Motorist pays parking fine - with 29 cheques!

Daily Echo: Motorist pays parking fine - with 29 cheques! Motorist pays parking fine - with 29 cheques!

A Southampton motorist who was caught illegally parked in a disabled bay sent in 29 cheques to pay the fine.

The driver was handed a parking ticket after being caught by car park officials at Bournemouth’s Castlepoint shopping complex.

The female driver of the Volvo car settled the fine by sending in cheques worth £1 and £2, but because she paid up within 10 days the £100 fine was reduced to £60.

Castlepoint manager Peter Matthews said he could see the funny side.

He said: “In one sense it’s quite funny and in another sense she is making a point.

“But by parking in a disabled bay without a blue badge, her point about the way she thinks she can behave has already been made.”

The Volvo, registration number T819 JPP, is registered to a Southampton address and was ticketed at 11.45am on February 15.

Were you the driver of the car? If so contact the Daily Echo newsdesk on 023 80424 504

Comments (29)

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8:19am Tue 28 Feb 12

olddellsaint says...

I don't see the funny side, it's the case of this person don't care about disabled person's, to the average disabled person 50 yards is the aquivalant of 5 miles for an able person to walk. that woman sould hold her head in shame.
I don't see the funny side, it's the case of this person don't care about disabled person's, to the average disabled person 50 yards is the aquivalant of 5 miles for an able person to walk. that woman sould hold her head in shame. olddellsaint

8:20am Tue 28 Feb 12

Taskforce 141 says...

Perhaps she can only park in disabled bays, as they give her enough room to make a hash of parking like some other ladies I know... lol
Perhaps she can only park in disabled bays, as they give her enough room to make a hash of parking like some other ladies I know... lol Taskforce 141

8:38am Tue 28 Feb 12

Bazil Brush says...

Taskforce 141 wrote:
Perhaps she can only park in disabled bays, as they give her enough room to make a hash of parking like some other ladies I know... lol
Ha Ha!! Love it!!
[quote][p][bold]Taskforce 141[/bold] wrote: Perhaps she can only park in disabled bays, as they give her enough room to make a hash of parking like some other ladies I know... lol[/p][/quote]Ha Ha!! Love it!! Bazil Brush

9:14am Tue 28 Feb 12

Essruu says...

I don't understand why disabled bays have to be closest to the shops anyway. Most of them have got wheels, so they can just roll up to the stores with little effort. Plus, they're going to take ages to get around, shop and load their wheelchairs back in their little cars: so why not put the disabled bays at the back of the car parks and keep the nearer ones for able-bodied people who just need a couple of things and are in a hurry, so they can run in quickly?
I don't understand why disabled bays have to be closest to the shops anyway. Most of them have got wheels, so they can just roll up to the stores with little effort. Plus, they're going to take ages to get around, shop and load their wheelchairs back in their little cars: so why not put the disabled bays at the back of the car parks and keep the nearer ones for able-bodied people who just need a couple of things and are in a hurry, so they can run in quickly? Essruu

9:25am Tue 28 Feb 12

wossit says...

Is there more families than disabled ? If so which think maybe the case why is there so many disabled bays to ratio of family bays. My local store seems to have 50 bays and half of them are empty.
Is there more families than disabled ? If so which think maybe the case why is there so many disabled bays to ratio of family bays. My local store seems to have 50 bays and half of them are empty. wossit

9:25am Tue 28 Feb 12

Linesman says...

Essruu wrote:
I don't understand why disabled bays have to be closest to the shops anyway. Most of them have got wheels, so they can just roll up to the stores with little effort. Plus, they're going to take ages to get around, shop and load their wheelchairs back in their little cars: so why not put the disabled bays at the back of the car parks and keep the nearer ones for able-bodied people who just need a couple of things and are in a hurry, so they can run in quickly?
I can understand why disabled bays are closest to the shops because I realise that not everyone with a mobility problem has a mobility scooter.

What I cannot understand is why 'parent and child' bays are also closest to the shop. The shop's trollys have a seat for the child, and if they are big enough to walk, and have walked round the shop, they could manage walk to the car.
[quote][p][bold]Essruu[/bold] wrote: I don't understand why disabled bays have to be closest to the shops anyway. Most of them have got wheels, so they can just roll up to the stores with little effort. Plus, they're going to take ages to get around, shop and load their wheelchairs back in their little cars: so why not put the disabled bays at the back of the car parks and keep the nearer ones for able-bodied people who just need a couple of things and are in a hurry, so they can run in quickly?[/p][/quote]I can understand why disabled bays are closest to the shops because I realise that not everyone with a mobility problem has a mobility scooter. What I cannot understand is why 'parent and child' bays are also closest to the shop. The shop's trollys have a seat for the child, and if they are big enough to walk, and have walked round the shop, they could manage walk to the car. Linesman

9:28am Tue 28 Feb 12

andrwingrm says...

I think the lack of respect to disabled bays could be down to the vast number of blue badge owners who can get out of a car and quite easily run into the shop. That and the fact there are far too many disabled bays in carparks anyway. How often is it that the only spare spaces are blue badge ones? It is irritating to say the least when there are no other bays available. Saying that however people know the risks of parking there when they are not allowed to so probably shouldn't be so petty when they do get a ticket.
I think the lack of respect to disabled bays could be down to the vast number of blue badge owners who can get out of a car and quite easily run into the shop. That and the fact there are far too many disabled bays in carparks anyway. How often is it that the only spare spaces are blue badge ones? It is irritating to say the least when there are no other bays available. Saying that however people know the risks of parking there when they are not allowed to so probably shouldn't be so petty when they do get a ticket. andrwingrm

9:28am Tue 28 Feb 12

News Fanatic says...

I guess the picture is very old because I thought Virgin Megastores became Zavvi and then folded.
I guess the picture is very old because I thought Virgin Megastores became Zavvi and then folded. News Fanatic

9:33am Tue 28 Feb 12

Essruu says...

Linesman wrote:
Essruu wrote: I don't understand why disabled bays have to be closest to the shops anyway. Most of them have got wheels, so they can just roll up to the stores with little effort. Plus, they're going to take ages to get around, shop and load their wheelchairs back in their little cars: so why not put the disabled bays at the back of the car parks and keep the nearer ones for able-bodied people who just need a couple of things and are in a hurry, so they can run in quickly?
I can understand why disabled bays are closest to the shops because I realise that not everyone with a mobility problem has a mobility scooter. What I cannot understand is why 'parent and child' bays are also closest to the shop. The shop's trollys have a seat for the child, and if they are big enough to walk, and have walked round the shop, they could manage walk to the car.
Well they need to paint new signs on the parking bays then. As shown in the photo above, the standard disabled logo is of one of them in a wheelchair. There is no reason why these wheeled disableds can't be at the back of the car park - perhaps on a slope so they can just free-wheel to the store entrances. A new logo can then be designed for disableds without wheelchairs (maybe showing one on crutches) and these can be closer to the store as at least they're making an effort and getting some exercise.
[quote][p][bold]Linesman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Essruu[/bold] wrote: I don't understand why disabled bays have to be closest to the shops anyway. Most of them have got wheels, so they can just roll up to the stores with little effort. Plus, they're going to take ages to get around, shop and load their wheelchairs back in their little cars: so why not put the disabled bays at the back of the car parks and keep the nearer ones for able-bodied people who just need a couple of things and are in a hurry, so they can run in quickly?[/p][/quote]I can understand why disabled bays are closest to the shops because I realise that not everyone with a mobility problem has a mobility scooter. What I cannot understand is why 'parent and child' bays are also closest to the shop. The shop's trollys have a seat for the child, and if they are big enough to walk, and have walked round the shop, they could manage walk to the car.[/p][/quote]Well they need to paint new signs on the parking bays then. As shown in the photo above, the standard disabled logo is of one of them in a wheelchair. There is no reason why these wheeled disableds can't be at the back of the car park - perhaps on a slope so they can just free-wheel to the store entrances. A new logo can then be designed for disableds without wheelchairs (maybe showing one on crutches) and these can be closer to the store as at least they're making an effort and getting some exercise. Essruu

9:33am Tue 28 Feb 12

wossit says...

I think the lack of respect to disabled bays could be down to the vast number of blue badge owners who can get out of a car and quite easily run into the shop.

andrwingrm that is so true blue badges are a joke
I think the lack of respect to disabled bays could be down to the vast number of blue badge owners who can get out of a car and quite easily run into the shop. andrwingrm that is so true blue badges are a joke wossit

9:38am Tue 28 Feb 12

The Wickham Man says...

Essruu wrote:
I don't understand why disabled bays have to be closest to the shops anyway. Most of them have got wheels, so they can just roll up to the stores with little effort. Plus, they're going to take ages to get around, shop and load their wheelchairs back in their little cars: so why not put the disabled bays at the back of the car parks and keep the nearer ones for able-bodied people who just need a couple of things and are in a hurry, so they can run in quickly?
Naughty! Anyone would think you were trying to snare the humourless with a dash of irony!
[quote][p][bold]Essruu[/bold] wrote: I don't understand why disabled bays have to be closest to the shops anyway. Most of them have got wheels, so they can just roll up to the stores with little effort. Plus, they're going to take ages to get around, shop and load their wheelchairs back in their little cars: so why not put the disabled bays at the back of the car parks and keep the nearer ones for able-bodied people who just need a couple of things and are in a hurry, so they can run in quickly?[/p][/quote]Naughty! Anyone would think you were trying to snare the humourless with a dash of irony! The Wickham Man

9:40am Tue 28 Feb 12

teamgreen says...

in the photo it has tape around the bays and a shopping trolley in one bay.if a car can get a ticket then what is this poor trolley going to get then. : )
and yes the amount of people miss using the bays with badges is on the up,most of the people in wheelchairs you see are in the mid 30's and very overweight.if you have a true disablity then that is fine but because you are fat and your legs cant take the strain stop eating fast foods, smoking and drinking boozeing and try walking abit.
in the photo it has tape around the bays and a shopping trolley in one bay.if a car can get a ticket then what is this poor trolley going to get then. : ) and yes the amount of people miss using the bays with badges is on the up,most of the people in wheelchairs you see are in the mid 30's and very overweight.if you have a true disablity then that is fine but because you are fat and your legs cant take the strain stop eating fast foods, smoking and drinking boozeing and try walking abit. teamgreen

9:40am Tue 28 Feb 12

freemantlegirl2 says...

andrwingrm wrote:
I think the lack of respect to disabled bays could be down to the vast number of blue badge owners who can get out of a car and quite easily run into the shop. That and the fact there are far too many disabled bays in carparks anyway. How often is it that the only spare spaces are blue badge ones? It is irritating to say the least when there are no other bays available. Saying that however people know the risks of parking there when they are not allowed to so probably shouldn't be so petty when they do get a ticket.
Once again these myths need correcting.

It is not always the driver of a car who is the Badge Holder, the Badge holder could still be inside the car and waiting to get out, or in. Case in question when a parent/carer has a disabled child. I got this in Hedge End, I'd helped my boys get into the car first and then put the shopping in. This man came up to me screeching that I wasn't disabled, I said no but my son is and opened the door. He ran off very embarrassed without an apology.

The second myth is that not all disability is visible! my mum had a Blue Badge when she had terminal cancer but she didn't have it tatooed on her head. She was capable of walking a few yards but then had to sit down. Another being someone with heart disease or breathing problem, again not outwardly visible.

Able bodied people don't have to park near shops. In fact I find it quite a relief when i don't have to search round for a bay when i don't have my sons with me, see peopel without badges in them, get wound up. parking a way away and having a stroll is quite appreciated!

people who moan about disabled bays should walk a mile in my or a disabled person's shoes who, going out, becomes a major incident and has to be planned carefully!! peopel who also moan about it need to get a grip. If they had a major illness or accident and suddenly had to live with this day in and day out, they would change their view in an instant guaranteed.

I'm not sure about the Echo publishing the registration plate, that is a bit out of order. But this woman should be ashamed of herself frankly.
[quote][p][bold]andrwingrm[/bold] wrote: I think the lack of respect to disabled bays could be down to the vast number of blue badge owners who can get out of a car and quite easily run into the shop. That and the fact there are far too many disabled bays in carparks anyway. How often is it that the only spare spaces are blue badge ones? It is irritating to say the least when there are no other bays available. Saying that however people know the risks of parking there when they are not allowed to so probably shouldn't be so petty when they do get a ticket.[/p][/quote]Once again these myths need correcting. It is not always the driver of a car who is the Badge Holder, the Badge holder could still be inside the car and waiting to get out, or in. Case in question when a parent/carer has a disabled child. I got this in Hedge End, I'd helped my boys get into the car first and then put the shopping in. This man came up to me screeching that I wasn't disabled, I said no but my son is and opened the door. He ran off very embarrassed without an apology. The second myth is that not all disability is visible! my mum had a Blue Badge when she had terminal cancer but she didn't have it tatooed on her head. She was capable of walking a few yards but then had to sit down. Another being someone with heart disease or breathing problem, again not outwardly visible. Able bodied people don't have to park near shops. In fact I find it quite a relief when i don't have to search round for a bay when i don't have my sons with me, see peopel without badges in them, get wound up. parking a way away and having a stroll is quite appreciated! people who moan about disabled bays should walk a mile in my or a disabled person's shoes who, going out, becomes a major incident and has to be planned carefully!! peopel who also moan about it need to get a grip. If they had a major illness or accident and suddenly had to live with this day in and day out, they would change their view in an instant guaranteed. I'm not sure about the Echo publishing the registration plate, that is a bit out of order. But this woman should be ashamed of herself frankly. freemantlegirl2

10:11am Tue 28 Feb 12

Dasal says...

Nice one DE !!
Now come on lady................
.get on this thread and defend yourself !!!
Nice one DE !! Now come on lady................ .get on this thread and defend yourself !!! Dasal

10:25am Tue 28 Feb 12

freefinker says...

.. well said fmg2.
Why are there so many people posting on this site who are incapable of even a small modicum of thought before they bash out all the usual rubbish about the disabled and the blue badge scheme?
.. well said fmg2. Why are there so many people posting on this site who are incapable of even a small modicum of thought before they bash out all the usual rubbish about the disabled and the blue badge scheme? freefinker

10:42am Tue 28 Feb 12

bigfella777 says...

A disabled bay is for people on wheels? what a load of absolute nonsense on here, what about people with a heart condition or who carry an oxygen cylinder or who have chronic arthritis?
Some people on here really do epitomise the general Neanderthal populous of Southampton.
A disabled bay is for people on wheels? what a load of absolute nonsense on here, what about people with a heart condition or who carry an oxygen cylinder or who have chronic arthritis? Some people on here really do epitomise the general Neanderthal populous of Southampton. bigfella777

11:04am Tue 28 Feb 12

freefinker says...

bigfella777 wrote:
A disabled bay is for people on wheels? what a load of absolute nonsense on here, what about people with a heart condition or who carry an oxygen cylinder or who have chronic arthritis?
Some people on here really do epitomise the general Neanderthal populous of Southampton.
.. be careful - that's a gross insult to Neanderthals
[quote][p][bold]bigfella777[/bold] wrote: A disabled bay is for people on wheels? what a load of absolute nonsense on here, what about people with a heart condition or who carry an oxygen cylinder or who have chronic arthritis? Some people on here really do epitomise the general Neanderthal populous of Southampton.[/p][/quote].. be careful - that's a gross insult to Neanderthals freefinker

11:20am Tue 28 Feb 12

BenjiWinsor says...

Well said freemantlegirl2, someone with experience and sense.

Unfortunately the motive of those who berate blue badge holders is often a mix of jealousy and spite. They have no idea what it is like to have chronic pain or a disability.

As long as the blue badge was applied for by the user then they have been assessed as needing it by their local council and that should be sufficient for others to accept.
Well said freemantlegirl2, someone with experience and sense. Unfortunately the motive of those who berate blue badge holders is often a mix of jealousy and spite. They have no idea what it is like to have chronic pain or a disability. As long as the blue badge was applied for by the user then they have been assessed as needing it by their local council and that should be sufficient for others to accept. BenjiWinsor

11:24am Tue 28 Feb 12

George4th says...

freemantlegirl2 wrote:
andrwingrm wrote:
I think the lack of respect to disabled bays could be down to the vast number of blue badge owners who can get out of a car and quite easily run into the shop. That and the fact there are far too many disabled bays in carparks anyway. How often is it that the only spare spaces are blue badge ones? It is irritating to say the least when there are no other bays available. Saying that however people know the risks of parking there when they are not allowed to so probably shouldn't be so petty when they do get a ticket.
Once again these myths need correcting.

It is not always the driver of a car who is the Badge Holder, the Badge holder could still be inside the car and waiting to get out, or in. Case in question when a parent/carer has a disabled child. I got this in Hedge End, I'd helped my boys get into the car first and then put the shopping in. This man came up to me screeching that I wasn't disabled, I said no but my son is and opened the door. He ran off very embarrassed without an apology.

The second myth is that not all disability is visible! my mum had a Blue Badge when she had terminal cancer but she didn't have it tatooed on her head. She was capable of walking a few yards but then had to sit down. Another being someone with heart disease or breathing problem, again not outwardly visible.

Able bodied people don't have to park near shops. In fact I find it quite a relief when i don't have to search round for a bay when i don't have my sons with me, see peopel without badges in them, get wound up. parking a way away and having a stroll is quite appreciated!

people who moan about disabled bays should walk a mile in my or a disabled person's shoes who, going out, becomes a major incident and has to be planned carefully!! peopel who also moan about it need to get a grip. If they had a major illness or accident and suddenly had to live with this day in and day out, they would change their view in an instant guaranteed.

I'm not sure about the Echo publishing the registration plate, that is a bit out of order. But this woman should be ashamed of herself frankly.
Entirely agree. Good riposte to these crass people who wallow in their own ignorance, including the lady who got fined!
[quote][p][bold]freemantlegirl2[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]andrwingrm[/bold] wrote: I think the lack of respect to disabled bays could be down to the vast number of blue badge owners who can get out of a car and quite easily run into the shop. That and the fact there are far too many disabled bays in carparks anyway. How often is it that the only spare spaces are blue badge ones? It is irritating to say the least when there are no other bays available. Saying that however people know the risks of parking there when they are not allowed to so probably shouldn't be so petty when they do get a ticket.[/p][/quote]Once again these myths need correcting. It is not always the driver of a car who is the Badge Holder, the Badge holder could still be inside the car and waiting to get out, or in. Case in question when a parent/carer has a disabled child. I got this in Hedge End, I'd helped my boys get into the car first and then put the shopping in. This man came up to me screeching that I wasn't disabled, I said no but my son is and opened the door. He ran off very embarrassed without an apology. The second myth is that not all disability is visible! my mum had a Blue Badge when she had terminal cancer but she didn't have it tatooed on her head. She was capable of walking a few yards but then had to sit down. Another being someone with heart disease or breathing problem, again not outwardly visible. Able bodied people don't have to park near shops. In fact I find it quite a relief when i don't have to search round for a bay when i don't have my sons with me, see peopel without badges in them, get wound up. parking a way away and having a stroll is quite appreciated! people who moan about disabled bays should walk a mile in my or a disabled person's shoes who, going out, becomes a major incident and has to be planned carefully!! peopel who also moan about it need to get a grip. If they had a major illness or accident and suddenly had to live with this day in and day out, they would change their view in an instant guaranteed. I'm not sure about the Echo publishing the registration plate, that is a bit out of order. But this woman should be ashamed of herself frankly.[/p][/quote]Entirely agree. Good riposte to these crass people who wallow in their own ignorance, including the lady who got fined! George4th

12:13pm Tue 28 Feb 12

John500 says...

The only point this lady is making is that she will happily deprive disabled people of their facilities in favor of her own pig headed convenience and when brought to task will be as awkward as possible about it.
Selfish and contemptuous behavior, not funny and no point to it, she should be ashamed.
The only point this lady is making is that she will happily deprive disabled people of their facilities in favor of her own pig headed convenience and when brought to task will be as awkward as possible about it. Selfish and contemptuous behavior, not funny and no point to it, she should be ashamed. John500

12:41pm Tue 28 Feb 12

Sure says...

I cannot understand why there is no charge for disabled bays. Disabled does not mean you are short of money. I wonder how many people would abuse these bays if they still had to pay.
I cannot understand why there is no charge for disabled bays. Disabled does not mean you are short of money. I wonder how many people would abuse these bays if they still had to pay. Sure

1:14pm Tue 28 Feb 12

townieboy says...

I parked at B&Q at nursling at 7.45pm at night to pop in for an item. No other person was in the carpark yet when i came out someone had clued a sticker on my windscreen saying disabled only. If i would have caught them believe me they would have been disabled very quickly.
I parked at B&Q at nursling at 7.45pm at night to pop in for an item. No other person was in the carpark yet when i came out someone had clued a sticker on my windscreen saying disabled only. If i would have caught them believe me they would have been disabled very quickly. townieboy

7:58pm Tue 28 Feb 12

dolomiteman says...

The driver was NOT illegally parked, you can not park illegally on private land that you have been invited on to, the car park operators do not issues fines they issue a notice asking you to pay because you have not abidded by their rule there is no law to say these request for money have to be paid and if you do not pay they threaten you with pretend solicitors or balliffs and official looking letters but can not atke any action to retreive the 'fine'. Only the police and council traffic enforcemnet officers (traffic wardens) can issue parking fines.
The driver was NOT illegally parked, you can not park illegally on private land that you have been invited on to, the car park operators do not issues fines they issue a notice asking you to pay because you have not abidded by their rule there is no law to say these request for money have to be paid and if you do not pay they threaten you with pretend solicitors or balliffs and official looking letters but can not atke any action to retreive the 'fine'. Only the police and council traffic enforcemnet officers (traffic wardens) can issue parking fines. dolomiteman

8:40pm Tue 28 Feb 12

rabbitlady says...

My father is terminally ill with lung cancer induced by asbestos. He has a blue badge because he is unable to walk great distances without getting out of breath. Being able to park close to a supermarket or similar means that he is able to enter the shop without being out of breath before he actually starts his shopping. People shouldn't comment on news feeds if they haven't had any personal experience of the topic in question.
My father is terminally ill with lung cancer induced by asbestos. He has a blue badge because he is unable to walk great distances without getting out of breath. Being able to park close to a supermarket or similar means that he is able to enter the shop without being out of breath before he actually starts his shopping. People shouldn't comment on news feeds if they haven't had any personal experience of the topic in question. rabbitlady

11:19pm Tue 28 Feb 12

cantthinkofone says...

“But by parking in a disabled bay without a blue badge, her point about the way she thinks she can behave has already been made.”

Nice retort by the centre manager there.
“But by parking in a disabled bay without a blue badge, her point about the way she thinks she can behave has already been made.” Nice retort by the centre manager there. cantthinkofone

11:21pm Tue 28 Feb 12

cantthinkofone says...

Linesman wrote:
Essruu wrote:
I don't understand why disabled bays have to be closest to the shops anyway. Most of them have got wheels, so they can just roll up to the stores with little effort. Plus, they're going to take ages to get around, shop and load their wheelchairs back in their little cars: so why not put the disabled bays at the back of the car parks and keep the nearer ones for able-bodied people who just need a couple of things and are in a hurry, so they can run in quickly?
I can understand why disabled bays are closest to the shops because I realise that not everyone with a mobility problem has a mobility scooter.

What I cannot understand is why 'parent and child' bays are also closest to the shop. The shop's trollys have a seat for the child, and if they are big enough to walk, and have walked round the shop, they could manage walk to the car.
I think the point with children is less about their ability to walk, and more about the danger of them getting run over in car parks. They're below sight level for drivers, and it may be that mum/dad can't hold their hands whilst also carrying the shopping. Yes, I know kids should be brought up to behave sensibly and not dash around in car parks, but the truth is that a lot aren't.
[quote][p][bold]Linesman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Essruu[/bold] wrote: I don't understand why disabled bays have to be closest to the shops anyway. Most of them have got wheels, so they can just roll up to the stores with little effort. Plus, they're going to take ages to get around, shop and load their wheelchairs back in their little cars: so why not put the disabled bays at the back of the car parks and keep the nearer ones for able-bodied people who just need a couple of things and are in a hurry, so they can run in quickly?[/p][/quote]I can understand why disabled bays are closest to the shops because I realise that not everyone with a mobility problem has a mobility scooter. What I cannot understand is why 'parent and child' bays are also closest to the shop. The shop's trollys have a seat for the child, and if they are big enough to walk, and have walked round the shop, they could manage walk to the car.[/p][/quote]I think the point with children is less about their ability to walk, and more about the danger of them getting run over in car parks. They're below sight level for drivers, and it may be that mum/dad can't hold their hands whilst also carrying the shopping. Yes, I know kids should be brought up to behave sensibly and not dash around in car parks, but the truth is that a lot aren't. cantthinkofone

8:54am Wed 29 Feb 12

olddellsaint says...

freemantlegirl2 wrote:
andrwingrm wrote:
I think the lack of respect to disabled bays could be down to the vast number of blue badge owners who can get out of a car and quite easily run into the shop. That and the fact there are far too many disabled bays in carparks anyway. How often is it that the only spare spaces are blue badge ones? It is irritating to say the least when there are no other bays available. Saying that however people know the risks of parking there when they are not allowed to so probably shouldn't be so petty when they do get a ticket.
Once again these myths need correcting.

It is not always the driver of a car who is the Badge Holder, the Badge holder could still be inside the car and waiting to get out, or in. Case in question when a parent/carer has a disabled child. I got this in Hedge End, I'd helped my boys get into the car first and then put the shopping in. This man came up to me screeching that I wasn't disabled, I said no but my son is and opened the door. He ran off very embarrassed without an apology.

The second myth is that not all disability is visible! my mum had a Blue Badge when she had terminal cancer but she didn't have it tatooed on her head. She was capable of walking a few yards but then had to sit down. Another being someone with heart disease or breathing problem, again not outwardly visible.

Able bodied people don't have to park near shops. In fact I find it quite a relief when i don't have to search round for a bay when i don't have my sons with me, see peopel without badges in them, get wound up. parking a way away and having a stroll is quite appreciated!

people who moan about disabled bays should walk a mile in my or a disabled person's shoes who, going out, becomes a major incident and has to be planned carefully!! peopel who also moan about it need to get a grip. If they had a major illness or accident and suddenly had to live with this day in and day out, they would change their view in an instant guaranteed.

I'm not sure about the Echo publishing the registration plate, that is a bit out of order. But this woman should be ashamed of herself frankly.
I agree with you, also may I add; a disabled person is not a 3rd class citizen, also most of our disabilities are not of our makings
[quote][p][bold]freemantlegirl2[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]andrwingrm[/bold] wrote: I think the lack of respect to disabled bays could be down to the vast number of blue badge owners who can get out of a car and quite easily run into the shop. That and the fact there are far too many disabled bays in carparks anyway. How often is it that the only spare spaces are blue badge ones? It is irritating to say the least when there are no other bays available. Saying that however people know the risks of parking there when they are not allowed to so probably shouldn't be so petty when they do get a ticket.[/p][/quote]Once again these myths need correcting. It is not always the driver of a car who is the Badge Holder, the Badge holder could still be inside the car and waiting to get out, or in. Case in question when a parent/carer has a disabled child. I got this in Hedge End, I'd helped my boys get into the car first and then put the shopping in. This man came up to me screeching that I wasn't disabled, I said no but my son is and opened the door. He ran off very embarrassed without an apology. The second myth is that not all disability is visible! my mum had a Blue Badge when she had terminal cancer but she didn't have it tatooed on her head. She was capable of walking a few yards but then had to sit down. Another being someone with heart disease or breathing problem, again not outwardly visible. Able bodied people don't have to park near shops. In fact I find it quite a relief when i don't have to search round for a bay when i don't have my sons with me, see peopel without badges in them, get wound up. parking a way away and having a stroll is quite appreciated! people who moan about disabled bays should walk a mile in my or a disabled person's shoes who, going out, becomes a major incident and has to be planned carefully!! peopel who also moan about it need to get a grip. If they had a major illness or accident and suddenly had to live with this day in and day out, they would change their view in an instant guaranteed. I'm not sure about the Echo publishing the registration plate, that is a bit out of order. But this woman should be ashamed of herself frankly.[/p][/quote]I agree with you, also may I add; a disabled person is not a 3rd class citizen, also most of our disabilities are not of our makings olddellsaint

7:36am Thu 1 Mar 12

Essruu says...

olddellsaint, are you a disabled on wheels?
olddellsaint, are you a disabled on wheels? Essruu

2:53pm Thu 1 Mar 12

chunky_lover says...

oh come on , there's always far too many disabled spaces anyway, this isn't news - it's nonsense.
oh come on , there's always far too many disabled spaces anyway, this isn't news - it's nonsense. chunky_lover

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