House sparrow most often seen bird in Hampshire gardens

Daily Echo: The house sparrow is Hampshire's most-seen bird. The house sparrow is Hampshire's most-seen bird.

THE house sparrow has come out top in a county-wide bird survey.

In Hampshire it was the bird most often seen in people’s gardens as part of the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds’ (RSPB) Big Garden Birdwatch.

It knocked the blue tit off the top spot, having been seen on an average of 3.5 birds per garden.

The woodpigeon came into the top three, pushing the blackbird into fourth.

Altogether 600,000 people took part and counted more than nine million birds.

The survey revealed that starling numbers were at an all-time low since the survey began 30 years ago – they have dropped from 15 in 1979 to an average three.

This figure was even lower in Hampshire at 2.1, with possible reasons for the decline changes in their feeding habitats.

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2:28pm Wed 11 Apr 12

southy says...

But how many people know the difference between House Sparrow, Hedge Sparrow, Rock Sparrow, Worthen Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow. there are 25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world and a few of them you are likely to see here.
But how many people know the difference between House Sparrow, Hedge Sparrow, Rock Sparrow, Worthen Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow. there are 25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world and a few of them you are likely to see here. southy
  • Score: 0

3:06pm Wed 11 Apr 12

Huffter says...

southy wrote:
But how many people know the difference between House Sparrow, Hedge Sparrow, Rock Sparrow, Worthen Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow. there are 25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world and a few of them you are likely to see here.
What does it matter if people can't identify all 25 sub-species of the House Sparrow? The thing that worries me most is that you haven't blamed it on the Tories (and they certainly have more than 25 sub-species).
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: But how many people know the difference between House Sparrow, Hedge Sparrow, Rock Sparrow, Worthen Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow. there are 25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world and a few of them you are likely to see here.[/p][/quote]What does it matter if people can't identify all 25 sub-species of the House Sparrow? The thing that worries me most is that you haven't blamed it on the Tories (and they certainly have more than 25 sub-species). Huffter
  • Score: 0

3:59pm Wed 11 Apr 12

BillyTheKid says...

Huffter wrote:
southy wrote:
But how many people know the difference between House Sparrow, Hedge Sparrow, Rock Sparrow, Worthen Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow. there are 25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world and a few of them you are likely to see here.
What does it matter if people can't identify all 25 sub-species of the House Sparrow? The thing that worries me most is that you haven't blamed it on the Tories (and they certainly have more than 25 sub-species).
Excellent ! Pure Echo forum brilliance !
You really knocked southy for six with that !
[quote][p][bold]Huffter[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: But how many people know the difference between House Sparrow, Hedge Sparrow, Rock Sparrow, Worthen Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow. there are 25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world and a few of them you are likely to see here.[/p][/quote]What does it matter if people can't identify all 25 sub-species of the House Sparrow? The thing that worries me most is that you haven't blamed it on the Tories (and they certainly have more than 25 sub-species).[/p][/quote]Excellent ! Pure Echo forum brilliance ! You really knocked southy for six with that ! BillyTheKid
  • Score: 0

7:51pm Wed 11 Apr 12

Georgem says...

Huffter wrote:
southy wrote:
But how many people know the difference between House Sparrow, Hedge Sparrow, Rock Sparrow, Worthen Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow. there are 25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world and a few of them you are likely to see here.
What does it matter if people can't identify all 25 sub-species of the House Sparrow? The thing that worries me most is that you haven't blamed it on the Tories (and they certainly have more than 25 sub-species).
Ba-zing!
[quote][p][bold]Huffter[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: But how many people know the difference between House Sparrow, Hedge Sparrow, Rock Sparrow, Worthen Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow. there are 25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world and a few of them you are likely to see here.[/p][/quote]What does it matter if people can't identify all 25 sub-species of the House Sparrow? The thing that worries me most is that you haven't blamed it on the Tories (and they certainly have more than 25 sub-species).[/p][/quote]Ba-zing! Georgem
  • Score: 0

8:56pm Wed 11 Apr 12

freefinker says...

southy wrote:
But how many people know the difference between House Sparrow, Hedge Sparrow, Rock Sparrow, Worthen Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow. there are 25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world and a few of them you are likely to see here.
southy, next time you look up Wikipedia in an attempt to make yourself appear credible, I suggest you actually read and then understand what is said.

There are NOT ‘25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world’ as you say, but just one - Passer domesticus.

Wikipedia does say, however, that the House Sparrow is ‘One of about 25 species in the genus Passer’. You obviously do not know the meaning of the term ‘genus’.

The UK has only two resident sparrows (i.e. genus Passer) – the Tree Sparrow and House Sparrow.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: But how many people know the difference between House Sparrow, Hedge Sparrow, Rock Sparrow, Worthen Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow. there are 25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world and a few of them you are likely to see here.[/p][/quote]southy, next time you look up Wikipedia in an attempt to make yourself appear credible, I suggest you actually read and then understand what is said. There are NOT ‘25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world’ as you say, but just one - Passer domesticus. Wikipedia does say, however, that the House Sparrow is ‘One of about 25 species in the genus Passer’. You obviously do not know the meaning of the term ‘genus’. The UK has only two resident sparrows (i.e. genus Passer) – the Tree Sparrow and House Sparrow. freefinker
  • Score: 0

9:47pm Wed 11 Apr 12

BillyTheKid says...

So what happens now ? Are southy and freefinker gonna argue about............spa
rrows ?
So what happens now ? Are southy and freefinker gonna argue about............spa rrows ? BillyTheKid
  • Score: 0

10:41pm Wed 11 Apr 12

Huffter says...

My own personal survey suggests an increase in the number of tits in local government.
My own personal survey suggests an increase in the number of tits in local government. Huffter
  • Score: 0

11:11pm Wed 11 Apr 12

southy says...

freefinker wrote:
southy wrote:
But how many people know the difference between House Sparrow, Hedge Sparrow, Rock Sparrow, Worthen Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow. there are 25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world and a few of them you are likely to see here.
southy, next time you look up Wikipedia in an attempt to make yourself appear credible, I suggest you actually read and then understand what is said.

There are NOT ‘25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world’ as you say, but just one - Passer domesticus.

Wikipedia does say, however, that the House Sparrow is ‘One of about 25 species in the genus Passer’. You obviously do not know the meaning of the term ‘genus’.

The UK has only two resident sparrows (i.e. genus Passer) – the Tree Sparrow and House Sparrow.
No there is 25 sub-species of House Sparrows around the world, the one we get most common in the UK is Passer domesticus Passeridae, and its no its not from wikipedia its from a Bird and Egg books that you find the RSPB as writen a page on.
A Tree Sparrow is commonly called a Hedge Sparrow and its not a true sparrow its a Dunnock.
The Rock Sparrow is common Sparrow that you will see nesting in roofs and gutters of a building.
But just for you so you can learn some thing a link for you see I know your in to the Eviroment.

http://www.pbase.com
/mobish/all_sparrow_
species_together

lokk down the list of pictures and you see 3 different kinds of House Sparrows.
[quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: But how many people know the difference between House Sparrow, Hedge Sparrow, Rock Sparrow, Worthen Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow. there are 25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world and a few of them you are likely to see here.[/p][/quote]southy, next time you look up Wikipedia in an attempt to make yourself appear credible, I suggest you actually read and then understand what is said. There are NOT ‘25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world’ as you say, but just one - Passer domesticus. Wikipedia does say, however, that the House Sparrow is ‘One of about 25 species in the genus Passer’. You obviously do not know the meaning of the term ‘genus’. The UK has only two resident sparrows (i.e. genus Passer) – the Tree Sparrow and House Sparrow.[/p][/quote]No there is 25 sub-species of House Sparrows around the world, the one we get most common in the UK is Passer domesticus Passeridae, and its no its not from wikipedia its from a Bird and Egg books that you find the RSPB as writen a page on. A Tree Sparrow is commonly called a Hedge Sparrow and its not a true sparrow its a Dunnock. The Rock Sparrow is common Sparrow that you will see nesting in roofs and gutters of a building. But just for you so you can learn some thing a link for you see I know your in to the Eviroment. http://www.pbase.com /mobish/all_sparrow_ species_together lokk down the list of pictures and you see 3 different kinds of House Sparrows. southy
  • Score: 0

11:15pm Wed 11 Apr 12

southy says...

Oh also just for you Freefinker, how to tell the difference between a Dunnocks (Hedge Sparrow) and true Sparrows is by the bill, sparrows bills are thick, Dunnocks are thin and slender.
Oh also just for you Freefinker, how to tell the difference between a Dunnocks (Hedge Sparrow) and true Sparrows is by the bill, sparrows bills are thick, Dunnocks are thin and slender. southy
  • Score: 0

11:17pm Wed 11 Apr 12

southy says...

Georgem wrote:
Huffter wrote:
southy wrote:
But how many people know the difference between House Sparrow, Hedge Sparrow, Rock Sparrow, Worthen Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow. there are 25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world and a few of them you are likely to see here.
What does it matter if people can't identify all 25 sub-species of the House Sparrow? The thing that worries me most is that you haven't blamed it on the Tories (and they certainly have more than 25 sub-species).
Ba-zing!
That not 25 sub-species of Torys, thats 25 sub-human of Torys.
[quote][p][bold]Georgem[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Huffter[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: But how many people know the difference between House Sparrow, Hedge Sparrow, Rock Sparrow, Worthen Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow. there are 25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world and a few of them you are likely to see here.[/p][/quote]What does it matter if people can't identify all 25 sub-species of the House Sparrow? The thing that worries me most is that you haven't blamed it on the Tories (and they certainly have more than 25 sub-species).[/p][/quote]Ba-zing![/p][/quote]That not 25 sub-species of Torys, thats 25 sub-human of Torys. southy
  • Score: 0

12:34am Thu 12 Apr 12

freefinker says...

southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
southy wrote:
But how many people know the difference between House Sparrow, Hedge Sparrow, Rock Sparrow, Worthen Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow. there are 25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world and a few of them you are likely to see here.
southy, next time you look up Wikipedia in an attempt to make yourself appear credible, I suggest you actually read and then understand what is said.

There are NOT ‘25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world’ as you say, but just one - Passer domesticus.

Wikipedia does say, however, that the House Sparrow is ‘One of about 25 species in the genus Passer’. You obviously do not know the meaning of the term ‘genus’.

The UK has only two resident sparrows (i.e. genus Passer) – the Tree Sparrow and House Sparrow.
No there is 25 sub-species of House Sparrows around the world, the one we get most common in the UK is Passer domesticus Passeridae, and its no its not from wikipedia its from a Bird and Egg books that you find the RSPB as writen a page on.
A Tree Sparrow is commonly called a Hedge Sparrow and its not a true sparrow its a Dunnock.
The Rock Sparrow is common Sparrow that you will see nesting in roofs and gutters of a building.
But just for you so you can learn some thing a link for you see I know your in to the Eviroment.

http://www.pbase.com

/mobish/all_sparrow_

species_together

lokk down the list of pictures and you see 3 different kinds of House Sparrows.
.. you are a complete fool southy, as you dig yet another huge hole to fall into.

There is no sub-species 'Passer domesticus Passeridae' and you obviously have no idea of how the Linnaean system of classification actually works.

The classification hierarchy is thus: -
Passeridae - is, in fact, the Family.
Passer - is the Genus.
domesticus - is the Species – House Sparrow.

Even the link you quote is quite clear with its heading - ‘ALL Sparrow Species Together’ and only shows the ONE species called ‘House Sparrow’.

Their natural distribution is Europe and Asia, with introduction to the Americas, Africa and Australasia. Over this range there is obviously regional variation in appearance (just like Homo sapiens) and 12 have been named by one authority as sub-species. NONE are called your ridiculously muddled up 'Passer domesticus Passeridae'. Throughout almost all of their natural distribution (including all the UK) this authority names the sub-species as 'Passer domesticus domesticus’.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: But how many people know the difference between House Sparrow, Hedge Sparrow, Rock Sparrow, Worthen Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow. there are 25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world and a few of them you are likely to see here.[/p][/quote]southy, next time you look up Wikipedia in an attempt to make yourself appear credible, I suggest you actually read and then understand what is said. There are NOT ‘25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world’ as you say, but just one - Passer domesticus. Wikipedia does say, however, that the House Sparrow is ‘One of about 25 species in the genus Passer’. You obviously do not know the meaning of the term ‘genus’. The UK has only two resident sparrows (i.e. genus Passer) – the Tree Sparrow and House Sparrow.[/p][/quote]No there is 25 sub-species of House Sparrows around the world, the one we get most common in the UK is Passer domesticus Passeridae, and its no its not from wikipedia its from a Bird and Egg books that you find the RSPB as writen a page on. A Tree Sparrow is commonly called a Hedge Sparrow and its not a true sparrow its a Dunnock. The Rock Sparrow is common Sparrow that you will see nesting in roofs and gutters of a building. But just for you so you can learn some thing a link for you see I know your in to the Eviroment. http://www.pbase.com /mobish/all_sparrow_ species_together lokk down the list of pictures and you see 3 different kinds of House Sparrows.[/p][/quote].. you are a complete fool southy, as you dig yet another huge hole to fall into. There is no sub-species 'Passer domesticus Passeridae' and you obviously have no idea of how the Linnaean system of classification actually works. The classification hierarchy is thus: - Passeridae - is, in fact, the Family. Passer - is the Genus. domesticus - is the Species – House Sparrow. Even the link you quote is quite clear with its heading - ‘ALL Sparrow Species Together’ and only shows the ONE species called ‘House Sparrow’. Their natural distribution is Europe and Asia, with introduction to the Americas, Africa and Australasia. Over this range there is obviously regional variation in appearance (just like Homo sapiens) and 12 have been named by one authority as sub-species. NONE are called your ridiculously muddled up 'Passer domesticus Passeridae'. Throughout almost all of their natural distribution (including all the UK) this authority names the sub-species as 'Passer domesticus domesticus’. freefinker
  • Score: 0

12:51am Thu 12 Apr 12

freefinker says...

.. and, no southy, again you are WRONG when you say ‘A Tree Sparrow is commonly called a Hedge Sparrow and its not a true sparrow its a Dunnock.’

Tree Sparrow = Passer montanus.
Dunnock = Prunella modularis.
They are TOTALY different.
The Dunnock is NOT even in the Family Passeridae - it is in fact Prunellida.

The Rock Sparrow, Petronia petronia, is ‘very rare in Britain’ according to the RSPB.

One day you may possible realise you are not very bright – but I doubt it.
.. and, no southy, again you are WRONG when you say ‘A Tree Sparrow is commonly called a Hedge Sparrow and its not a true sparrow its a Dunnock.’ Tree Sparrow = Passer montanus. Dunnock = Prunella modularis. They are TOTALY different. The Dunnock is NOT even in the Family Passeridae - it is in fact Prunellida. The Rock Sparrow, Petronia petronia, is ‘very rare in Britain’ according to the RSPB. One day you may possible realise you are not very bright – but I doubt it. freefinker
  • Score: 0

12:53am Thu 12 Apr 12

freefinker says...

BillyTheKid wrote:
So what happens now ? Are southy and freefinker gonna argue about............spa

rrows ?
.. not argue.
southy makes it up, I correct.
[quote][p][bold]BillyTheKid[/bold] wrote: So what happens now ? Are southy and freefinker gonna argue about............spa rrows ?[/p][/quote].. not argue. southy makes it up, I correct. freefinker
  • Score: 0

11:37am Thu 12 Apr 12

southy says...

freefinker wrote:
southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
southy wrote:
But how many people know the difference between House Sparrow, Hedge Sparrow, Rock Sparrow, Worthen Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow. there are 25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world and a few of them you are likely to see here.
southy, next time you look up Wikipedia in an attempt to make yourself appear credible, I suggest you actually read and then understand what is said.

There are NOT ‘25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world’ as you say, but just one - Passer domesticus.

Wikipedia does say, however, that the House Sparrow is ‘One of about 25 species in the genus Passer’. You obviously do not know the meaning of the term ‘genus’.

The UK has only two resident sparrows (i.e. genus Passer) – the Tree Sparrow and House Sparrow.
No there is 25 sub-species of House Sparrows around the world, the one we get most common in the UK is Passer domesticus Passeridae, and its no its not from wikipedia its from a Bird and Egg books that you find the RSPB as writen a page on.
A Tree Sparrow is commonly called a Hedge Sparrow and its not a true sparrow its a Dunnock.
The Rock Sparrow is common Sparrow that you will see nesting in roofs and gutters of a building.
But just for you so you can learn some thing a link for you see I know your in to the Eviroment.

http://www.pbase.com


/mobish/all_sparrow_


species_together

lokk down the list of pictures and you see 3 different kinds of House Sparrows.
.. you are a complete fool southy, as you dig yet another huge hole to fall into.

There is no sub-species 'Passer domesticus Passeridae' and you obviously have no idea of how the Linnaean system of classification actually works.

The classification hierarchy is thus: -
Passeridae - is, in fact, the Family.
Passer - is the Genus.
domesticus - is the Species – House Sparrow.

Even the link you quote is quite clear with its heading - ‘ALL Sparrow Species Together’ and only shows the ONE species called ‘House Sparrow’.

Their natural distribution is Europe and Asia, with introduction to the Americas, Africa and Australasia. Over this range there is obviously regional variation in appearance (just like Homo sapiens) and 12 have been named by one authority as sub-species. NONE are called your ridiculously muddled up 'Passer domesticus Passeridae'. Throughout almost all of their natural distribution (including all the UK) this authority names the sub-species as 'Passer domesticus domesticus’.
Seems I have better understanding that your self Freefinker go and chat to Frank Vosper before you drop into that pit deeper or chat with Phil toy. 2 well known bird experts.
The Tree Sparrow commonly called the Hedge Sparrow is not a true Sparrow its a Dunnock, and its only people like your self that make silly errors like this.
[quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: But how many people know the difference between House Sparrow, Hedge Sparrow, Rock Sparrow, Worthen Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow. there are 25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world and a few of them you are likely to see here.[/p][/quote]southy, next time you look up Wikipedia in an attempt to make yourself appear credible, I suggest you actually read and then understand what is said. There are NOT ‘25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world’ as you say, but just one - Passer domesticus. Wikipedia does say, however, that the House Sparrow is ‘One of about 25 species in the genus Passer’. You obviously do not know the meaning of the term ‘genus’. The UK has only two resident sparrows (i.e. genus Passer) – the Tree Sparrow and House Sparrow.[/p][/quote]No there is 25 sub-species of House Sparrows around the world, the one we get most common in the UK is Passer domesticus Passeridae, and its no its not from wikipedia its from a Bird and Egg books that you find the RSPB as writen a page on. A Tree Sparrow is commonly called a Hedge Sparrow and its not a true sparrow its a Dunnock. The Rock Sparrow is common Sparrow that you will see nesting in roofs and gutters of a building. But just for you so you can learn some thing a link for you see I know your in to the Eviroment. http://www.pbase.com /mobish/all_sparrow_ species_together lokk down the list of pictures and you see 3 different kinds of House Sparrows.[/p][/quote].. you are a complete fool southy, as you dig yet another huge hole to fall into. There is no sub-species 'Passer domesticus Passeridae' and you obviously have no idea of how the Linnaean system of classification actually works. The classification hierarchy is thus: - Passeridae - is, in fact, the Family. Passer - is the Genus. domesticus - is the Species – House Sparrow. Even the link you quote is quite clear with its heading - ‘ALL Sparrow Species Together’ and only shows the ONE species called ‘House Sparrow’. Their natural distribution is Europe and Asia, with introduction to the Americas, Africa and Australasia. Over this range there is obviously regional variation in appearance (just like Homo sapiens) and 12 have been named by one authority as sub-species. NONE are called your ridiculously muddled up 'Passer domesticus Passeridae'. Throughout almost all of their natural distribution (including all the UK) this authority names the sub-species as 'Passer domesticus domesticus’.[/p][/quote]Seems I have better understanding that your self Freefinker go and chat to Frank Vosper before you drop into that pit deeper or chat with Phil toy. 2 well known bird experts. The Tree Sparrow commonly called the Hedge Sparrow is not a true Sparrow its a Dunnock, and its only people like your self that make silly errors like this. southy
  • Score: 0

11:40am Thu 12 Apr 12

southy says...

I hate putting up links it makes people lazy and start to expect every thing laid on a plate for them.
Another link for you. so you can correct your self.


http://birdtablenews
.com/2010/04/dunnock
-fact-sheet/
I hate putting up links it makes people lazy and start to expect every thing laid on a plate for them. Another link for you. so you can correct your self. http://birdtablenews .com/2010/04/dunnock -fact-sheet/ southy
  • Score: 0

1:22pm Thu 12 Apr 12

BillyTheKid says...

This thread is more interesting than the close observation of drying paint, but only marginally. Not that I've actually watched paint dry......but one has to use one's imagination. I suspect that watching anything dry would be somewhat demanding on one's ability to apply undivided attention and full concentration.......
sorry, am I boring you ? Well, I could talk about the brown rat.........no. In fact, I don't really think I have anything to say on the above matter, so I think I'll leave it..........just go and look out the window.........watch the lawn dry............yawww
wwwn.
This thread is more interesting than the close observation of drying paint, but only marginally. Not that I've actually watched paint dry......but one has to use one's imagination. I suspect that watching anything dry would be somewhat demanding on one's ability to apply undivided attention and full concentration....... sorry, am I boring you ? Well, I could talk about the brown rat.........no. In fact, I don't really think I have anything to say on the above matter, so I think I'll leave it..........just go and look out the window.........watch the lawn dry............yawww wwwn. BillyTheKid
  • Score: 0

3:14pm Thu 12 Apr 12

southy says...

BillyTheKid wrote:
This thread is more interesting than the close observation of drying paint, but only marginally. Not that I've actually watched paint dry......but one has to use one's imagination. I suspect that watching anything dry would be somewhat demanding on one's ability to apply undivided attention and full concentration.......

sorry, am I boring you ? Well, I could talk about the brown rat.........no. In fact, I don't really think I have anything to say on the above matter, so I think I'll leave it..........just go and look out the window.........watch the lawn dry............yawww

wwwn.
Well billy it make an interedting break from the normal mondaine things.

Freefinker phone up the local RSPCB officer Frank vosper and he will tell you the same thing I have done.
The Rock sparrow just because they put it on the watch list do not make it rare it is very common, if you read the RSPCB or the WWF they explain what they mean when they say a thing is rare, it do not mean they are hard to see or find it just means there numbers have drop below there normal population levels.
rare = below population levels.
extreme rare= population half of normal population levels.
critical rare= going extinct
extinct rare= not been seen in the species life cycle. (even this do not mean that they have gone, take a look at the Tasmanian Tiger thought be Hunted to extinction in 1936 then in 1995 one shows up out of the blue)
[quote][p][bold]BillyTheKid[/bold] wrote: This thread is more interesting than the close observation of drying paint, but only marginally. Not that I've actually watched paint dry......but one has to use one's imagination. I suspect that watching anything dry would be somewhat demanding on one's ability to apply undivided attention and full concentration....... sorry, am I boring you ? Well, I could talk about the brown rat.........no. In fact, I don't really think I have anything to say on the above matter, so I think I'll leave it..........just go and look out the window.........watch the lawn dry............yawww wwwn.[/p][/quote]Well billy it make an interedting break from the normal mondaine things. Freefinker phone up the local RSPCB officer Frank vosper and he will tell you the same thing I have done. The Rock sparrow just because they put it on the watch list do not make it rare it is very common, if you read the RSPCB or the WWF they explain what they mean when they say a thing is rare, it do not mean they are hard to see or find it just means there numbers have drop below there normal population levels. rare = below population levels. extreme rare= population half of normal population levels. critical rare= going extinct extinct rare= not been seen in the species life cycle. (even this do not mean that they have gone, take a look at the Tasmanian Tiger thought be Hunted to extinction in 1936 then in 1995 one shows up out of the blue) southy
  • Score: 0

5:42pm Thu 12 Apr 12

BillyTheKid says...

southy wrote:
BillyTheKid wrote:
This thread is more interesting than the close observation of drying paint, but only marginally. Not that I've actually watched paint dry......but one has to use one's imagination. I suspect that watching anything dry would be somewhat demanding on one's ability to apply undivided attention and full concentration.......


sorry, am I boring you ? Well, I could talk about the brown rat.........no. In fact, I don't really think I have anything to say on the above matter, so I think I'll leave it..........just go and look out the window.........watch the lawn dry............yawww


wwwn.
Well billy it make an interedting break from the normal mondaine things.

Freefinker phone up the local RSPCB officer Frank vosper and he will tell you the same thing I have done.
The Rock sparrow just because they put it on the watch list do not make it rare it is very common, if you read the RSPCB or the WWF they explain what they mean when they say a thing is rare, it do not mean they are hard to see or find it just means there numbers have drop below there normal population levels.
rare = below population levels.
extreme rare= population half of normal population levels.
critical rare= going extinct
extinct rare= not been seen in the species life cycle. (even this do not mean that they have gone, take a look at the Tasmanian Tiger thought be Hunted to extinction in 1936 then in 1995 one shows up out of the blue)
No chance of you becoming "extinct rare" is there, southy ?
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BillyTheKid[/bold] wrote: This thread is more interesting than the close observation of drying paint, but only marginally. Not that I've actually watched paint dry......but one has to use one's imagination. I suspect that watching anything dry would be somewhat demanding on one's ability to apply undivided attention and full concentration....... sorry, am I boring you ? Well, I could talk about the brown rat.........no. In fact, I don't really think I have anything to say on the above matter, so I think I'll leave it..........just go and look out the window.........watch the lawn dry............yawww wwwn.[/p][/quote]Well billy it make an interedting break from the normal mondaine things. Freefinker phone up the local RSPCB officer Frank vosper and he will tell you the same thing I have done. The Rock sparrow just because they put it on the watch list do not make it rare it is very common, if you read the RSPCB or the WWF they explain what they mean when they say a thing is rare, it do not mean they are hard to see or find it just means there numbers have drop below there normal population levels. rare = below population levels. extreme rare= population half of normal population levels. critical rare= going extinct extinct rare= not been seen in the species life cycle. (even this do not mean that they have gone, take a look at the Tasmanian Tiger thought be Hunted to extinction in 1936 then in 1995 one shows up out of the blue)[/p][/quote]No chance of you becoming "extinct rare" is there, southy ? BillyTheKid
  • Score: 0

7:04pm Thu 12 Apr 12

freefinker says...

southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
southy wrote:
But how many people know the difference between House Sparrow, Hedge Sparrow, Rock Sparrow, Worthen Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow. there are 25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world and a few of them you are likely to see here.
southy, next time you look up Wikipedia in an attempt to make yourself appear credible, I suggest you actually read and then understand what is said.

There are NOT ‘25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world’ as you say, but just one - Passer domesticus.

Wikipedia does say, however, that the House Sparrow is ‘One of about 25 species in the genus Passer’. You obviously do not know the meaning of the term ‘genus’.

The UK has only two resident sparrows (i.e. genus Passer) – the Tree Sparrow and House Sparrow.
No there is 25 sub-species of House Sparrows around the world, the one we get most common in the UK is Passer domesticus Passeridae, and its no its not from wikipedia its from a Bird and Egg books that you find the RSPB as writen a page on.
A Tree Sparrow is commonly called a Hedge Sparrow and its not a true sparrow its a Dunnock.
The Rock Sparrow is common Sparrow that you will see nesting in roofs and gutters of a building.
But just for you so you can learn some thing a link for you see I know your in to the Eviroment.

http://www.pbase.com



/mobish/all_sparrow_



species_together

lokk down the list of pictures and you see 3 different kinds of House Sparrows.
.. you are a complete fool southy, as you dig yet another huge hole to fall into.

There is no sub-species 'Passer domesticus Passeridae' and you obviously have no idea of how the Linnaean system of classification actually works.

The classification hierarchy is thus: -
Passeridae - is, in fact, the Family.
Passer - is the Genus.
domesticus - is the Species – House Sparrow.

Even the link you quote is quite clear with its heading - ‘ALL Sparrow Species Together’ and only shows the ONE species called ‘House Sparrow’.

Their natural distribution is Europe and Asia, with introduction to the Americas, Africa and Australasia. Over this range there is obviously regional variation in appearance (just like Homo sapiens) and 12 have been named by one authority as sub-species. NONE are called your ridiculously muddled up 'Passer domesticus Passeridae'. Throughout almost all of their natural distribution (including all the UK) this authority names the sub-species as 'Passer domesticus domesticus’.
Seems I have better understanding that your self Freefinker go and chat to Frank Vosper before you drop into that pit deeper or chat with Phil toy. 2 well known bird experts.
The Tree Sparrow commonly called the Hedge Sparrow is not a true Sparrow its a Dunnock, and its only people like your self that make silly errors like this.
.. southy, Frank Voysey is a very old mate of mine - known him for well over 20 years. He and Jean moved out the area a few years ago.

On bird ID and correct species names you are still totally wrong.

As I pointed out, the Tree Sparrow is in a totally different Family (let alone Genus) than the Dunnock - THEY ARE NOT THE SAME.

Any competent ornithologist can tell you that. But that is not you - you are as incompetent in your knowledge of birds as you are on almost all subjects scientific.

If anyone actually want to know what the RSPB say go to: -
http://www.rspb.org.
uk/wildlife/birdguid
e/name/d/
and then.
http://www.rspb.org.
uk/wildlife/birdguid
e/name/t/
and you will see for yourself that southy is just wrong - again
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: But how many people know the difference between House Sparrow, Hedge Sparrow, Rock Sparrow, Worthen Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow. there are 25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world and a few of them you are likely to see here.[/p][/quote]southy, next time you look up Wikipedia in an attempt to make yourself appear credible, I suggest you actually read and then understand what is said. There are NOT ‘25 sub-species of the House Sparrow in the world’ as you say, but just one - Passer domesticus. Wikipedia does say, however, that the House Sparrow is ‘One of about 25 species in the genus Passer’. You obviously do not know the meaning of the term ‘genus’. The UK has only two resident sparrows (i.e. genus Passer) – the Tree Sparrow and House Sparrow.[/p][/quote]No there is 25 sub-species of House Sparrows around the world, the one we get most common in the UK is Passer domesticus Passeridae, and its no its not from wikipedia its from a Bird and Egg books that you find the RSPB as writen a page on. A Tree Sparrow is commonly called a Hedge Sparrow and its not a true sparrow its a Dunnock. The Rock Sparrow is common Sparrow that you will see nesting in roofs and gutters of a building. But just for you so you can learn some thing a link for you see I know your in to the Eviroment. http://www.pbase.com /mobish/all_sparrow_ species_together lokk down the list of pictures and you see 3 different kinds of House Sparrows.[/p][/quote].. you are a complete fool southy, as you dig yet another huge hole to fall into. There is no sub-species 'Passer domesticus Passeridae' and you obviously have no idea of how the Linnaean system of classification actually works. The classification hierarchy is thus: - Passeridae - is, in fact, the Family. Passer - is the Genus. domesticus - is the Species – House Sparrow. Even the link you quote is quite clear with its heading - ‘ALL Sparrow Species Together’ and only shows the ONE species called ‘House Sparrow’. Their natural distribution is Europe and Asia, with introduction to the Americas, Africa and Australasia. Over this range there is obviously regional variation in appearance (just like Homo sapiens) and 12 have been named by one authority as sub-species. NONE are called your ridiculously muddled up 'Passer domesticus Passeridae'. Throughout almost all of their natural distribution (including all the UK) this authority names the sub-species as 'Passer domesticus domesticus’.[/p][/quote]Seems I have better understanding that your self Freefinker go and chat to Frank Vosper before you drop into that pit deeper or chat with Phil toy. 2 well known bird experts. The Tree Sparrow commonly called the Hedge Sparrow is not a true Sparrow its a Dunnock, and its only people like your self that make silly errors like this.[/p][/quote].. southy, Frank Voysey is a very old mate of mine - known him for well over 20 years. He and Jean moved out the area a few years ago. On bird ID and correct species names you are still totally wrong. As I pointed out, the Tree Sparrow is in a totally different Family (let alone Genus) than the Dunnock - THEY ARE NOT THE SAME. Any competent ornithologist can tell you that. But that is not you - you are as incompetent in your knowledge of birds as you are on almost all subjects scientific. If anyone actually want to know what the RSPB say go to: - http://www.rspb.org. uk/wildlife/birdguid e/name/d/ and then. http://www.rspb.org. uk/wildlife/birdguid e/name/t/ and you will see for yourself that southy is just wrong - again freefinker
  • Score: 0

7:18pm Thu 12 Apr 12

freefinker says...

southy wrote:
I hate putting up links it makes people lazy and start to expect every thing laid on a plate for them.
Another link for you. so you can correct your self.


http://birdtablenews

.com/2010/04/dunnock

-fact-sheet/
Oh, I've looked at the link and it confirms what I have said.

'THE DUNNOCK: Latin Name: Prunella modularis.'

Now look up Tree Sparrow and see what its Latin Name is - the RSPB site I list above will get you there because the site you are looking at only lists a very few birds.

What is it southy? Well blow me down, its Passer montanus - A TOTALLY DIFFERENT SPECIES.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: I hate putting up links it makes people lazy and start to expect every thing laid on a plate for them. Another link for you. so you can correct your self. http://birdtablenews .com/2010/04/dunnock -fact-sheet/[/p][/quote]Oh, I've looked at the link and it confirms what I have said. 'THE DUNNOCK: Latin Name: Prunella modularis.' Now look up Tree Sparrow and see what its Latin Name is - the RSPB site I list above will get you there because the site you are looking at only lists a very few birds. What is it southy? Well blow me down, its Passer montanus - A TOTALLY DIFFERENT SPECIES. freefinker
  • Score: 0

7:32pm Thu 12 Apr 12

freefinker says...

southy wrote:
BillyTheKid wrote:
This thread is more interesting than the close observation of drying paint, but only marginally. Not that I've actually watched paint dry......but one has to use one's imagination. I suspect that watching anything dry would be somewhat demanding on one's ability to apply undivided attention and full concentration.......


sorry, am I boring you ? Well, I could talk about the brown rat.........no. In fact, I don't really think I have anything to say on the above matter, so I think I'll leave it..........just go and look out the window.........watch the lawn dry............yawww


wwwn.
Well billy it make an interedting break from the normal mondaine things.

Freefinker phone up the local RSPCB officer Frank vosper and he will tell you the same thing I have done.
The Rock sparrow just because they put it on the watch list do not make it rare it is very common, if you read the RSPCB or the WWF they explain what they mean when they say a thing is rare, it do not mean they are hard to see or find it just means there numbers have drop below there normal population levels.
rare = below population levels.
extreme rare= population half of normal population levels.
critical rare= going extinct
extinct rare= not been seen in the species life cycle. (even this do not mean that they have gone, take a look at the Tasmanian Tiger thought be Hunted to extinction in 1936 then in 1995 one shows up out of the blue)
Absolute twaddle, as usual.

The Rock Sparrow, Petronia petronia, has a normal range of Iberia, Southern France, The Maghreb, Southern Italy and Greece and Turkey.

It is a VERY rare migrant to the British Isles.

I don't know what bird you are seeing regularly, but it CERTAINLY isn't a Rock Sparrow - a species UK twitchers flock in some numbers to see if ever one is reported in the UK.

As for your classification scheme – it’s a pure southy fantasy.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BillyTheKid[/bold] wrote: This thread is more interesting than the close observation of drying paint, but only marginally. Not that I've actually watched paint dry......but one has to use one's imagination. I suspect that watching anything dry would be somewhat demanding on one's ability to apply undivided attention and full concentration....... sorry, am I boring you ? Well, I could talk about the brown rat.........no. In fact, I don't really think I have anything to say on the above matter, so I think I'll leave it..........just go and look out the window.........watch the lawn dry............yawww wwwn.[/p][/quote]Well billy it make an interedting break from the normal mondaine things. Freefinker phone up the local RSPCB officer Frank vosper and he will tell you the same thing I have done. The Rock sparrow just because they put it on the watch list do not make it rare it is very common, if you read the RSPCB or the WWF they explain what they mean when they say a thing is rare, it do not mean they are hard to see or find it just means there numbers have drop below there normal population levels. rare = below population levels. extreme rare= population half of normal population levels. critical rare= going extinct extinct rare= not been seen in the species life cycle. (even this do not mean that they have gone, take a look at the Tasmanian Tiger thought be Hunted to extinction in 1936 then in 1995 one shows up out of the blue)[/p][/quote]Absolute twaddle, as usual. The Rock Sparrow, Petronia petronia, has a normal range of Iberia, Southern France, The Maghreb, Southern Italy and Greece and Turkey. It is a VERY rare migrant to the British Isles. I don't know what bird you are seeing regularly, but it CERTAINLY isn't a Rock Sparrow - a species UK twitchers flock in some numbers to see if ever one is reported in the UK. As for your classification scheme – it’s a pure southy fantasy. freefinker
  • Score: 0

7:51pm Thu 12 Apr 12

freefinker says...

In fact the Rock Sparrow is so rare that I have looked up the records for UK.

So far there has been only ONE confirmed sighting – Norfolk in 1981.

Data from BTO - http://blx1.bto.org/
birdfacts/results/bo
b16040.htm#records

And you see them all the time? More likely to get a TUSC government at the next General Election.
In fact the Rock Sparrow is so rare that I have looked up the records for UK. So far there has been only ONE confirmed sighting – Norfolk in 1981. Data from BTO - http://blx1.bto.org/ birdfacts/results/bo b16040.htm#records And you see them all the time? More likely to get a TUSC government at the next General Election. freefinker
  • Score: 0

12:17am Fri 13 Apr 12

BillyTheKid says...

They say that if you put enough Rock Sparrows in a music shop for long enough, they will eventually learn to play guitar and form a band !

Don't you Rock me Sparriow
Don't you Rock me Sparriow

Two little wobins, sittin on a bwush,
Each one wishin the uvver woz a fwush,

Don't you rock me Sparriow,
Don't you rock me Sparriow !
They say that if you put enough Rock Sparrows in a music shop for long enough, they will eventually learn to play guitar and form a band ! Don't you Rock me Sparriow Don't you Rock me Sparriow Two little wobins, sittin on a bwush, Each one wishin the uvver woz a fwush, Don't you rock me Sparriow, Don't you rock me Sparriow ! BillyTheKid
  • Score: 0

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