MP slams ministers for not hitting flood hit town

MP slams ministers for not hitting flood hit town

MP slams ministers for not hitting flood hit town

First published in News Daily Echo: Photograph of the Author by , Parliamentary Correspondent

CONSERVATIVE MP Caroline Nokes has criticised the failure of Government ministers to visit her flood-hit constituency.

It is five months since large areas of Romsey were under water after the River Test burst its banks causing misery for homes and businesses.

The Army and the Navy were called in to shore up flood defences with thousands of sandbags, and a boom was built across the A3075 at Greatbridge to protect the town centre.

Ms Nokes, pictured, said: “Flooding may seem a dim and distant memory, but the effects are ongoing in Romsey.

“Not a single Government minister has yet been to my constituency to see the work that desperately needs to be und-ertaken to safeguard the town from future flooding.”

The Romsey and Southampton North MP spoke out after one minister – Greg Barker – twice cancelled planned visits to see the flood-hit town for himself.

The climate change minister, who lost his job in last week’s reshuffle, was booked to come in both May and June – but pulled out on both occasions.

Ms Nokes had planned to push the case for more flood defences, including to ensure access to The Causeway pumping station, and has questioned the town’s ageing drainage system.

In reply to Ms Nokes, environment minister Dan Rogerson said: “Ministers have undertaken a great number of visits across the country and I would be happy to join my honourable friend in a visit to her constituency.”

Fifty homes in Romsey were affected as nearly 40in of rain fell between December and February – the most since 1766.

An inquiry for Hampshire County Council also concluded drainage and river defences in Romsey must be beefed up to avoid a repeat of the worst flooding in 50 years.

Intense rainfall was found to have overwhelmed ageing drains, inundating homes and businesses in Winchester Road, Middlebridge Street, Mainstone, Riverside Gardens and the Causeway with foul sewage.

Permanent measures were also needed to stop the River Test bursting its banks and flooding areas such as Mainstone, Budds Lane and The Causeway.

In evidence to MPs, the county council blamed spending cuts and blunders by officials for making last winter’s floods worse.

Its submission to a parliamentary inquiry, it warned district councils no longer have the cash to maintain watercourses, a failure which can result in flooded roads.

Instead, town halls were relying on the county council to take enforcement action against landowners.

Comments (9)

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9:07am Wed 23 Jul 14

Lone Ranger. says...

You see Ms Noakes ...... as i have pointed out before your party really does not give a t0ss about areas like yours as they are not in the "Stockbroker" belt and probably make no financial contribution to Slippery Dave's propaganda machine ......
.
I feel so sorry for the residents of your constituency that voted Lib Dem and ended up with the dross of the Tories
You see Ms Noakes ...... as i have pointed out before your party really does not give a t0ss about areas like yours as they are not in the "Stockbroker" belt and probably make no financial contribution to Slippery Dave's propaganda machine ...... . I feel so sorry for the residents of your constituency that voted Lib Dem and ended up with the dross of the Tories Lone Ranger.
  • Score: 0

9:36am Wed 23 Jul 14

Linesman says...

If he 'pulled out' twice, I can understand Ms Nokes' frustration.
If he 'pulled out' twice, I can understand Ms Nokes' frustration. Linesman
  • Score: 5

10:16am Wed 23 Jul 14

Dai Rear says...

"In evidence to MPs, the county council blamed spending cuts and blunders by officials for making last winter’s floods worse.

Its submission to a parliamentary inquiry, it warned district councils no longer have the cash to maintain watercourses, a failure which can result in flooded roads"
Last time I looked they had still the cash to pay numerous clerks £50K plus, calling them "Directors" of this and that. What is needed is good sense. For example-and I know this is not "County" money-why are student loans still going to those living outside the jurisdiction of our courts in Europe and elsewhere, who simply won't repay? It 's nothing to do with the political cant trotted out (as ever) by the Commy Ranger above, it's just that it requires competence to spend tax money effectively and that competence is almost absent the whole of the political class and public sector.
"In evidence to MPs, the county council blamed spending cuts and blunders by officials for making last winter’s floods worse. Its submission to a parliamentary inquiry, it warned district councils no longer have the cash to maintain watercourses, a failure which can result in flooded roads" Last time I looked they had still the cash to pay numerous clerks £50K plus, calling them "Directors" of this and that. What is needed is good sense. For example-and I know this is not "County" money-why are student loans still going to those living outside the jurisdiction of our courts in Europe and elsewhere, who simply won't repay? It 's nothing to do with the political cant trotted out (as ever) by the Commy Ranger above, it's just that it requires competence to spend tax money effectively and that competence is almost absent the whole of the political class and public sector. Dai Rear
  • Score: 0

1:14pm Wed 23 Jul 14

Lone Ranger. says...

Dai Rear wrote:
"In evidence to MPs, the county council blamed spending cuts and blunders by officials for making last winter’s floods worse.

Its submission to a parliamentary inquiry, it warned district councils no longer have the cash to maintain watercourses, a failure which can result in flooded roads"
Last time I looked they had still the cash to pay numerous clerks £50K plus, calling them "Directors" of this and that. What is needed is good sense. For example-and I know this is not "County" money-why are student loans still going to those living outside the jurisdiction of our courts in Europe and elsewhere, who simply won't repay? It 's nothing to do with the political cant trotted out (as ever) by the Commy Ranger above, it's just that it requires competence to spend tax money effectively and that competence is almost absent the whole of the political class and public sector.
Commy Ranger !!! ..... Oh diarrhoea that is almost as funny, and as dated, as so many of your posts .....
[quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: "In evidence to MPs, the county council blamed spending cuts and blunders by officials for making last winter’s floods worse. Its submission to a parliamentary inquiry, it warned district councils no longer have the cash to maintain watercourses, a failure which can result in flooded roads" Last time I looked they had still the cash to pay numerous clerks £50K plus, calling them "Directors" of this and that. What is needed is good sense. For example-and I know this is not "County" money-why are student loans still going to those living outside the jurisdiction of our courts in Europe and elsewhere, who simply won't repay? It 's nothing to do with the political cant trotted out (as ever) by the Commy Ranger above, it's just that it requires competence to spend tax money effectively and that competence is almost absent the whole of the political class and public sector.[/p][/quote]Commy Ranger !!! ..... Oh diarrhoea that is almost as funny, and as dated, as so many of your posts ..... Lone Ranger.
  • Score: 0

4:03pm Wed 23 Jul 14

Linesman says...

Dai Rear wrote:
"In evidence to MPs, the county council blamed spending cuts and blunders by officials for making last winter’s floods worse.

Its submission to a parliamentary inquiry, it warned district councils no longer have the cash to maintain watercourses, a failure which can result in flooded roads"
Last time I looked they had still the cash to pay numerous clerks £50K plus, calling them "Directors" of this and that. What is needed is good sense. For example-and I know this is not "County" money-why are student loans still going to those living outside the jurisdiction of our courts in Europe and elsewhere, who simply won't repay? It 's nothing to do with the political cant trotted out (as ever) by the Commy Ranger above, it's just that it requires competence to spend tax money effectively and that competence is almost absent the whole of the political class and public sector.
'Commy Ranger'?

Schools broke up for the summer holidays today, so I suppose a bit of childish name-calling is to be expected.

Some adults think it gives them credibility to copy youngsters.

What's your excuse?
[quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: "In evidence to MPs, the county council blamed spending cuts and blunders by officials for making last winter’s floods worse. Its submission to a parliamentary inquiry, it warned district councils no longer have the cash to maintain watercourses, a failure which can result in flooded roads" Last time I looked they had still the cash to pay numerous clerks £50K plus, calling them "Directors" of this and that. What is needed is good sense. For example-and I know this is not "County" money-why are student loans still going to those living outside the jurisdiction of our courts in Europe and elsewhere, who simply won't repay? It 's nothing to do with the political cant trotted out (as ever) by the Commy Ranger above, it's just that it requires competence to spend tax money effectively and that competence is almost absent the whole of the political class and public sector.[/p][/quote]'Commy Ranger'? Schools broke up for the summer holidays today, so I suppose a bit of childish name-calling is to be expected. Some adults think it gives them credibility to copy youngsters. What's your excuse? Linesman
  • Score: 2

2:52am Thu 24 Jul 14

Dai Rear says...

Well, you two pals managed to pick on the trivial and not the essence, but that will come as no surprise. When the public sector stops advertising highly paid sinecures (why spend cash on the adverts? Anyone seeking a cushy public sector number will happily go to a website) then talk of "austerity" can start.
Like the first pal, I feel sorry for anyone who voted Liberal/SDP, though my sorrow is obviously for a different reason.
Well, you two pals managed to pick on the trivial and not the essence, but that will come as no surprise. When the public sector stops advertising highly paid sinecures (why spend cash on the adverts? Anyone seeking a cushy public sector number will happily go to a website) then talk of "austerity" can start. Like the first pal, I feel sorry for anyone who voted Liberal/SDP, though my sorrow is obviously for a different reason. Dai Rear
  • Score: 0

8:08am Thu 24 Jul 14

Lone Ranger. says...

Dai Rear wrote:
Well, you two pals managed to pick on the trivial and not the essence, but that will come as no surprise. When the public sector stops advertising highly paid sinecures (why spend cash on the adverts? Anyone seeking a cushy public sector number will happily go to a website) then talk of "austerity" can start.
Like the first pal, I feel sorry for anyone who voted Liberal/SDP, though my sorrow is obviously for a different reason.
Was there any "essence" to your post then ??
[quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: Well, you two pals managed to pick on the trivial and not the essence, but that will come as no surprise. When the public sector stops advertising highly paid sinecures (why spend cash on the adverts? Anyone seeking a cushy public sector number will happily go to a website) then talk of "austerity" can start. Like the first pal, I feel sorry for anyone who voted Liberal/SDP, though my sorrow is obviously for a different reason.[/p][/quote]Was there any "essence" to your post then ?? Lone Ranger.
  • Score: 0

8:27am Thu 24 Jul 14

Dai Rear says...

Yes. The people into whose hands the tax money first comes in the public sector (who style themselves "managers") will spend it on themselves as a priority, rather than on what it was meant for.
This is not particularly profound and is unchanged by the political complexion of the government. Nevertheless , because the number of highly paid sinecures in the Civil Service, the NHS, Local Government and Quangoland has rocketed since the 1980's it is a problem crying out for action.
Yes. The people into whose hands the tax money first comes in the public sector (who style themselves "managers") will spend it on themselves as a priority, rather than on what it was meant for. This is not particularly profound and is unchanged by the political complexion of the government. Nevertheless , because the number of highly paid sinecures in the Civil Service, the NHS, Local Government and Quangoland has rocketed since the 1980's it is a problem crying out for action. Dai Rear
  • Score: 0

8:50am Thu 24 Jul 14

Linesman says...

Dai Rear wrote:
Well, you two pals managed to pick on the trivial and not the essence, but that will come as no surprise. When the public sector stops advertising highly paid sinecures (why spend cash on the adverts? Anyone seeking a cushy public sector number will happily go to a website) then talk of "austerity" can start.
Like the first pal, I feel sorry for anyone who voted Liberal/SDP, though my sorrow is obviously for a different reason.
Why post trivia?

I would point out that David Cameron, when speaking of the flood damage, said that 'money was no object' when it came to clearing up the mess, and taking preventative measures.

From that statement, I assumed that the money would be made available by central government, but that does not appear to be the case.

Money appears, in small quantities, with promises of further help, in an apparent attempt to appease certain sections of the community and certain areas. Whether there would be a delivery on these promises is very questionable.

My thoughts are that, if the Tories win the next election, then the promises will evaporate, but if they don't, Cameron will remember his promises and say that he would have kept them if he had been returned to power.

In the words of a hymn that I remember from my youth.

"TELL ME THE OLD, OLD STORY. TELL ME THE OLD, OLD STORY."
[quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: Well, you two pals managed to pick on the trivial and not the essence, but that will come as no surprise. When the public sector stops advertising highly paid sinecures (why spend cash on the adverts? Anyone seeking a cushy public sector number will happily go to a website) then talk of "austerity" can start. Like the first pal, I feel sorry for anyone who voted Liberal/SDP, though my sorrow is obviously for a different reason.[/p][/quote]Why post trivia? I would point out that David Cameron, when speaking of the flood damage, said that 'money was no object' when it came to clearing up the mess, and taking preventative measures. From that statement, I assumed that the money would be made available by central government, but that does not appear to be the case. Money appears, in small quantities, with promises of further help, in an apparent attempt to appease certain sections of the community and certain areas. Whether there would be a delivery on these promises is very questionable. My thoughts are that, if the Tories win the next election, then the promises will evaporate, but if they don't, Cameron will remember his promises and say that he would have kept them if he had been returned to power. In the words of a hymn that I remember from my youth. "TELL ME THE OLD, OLD STORY. TELL ME THE OLD, OLD STORY." Linesman
  • Score: 0

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