homes and everything else.
[quote][p][bold]Linesman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: Has anyone calculated the number of public housing starts that would have been necessary just to accommodate the immigration flood admitted to the UK between 1997 and 2010?[/p][/quote]There is always someone who wants to introduce the racial theme. I bet you voted UKIP.[/p][/quote]I don't see any mention of race in the post you quoted. It seems it's you that has decided to play the race card. Immigration is a valid point and a very good reason why we are so short of jobs, homes and everything else. jen1
  • Score: 13

7:47am Mon 30 Jun 14

jen1 says...

jonone wrote:
Dai Rear wrote:
Has anyone calculated the number of public housing starts that would have been necessary just to accommodate the immigration flood admitted to the UK between 1997 and 2010?
No, most immigrants have either bought or rented privately, contrary to far right opinion.
Thus increasing the housing shortage. It doesn't matter whether they rent privately or buy property. They are still using them up.
[quote][p][bold]jonone[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: Has anyone calculated the number of public housing starts that would have been necessary just to accommodate the immigration flood admitted to the UK between 1997 and 2010?[/p][/quote]No, most immigrants have either bought or rented privately, contrary to far right opinion.[/p][/quote]Thus increasing the housing shortage. It doesn't matter whether they rent privately or buy property. They are still using them up. jen1
  • Score: 11

9:05am Mon 30 Jun 14

Dai Rear says...

jonone wrote:
Dai Rear wrote:
Has anyone calculated the number of public housing starts that would have been necessary just to accommodate the immigration flood admitted to the UK between 1997 and 2010?
No, most immigrants have either bought or rented privately, contrary to far right opinion.
And you can guarantee that every single one of the 15000 on the Southampton public housing list is a native of this country, can you? The far left says "let 'em all in", so it's a bit hypocritical for them then to whinge about us not being able to accommodate the rest of the world in our little island.
[quote][p][bold]jonone[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: Has anyone calculated the number of public housing starts that would have been necessary just to accommodate the immigration flood admitted to the UK between 1997 and 2010?[/p][/quote]No, most immigrants have either bought or rented privately, contrary to far right opinion.[/p][/quote]And you can guarantee that every single one of the 15000 on the Southampton public housing list is a native of this country, can you? The far left says "let 'em all in", so it's a bit hypocritical for them then to whinge about us not being able to accommodate the rest of the world in our little island. Dai Rear
  • Score: -2

9:14am Mon 30 Jun 14

Dai Rear says...

Linesman wrote:
Dai Rear wrote:
Has anyone calculated the number of public housing starts that would have been necessary just to accommodate the immigration flood admitted to the UK between 1997 and 2010?
There is always someone who wants to introduce the racial theme.

I bet you voted UKIP.
I'll vote for any party that displays sanity on the issue of immigration. I will concede that, given Labour's appalling record on the subject 1997-2010 and its refusal to countenance a referendum as to whether we should continue to admit millions from the EU, soon to include Albania, Turkey and all points east, I would be surprised to find myself voting for that lot any time soon. I'm non-plussed actually as to anyone voting for them, but maybe you genuinely believe in open door immigration. As to the "racial" thing, because Labour's appalling criminal legislation confused in a fundamentally inane way, nationality and race doesn't mean to say you've got to. I wouldn't insult anyone by suggesting they've got as little sense as David Blunkett.
[quote][p][bold]Linesman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: Has anyone calculated the number of public housing starts that would have been necessary just to accommodate the immigration flood admitted to the UK between 1997 and 2010?[/p][/quote]There is always someone who wants to introduce the racial theme. I bet you voted UKIP.[/p][/quote]I'll vote for any party that displays sanity on the issue of immigration. I will concede that, given Labour's appalling record on the subject 1997-2010 and its refusal to countenance a referendum as to whether we should continue to admit millions from the EU, soon to include Albania, Turkey and all points east, I would be surprised to find myself voting for that lot any time soon. I'm non-plussed actually as to anyone voting for them, but maybe you genuinely believe in open door immigration. As to the "racial" thing, because Labour's appalling criminal legislation confused in a fundamentally inane way, nationality and race doesn't mean to say you've got to. I wouldn't insult anyone by suggesting they've got as little sense as David Blunkett. Dai Rear
  • Score: 4

9:47am Mon 30 Jun 14

derek james says...

Dai Rear wrote:
Has anyone calculated the number of public housing starts that would have been necessary just to accommodate the immigration flood admitted to the UK between 1997 and 2010?
i do believe that 40% of new housing is needed just to keep pace with immigration
[quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: Has anyone calculated the number of public housing starts that would have been necessary just to accommodate the immigration flood admitted to the UK between 1997 and 2010?[/p][/quote]i do believe that 40% of new housing is needed just to keep pace with immigration derek james
  • Score: -1

11:32am Mon 30 Jun 14

Tony S says...

The lowest priced new build 3 bed home near me is £180,000
Yet there are preowned 3 bed houses at £140,000. And they have gardens!
The lowest priced new build 3 bed home near me is £180,000 Yet there are preowned 3 bed houses at £140,000. And they have gardens! Tony S
  • Score: 0

11:33am Mon 30 Jun 14

southy says...

jen1 wrote:
Linesman wrote:
Dai Rear wrote:
Has anyone calculated the number of public housing starts that would have been necessary just to accommodate the immigration flood admitted to the UK between 1997 and 2010?
There is always someone who wants to introduce the racial theme.

I bet you voted UKIP.
I don't see any mention of race in the post you quoted. It seems it's you that has decided to play the race card. Immigration is a valid point and a very good reason why we are so short of jobs, homes and everything else.
The moment the word immigration is used

Asians are our biggest influx of immigrats, and the biggest bulk of these are students who come here for up to 5 years before returning home, out of the EU the French are the biggest influx, They tend to come here for a high number of years some even staying and its not like how the Far Right Wing like UKIP or BNP would have you to believe, if we believe the numbers that UKIP and BNP said would come it would leave those 3 countrys with a very low population that it could not surrivive
[quote][p][bold]jen1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Linesman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: Has anyone calculated the number of public housing starts that would have been necessary just to accommodate the immigration flood admitted to the UK between 1997 and 2010?[/p][/quote]There is always someone who wants to introduce the racial theme. I bet you voted UKIP.[/p][/quote]I don't see any mention of race in the post you quoted. It seems it's you that has decided to play the race card. Immigration is a valid point and a very good reason why we are so short of jobs, homes and everything else.[/p][/quote]The moment the word immigration is used Asians are our biggest influx of immigrats, and the biggest bulk of these are students who come here for up to 5 years before returning home, out of the EU the French are the biggest influx, They tend to come here for a high number of years some even staying and its not like how the Far Right Wing like UKIP or BNP would have you to believe, if we believe the numbers that UKIP and BNP said would come it would leave those 3 countrys with a very low population that it could not surrivive southy
  • Score: -6

11:34am Mon 30 Jun 14

southy says...

As for this article I say keep building drive the house price down
As for this article I say keep building drive the house price down southy
  • Score: -1

12:03pm Mon 30 Jun 14

Tony Blair's Accountant says...

derek james wrote:
Dai Rear wrote:
Has anyone calculated the number of public housing starts that would have been necessary just to accommodate the immigration flood admitted to the UK between 1997 and 2010?
i do believe that 40% of new housing is needed just to keep pace with immigration
That's about right.

Net immigration is 210,000 every year. We build 140,000 flats and houses a year.
On average 3 people occupy each dwelling. So we're housing 420,000 a year, half of whom are new arrivals.

( Not quite sure how those facts are racist.)
[quote][p][bold]derek james[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: Has anyone calculated the number of public housing starts that would have been necessary just to accommodate the immigration flood admitted to the UK between 1997 and 2010?[/p][/quote]i do believe that 40% of new housing is needed just to keep pace with immigration[/p][/quote]That's about right. Net immigration is 210,000 every year. We build 140,000 flats and houses a year. On average 3 people occupy each dwelling. So we're housing 420,000 a year, half of whom are new arrivals. ( Not quite sure how those facts are racist.) Tony Blair's Accountant
  • Score: 2

12:04pm Mon 30 Jun 14

garlic says...

Not really anything to do with immigration. More to do with a general housing crisis. There's not enough affordable housing, but there's not enough housing full stop. The culture of treating homes as investment properties instead of as homes which people NEED for living in. The government is keen to keep property prices increasing unsustainably high to the benefit of those who own property and the detriment of everybody else. If one or more simple measures were put in place to reduce the rate at which house prices increased and the increase was in line with say the increase in wages, then those who own property still have a house to live and an asset which increases in value year on year, and those who don't are able to rent or buy homes at a reasonable price.

Big property developers who dominate house building are happy to just sit on empty land with the promise of building homes in the future, when they'll be worth 10, 20, 30, 40, 50+ percent more than now.
Not really anything to do with immigration. More to do with a general housing crisis. There's not enough affordable housing, but there's not enough housing full stop. The culture of treating homes as investment properties instead of as homes which people NEED for living in. The government is keen to keep property prices increasing unsustainably high to the benefit of those who own property and the detriment of everybody else. If one or more simple measures were put in place to reduce the rate at which house prices increased and the increase was in line with say the increase in wages, then those who own property still have a house to live and an asset which increases in value year on year, and those who don't are able to rent or buy homes at a reasonable price. Big property developers who dominate house building are happy to just sit on empty land with the promise of building homes in the future, when they'll be worth 10, 20, 30, 40, 50+ percent more than now. garlic
  • Score: 5

2:00pm Mon 30 Jun 14

jonone says...

jen1 wrote:
jonone wrote:
Dai Rear wrote: Has anyone calculated the number of public housing starts that would have been necessary just to accommodate the immigration flood admitted to the UK between 1997 and 2010?
No, most immigrants have either bought or rented privately, contrary to far right opinion.
Thus increasing the housing shortage. It doesn't matter whether they rent privately or buy property. They are still using them up.
But paying fully, without recourse to the public purse.

I have 3 families of immigrants living one side of me, both work full time and have bought their houses and have produced between them 4 children.

One the other side are 3 white British families, who all work in part time, enjoy taxpayer subsidised rental property that they can treat as their own and between them have produced 12 children.

You tell me who the biggest drain on housing and society (now AND in the future) is?
[quote][p][bold]jen1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jonone[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: Has anyone calculated the number of public housing starts that would have been necessary just to accommodate the immigration flood admitted to the UK between 1997 and 2010?[/p][/quote]No, most immigrants have either bought or rented privately, contrary to far right opinion.[/p][/quote]Thus increasing the housing shortage. It doesn't matter whether they rent privately or buy property. They are still using them up.[/p][/quote]But paying fully, without recourse to the public purse. I have 3 families of immigrants living one side of me, both work full time and have bought their houses and have produced between them 4 children. One the other side are 3 white British families, who all work in part time, enjoy taxpayer subsidised rental property that they can treat as their own and between them have produced 12 children. You tell me who the biggest drain on housing and society (now AND in the future) is? jonone
  • Score: 0

5:09pm Mon 30 Jun 14

wilson castaway says...

The problem with 'affordable' homes is that actually, they are not that affordable.Usually they cost more.As a working family we applied for an affordable home and were refused as we didn't earn enough!
The problem with 'affordable' homes is that actually, they are not that affordable.Usually they cost more.As a working family we applied for an affordable home and were refused as we didn't earn enough! wilson castaway
  • Score: 2

5:14pm Mon 30 Jun 14

Bwaltham30 says...

Cambridge dictionary definition:

B2 the act of someone coming to live in a different country :
There are strict limits on immigration (into the country ).

No where does this word stake claims to racism nor is classed as a racist word, and is used by government everyday. It is true that clearly given a higher number of people that more housing is needed and immigration makes us require even more, simply mathematics not racism
Cambridge dictionary definition: B2 the act of someone coming to live in a different country : There are strict limits on immigration (into the country ). No where does this word stake claims to racism nor is classed as a racist word, and is used by government everyday. It is true that clearly given a higher number of people that more housing is needed and immigration makes us require even more, simply mathematics not racism Bwaltham30
  • Score: 3
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