Janet Coxen's potentially fatal adder bite not spotted twice by doctors

Janet Coxen

Janet Coxen

First published in News Daily Echo: Photograph of the Author Exclusive by , Eastleigh Chief Reporter

A HAMPSHIRE mum is demanding an investigation after claiming that medics twice failed to spot that she had been bitten by a snake.

Janet Coxen was standing in long grass in her back garden when the adder struck, plunging its fangs in her ankle and injecting it with venom.

The Chandler’s Ford foster care worker suffered excruciating pain in her leg, a swollen ankle and severe headaches.

As the pain got worse she sought advice from a GP at Eastleigh Health Centre who she says gave her antibiotics and assured her that it was not a snake bite.

The next day when the pain was still severe friends insisted that she went to A&E at Royal Hampshire County Hospital, Winchester.

There she said that doctors gave her the same response and dismissed her theory that a snake was responsible.

In desperation she contacted Grange Reptiles, Botley, and spoke to Adie Roberts, reptile expert and former paramedic, who looked at a photo of the puncture wounds and then examined her foot.

He told her to go straight to hospital and called ahead to let them know that a woman with a “very serious” snake bite was on her way in.

She was treated with drugs that counteract the effect of the venom and kept in overnight at Southampton General Hospital.

Janet said: “I don’t like to make a fuss about this kind of thing. I saw two puncture marks on my ankle with blood trickling from them but thought it must be a scratch.

“I was in agony when I went to the doctor’s and hospital and I felt humiliated at being mocked.

“When it was confirmed as a snake bite I was petrified.”

The 54-year-old mum-of-three is now calling for an investigation into how medics missed the diagnosis, and is lodging a complaint against the Winchester and E a s t l e i g h Healthcare NHS Trust, the body in charge of the Winchester hospital.

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Adie said: “I knew immediately from the picture she sent it was definitely an adder bite, there is simply nothing else it could be, and I think it is horrific the doctors didn’t pick up on it.

“I consulted a friend who looks after venomous snakes in London Zoo and we agreed it was a bad bite and she needed to get to hospital immediately. It is rare for people to die of adder bites in this country but they do.”

He went on to say that the hot weather and heavy rain over the past few weeks had probably led the snake to take refuge in Janet’s garden.

A Winchester and Eastleigh Healthcare NHS Trust spokesman said: “We are sorry if Mrs Coxen feels the care she received in A&E fell below our normal high standard. If she would like to get in touch we will fully investigate the matter.”

No one from NHS Hampshire, which overseas Eastleigh Health Centre, was available for comment.

Comments (33)

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12:21pm Wed 18 Aug 10

StEmmosfire says...

How do you miss being bitten by a snake! If I was bitten I'd sure know about it.
How do you miss being bitten by a snake! If I was bitten I'd sure know about it. StEmmosfire
  • Score: 0

12:34pm Wed 18 Aug 10

bigmonkeyman says...

As there have have been no reported deaths from an adder bite for nearly 40 years,i reckon you will be alright.
As there have have been no reported deaths from an adder bite for nearly 40 years,i reckon you will be alright. bigmonkeyman
  • Score: 0

12:37pm Wed 18 Aug 10

shagbands says...

Echo is a little uninformed. An adders bite is harmless to a healthy adult but will only be fatal if the person is allergic to the venom, the person is elder or very young or has a weakened immune system.

There has only been 14 fatalities in the UK since 1876. The last being a 5 year old girl in 1975. I think the woman in question has overreacted about the whole thing. We've shared this country with the snake species for centuries. I'm very sure everyone has some form of natural immunity to the venom.

But to avoid bites, one must remember that the snakes like a variety of habitats ranging from chalky downs to stone quarries, they also are very camouflaged and it is very easy to miss them. When walking in snake territory, keep to the paths, don't let young children stray to far and never pick allow them to pick up any snake.

If you do come across a snake out in the open, admire it from afar and leave it alone.
Echo is a little uninformed. An adders bite is harmless to a healthy adult but will only be fatal if the person is allergic to the venom, the person is elder or very young or has a weakened immune system. There has only been 14 fatalities in the UK since 1876. The last being a 5 year old girl in 1975. I think the woman in question has overreacted about the whole thing. We've shared this country with the snake species for centuries. I'm very sure everyone has some form of natural immunity to the venom. But to avoid bites, one must remember that the snakes like a variety of habitats ranging from chalky downs to stone quarries, they also are very camouflaged and it is very easy to miss them. When walking in snake territory, keep to the paths, don't let young children stray to far and never pick allow them to pick up any snake. If you do come across a snake out in the open, admire it from afar and leave it alone. shagbands
  • Score: 0

12:41pm Wed 18 Aug 10

Elgy says...

Er, woman says she's been bitten by snake, and I assume shows the doctor where it hurts. And this happens? Weird!
Er, woman says she's been bitten by snake, and I assume shows the doctor where it hurts. And this happens? Weird! Elgy
  • Score: 0

1:07pm Wed 18 Aug 10

News Fanatic says...

Most doctors probably never see a snake bite in their entire careers. This must make one difficult to identify.
Most doctors probably never see a snake bite in their entire careers. This must make one difficult to identify. News Fanatic
  • Score: 0

1:24pm Wed 18 Aug 10

redsnapper says...

Just a minute. Why not just sort this out with the health centre instead of making a song and dance about it.

Another example of the "I wannabee famous for anything brigade"- no sympathy.
Just a minute. Why not just sort this out with the health centre instead of making a song and dance about it. Another example of the "I wannabee famous for anything brigade"- no sympathy. redsnapper
  • Score: 0

1:24pm Wed 18 Aug 10

J.K. says...

Perhaps she had been drinking too much Snake Bite
Perhaps she had been drinking too much Snake Bite J.K.
  • Score: 0

2:02pm Wed 18 Aug 10

southy says...

shagbands wrote:
Echo is a little uninformed. An adders bite is harmless to a healthy adult but will only be fatal if the person is allergic to the venom, the person is elder or very young or has a weakened immune system.

There has only been 14 fatalities in the UK since 1876. The last being a 5 year old girl in 1975. I think the woman in question has overreacted about the whole thing. We've shared this country with the snake species for centuries. I'm very sure everyone has some form of natural immunity to the venom.

But to avoid bites, one must remember that the snakes like a variety of habitats ranging from chalky downs to stone quarries, they also are very camouflaged and it is very easy to miss them. When walking in snake territory, keep to the paths, don't let young children stray to far and never pick allow them to pick up any snake.

If you do come across a snake out in the open, admire it from afar and leave it alone.
very good post, but may i add to your post, apart from we have 3 native species 2 are harmless, smooth and grass snake those are constrictors, the adder is a viper (a biter) there are 2 kinds of adders in this country the common (aka brown) and can very in the lightness or darkness of the colour but the zig-zag pattern remain the same colour, and is the most likest you will come across where it is very common and will live in a commune or on its own. and found all over europe, the other is a black adder extremely rare and only found in the uk, it was not relise it was a second kind of adder till about 7 years ago. when an old black adder was pick up for venom in cornwall. the venmon in a black adder gets stronger has it gets older research is still on going, it is very hard to tell the difference between the two. but the zig-zag pattern is a little bit darker than the brown.
and if your wondering how i know this information, i have a licence to handle wild british reptiles, (even lo its not use to me no more) where it is illegal now to handle or to purposely disturb british reptiles
[quote][p][bold]shagbands[/bold] wrote: Echo is a little uninformed. An adders bite is harmless to a healthy adult but will only be fatal if the person is allergic to the venom, the person is elder or very young or has a weakened immune system. There has only been 14 fatalities in the UK since 1876. The last being a 5 year old girl in 1975. I think the woman in question has overreacted about the whole thing. We've shared this country with the snake species for centuries. I'm very sure everyone has some form of natural immunity to the venom. But to avoid bites, one must remember that the snakes like a variety of habitats ranging from chalky downs to stone quarries, they also are very camouflaged and it is very easy to miss them. When walking in snake territory, keep to the paths, don't let young children stray to far and never pick allow them to pick up any snake. If you do come across a snake out in the open, admire it from afar and leave it alone.[/p][/quote]very good post, but may i add to your post, apart from we have 3 native species 2 are harmless, smooth and grass snake those are constrictors, the adder is a viper (a biter) there are 2 kinds of adders in this country the common (aka brown) and can very in the lightness or darkness of the colour but the zig-zag pattern remain the same colour, and is the most likest you will come across where it is very common and will live in a commune or on its own. and found all over europe, the other is a black adder extremely rare and only found in the uk, it was not relise it was a second kind of adder till about 7 years ago. when an old black adder was pick up for venom in cornwall. the venmon in a black adder gets stronger has it gets older research is still on going, it is very hard to tell the difference between the two. but the zig-zag pattern is a little bit darker than the brown. and if your wondering how i know this information, i have a licence to handle wild british reptiles, (even lo its not use to me no more) where it is illegal now to handle or to purposely disturb british reptiles southy
  • Score: 0

2:06pm Wed 18 Aug 10

southy says...

News Fanatic wrote:
Most doctors probably never see a snake bite in their entire careers. This must make one difficult to identify.
not city ones you probley be right, snake bites in the uk are mainly dealt with at the nearest GP or clinic. and most go unreported.
[quote][p][bold]News Fanatic[/bold] wrote: Most doctors probably never see a snake bite in their entire careers. This must make one difficult to identify.[/p][/quote]not city ones you probley be right, snake bites in the uk are mainly dealt with at the nearest GP or clinic. and most go unreported. southy
  • Score: 0

3:22pm Wed 18 Aug 10

daddi says...

Snake bite , thats not a snake bite,
seeing a doctor after 3 days, little buggers out here will kill you in 3 hours and we got more than just one , we have a selection of the little sods out here in Australia
Snake bite , thats not a snake bite, seeing a doctor after 3 days, little buggers out here will kill you in 3 hours and we got more than just one , we have a selection of the little sods out here in Australia daddi
  • Score: 0

4:24pm Wed 18 Aug 10

saints4eva12 says...

she could have been bitten by a spider thats not navtive to this country
she could have been bitten by a spider thats not navtive to this country saints4eva12
  • Score: 0

4:48pm Wed 18 Aug 10

B. L. says...

daddi wrote:
Snake bite , thats not a snake bite,
seeing a doctor after 3 days, little buggers out here will kill you in 3 hours and we got more than just one , we have a selection of the little sods out here in Australia
Too right mate, that's why I don't live in Australia, nice place but....

Am I correct in believing that the 10 most venomous snakes in the world live there. The spiders there are also not a turn on. Beer's OK though.
[quote][p][bold]daddi[/bold] wrote: Snake bite , thats not a snake bite, seeing a doctor after 3 days, little buggers out here will kill you in 3 hours and we got more than just one , we have a selection of the little sods out here in Australia[/p][/quote]Too right mate, that's why I don't live in Australia, nice place but.... Am I correct in believing that the 10 most venomous snakes in the world live there. The spiders there are also not a turn on. Beer's OK though. B. L.
  • Score: 0

4:51pm Wed 18 Aug 10

didicoy says...

Trouser snake
Trouser snake didicoy
  • Score: 0

4:57pm Wed 18 Aug 10

southy says...

saints4eva12 wrote:
she could have been bitten by a spider thats not navtive to this country
that is real possibility i now wonder did she see what bit her. even a native spider the quarry spider will bite and draw blood. and is on the watch list has it may become our first venomous spider.
[quote][p][bold]saints4eva12[/bold] wrote: she could have been bitten by a spider thats not navtive to this country[/p][/quote]that is real possibility i now wonder did she see what bit her. even a native spider the quarry spider will bite and draw blood. and is on the watch list has it may become our first venomous spider. southy
  • Score: 0

5:00pm Wed 18 Aug 10

didicoy says...

southy wrote:
saints4eva12 wrote:
she could have been bitten by a spider thats not navtive to this country
that is real possibility i now wonder did she see what bit her. even a native spider the quarry spider will bite and draw blood. and is on the watch list has it may become our first venomous spider.
Considering the news reports says "she was biten by a venemous adder" i think we know the cause.

but i'll add to this madness, it may have been a raptor.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]saints4eva12[/bold] wrote: she could have been bitten by a spider thats not navtive to this country[/p][/quote]that is real possibility i now wonder did she see what bit her. even a native spider the quarry spider will bite and draw blood. and is on the watch list has it may become our first venomous spider.[/p][/quote]Considering the news reports says "she was biten by a venemous adder" i think we know the cause. but i'll add to this madness, it may have been a raptor. didicoy
  • Score: 0

5:00pm Wed 18 Aug 10

southy says...

B. L. wrote:
daddi wrote:
Snake bite , thats not a snake bite,
seeing a doctor after 3 days, little buggers out here will kill you in 3 hours and we got more than just one , we have a selection of the little sods out here in Australia
Too right mate, that's why I don't live in Australia, nice place but....

Am I correct in believing that the 10 most venomous snakes in the world live there. The spiders there are also not a turn on. Beer's OK though.
there is some real deadly snakes over there and the most deadliest spider of them all the funnel web spider.
bring on the castlemain xxx lo
[quote][p][bold]B. L.[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]daddi[/bold] wrote: Snake bite , thats not a snake bite, seeing a doctor after 3 days, little buggers out here will kill you in 3 hours and we got more than just one , we have a selection of the little sods out here in Australia[/p][/quote]Too right mate, that's why I don't live in Australia, nice place but.... Am I correct in believing that the 10 most venomous snakes in the world live there. The spiders there are also not a turn on. Beer's OK though.[/p][/quote]there is some real deadly snakes over there and the most deadliest spider of them all the funnel web spider. bring on the castlemain xxx lo southy
  • Score: 0

5:00pm Wed 18 Aug 10

didicoy says...

southy wrote:
saints4eva12 wrote:
she could have been bitten by a spider thats not navtive to this country
that is real possibility i now wonder did she see what bit her. even a native spider the quarry spider will bite and draw blood. and is on the watch list has it may become our first venomous spider.
Considering the news reports says "she was biten by a venomous adder" i think we know the cause.

but i'll add to this madness, it may have been a raptor.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]saints4eva12[/bold] wrote: she could have been bitten by a spider thats not navtive to this country[/p][/quote]that is real possibility i now wonder did she see what bit her. even a native spider the quarry spider will bite and draw blood. and is on the watch list has it may become our first venomous spider.[/p][/quote]Considering the news reports says "she was biten by a venomous adder" i think we know the cause. but i'll add to this madness, it may have been a raptor. didicoy
  • Score: 0

5:06pm Wed 18 Aug 10

southy says...

didicoy wrote:
southy wrote:
saints4eva12 wrote:
she could have been bitten by a spider thats not navtive to this country
that is real possibility i now wonder did she see what bit her. even a native spider the quarry spider will bite and draw blood. and is on the watch list has it may become our first venomous spider.
Considering the news reports says "she was biten by a venemous adder" i think we know the cause.

but i'll add to this madness, it may have been a raptor.
lol, the 2 legged kind of raptor didicoy.
but rethinking about it you should be able to tell the difference between spider fangs and snake fangs, spider fang puncher marks are very much closer of the two.
[quote][p][bold]didicoy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]saints4eva12[/bold] wrote: she could have been bitten by a spider thats not navtive to this country[/p][/quote]that is real possibility i now wonder did she see what bit her. even a native spider the quarry spider will bite and draw blood. and is on the watch list has it may become our first venomous spider.[/p][/quote]Considering the news reports says "she was biten by a venemous adder" i think we know the cause. but i'll add to this madness, it may have been a raptor.[/p][/quote]lol, the 2 legged kind of raptor didicoy. but rethinking about it you should be able to tell the difference between spider fangs and snake fangs, spider fang puncher marks are very much closer of the two. southy
  • Score: 0

5:36pm Wed 18 Aug 10

Iw61 says...

J.K. wrote:
Perhaps she had been drinking too much Snake Bite
Thats what I thought when I first saw the headline.
Being bitten by an Adder is an incredibly rare event.
[quote][p][bold]J.K.[/bold] wrote: Perhaps she had been drinking too much Snake Bite[/p][/quote]Thats what I thought when I first saw the headline. Being bitten by an Adder is an incredibly rare event. Iw61
  • Score: 0

6:05pm Wed 18 Aug 10

Ruth920 says...

Have any of you seen the photos? Not an overreaction in my book. According to snake expert the adders have a certain amount of anaesthetic on their teeth so you don't always feel it as you'd think. Also, it's not about wanting to be famous, it's about raising awareness that this is becoming more common and could happen to you or your pet in your own back garden. It may not have killed her but it was bad enough for the doctors to keep her in overnight for treatment! I'd like to see how the person who thought she "overreacted" would've reacted!!!
Have any of you seen the photos? Not an overreaction in my book. According to snake expert the adders have a certain amount of anaesthetic on their teeth so you don't always feel it as you'd think. Also, it's not about wanting to be famous, it's about raising awareness that this is becoming more common and could happen to you or your pet in your own back garden. It may not have killed her but it was bad enough for the doctors to keep her in overnight for treatment! I'd like to see how the person who thought she "overreacted" would've reacted!!! Ruth920
  • Score: 0

6:16pm Wed 18 Aug 10

KA says...

Ruth920 wrote:
Have any of you seen the photos? Not an overreaction in my book. According to snake expert the adders have a certain amount of anaesthetic on their teeth so you don't always feel it as you'd think. Also, it's not about wanting to be famous, it's about raising awareness that this is becoming more common and could happen to you or your pet in your own back garden. It may not have killed her but it was bad enough for the doctors to keep her in overnight for treatment! I'd like to see how the person who thought she "overreacted" would've reacted!!!
Agreed...:D
[quote][p][bold]Ruth920[/bold] wrote: Have any of you seen the photos? Not an overreaction in my book. According to snake expert the adders have a certain amount of anaesthetic on their teeth so you don't always feel it as you'd think. Also, it's not about wanting to be famous, it's about raising awareness that this is becoming more common and could happen to you or your pet in your own back garden. It may not have killed her but it was bad enough for the doctors to keep her in overnight for treatment! I'd like to see how the person who thought she "overreacted" would've reacted!!![/p][/quote]Agreed...:D KA
  • Score: 0

6:19pm Wed 18 Aug 10

Jasper7 says...

Ruth920 wrote:
Have any of you seen the photos? Not an overreaction in my book. According to snake expert the adders have a certain amount of anaesthetic on their teeth so you don't always feel it as you'd think. Also, it's not about wanting to be famous, it's about raising awareness that this is becoming more common and could happen to you or your pet in your own back garden. It may not have killed her but it was bad enough for the doctors to keep her in overnight for treatment! I'd like to see how the person who thought she "overreacted" would've reacted!!!
Every actress has an agent.....
[quote][p][bold]Ruth920[/bold] wrote: Have any of you seen the photos? Not an overreaction in my book. According to snake expert the adders have a certain amount of anaesthetic on their teeth so you don't always feel it as you'd think. Also, it's not about wanting to be famous, it's about raising awareness that this is becoming more common and could happen to you or your pet in your own back garden. It may not have killed her but it was bad enough for the doctors to keep her in overnight for treatment! I'd like to see how the person who thought she "overreacted" would've reacted!!![/p][/quote]Every actress has an agent..... Jasper7
  • Score: 0

6:27pm Wed 18 Aug 10

Atpost says...

My thoughts exactly.

It's an adder bite. Less common, but no more serious than a bee sting.

Grow up princess, and get on with life.

Or is it a call to BGR Bloomer - no win/no fee
My thoughts exactly. It's an adder bite. Less common, but no more serious than a bee sting. Grow up princess, and get on with life. Or is it a call to BGR Bloomer - no win/no fee Atpost
  • Score: 0

6:36pm Wed 18 Aug 10

Ulysses 31 says...

southy wrote:
shagbands wrote:
Echo is a little uninformed. An adders bite is harmless to a healthy adult but will only be fatal if the person is allergic to the venom, the person is elder or very young or has a weakened immune system.

There has only been 14 fatalities in the UK since 1876. The last being a 5 year old girl in 1975. I think the woman in question has overreacted about the whole thing. We've shared this country with the snake species for centuries. I'm very sure everyone has some form of natural immunity to the venom.

But to avoid bites, one must remember that the snakes like a variety of habitats ranging from chalky downs to stone quarries, they also are very camouflaged and it is very easy to miss them. When walking in snake territory, keep to the paths, don't let young children stray to far and never pick allow them to pick up any snake.

If you do come across a snake out in the open, admire it from afar and leave it alone.
very good post, but may i add to your post, apart from we have 3 native species 2 are harmless, smooth and grass snake those are constrictors, the adder is a viper (a biter) there are 2 kinds of adders in this country the common (aka brown) and can very in the lightness or darkness of the colour but the zig-zag pattern remain the same colour, and is the most likest you will come across where it is very common and will live in a commune or on its own. and found all over europe, the other is a black adder extremely rare and only found in the uk, it was not relise it was a second kind of adder till about 7 years ago. when an old black adder was pick up for venom in cornwall. the venmon in a black adder gets stronger has it gets older research is still on going, it is very hard to tell the difference between the two. but the zig-zag pattern is a little bit darker than the brown.
and if your wondering how i know this information, i have a licence to handle wild british reptiles, (even lo its not use to me no more) where it is illegal now to handle or to purposely disturb british reptiles
I dont think that is quite true, abolut the black "melanistic adder" being unique to the UK, Infact i think melantistic forms can be found anywhere where adders exist, i know a site about a mile from where i live where melantistics seem to be the predominant form, and yes i also hold a ARG (formerly HCT) liscence so Im not just making this up!
And also it is not dificuilt at all to tell the differnece between a melantistic and a normal coloured adder, the emales tend to have brown-orange zig zag, against a brown body, the males have a black zig zag and the body can range from yellowish to almost white.
i noticed in the newpaper it said the adder is poisonous, this really annoys me, poison is injested, venoum is injected, adders are venemous NOT poisonous.
this kind of reporting does not do the adder much favour by making it out to be such a dangerous snake, I actively go out and search for them and often get very, very close to them, yet i have never been bitten, ive been struck at and hissed at! but i can tell if they are in the mood to let me take photos, if they are grumpy i leave them alone.
But i wonder how i can be going through the adders habitat and nevrr get bitten yet this lady claims she was just stood in her garden and one bit her, i think not, and how can she be so sure it was an adder and not someones pet snake that has escaped, for an adder to be in a urban garden is quite unusual, i dont know if her garden backs onto any habitat suitable for adders but its certaionly not the kind of thing youde see slithering down the road!
I hope this dosnt make people hate adders, they, as are all reptiles are wondefull creatuires and we should be proud to have them in our country.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]shagbands[/bold] wrote: Echo is a little uninformed. An adders bite is harmless to a healthy adult but will only be fatal if the person is allergic to the venom, the person is elder or very young or has a weakened immune system. There has only been 14 fatalities in the UK since 1876. The last being a 5 year old girl in 1975. I think the woman in question has overreacted about the whole thing. We've shared this country with the snake species for centuries. I'm very sure everyone has some form of natural immunity to the venom. But to avoid bites, one must remember that the snakes like a variety of habitats ranging from chalky downs to stone quarries, they also are very camouflaged and it is very easy to miss them. When walking in snake territory, keep to the paths, don't let young children stray to far and never pick allow them to pick up any snake. If you do come across a snake out in the open, admire it from afar and leave it alone.[/p][/quote]very good post, but may i add to your post, apart from we have 3 native species 2 are harmless, smooth and grass snake those are constrictors, the adder is a viper (a biter) there are 2 kinds of adders in this country the common (aka brown) and can very in the lightness or darkness of the colour but the zig-zag pattern remain the same colour, and is the most likest you will come across where it is very common and will live in a commune or on its own. and found all over europe, the other is a black adder extremely rare and only found in the uk, it was not relise it was a second kind of adder till about 7 years ago. when an old black adder was pick up for venom in cornwall. the venmon in a black adder gets stronger has it gets older research is still on going, it is very hard to tell the difference between the two. but the zig-zag pattern is a little bit darker than the brown. and if your wondering how i know this information, i have a licence to handle wild british reptiles, (even lo its not use to me no more) where it is illegal now to handle or to purposely disturb british reptiles[/p][/quote]I dont think that is quite true, abolut the black "melanistic adder" being unique to the UK, Infact i think melantistic forms can be found anywhere where adders exist, i know a site about a mile from where i live where melantistics seem to be the predominant form, and yes i also hold a ARG (formerly HCT) liscence so Im not just making this up! And also it is not dificuilt at all to tell the differnece between a melantistic and a normal coloured adder, the emales tend to have brown-orange zig zag, against a brown body, the males have a black zig zag and the body can range from yellowish to almost white. i noticed in the newpaper it said the adder is poisonous, this really annoys me, poison is injested, venoum is injected, adders are venemous NOT poisonous. this kind of reporting does not do the adder much favour by making it out to be such a dangerous snake, I actively go out and search for them and often get very, very close to them, yet i have never been bitten, ive been struck at and hissed at! but i can tell if they are in the mood to let me take photos, if they are grumpy i leave them alone. But i wonder how i can be going through the adders habitat and nevrr get bitten yet this lady claims she was just stood in her garden and one bit her, i think not, and how can she be so sure it was an adder and not someones pet snake that has escaped, for an adder to be in a urban garden is quite unusual, i dont know if her garden backs onto any habitat suitable for adders but its certaionly not the kind of thing youde see slithering down the road! I hope this dosnt make people hate adders, they, as are all reptiles are wondefull creatuires and we should be proud to have them in our country. Ulysses 31
  • Score: 0

6:39pm Wed 18 Aug 10

Atpost says...

"and yes i also hold a ARG (formerly HCT) liscence so Im not just making this up"

WELL MR KNOW-ALL
Is it melanistic, OR melantistic
"and yes i also hold a ARG (formerly HCT) liscence so Im not just making this up" WELL MR KNOW-ALL Is it melanistic, OR melantistic Atpost
  • Score: 0

6:58pm Wed 18 Aug 10

Stillness says...

southy wrote:
News Fanatic wrote:
Most doctors probably never see a snake bite in their entire careers. This must make one difficult to identify.
not city ones you probley be right, snake bites in the uk are mainly dealt with at the nearest GP or clinic. and most go unreported.
How the hell can you know that most go unreported if most go unreported?

God he makes my head hurt at times lol.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]News Fanatic[/bold] wrote: Most doctors probably never see a snake bite in their entire careers. This must make one difficult to identify.[/p][/quote]not city ones you probley be right, snake bites in the uk are mainly dealt with at the nearest GP or clinic. and most go unreported.[/p][/quote]How the hell can you know that most go unreported if most go unreported? God he makes my head hurt at times lol. Stillness
  • Score: 0

10:53pm Wed 18 Aug 10

cowley says...

too much time on ya hands southy!
too much time on ya hands southy! cowley
  • Score: 0

9:49am Thu 19 Aug 10

Redback says...

It could have been a very small tiger.
It could have been a very small tiger. Redback
  • Score: 0

12:19pm Thu 19 Aug 10

Stillness says...

Redback wrote:
It could have been a very small tiger.
Fox. Defiantly a fox. Maybe with a stripy shirt on.
[quote][p][bold]Redback[/bold] wrote: It could have been a very small tiger.[/p][/quote]Fox. Defiantly a fox. Maybe with a stripy shirt on. Stillness
  • Score: 0

12:37pm Thu 19 Aug 10

Ulysses 31 says...

Atpost wrote:
"and yes i also hold a ARG (formerly HCT) liscence so Im not just making this up"

WELL MR KNOW-ALL
Is it melanistic, OR melantistic
It is melanistic, mr pedantic about correct spellings!
[quote][p][bold]Atpost[/bold] wrote: "and yes i also hold a ARG (formerly HCT) liscence so Im not just making this up" WELL MR KNOW-ALL Is it melanistic, OR melantistic[/p][/quote]It is melanistic, mr pedantic about correct spellings! Ulysses 31
  • Score: 0

2:38pm Thu 19 Aug 10

B. L. says...

Stillness wrote:
southy wrote:
News Fanatic wrote:
Most doctors probably never see a snake bite in their entire careers. This must make one difficult to identify.
not city ones you probley be right, snake bites in the uk are mainly dealt with at the nearest GP or clinic. and most go unreported.
How the hell can you know that most go unreported if most go unreported?

God he makes my head hurt at times lol.
As I've suggested to others, please put on a helmet before going near the brick wall. :)
[quote][p][bold]Stillness[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]News Fanatic[/bold] wrote: Most doctors probably never see a snake bite in their entire careers. This must make one difficult to identify.[/p][/quote]not city ones you probley be right, snake bites in the uk are mainly dealt with at the nearest GP or clinic. and most go unreported.[/p][/quote]How the hell can you know that most go unreported if most go unreported? God he makes my head hurt at times lol.[/p][/quote]As I've suggested to others, please put on a helmet before going near the brick wall. :) B. L.
  • Score: 0

3:29pm Thu 19 Aug 10

southy says...

B. L. wrote:
Stillness wrote:
southy wrote:
News Fanatic wrote:
Most doctors probably never see a snake bite in their entire careers. This must make one difficult to identify.
not city ones you probley be right, snake bites in the uk are mainly dealt with at the nearest GP or clinic. and most go unreported.
How the hell can you know that most go unreported if most go unreported?

God he makes my head hurt at times lol.
As I've suggested to others, please put on a helmet before going near the brick wall. :)
do a gp report every cold out break no they dont, its to minor to worry about and is not a general public threat. native snake bites just go under miscellaneous, its when some one died,s of a native snake bite do it really get reported because check is then needed to take place on the venom serum to make sure that serum is still good to use, and the type of snake in question has not gone or going though an evolutional change.

try thinking for once.
[quote][p][bold]B. L.[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Stillness[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]News Fanatic[/bold] wrote: Most doctors probably never see a snake bite in their entire careers. This must make one difficult to identify.[/p][/quote]not city ones you probley be right, snake bites in the uk are mainly dealt with at the nearest GP or clinic. and most go unreported.[/p][/quote]How the hell can you know that most go unreported if most go unreported? God he makes my head hurt at times lol.[/p][/quote]As I've suggested to others, please put on a helmet before going near the brick wall. :)[/p][/quote]do a gp report every cold out break no they dont, its to minor to worry about and is not a general public threat. native snake bites just go under miscellaneous, its when some one died,s of a native snake bite do it really get reported because check is then needed to take place on the venom serum to make sure that serum is still good to use, and the type of snake in question has not gone or going though an evolutional change. try thinking for once. southy
  • Score: 0

2:15pm Fri 20 Aug 10

B. L. says...

southy wrote:
B. L. wrote:
Stillness wrote:
southy wrote:
News Fanatic wrote:
Most doctors probably never see a snake bite in their entire careers. This must make one difficult to identify.
not city ones you probley be right, snake bites in the uk are mainly dealt with at the nearest GP or clinic. and most go unreported.
How the hell can you know that most go unreported if most go unreported?

God he makes my head hurt at times lol.
As I've suggested to others, please put on a helmet before going near the brick wall. :)
do a gp report every cold out break no they dont, its to minor to worry about and is not a general public threat. native snake bites just go under miscellaneous, its when some one died,s of a native snake bite do it really get reported because check is then needed to take place on the venom serum to make sure that serum is still good to use, and the type of snake in question has not gone or going though an evolutional change.

try thinking for once.
OK. Thinking about what ? Not putting on a helmet ?
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]B. L.[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Stillness[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]News Fanatic[/bold] wrote: Most doctors probably never see a snake bite in their entire careers. This must make one difficult to identify.[/p][/quote]not city ones you probley be right, snake bites in the uk are mainly dealt with at the nearest GP or clinic. and most go unreported.[/p][/quote]How the hell can you know that most go unreported if most go unreported? God he makes my head hurt at times lol.[/p][/quote]As I've suggested to others, please put on a helmet before going near the brick wall. :)[/p][/quote]do a gp report every cold out break no they dont, its to minor to worry about and is not a general public threat. native snake bites just go under miscellaneous, its when some one died,s of a native snake bite do it really get reported because check is then needed to take place on the venom serum to make sure that serum is still good to use, and the type of snake in question has not gone or going though an evolutional change. try thinking for once.[/p][/quote]OK. Thinking about what ? Not putting on a helmet ? B. L.
  • Score: 0

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