£1m study of seabed launched as part of Navitus Bay plans

£1m study of the seabed launched for controversial windfarm

£1.3m study of the seabed launched for controversial windfarm

Surveying vessel Horizon GeoBayis able to accurately drill the sea bed over a range of tidal swells as part of the Navitus Bay plans

First published in News
Last updated
Daily Echo: Photograph of the Author by , Chief Reporter, New Forest

BOSSES behind controversial plans for a huge wind farm off the Hampshire coast have launched a £1 million study of the sea bed.

Navitus Bay Development Ltd (NBDL) is drilling bore holes and extracting material in a bid to devise to most suitable foundations for the 194 turbines.

A specialist survey vessel called Horizon GeoBay is fitted with water jets that keep it stationary, helping the crew to perform more accurate drilling.

Bore holes of various depths will enable experts to obtain 15 different sets of samples and compile a detailed analysis of the sea bed.

It comes after NBDL had its application for a Development Consent Order (DCO) accepted for examination by Government planners.

Project director Mike Unsworth said: “In parallel with seeking consent for the project, it's vital that we continue to gather additional information about the site conditions to help inform our detailed design of the proposed offshore wind park.

“This latest investigation is the next step in the process of engineering an optimum design for the wind turbine foundations.”

As reported in the Daily Echo, the proposed wind farm will occupy a 60 square mile site west of the Isle of Wight.

It will generate enough low carbon electricity to power around 710,000 homes, offsetting approximately 1,290,000 tonnes of CO2 emissions every year.

But 650ft tall turbines will be just 14.5 miles from Lymington and less than 12 miles from Milford on Sea.

The New Forest National Park Authority (NPA) has hit out at the visual impact of the turbines.

Members have also raised concerns about an underground cable linking the wind farm with a National Grid sub-station north of Ferndown in Dorset.

Cllr Pat Wyeth, chairman of the NPA's planning committee, said the cable would create a “permanent scar” across the Forest.

The Government's Planning Inspectorate will spend the next eight months examining the proposals before submitting its recommendation to the Secretary of State for Energy.

If planning permission is granted construction work is likely to begin in 2017, with the first turbines starting to generate electricity two years later.

Comments (5)

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1:08pm Mon 11 Aug 14

Ravenor says...

"turbines will be just 14.5 miles from Lymington and less than 12 miles from Milford on Sea"

I love the language of this paragraph. "just" and "less than". 12 miles is quite a ways. It's the distance from West Quay shopping centre to Winchester Cathedral.


Don't get me wrong - I'd hate it if a beautiful view was spoiled by a carpet of these things right up close, but they're a half-marathon run away, and I think a bit of perspective is needed - both literally and figuratively...
"turbines will be just 14.5 miles from Lymington and less than 12 miles from Milford on Sea" I love the language of this paragraph. "just" and "less than". 12 miles is quite a ways. It's the distance from West Quay shopping centre to Winchester Cathedral. Don't get me wrong - I'd hate it if a beautiful view was spoiled by a carpet of these things right up close, but they're a half-marathon run away, and I think a bit of perspective is needed - both literally and figuratively... Ravenor
  • Score: 6

7:00pm Mon 11 Aug 14

forest hump says...

"It will generate enough low carbon electricity to power around 710,000 homes, offsetting approximately 1,290,000 tonnes of CO2 emissions every year." But actually not displacing any "traditional" method of reliable, consistent generation. In other words, projects like these will be always at additional cost. If the money were to be invested in tried and tested generation techniques, with current efficiency gains it would save a whole chunk of money. Andy of Locks Heath is much better qualified to quantify but my point is that we are chucking away money.
"It will generate enough low carbon electricity to power around 710,000 homes, offsetting approximately 1,290,000 tonnes of CO2 emissions every year." But actually not displacing any "traditional" method of reliable, consistent generation. In other words, projects like these will be always at additional cost. If the money were to be invested in tried and tested generation techniques, with current efficiency gains it would save a whole chunk of money. Andy of Locks Heath is much better qualified to quantify but my point is that we are chucking away money. forest hump
  • Score: 0

7:53pm Mon 11 Aug 14

RTT123 says...

On average these turbine are only 30% of the figures claimed. The materials required and the land required (or seabed) is massive, and they are notorious for causing the deaths of thousands of birds (numbers which at sea will never be verified). They are a blot on the horizon and on the coldest January night when the UK is covered by a high pressure weather system nearly 0% efficient, great when the demand for heat and power is at it's greatest.

In the Solent we have Palmerstons Follies, in Poole Bay we will have the Navitus Follies and we will probably loose the protected status of the Jurassic Coastline as UNESCO are threatening to remove the World Heritage Status if the wind farm is built.
On average these turbine are only 30% of the figures claimed. The materials required and the land required (or seabed) is massive, and they are notorious for causing the deaths of thousands of birds (numbers which at sea will never be verified). They are a blot on the horizon and on the coldest January night when the UK is covered by a high pressure weather system nearly 0% efficient, great when the demand for heat and power is at it's greatest. In the Solent we have Palmerstons Follies, in Poole Bay we will have the Navitus Follies and we will probably loose the protected status of the Jurassic Coastline as UNESCO are threatening to remove the World Heritage Status if the wind farm is built. RTT123
  • Score: 0

8:51am Tue 12 Aug 14

forest hump says...

RTT123 wrote:
On average these turbine are only 30% of the figures claimed. The materials required and the land required (or seabed) is massive, and they are notorious for causing the deaths of thousands of birds (numbers which at sea will never be verified). They are a blot on the horizon and on the coldest January night when the UK is covered by a high pressure weather system nearly 0% efficient, great when the demand for heat and power is at it's greatest.

In the Solent we have Palmerstons Follies, in Poole Bay we will have the Navitus Follies and we will probably loose the protected status of the Jurassic Coastline as UNESCO are threatening to remove the World Heritage Status if the wind farm is built.
Never mind all that.....it is just a waste of cash
[quote][p][bold]RTT123[/bold] wrote: On average these turbine are only 30% of the figures claimed. The materials required and the land required (or seabed) is massive, and they are notorious for causing the deaths of thousands of birds (numbers which at sea will never be verified). They are a blot on the horizon and on the coldest January night when the UK is covered by a high pressure weather system nearly 0% efficient, great when the demand for heat and power is at it's greatest. In the Solent we have Palmerstons Follies, in Poole Bay we will have the Navitus Follies and we will probably loose the protected status of the Jurassic Coastline as UNESCO are threatening to remove the World Heritage Status if the wind farm is built.[/p][/quote]Never mind all that.....it is just a waste of cash forest hump
  • Score: 0

9:15am Tue 12 Aug 14

Tony Blair's Accountant says...

We do not need this wind farm. Hampshire is windy enough already.
We do not need this wind farm. Hampshire is windy enough already. Tony Blair's Accountant
  • Score: 0

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