'Sexting' concerns

Julie Churcher

Julie Churcher

First published in News by , Chief Reporter

THE headteacher of a Basingstoke secondary school believes young people are given mobile phones and other gadgets at too young an age.

Julie Churcher spoke to The Gazette in response to a study conducted by children’s charity The NSPCC about the increase in ‘sexting.’ This is when someone sends a text message of a sexual content on their phone – something which The NSPCC said is increasing among teenagers.

Although Mrs Churcher, head at Aldworth Science College, in Western Way, said she has not been made aware of this happening at her school, she is concerned about the findings of the study, and said: “It’s something that we need to take seriously.”

The study showed that teenage girls are subject to peer pressure from boys, constantly demanding sexual images.

Jon Brown, head of the sexual abuse programme at the NSPCC, said: “What’s most striking about this research is that many young people seem to accept all this as just part of life. But it can be another layer of sexual abuse and, although most children will not be aware, it is illegal.

“Girls should never be forced to carry out sex acts, and boys must understand it’s not acceptable to put them under such duress.”

The charity hopes parents, teachers, industry and other professionals will work together to give victims the protection they need.

Mrs Churcher said: “We do talk to children about the proper use of emails and we also try to follow up where we can with issues, mainly friendship ones, in relation to Facebook.

“I think parents and schools need to educate children about the dangers of electronic gadgets. My personal view is that children are given access to these things at too early an age.”

The use of mobile phones by pupils is banned during the school day at Aldworth after a new policy was introduced in September last year. If a pupil’s phone is confiscated, it has to be collected by a parent.

Mrs Churcher said: “This protects them (the pupils) and means it’s not disruptive to learning.”

The NSPCC is now calling for all professionals to receive training in the latest technology so they are better equipped to deal with ‘sexting.’ It also wants secondary schools and the communication industry to give young people better protection through education promoting considerate, respectful relationships, and for parents to talk to their children about the issue.

Comments (7)

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11:14am Fri 15 Jun 12

Theyouthmatters says...

Sounds a bit sexist to me... sexting pressure can go both ways... but as always with these sort of things offline and online it's girls who are the only ones who can be a victim.
Sounds a bit sexist to me... sexting pressure can go both ways... but as always with these sort of things offline and online it's girls who are the only ones who can be a victim. Theyouthmatters
  • Score: 0

1:20pm Fri 15 Jun 12

nameiswritinwater says...

Boys can be victims of sexual abuse by both girls and boys, physically and mentally, especially the latter.
Boys can be victims of sexual abuse by both girls and boys, physically and mentally, especially the latter. nameiswritinwater
  • Score: 0

1:40pm Fri 15 Jun 12

robertspet8 says...

Theyouthmatters wrote:
Sounds a bit sexist to me... sexting pressure can go both ways... but as always with these sort of things offline and online it's girls who are the only ones who can be a victim.
Which bit sounds sexist? The study was commissioned by the NSPCC, a body which tries to protect all children and has no reasons to exaggerate the dangers faced by either sex. The study, carried out by King's College London, shows that school girls are under far more sexual and sexting pressure from school boys than the other way around. If you are really interested in the truth then go to http://www.nspcc.org
.uk/Inform/resources
forprofessionals/sex
ualabuse/sexting-res
earch-report_wdf8926
9.pdf to read the full report.
[quote][p][bold]Theyouthmatters[/bold] wrote: Sounds a bit sexist to me... sexting pressure can go both ways... but as always with these sort of things offline and online it's girls who are the only ones who can be a victim.[/p][/quote]Which bit sounds sexist? The study was commissioned by the NSPCC, a body which tries to protect all children and has no reasons to exaggerate the dangers faced by either sex. The study, carried out by King's College London, shows that school girls are under far more sexual and sexting pressure from school boys than the other way around. If you are really interested in the truth then go to http://www.nspcc.org .uk/Inform/resources forprofessionals/sex ualabuse/sexting-res earch-report_wdf8926 9.pdf to read the full report. robertspet8
  • Score: 0

4:11pm Fri 15 Jun 12

Mayor_Joe_Quimby says...

I suspect the NSPCC's first concern will be funding. Once that is covered they may move on to other matters.

Without a mobile phone, how would abused children call Childline?
I suspect the NSPCC's first concern will be funding. Once that is covered they may move on to other matters. Without a mobile phone, how would abused children call Childline? Mayor_Joe_Quimby
  • Score: 0

6:54pm Fri 15 Jun 12

nameiswritinwater says...

They would use a landline, I imagine, in the same way we used landlines back in the Stone Age. Or they'd log onto the NSPCC website.

Also, if they take pictures of themselves and then send them, surely it's a voluntary act.
They would use a landline, I imagine, in the same way we used landlines back in the Stone Age. Or they'd log onto the NSPCC website. Also, if they take pictures of themselves and then send them, surely it's a voluntary act. nameiswritinwater
  • Score: 0

11:54pm Fri 15 Jun 12

Theyouthmatters says...

robertspet8 wrote:
Theyouthmatters wrote:
Sounds a bit sexist to me... sexting pressure can go both ways... but as always with these sort of things offline and online it's girls who are the only ones who can be a victim.
Which bit sounds sexist? The study was commissioned by the NSPCC, a body which tries to protect all children and has no reasons to exaggerate the dangers faced by either sex. The study, carried out by King's College London, shows that school girls are under far more sexual and sexting pressure from school boys than the other way around. If you are really interested in the truth then go to http://www.nspcc.org

.uk/Inform/resources

forprofessionals/sex

ualabuse/sexting-res

earch-report_wdf8926

9.pdf to read the full report.
There is a quote in the middle of the f***ing article.

“Girls should never be forced to carry out sex acts, and boys must understand it’s not acceptable to put them under such duress.”
[quote][p][bold]robertspet8[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Theyouthmatters[/bold] wrote: Sounds a bit sexist to me... sexting pressure can go both ways... but as always with these sort of things offline and online it's girls who are the only ones who can be a victim.[/p][/quote]Which bit sounds sexist? The study was commissioned by the NSPCC, a body which tries to protect all children and has no reasons to exaggerate the dangers faced by either sex. The study, carried out by King's College London, shows that school girls are under far more sexual and sexting pressure from school boys than the other way around. If you are really interested in the truth then go to http://www.nspcc.org .uk/Inform/resources forprofessionals/sex ualabuse/sexting-res earch-report_wdf8926 9.pdf to read the full report.[/p][/quote]There is a quote in the middle of the f***ing article. “Girls should never be forced to carry out sex acts, and boys must understand it’s not acceptable to put them under such duress.” Theyouthmatters
  • Score: 0

5:12pm Tue 19 Jun 12

robertspet8 says...

Have you even bothered to read the report Theyouthmatters?
The quote is balanced because the study found that it is girls under the most pressure not boys. You might as well ask them to state, 'Girls, boys, dogs, cats, etc should never be forced...' But the study did not find that boys, dogs, cats, etc., were under the same pressures as girls.
Have you even bothered to read the report Theyouthmatters? The quote is balanced because the study found that it is girls under the most pressure not boys. You might as well ask them to state, 'Girls, boys, dogs, cats, etc should never be forced...' But the study did not find that boys, dogs, cats, etc., were under the same pressures as girls. robertspet8
  • Score: 0

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