Officer cadets from Southampton ignore travel warning to help Kenya education project

Daily Echo: Cadets ready for Kenya charity mission Cadets ready for Kenya charity mission

A GROUP of Southampton officer cadets will be travelling to Kenya to help the community.

The team is going to the country to improve children’s access to education.

And although the Government is currently advising British tourists not to travel to Kenya because of terrorism threats, the group is determined to go.

It is a trip which was inspired by fellow cadet Quinn Sorabjee who is based in Loughborough but grew up in Naivasha – a Nakuru market town.

Five members of the Thunderer Squadron at the National Oceonography Centre in Southampton will be making the journey.

First year University of Southampton computer science students Todd Lynes and Chris Argles, both 19 from Swaythling will be joining civil engineering student Rosey Burchell, 19 from Bassett for the adventure.

Also venturing out to Kenya will be second year environmental sciences student Hannah Kirkham, 20, from Portswood and Gary Chivers, 21 from Portswood who is in his third year studying mechanical engineering.

The officer cadets are all part of an undergraduate scheme called the Defence Technical Officer and Engineer Entry Scheme (DTOEES) encouraging young people to join the military and there are four squadrons set up in universities across the UK.

After university Todd plans to join the RAF, Rosey and Hannah want to join the Armed Forces and Gary and Chris want to join the Navy, so this trip will be the perfect opportunity for them to develop adventure skills and understand the varied culture.

They will set off in July and spend three weeks buiding facilities at a primary school, including a sanitation centre and volleyball shelter as well as visiting a conservancy which is the largest home for black rhinos in East Africa.

The students are now rallying support in Hampshire after being tasked with raising a minimum of £500 each for the Nakuru Children’s Project and the Tusk Trust Sanctuary.

Hannah said: “We are excited to learn about the different cultures and can’t wait to get involved with the community out there.We have never really been outside of Europe.”

Todd added: “The Commonwealth Office has advised us not to travel along the east coast near Mombasa. Nakuru is very central – we’re talking hundreds and hundreds of miles away from the coast, so we are all very keen to go ahead. All the money we raise will go straight to the charities and having all done fundraising work before it will be really rewarding to see how it helps.”

Comments (16)

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10:24am Sun 6 Jul 14

Dai Rear says...

On the one hand it's great to see decent youngsters doing their bit. On the other, I'm not too sure how , for example, Londoners would feel about a group of young Kenyans arriving in Finchley to " improve children’s access to education. "
On the one hand it's great to see decent youngsters doing their bit. On the other, I'm not too sure how , for example, Londoners would feel about a group of young Kenyans arriving in Finchley to " improve children’s access to education. " Dai Rear
  • Score: 1

11:25am Sun 6 Jul 14

cliffwalker says...

Dai Rear wrote:
On the one hand it's great to see decent youngsters doing their bit. On the other, I'm not too sure how , for example, Londoners would feel about a group of young Kenyans arriving in Finchley to " improve children’s access to education. "
I don't think that analogy is quite relevant. The levels of wealth and education standards in the two territories are not equal or anywhere near it.
Of more concern is whether these young cadets have received appropriate advice from their supervisors in relation to the risks compared with the value of their work (to the children and to themselves) in Kenya.
[quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: On the one hand it's great to see decent youngsters doing their bit. On the other, I'm not too sure how , for example, Londoners would feel about a group of young Kenyans arriving in Finchley to " improve children’s access to education. "[/p][/quote]I don't think that analogy is quite relevant. The levels of wealth and education standards in the two territories are not equal or anywhere near it. Of more concern is whether these young cadets have received appropriate advice from their supervisors in relation to the risks compared with the value of their work (to the children and to themselves) in Kenya. cliffwalker
  • Score: 9

11:29am Sun 6 Jul 14

burgerboy says...

The next story will read"please foreign office can you get our children out as they have been kidnapped"..........
....
The next story will read"please foreign office can you get our children out as they have been kidnapped".......... .... burgerboy
  • Score: 18

12:05pm Sun 6 Jul 14

Dai Rear says...

cliffwalker wrote:
Dai Rear wrote:
On the one hand it's great to see decent youngsters doing their bit. On the other, I'm not too sure how , for example, Londoners would feel about a group of young Kenyans arriving in Finchley to " improve children’s access to education. "
I don't think that analogy is quite relevant. The levels of wealth and education standards in the two territories are not equal or anywhere near it.
Of more concern is whether these young cadets have received appropriate advice from their supervisors in relation to the risks compared with the value of their work (to the children and to themselves) in Kenya.
They may very well not be, but I doubt whether the inhabitants of Bucharest, a place whose wealth and education is probably very similar to that of Kenya would welcome a visit. Is it not patronising to suppose that Kenyans cannot perfectly well do this for themselves if they wish to?
[quote][p][bold]cliffwalker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: On the one hand it's great to see decent youngsters doing their bit. On the other, I'm not too sure how , for example, Londoners would feel about a group of young Kenyans arriving in Finchley to " improve children’s access to education. "[/p][/quote]I don't think that analogy is quite relevant. The levels of wealth and education standards in the two territories are not equal or anywhere near it. Of more concern is whether these young cadets have received appropriate advice from their supervisors in relation to the risks compared with the value of their work (to the children and to themselves) in Kenya.[/p][/quote]They may very well not be, but I doubt whether the inhabitants of Bucharest, a place whose wealth and education is probably very similar to that of Kenya would welcome a visit. Is it not patronising to suppose that Kenyans cannot perfectly well do this for themselves if they wish to? Dai Rear
  • Score: 0

12:35pm Sun 6 Jul 14

magssoton says...

burgerboy wrote:
The next story will read"please foreign office can you get our children out as they have been kidnapped"..........

....
or worse.
i admire them completely but why would they want to risk their own safety if the government advises against going ?
[quote][p][bold]burgerboy[/bold] wrote: The next story will read"please foreign office can you get our children out as they have been kidnapped".......... ....[/p][/quote]or worse. i admire them completely but why would they want to risk their own safety if the government advises against going ? magssoton
  • Score: 10

12:42pm Sun 6 Jul 14

southampton999 says...

Dai Rear wrote:
cliffwalker wrote:
Dai Rear wrote:
On the one hand it's great to see decent youngsters doing their bit. On the other, I'm not too sure how , for example, Londoners would feel about a group of young Kenyans arriving in Finchley to " improve children’s access to education. "
I don't think that analogy is quite relevant. The levels of wealth and education standards in the two territories are not equal or anywhere near it.
Of more concern is whether these young cadets have received appropriate advice from their supervisors in relation to the risks compared with the value of their work (to the children and to themselves) in Kenya.
They may very well not be, but I doubt whether the inhabitants of Bucharest, a place whose wealth and education is probably very similar to that of Kenya would welcome a visit. Is it not patronising to suppose that Kenyans cannot perfectly well do this for themselves if they wish to?
Having owned a business employing over 100 people in Bucharest and having also worked in Kenya I think you will find that Bucharest is probably much closer to the uk in wealth and education than Kenya. In fact educationally I would say ahead of the uk.
[quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cliffwalker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: On the one hand it's great to see decent youngsters doing their bit. On the other, I'm not too sure how , for example, Londoners would feel about a group of young Kenyans arriving in Finchley to " improve children’s access to education. "[/p][/quote]I don't think that analogy is quite relevant. The levels of wealth and education standards in the two territories are not equal or anywhere near it. Of more concern is whether these young cadets have received appropriate advice from their supervisors in relation to the risks compared with the value of their work (to the children and to themselves) in Kenya.[/p][/quote]They may very well not be, but I doubt whether the inhabitants of Bucharest, a place whose wealth and education is probably very similar to that of Kenya would welcome a visit. Is it not patronising to suppose that Kenyans cannot perfectly well do this for themselves if they wish to?[/p][/quote]Having owned a business employing over 100 people in Bucharest and having also worked in Kenya I think you will find that Bucharest is probably much closer to the uk in wealth and education than Kenya. In fact educationally I would say ahead of the uk. southampton999
  • Score: 4

1:10pm Sun 6 Jul 14

southy says...

southampton999 wrote:
Dai Rear wrote:
cliffwalker wrote:
Dai Rear wrote:
On the one hand it's great to see decent youngsters doing their bit. On the other, I'm not too sure how , for example, Londoners would feel about a group of young Kenyans arriving in Finchley to " improve children’s access to education. "
I don't think that analogy is quite relevant. The levels of wealth and education standards in the two territories are not equal or anywhere near it.
Of more concern is whether these young cadets have received appropriate advice from their supervisors in relation to the risks compared with the value of their work (to the children and to themselves) in Kenya.
They may very well not be, but I doubt whether the inhabitants of Bucharest, a place whose wealth and education is probably very similar to that of Kenya would welcome a visit. Is it not patronising to suppose that Kenyans cannot perfectly well do this for themselves if they wish to?
Having owned a business employing over 100 people in Bucharest and having also worked in Kenya I think you will find that Bucharest is probably much closer to the uk in wealth and education than Kenya. In fact educationally I would say ahead of the uk.
Was going to point out the same thing, also the people are more likely to protect there system more so than we have to date, The Romanians took to the Streets and bought down there Government when they tried to privatise the country Health and Weathfare system
[quote][p][bold]southampton999[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cliffwalker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: On the one hand it's great to see decent youngsters doing their bit. On the other, I'm not too sure how , for example, Londoners would feel about a group of young Kenyans arriving in Finchley to " improve children’s access to education. "[/p][/quote]I don't think that analogy is quite relevant. The levels of wealth and education standards in the two territories are not equal or anywhere near it. Of more concern is whether these young cadets have received appropriate advice from their supervisors in relation to the risks compared with the value of their work (to the children and to themselves) in Kenya.[/p][/quote]They may very well not be, but I doubt whether the inhabitants of Bucharest, a place whose wealth and education is probably very similar to that of Kenya would welcome a visit. Is it not patronising to suppose that Kenyans cannot perfectly well do this for themselves if they wish to?[/p][/quote]Having owned a business employing over 100 people in Bucharest and having also worked in Kenya I think you will find that Bucharest is probably much closer to the uk in wealth and education than Kenya. In fact educationally I would say ahead of the uk.[/p][/quote]Was going to point out the same thing, also the people are more likely to protect there system more so than we have to date, The Romanians took to the Streets and bought down there Government when they tried to privatise the country Health and Weathfare system southy
  • Score: -7

1:22pm Sun 6 Jul 14

Shoong says...

southy wrote:
southampton999 wrote:
Dai Rear wrote:
cliffwalker wrote:
Dai Rear wrote:
On the one hand it's great to see decent youngsters doing their bit. On the other, I'm not too sure how , for example, Londoners would feel about a group of young Kenyans arriving in Finchley to " improve children’s access to education. "
I don't think that analogy is quite relevant. The levels of wealth and education standards in the two territories are not equal or anywhere near it.
Of more concern is whether these young cadets have received appropriate advice from their supervisors in relation to the risks compared with the value of their work (to the children and to themselves) in Kenya.
They may very well not be, but I doubt whether the inhabitants of Bucharest, a place whose wealth and education is probably very similar to that of Kenya would welcome a visit. Is it not patronising to suppose that Kenyans cannot perfectly well do this for themselves if they wish to?
Having owned a business employing over 100 people in Bucharest and having also worked in Kenya I think you will find that Bucharest is probably much closer to the uk in wealth and education than Kenya. In fact educationally I would say ahead of the uk.
Was going to point out the same thing, also the people are more likely to protect there system more so than we have to date, The Romanians took to the Streets and bought down there Government when they tried to privatise the country Health and Weathfare system
The relevance to the story being..?

I think the more rational of us will stick with elections, thanks.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southampton999[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cliffwalker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: On the one hand it's great to see decent youngsters doing their bit. On the other, I'm not too sure how , for example, Londoners would feel about a group of young Kenyans arriving in Finchley to " improve children’s access to education. "[/p][/quote]I don't think that analogy is quite relevant. The levels of wealth and education standards in the two territories are not equal or anywhere near it. Of more concern is whether these young cadets have received appropriate advice from their supervisors in relation to the risks compared with the value of their work (to the children and to themselves) in Kenya.[/p][/quote]They may very well not be, but I doubt whether the inhabitants of Bucharest, a place whose wealth and education is probably very similar to that of Kenya would welcome a visit. Is it not patronising to suppose that Kenyans cannot perfectly well do this for themselves if they wish to?[/p][/quote]Having owned a business employing over 100 people in Bucharest and having also worked in Kenya I think you will find that Bucharest is probably much closer to the uk in wealth and education than Kenya. In fact educationally I would say ahead of the uk.[/p][/quote]Was going to point out the same thing, also the people are more likely to protect there system more so than we have to date, The Romanians took to the Streets and bought down there Government when they tried to privatise the country Health and Weathfare system[/p][/quote]The relevance to the story being..? I think the more rational of us will stick with elections, thanks. Shoong
  • Score: 1

1:40pm Sun 6 Jul 14

amberchi3 says...

Sadly the current situation in Kenya has been very damaging for charities and tourism. Hotels are closing down, charities are struggling and the cost of living has risen. I currently run an orphanage out there and we have been hit hard.
These cadets can be highly commended for their bravery in embarking on this trip without fear. I suspect their Insurance is sky high too so they need support not criticism. Terrorism is everywhere and if we stop trying to help then it will be the end of humanity as we know it. It is our duty to help humanity. We cannot ignore the situation. The world is an unpredictable place right now but if live in fear then we are giving up. Good luck to you all!
Sadly the current situation in Kenya has been very damaging for charities and tourism. Hotels are closing down, charities are struggling and the cost of living has risen. I currently run an orphanage out there and we have been hit hard. These cadets can be highly commended for their bravery in embarking on this trip without fear. I suspect their Insurance is sky high too so they need support not criticism. Terrorism is everywhere and if we stop trying to help then it will be the end of humanity as we know it. It is our duty to help humanity. We cannot ignore the situation. The world is an unpredictable place right now but if live in fear then we are giving up. Good luck to you all! amberchi3
  • Score: -3

5:09pm Sun 6 Jul 14

Dai Rear says...

southampton999 wrote:
Dai Rear wrote:
cliffwalker wrote:
Dai Rear wrote:
On the one hand it's great to see decent youngsters doing their bit. On the other, I'm not too sure how , for example, Londoners would feel about a group of young Kenyans arriving in Finchley to " improve children’s access to education. "
I don't think that analogy is quite relevant. The levels of wealth and education standards in the two territories are not equal or anywhere near it.
Of more concern is whether these young cadets have received appropriate advice from their supervisors in relation to the risks compared with the value of their work (to the children and to themselves) in Kenya.
They may very well not be, but I doubt whether the inhabitants of Bucharest, a place whose wealth and education is probably very similar to that of Kenya would welcome a visit. Is it not patronising to suppose that Kenyans cannot perfectly well do this for themselves if they wish to?
Having owned a business employing over 100 people in Bucharest and having also worked in Kenya I think you will find that Bucharest is probably much closer to the uk in wealth and education than Kenya. In fact educationally I would say ahead of the uk.
OK then, Moldova? Albania? .Do you really not think that Kenyans are capable of doing the job themselves? I just don't want to be Bwana any more.
[quote][p][bold]southampton999[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cliffwalker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: On the one hand it's great to see decent youngsters doing their bit. On the other, I'm not too sure how , for example, Londoners would feel about a group of young Kenyans arriving in Finchley to " improve children’s access to education. "[/p][/quote]I don't think that analogy is quite relevant. The levels of wealth and education standards in the two territories are not equal or anywhere near it. Of more concern is whether these young cadets have received appropriate advice from their supervisors in relation to the risks compared with the value of their work (to the children and to themselves) in Kenya.[/p][/quote]They may very well not be, but I doubt whether the inhabitants of Bucharest, a place whose wealth and education is probably very similar to that of Kenya would welcome a visit. Is it not patronising to suppose that Kenyans cannot perfectly well do this for themselves if they wish to?[/p][/quote]Having owned a business employing over 100 people in Bucharest and having also worked in Kenya I think you will find that Bucharest is probably much closer to the uk in wealth and education than Kenya. In fact educationally I would say ahead of the uk.[/p][/quote]OK then, Moldova? Albania? .Do you really not think that Kenyans are capable of doing the job themselves? I just don't want to be Bwana any more. Dai Rear
  • Score: 1

6:06pm Sun 6 Jul 14

Turtlebay says...

There is a small area in the North East of Kenya that is a danger spot, that's all!

As for hotels closing down please list which ones? The main resort hotels are mostly closed now because it's the monsoon season, that's the only reason, because they have the long rains and the beaches are mostly covered in feet of seaweed.
There is a small area in the North East of Kenya that is a danger spot, that's all! As for hotels closing down please list which ones? The main resort hotels are mostly closed now because it's the monsoon season, that's the only reason, because they have the long rains and the beaches are mostly covered in feet of seaweed. Turtlebay
  • Score: -3

6:38pm Sun 6 Jul 14

Torchie1 says...

southy wrote:
southampton999 wrote:
Dai Rear wrote:
cliffwalker wrote:
Dai Rear wrote:
On the one hand it's great to see decent youngsters doing their bit. On the other, I'm not too sure how , for example, Londoners would feel about a group of young Kenyans arriving in Finchley to " improve children’s access to education. "
I don't think that analogy is quite relevant. The levels of wealth and education standards in the two territories are not equal or anywhere near it.
Of more concern is whether these young cadets have received appropriate advice from their supervisors in relation to the risks compared with the value of their work (to the children and to themselves) in Kenya.
They may very well not be, but I doubt whether the inhabitants of Bucharest, a place whose wealth and education is probably very similar to that of Kenya would welcome a visit. Is it not patronising to suppose that Kenyans cannot perfectly well do this for themselves if they wish to?
Having owned a business employing over 100 people in Bucharest and having also worked in Kenya I think you will find that Bucharest is probably much closer to the uk in wealth and education than Kenya. In fact educationally I would say ahead of the uk.
Was going to point out the same thing, also the people are more likely to protect there system more so than we have to date, The Romanians took to the Streets and bought down there Government when they tried to privatise the country Health and Weathfare system
When did this happen ? The option to find out for myself will be as good an admission as any that it never did but I' ll give you a chance to air your knowledge.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southampton999[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cliffwalker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: On the one hand it's great to see decent youngsters doing their bit. On the other, I'm not too sure how , for example, Londoners would feel about a group of young Kenyans arriving in Finchley to " improve children’s access to education. "[/p][/quote]I don't think that analogy is quite relevant. The levels of wealth and education standards in the two territories are not equal or anywhere near it. Of more concern is whether these young cadets have received appropriate advice from their supervisors in relation to the risks compared with the value of their work (to the children and to themselves) in Kenya.[/p][/quote]They may very well not be, but I doubt whether the inhabitants of Bucharest, a place whose wealth and education is probably very similar to that of Kenya would welcome a visit. Is it not patronising to suppose that Kenyans cannot perfectly well do this for themselves if they wish to?[/p][/quote]Having owned a business employing over 100 people in Bucharest and having also worked in Kenya I think you will find that Bucharest is probably much closer to the uk in wealth and education than Kenya. In fact educationally I would say ahead of the uk.[/p][/quote]Was going to point out the same thing, also the people are more likely to protect there system more so than we have to date, The Romanians took to the Streets and bought down there Government when they tried to privatise the country Health and Weathfare system[/p][/quote]When did this happen ? The option to find out for myself will be as good an admission as any that it never did but I' ll give you a chance to air your knowledge. Torchie1
  • Score: 2

6:49pm Sun 6 Jul 14

mickey01 says...

nice to see them smiling before the journey lets hope they are still smiling after
if it goes wrong i hope the connections (including the families ) will not be complaining about the safety as it has been reported for all to see
nice to see them smiling before the journey lets hope they are still smiling after if it goes wrong i hope the connections (including the families ) will not be complaining about the safety as it has been reported for all to see mickey01
  • Score: 2

7:18pm Sun 6 Jul 14

nemesis1066 says...

I hope the MoD reviews the applications of these misguided individuals.

Whilst having personnel who are willing to take risks is all part of the military lifestyle, to do so, without the correct support is stupidity. I wonder if they will disobey other advice when they are in the Military, or even have the ability to follow orders they don't agree with.

Finally, if I were going somewhere that has security problems like Kenya, then I wouldn't advertise it, or mention I am on officer cadet, or British etc.
I hope the poor individuals who get tasked to 'rescue' these citizens give them some appreciation.
Enough said!
I hope the MoD reviews the applications of these misguided individuals. Whilst having personnel who are willing to take risks is all part of the military lifestyle, to do so, without the correct support is stupidity. I wonder if they will disobey other advice when they are in the Military, or even have the ability to follow orders they don't agree with. Finally, if I were going somewhere that has security problems like Kenya, then I wouldn't advertise it, or mention I am on officer cadet, or British etc. I hope the poor individuals who get tasked to 'rescue' these citizens give them some appreciation. Enough said! nemesis1066
  • Score: 2

1:10am Mon 7 Jul 14

southy says...

Torchie1 wrote:
southy wrote:
southampton999 wrote:
Dai Rear wrote:
cliffwalker wrote:
Dai Rear wrote:
On the one hand it's great to see decent youngsters doing their bit. On the other, I'm not too sure how , for example, Londoners would feel about a group of young Kenyans arriving in Finchley to " improve children’s access to education. "
I don't think that analogy is quite relevant. The levels of wealth and education standards in the two territories are not equal or anywhere near it.
Of more concern is whether these young cadets have received appropriate advice from their supervisors in relation to the risks compared with the value of their work (to the children and to themselves) in Kenya.
They may very well not be, but I doubt whether the inhabitants of Bucharest, a place whose wealth and education is probably very similar to that of Kenya would welcome a visit. Is it not patronising to suppose that Kenyans cannot perfectly well do this for themselves if they wish to?
Having owned a business employing over 100 people in Bucharest and having also worked in Kenya I think you will find that Bucharest is probably much closer to the uk in wealth and education than Kenya. In fact educationally I would say ahead of the uk.
Was going to point out the same thing, also the people are more likely to protect there system more so than we have to date, The Romanians took to the Streets and bought down there Government when they tried to privatise the country Health and Weathfare system
When did this happen ? The option to find out for myself will be as good an admission as any that it never did but I' ll give you a chance to air your knowledge.
You was told at the time what was going on in Romania, i told you and others at the time it was taken place, It was part of the EU directive if Romania wanted in the EU
[quote][p][bold]Torchie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southampton999[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cliffwalker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: On the one hand it's great to see decent youngsters doing their bit. On the other, I'm not too sure how , for example, Londoners would feel about a group of young Kenyans arriving in Finchley to " improve children’s access to education. "[/p][/quote]I don't think that analogy is quite relevant. The levels of wealth and education standards in the two territories are not equal or anywhere near it. Of more concern is whether these young cadets have received appropriate advice from their supervisors in relation to the risks compared with the value of their work (to the children and to themselves) in Kenya.[/p][/quote]They may very well not be, but I doubt whether the inhabitants of Bucharest, a place whose wealth and education is probably very similar to that of Kenya would welcome a visit. Is it not patronising to suppose that Kenyans cannot perfectly well do this for themselves if they wish to?[/p][/quote]Having owned a business employing over 100 people in Bucharest and having also worked in Kenya I think you will find that Bucharest is probably much closer to the uk in wealth and education than Kenya. In fact educationally I would say ahead of the uk.[/p][/quote]Was going to point out the same thing, also the people are more likely to protect there system more so than we have to date, The Romanians took to the Streets and bought down there Government when they tried to privatise the country Health and Weathfare system[/p][/quote]When did this happen ? The option to find out for myself will be as good an admission as any that it never did but I' ll give you a chance to air your knowledge.[/p][/quote]You was told at the time what was going on in Romania, i told you and others at the time it was taken place, It was part of the EU directive if Romania wanted in the EU southy
  • Score: -2

1:12am Mon 7 Jul 14

southy says...

Off beat the IMF as some planed for this mth the 20th is the likely date
Off beat the IMF as some planed for this mth the 20th is the likely date southy
  • Score: -4
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