Political row as Southampton music festivals clash

Mark Hill, otherwise known as Artful

Mark Hill, otherwise known as Artful

First published in News Daily Echo: Photograph of the Author by , Politics and business reporter

A POLITICAL row has broken out over two Southampton music festivals, one backed by Labour and the other by the Tories, which take place within days of each other.

The Liberal Democrats last night called for organisers to set aside political differences, pool resources and merge the free festivals for a “bigger impact”.

Southampton’s Guildhall Square was today due to play host to a new event, So: Fest , which has been launched with the backing of the new Labour council, which pledged to give the city its own festival again.

The festival, featuring five local dance, rock, electro and soul acts, has received £10,000 of council funding.

On Wednesday, Music in The City , a five-day celebration of music around the city from jazz and flamenco to reggae and rock, returns for the third year across 11 venues, organised by two Conservative councillors.

It was given £25,000 of council funding last year but will this year receive just £2,000.

Lib Dem group leader Cllr Adrian Vinson said: “It seems a pity that the two events should be taking place within a week of each other when the pooling of resources could make a bigger impact and make a significant start on the major festival, which Southampton undoubtedly needs as part of its cultural offer.”

Former council officer Charlie Hislop and Tony Gumm, a project manager who worked to organise Music in the City last year, were asked by the council’s new administration to set up So: Fest, which Labour leaders now hope will grow into a south coast rival to the Edinburgh Festival.

The council’s leisure boss Cllr Warwick Payne said that although So: Fest was a one-day event he hoped it would grow and become a new festival brand for Southampton.

He added: “Music in the City is entering its third year and would be the kind of thing that would tie in with the Southampton Festival.”

He ruled out So: Fest ever becoming a Reading-style music festival on the Common, but said the idea was to keep visitors and money in the city after the boat show ends in September.

“Our hope is that it will become a counterbalance to the Edinburgh Festival,” he said, creating an Edinburgh “lite”.

Conservative councillors Linda Norris and Peter Baillie said there was space for both events and they were grateful for the council support this year.

Cllr Norris said: “There is room for a lot more music in Southampton. Edinburgh didn’t start in a week.”

So: Fest is being held today in Guildhall Square from 4pm to 10pm, headlined by Artful, the act which helped Craig David shoot to fame in 1999.

Other local acts include Burn the Fleet, Scarlet Soho, LST, Welcome Pariah, Soma High, and Charley Macaulay.

Comments (25)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

10:12am Sat 29 Sep 12

missymoocow says...

Next summer will see an amazing festival for music-lovers, families and cyclists in the New Forest - http://www.earlyrise
rfestival.co.uk/
I think it is all very exciting for the south coast!
Next summer will see an amazing festival for music-lovers, families and cyclists in the New Forest - http://www.earlyrise rfestival.co.uk/ I think it is all very exciting for the south coast! missymoocow
  • Score: 0

10:24am Sat 29 Sep 12

S Pance says...

So, there's an existing festival, started by the Tories, with £25k funding?

In come Labour who slash the funding to £2k who then start their own rival festival with £10k.

This is just petty jealousy on the part of Labour! P1ss all over the Tory instigated festival, withdraw funding so they can set up their own festival and claim credit.

The Labour councillors should GROW UP!
So, there's an existing festival, started by the Tories, with £25k funding? In come Labour who slash the funding to £2k who then start their own rival festival with £10k. This is just petty jealousy on the part of Labour! P1ss all over the Tory instigated festival, withdraw funding so they can set up their own festival and claim credit. The Labour councillors should GROW UP! S Pance
  • Score: 0

10:26am Sat 29 Sep 12

loosehead says...

Why did they not just expand the festival the Tory's started?
Why did they not just expand the festival the Tory's started? loosehead
  • Score: 0

10:36am Sat 29 Sep 12

sarfhamton says...

There is a better festival in Pompey today called Tonic and its not political at all. Either that get down to the joiners and see Sean McGowan before he gets super famous.
There is a better festival in Pompey today called Tonic and its not political at all. Either that get down to the joiners and see Sean McGowan before he gets super famous. sarfhamton
  • Score: 0

10:39am Sat 29 Sep 12

Linesman says...

S Pance wrote:
So, there's an existing festival, started by the Tories, with £25k funding?

In come Labour who slash the funding to £2k who then start their own rival festival with £10k.

This is just petty jealousy on the part of Labour! P1ss all over the Tory instigated festival, withdraw funding so they can set up their own festival and claim credit.

The Labour councillors should GROW UP!
When you do the maths you will see that the Labour council is making a saving of £13,000.

When Royston Smith was sacking staff and seeing rubbish piling up in the streets, all in the name of cost-cutting, he was also handing out £25,000 (Repeat) £25,000 for a Tory-supporting music festival.

No wonder he left the City up S*** Creek.
[quote][p][bold]S Pance[/bold] wrote: So, there's an existing festival, started by the Tories, with £25k funding? In come Labour who slash the funding to £2k who then start their own rival festival with £10k. This is just petty jealousy on the part of Labour! P1ss all over the Tory instigated festival, withdraw funding so they can set up their own festival and claim credit. The Labour councillors should GROW UP![/p][/quote]When you do the maths you will see that the Labour council is making a saving of £13,000. When Royston Smith was sacking staff and seeing rubbish piling up in the streets, all in the name of cost-cutting, he was also handing out £25,000 (Repeat) £25,000 for a Tory-supporting music festival. No wonder he left the City up S*** Creek. Linesman
  • Score: 0

11:05am Sat 29 Sep 12

lisa whitemore says...

S Pance wrote:
So, there's an existing festival, started by the Tories, with £25k funding?

In come Labour who slash the funding to £2k who then start their own rival festival with £10k.

This is just petty jealousy on the part of Labour! P1ss all over the Tory instigated festival, withdraw funding so they can set up their own festival and claim credit.

The Labour councillors should GROW UP!
They also need to learn how to 'listen' to the people they will want to vote next time round! They certainly wont be getting mine aswell as with many others in Southampton-Fact
[quote][p][bold]S Pance[/bold] wrote: So, there's an existing festival, started by the Tories, with £25k funding? In come Labour who slash the funding to £2k who then start their own rival festival with £10k. This is just petty jealousy on the part of Labour! P1ss all over the Tory instigated festival, withdraw funding so they can set up their own festival and claim credit. The Labour councillors should GROW UP![/p][/quote]They also need to learn how to 'listen' to the people they will want to vote next time round! They certainly wont be getting mine aswell as with many others in Southampton-Fact lisa whitemore
  • Score: 0

11:24am Sat 29 Sep 12

The Watcher says...

S Pance wrote:
So, there's an existing festival, started by the Tories, with £25k funding?

In come Labour who slash the funding to £2k who then start their own rival festival with £10k.

This is just petty jealousy on the part of Labour! P1ss all over the Tory instigated festival, withdraw funding so they can set up their own festival and claim credit.

The Labour councillors should GROW UP!
A net saving of £13,000 and an extra day of events to boot.

I would read that as a positive for the City and certainly not use it as an opportunity to attempt (and fail) to score cheap political points.
[quote][p][bold]S Pance[/bold] wrote: So, there's an existing festival, started by the Tories, with £25k funding? In come Labour who slash the funding to £2k who then start their own rival festival with £10k. This is just petty jealousy on the part of Labour! P1ss all over the Tory instigated festival, withdraw funding so they can set up their own festival and claim credit. The Labour councillors should GROW UP![/p][/quote]A net saving of £13,000 and an extra day of events to boot. I would read that as a positive for the City and certainly not use it as an opportunity to attempt (and fail) to score cheap political points. The Watcher
  • Score: 0

12:20pm Sat 29 Sep 12

Stu J says...

Linesman wrote:
S Pance wrote:
So, there's an existing festival, started by the Tories, with £25k funding?

In come Labour who slash the funding to £2k who then start their own rival festival with £10k.

This is just petty jealousy on the part of Labour! P1ss all over the Tory instigated festival, withdraw funding so they can set up their own festival and claim credit.

The Labour councillors should GROW UP!
When you do the maths you will see that the Labour council is making a saving of £13,000.

When Royston Smith was sacking staff and seeing rubbish piling up in the streets, all in the name of cost-cutting, he was also handing out £25,000 (Repeat) £25,000 for a Tory-supporting music festival.

No wonder he left the City up S*** Creek.
Well said.

Why on earth would anyone expect one party to try and make the other look good anyway? It never happens and they're all as bad as each other for rubbishing the last lot's plans.

Starting a new and cheaper one day event that can be expanded upon in the future when it hopefully is generating a reasonable amount of it's own income makes far more sense. Also So:Fest is a much more catchy name and easier to market IMO.


25k Vs £13k... Good move and good luck to all involved.
[quote][p][bold]Linesman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]S Pance[/bold] wrote: So, there's an existing festival, started by the Tories, with £25k funding? In come Labour who slash the funding to £2k who then start their own rival festival with £10k. This is just petty jealousy on the part of Labour! P1ss all over the Tory instigated festival, withdraw funding so they can set up their own festival and claim credit. The Labour councillors should GROW UP![/p][/quote]When you do the maths you will see that the Labour council is making a saving of £13,000. When Royston Smith was sacking staff and seeing rubbish piling up in the streets, all in the name of cost-cutting, he was also handing out £25,000 (Repeat) £25,000 for a Tory-supporting music festival. No wonder he left the City up S*** Creek.[/p][/quote]Well said. Why on earth would anyone expect one party to try and make the other look good anyway? It never happens and they're all as bad as each other for rubbishing the last lot's plans. Starting a new and cheaper one day event that can be expanded upon in the future when it hopefully is generating a reasonable amount of it's own income makes far more sense. Also So:Fest is a much more catchy name and easier to market IMO. 25k Vs £13k... Good move and good luck to all involved. Stu J
  • Score: 0

1:06pm Sat 29 Sep 12

Paramjit Bahia says...

sarfhamton wrote:
There is a better festival in Pompey today called Tonic and its not political at all. Either that get down to the joiners and see Sean McGowan before he gets super famous.
Joiners in St Mary Street provides exceptionally good value for money to those who enjoy music, and as far as I am aware are not dependent upon Council grants. And unlike politicaly tainted events promoted by the Council is open through out the year.
[quote][p][bold]sarfhamton[/bold] wrote: There is a better festival in Pompey today called Tonic and its not political at all. Either that get down to the joiners and see Sean McGowan before he gets super famous.[/p][/quote]Joiners in St Mary Street provides exceptionally good value for money to those who enjoy music, and as far as I am aware are not dependent upon Council grants. And unlike politicaly tainted events promoted by the Council is open through out the year. Paramjit Bahia
  • Score: 0

4:39pm Sat 29 Sep 12

freefinker says...

The funniest bit of info in this story is this: -

"Lib Dem group leader Cllr Adrian Vinson .."

A group leader for just two of them!!

How pretentious.
The funniest bit of info in this story is this: - "Lib Dem group leader Cllr Adrian Vinson .." A group leader for just two of them!! How pretentious. freefinker
  • Score: 0

5:26pm Sat 29 Sep 12

george h says...

freefinker wrote:
The funniest bit of info in this story is this: -

"Lib Dem group leader Cllr Adrian Vinson .."

A group leader for just two of them!!

How pretentious.
Koasda space to spare then when they hold a group meeting in the LiB-Dem phone box.
[quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: The funniest bit of info in this story is this: - "Lib Dem group leader Cllr Adrian Vinson .." A group leader for just two of them!! How pretentious.[/p][/quote]Koasda space to spare then when they hold a group meeting in the LiB-Dem phone box. george h
  • Score: 0

7:43pm Sat 29 Sep 12

kingnotail says...

Politically-aligned music festivals? Yes, I'm sure that's exactly what the kids want..
Politically-aligned music festivals? Yes, I'm sure that's exactly what the kids want.. kingnotail
  • Score: 0

8:57pm Sat 29 Sep 12

G0Rf says...

Was there much of a turn out at the Guildhall event?

Why cant Southampton have a MASSIVE music event like POWER IN THE PARK at THE COMMON ??

The Common is the best place!
Was there much of a turn out at the Guildhall event? Why cant Southampton have a MASSIVE music event like POWER IN THE PARK at THE COMMON ?? The Common is the best place! G0Rf
  • Score: 0

9:10pm Sat 29 Sep 12

loosehead says...

Linesman wrote:
S Pance wrote:
So, there's an existing festival, started by the Tories, with £25k funding?

In come Labour who slash the funding to £2k who then start their own rival festival with £10k.

This is just petty jealousy on the part of Labour! P1ss all over the Tory instigated festival, withdraw funding so they can set up their own festival and claim credit.

The Labour councillors should GROW UP!
When you do the maths you will see that the Labour council is making a saving of £13,000.

When Royston Smith was sacking staff and seeing rubbish piling up in the streets, all in the name of cost-cutting, he was also handing out £25,000 (Repeat) £25,000 for a Tory-supporting music festival.

No wonder he left the City up S*** Creek.
Do you mean whilst he cut wages over £17,500 by 2% going up to 5.5% & now the council will only be restoring some of the wages now but are cutting 200 jobs & shutting a swimming pool to afford it?
I guess the 200 temps & the 200 permanent people given the temps temporary posts are wishing they'd voted Tory now.
[quote][p][bold]Linesman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]S Pance[/bold] wrote: So, there's an existing festival, started by the Tories, with £25k funding? In come Labour who slash the funding to £2k who then start their own rival festival with £10k. This is just petty jealousy on the part of Labour! P1ss all over the Tory instigated festival, withdraw funding so they can set up their own festival and claim credit. The Labour councillors should GROW UP![/p][/quote]When you do the maths you will see that the Labour council is making a saving of £13,000. When Royston Smith was sacking staff and seeing rubbish piling up in the streets, all in the name of cost-cutting, he was also handing out £25,000 (Repeat) £25,000 for a Tory-supporting music festival. No wonder he left the City up S*** Creek.[/p][/quote]Do you mean whilst he cut wages over £17,500 by 2% going up to 5.5% & now the council will only be restoring some of the wages now but are cutting 200 jobs & shutting a swimming pool to afford it? I guess the 200 temps & the 200 permanent people given the temps temporary posts are wishing they'd voted Tory now. loosehead
  • Score: 0

11:01pm Sat 29 Sep 12

sarfhamton says...

Paramjit Bahia wrote:
sarfhamton wrote:
There is a better festival in Pompey today called Tonic and its not political at all. Either that get down to the joiners and see Sean McGowan before he gets super famous.
Joiners in St Mary Street provides exceptionally good value for money to those who enjoy music, and as far as I am aware are not dependent upon Council grants. And unlike politicaly tainted events promoted by the Council is open through out the year.
Sean McGowan is Nov 10th, my mistake
[quote][p][bold]Paramjit Bahia[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sarfhamton[/bold] wrote: There is a better festival in Pompey today called Tonic and its not political at all. Either that get down to the joiners and see Sean McGowan before he gets super famous.[/p][/quote]Joiners in St Mary Street provides exceptionally good value for money to those who enjoy music, and as far as I am aware are not dependent upon Council grants. And unlike politicaly tainted events promoted by the Council is open through out the year.[/p][/quote]Sean McGowan is Nov 10th, my mistake sarfhamton
  • Score: 0

6:26pm Sun 30 Sep 12

The Music Man says...

sarfhamton wrote:
Paramjit Bahia wrote:
sarfhamton wrote:
There is a better festival in Pompey today called Tonic and its not political at all. Either that get down to the joiners and see Sean McGowan before he gets super famous.
Joiners in St Mary Street provides exceptionally good value for money to those who enjoy music, and as far as I am aware are not dependent upon Council grants. And unlike politicaly tainted events promoted by the Council is open through out the year.
Sean McGowan is Nov 10th, my mistake
Seán was playing to a packed Talking Heads pub last night at the Amy Winehouse Foundation Benefit gig, helping to raise over £1k.
[quote][p][bold]sarfhamton[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Paramjit Bahia[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sarfhamton[/bold] wrote: There is a better festival in Pompey today called Tonic and its not political at all. Either that get down to the joiners and see Sean McGowan before he gets super famous.[/p][/quote]Joiners in St Mary Street provides exceptionally good value for money to those who enjoy music, and as far as I am aware are not dependent upon Council grants. And unlike politicaly tainted events promoted by the Council is open through out the year.[/p][/quote]Sean McGowan is Nov 10th, my mistake[/p][/quote]Seán was playing to a packed Talking Heads pub last night at the Amy Winehouse Foundation Benefit gig, helping to raise over £1k. The Music Man
  • Score: 0

6:30pm Sun 30 Sep 12

The Music Man says...

G0Rf wrote:
Was there much of a turn out at the Guildhall event?

Why cant Southampton have a MASSIVE music event like POWER IN THE PARK at THE COMMON ??

The Common is the best place!
poor turnout
[quote][p][bold]G0Rf[/bold] wrote: Was there much of a turn out at the Guildhall event? Why cant Southampton have a MASSIVE music event like POWER IN THE PARK at THE COMMON ?? The Common is the best place![/p][/quote]poor turnout The Music Man
  • Score: 0

8:14pm Sun 30 Sep 12

FoysCornerBoy says...

I fail to see how this can be described as a political row. Unlike the majority of commentators on this thread, I actually attended yesterday's event which was by all accounts a huge success.

People I spoke to (who care little about petty party politics) were very pleased that the Council had provided a much-needed platform for a wide array of talent on offer in the city.

This non story by the Echo carried a quote from a Liberal Democrat former leader of the Council (was he set up?) under whose watch the City lost both its Balloon & Flower Festival AND Power in the Park.

None of the political groups on the City Council had proposed a budget for Music in the City in this current financial year and none was requested by its organisers until a few weeks ago.

It is to Labour's credit that they put the City's interests before those of any political party and provided funding for both SO:FEST and Music in the City events. Let's have more of this, please.
I fail to see how this can be described as a political row. Unlike the majority of commentators on this thread, I actually attended yesterday's event which was by all accounts a huge success. People I spoke to (who care little about petty party politics) were very pleased that the Council had provided a much-needed platform for a wide array of talent on offer in the city. This non story by the Echo carried a quote from a Liberal Democrat former leader of the Council (was he set up?) under whose watch the City lost both its Balloon & Flower Festival AND Power in the Park. None of the political groups on the City Council had proposed a budget for Music in the City in this current financial year and none was requested by its organisers until a few weeks ago. It is to Labour's credit that they put the City's interests before those of any political party and provided funding for both SO:FEST and Music in the City events. Let's have more of this, please. FoysCornerBoy
  • Score: 0

9:15pm Sun 30 Sep 12

loosehead says...

FoysCornerBoy wrote:
I fail to see how this can be described as a political row. Unlike the majority of commentators on this thread, I actually attended yesterday's event which was by all accounts a huge success.

People I spoke to (who care little about petty party politics) were very pleased that the Council had provided a much-needed platform for a wide array of talent on offer in the city.

This non story by the Echo carried a quote from a Liberal Democrat former leader of the Council (was he set up?) under whose watch the City lost both its Balloon & Flower Festival AND Power in the Park.

None of the political groups on the City Council had proposed a budget for Music in the City in this current financial year and none was requested by its organisers until a few weeks ago.

It is to Labour's credit that they put the City's interests before those of any political party and provided funding for both SO:FEST and Music in the City events. Let's have more of this, please.
So why not amalgamate the two festivals instead of using ten thousand for just one?
[quote][p][bold]FoysCornerBoy[/bold] wrote: I fail to see how this can be described as a political row. Unlike the majority of commentators on this thread, I actually attended yesterday's event which was by all accounts a huge success. People I spoke to (who care little about petty party politics) were very pleased that the Council had provided a much-needed platform for a wide array of talent on offer in the city. This non story by the Echo carried a quote from a Liberal Democrat former leader of the Council (was he set up?) under whose watch the City lost both its Balloon & Flower Festival AND Power in the Park. None of the political groups on the City Council had proposed a budget for Music in the City in this current financial year and none was requested by its organisers until a few weeks ago. It is to Labour's credit that they put the City's interests before those of any political party and provided funding for both SO:FEST and Music in the City events. Let's have more of this, please.[/p][/quote]So why not amalgamate the two festivals instead of using ten thousand for just one? loosehead
  • Score: 0

2:42pm Mon 1 Oct 12

southamptonfestivals says...

Really sorry to see people trying to suggest there is a row, or that this is a political thing. Reading the article we couldn't see the beef. Two - very different - events supported by the City Council.

Having been involved in organising MitC while working for the Council we didn't realise it was a political event - it was just a council sponsored effort to make more of the city's talent and its historic sites, and contribute to 'bigging up' the city. This year and last it is being run independently - although using council venues and support in addition to a grant, and we want to see MitC continue and be successful. We shall certainly be using our networks to promote it this week.

We set up not-for-profit Southampton Festivals in March with a slightly different idea.... So much of what happens in Southampton struggles for funding and promotion. After talking to a number of people and projects we approached the Council proposing that we try to establish and promote lots of events as a whole season of festivals in the city - not just music, but arts, Ejector Seat festival, film week, Mela, new events and more - and work systematically with organizers to develop sponsorship, and improve promotion by coordination and working together. The Council liked this approach - and asked us to launch it with a concert in the Guildhall Square - bring it to life as a venue, and show off the city's successful pop talent.

SO:FEST was a marker for an annual festival, and a launch for this longer term idea, which we believe in time can contribute economically both in terms of visitors, business, jobs and training, and in terms of making Southampton a great place to live, where lots goes on, everyone knows it and is proud of being part of it.

As for amalgamating funding - we amalgamated Council funding with equal private sector sponsorship to put on SO:FEST because - in austerity Britain - that's the future.

As for bigger festivals - is that what we want ? There is evidence - including some firms going into administration - that putting all your eggs into one big basket doesn't work so well - particularly with our weather. But also not everyone wants the same thing anyway. The audience for classical music and choirs isn't necessarily the same as for Artful and Burn the Fleet.

What we want to achieve is diversity - a range of things that offers something for everyone; a varied, well-sponsored and promoted season that people can get involved in and be proud of. Like Cllr Norris, we are very grateful of the support that we have had from the Council to help get SO:FEST off the ground and get people talking about our longer term project to use festivals to benefit the city and the people who live and work here. Isn't that something we all want to achieve?

If you were one of the 3,800 people who came to the square on Saturday, or the 500 or so on the grass. Isn't is a fantastic space and venue, and hasn't Southampton got such talent ?
Really sorry to see people trying to suggest there is a row, or that this is a political thing. Reading the article we couldn't see the beef. Two - very different - events supported by the City Council. Having been involved in organising MitC while working for the Council we didn't realise it was a political event - it was just a council sponsored effort to make more of the city's talent and its historic sites, and contribute to 'bigging up' the city. This year and last it is being run independently - although using council venues and support in addition to a grant, and we want to see MitC continue and be successful. We shall certainly be using our networks to promote it this week. We set up not-for-profit Southampton Festivals in March with a slightly different idea.... So much of what happens in Southampton struggles for funding and promotion. After talking to a number of people and projects we approached the Council proposing that we try to establish and promote lots of events as a whole season of festivals in the city - not just music, but arts, Ejector Seat festival, film week, Mela, new events and more - and work systematically with organizers to develop sponsorship, and improve promotion by coordination and working together. The Council liked this approach - and asked us to launch it with a concert in the Guildhall Square - bring it to life as a venue, and show off the city's successful pop talent. SO:FEST was a marker for an annual festival, and a launch for this longer term idea, which we believe in time can contribute economically both in terms of visitors, business, jobs and training, and in terms of making Southampton a great place to live, where lots goes on, everyone knows it and is proud of being part of it. As for amalgamating funding - we amalgamated Council funding with equal private sector sponsorship to put on SO:FEST because - in austerity Britain - that's the future. As for bigger festivals - is that what we want ? There is evidence - including some firms going into administration - that putting all your eggs into one big basket doesn't work so well - particularly with our weather. But also not everyone wants the same thing anyway. The audience for classical music and choirs isn't necessarily the same as for Artful and Burn the Fleet. What we want to achieve is diversity - a range of things that offers something for everyone; a varied, well-sponsored and promoted season that people can get involved in and be proud of. Like Cllr Norris, we are very grateful of the support that we have had from the Council to help get SO:FEST off the ground and get people talking about our longer term project to use festivals to benefit the city and the people who live and work here. Isn't that something we all want to achieve? If you were one of the 3,800 people who came to the square on Saturday, or the 500 or so on the grass. Isn't is a fantastic space and venue, and hasn't Southampton got such talent ? southamptonfestivals
  • Score: 0

3:51pm Mon 1 Oct 12

loosehead says...

southamptonfestivals wrote:
Really sorry to see people trying to suggest there is a row, or that this is a political thing. Reading the article we couldn't see the beef. Two - very different - events supported by the City Council.

Having been involved in organising MitC while working for the Council we didn't realise it was a political event - it was just a council sponsored effort to make more of the city's talent and its historic sites, and contribute to 'bigging up' the city. This year and last it is being run independently - although using council venues and support in addition to a grant, and we want to see MitC continue and be successful. We shall certainly be using our networks to promote it this week.

We set up not-for-profit Southampton Festivals in March with a slightly different idea.... So much of what happens in Southampton struggles for funding and promotion. After talking to a number of people and projects we approached the Council proposing that we try to establish and promote lots of events as a whole season of festivals in the city - not just music, but arts, Ejector Seat festival, film week, Mela, new events and more - and work systematically with organizers to develop sponsorship, and improve promotion by coordination and working together. The Council liked this approach - and asked us to launch it with a concert in the Guildhall Square - bring it to life as a venue, and show off the city's successful pop talent.

SO:FEST was a marker for an annual festival, and a launch for this longer term idea, which we believe in time can contribute economically both in terms of visitors, business, jobs and training, and in terms of making Southampton a great place to live, where lots goes on, everyone knows it and is proud of being part of it.

As for amalgamating funding - we amalgamated Council funding with equal private sector sponsorship to put on SO:FEST because - in austerity Britain - that's the future.

As for bigger festivals - is that what we want ? There is evidence - including some firms going into administration - that putting all your eggs into one big basket doesn't work so well - particularly with our weather. But also not everyone wants the same thing anyway. The audience for classical music and choirs isn't necessarily the same as for Artful and Burn the Fleet.

What we want to achieve is diversity - a range of things that offers something for everyone; a varied, well-sponsored and promoted season that people can get involved in and be proud of. Like Cllr Norris, we are very grateful of the support that we have had from the Council to help get SO:FEST off the ground and get people talking about our longer term project to use festivals to benefit the city and the people who live and work here. Isn't that something we all want to achieve?

If you were one of the 3,800 people who came to the square on Saturday, or the 500 or so on the grass. Isn't is a fantastic space and venue, and hasn't Southampton got such talent ?
So exactly what events will you do for the older generation(30-65+)?
Could you organise a last night at the proms say in either Mayflower Park or Guildhall Square?
[quote][p][bold]southamptonfestivals[/bold] wrote: Really sorry to see people trying to suggest there is a row, or that this is a political thing. Reading the article we couldn't see the beef. Two - very different - events supported by the City Council. Having been involved in organising MitC while working for the Council we didn't realise it was a political event - it was just a council sponsored effort to make more of the city's talent and its historic sites, and contribute to 'bigging up' the city. This year and last it is being run independently - although using council venues and support in addition to a grant, and we want to see MitC continue and be successful. We shall certainly be using our networks to promote it this week. We set up not-for-profit Southampton Festivals in March with a slightly different idea.... So much of what happens in Southampton struggles for funding and promotion. After talking to a number of people and projects we approached the Council proposing that we try to establish and promote lots of events as a whole season of festivals in the city - not just music, but arts, Ejector Seat festival, film week, Mela, new events and more - and work systematically with organizers to develop sponsorship, and improve promotion by coordination and working together. The Council liked this approach - and asked us to launch it with a concert in the Guildhall Square - bring it to life as a venue, and show off the city's successful pop talent. SO:FEST was a marker for an annual festival, and a launch for this longer term idea, which we believe in time can contribute economically both in terms of visitors, business, jobs and training, and in terms of making Southampton a great place to live, where lots goes on, everyone knows it and is proud of being part of it. As for amalgamating funding - we amalgamated Council funding with equal private sector sponsorship to put on SO:FEST because - in austerity Britain - that's the future. As for bigger festivals - is that what we want ? There is evidence - including some firms going into administration - that putting all your eggs into one big basket doesn't work so well - particularly with our weather. But also not everyone wants the same thing anyway. The audience for classical music and choirs isn't necessarily the same as for Artful and Burn the Fleet. What we want to achieve is diversity - a range of things that offers something for everyone; a varied, well-sponsored and promoted season that people can get involved in and be proud of. Like Cllr Norris, we are very grateful of the support that we have had from the Council to help get SO:FEST off the ground and get people talking about our longer term project to use festivals to benefit the city and the people who live and work here. Isn't that something we all want to achieve? If you were one of the 3,800 people who came to the square on Saturday, or the 500 or so on the grass. Isn't is a fantastic space and venue, and hasn't Southampton got such talent ?[/p][/quote]So exactly what events will you do for the older generation(30-65+)? Could you organise a last night at the proms say in either Mayflower Park or Guildhall Square? loosehead
  • Score: 0

6:35pm Mon 1 Oct 12

southamptonfestivals says...

On Saturday I saw a great dance-off between a 20 something and someone who was in probably his 50s, and I was dancing the after-party in the Cellar at 2.30 to some great Dance music and I'm beyond that. It's 50 years since the Beatles first Single was released - so we're not hung up about ages and who should like what.

But our idea about festivals isn't just music. We think there are lots of things here to celebrate. If orchestral music is your thing, then look at the Music in the City schedule - it has choirs and orchestras in the library in the next week for free.

When you say "do for the older generation" we aren't going to be doing things "for" - it's definitely "with" becasue this is all about Southampton and its people. I've worked to keep the Over 50s festival going with its committee, alongside Age Concern, and that's something we would want see as part of the city's festival season -it's been going nearly 30 years - and we'd be offering it the same sort of support that we would to other festivals like Film Week or Ejector Seat. We would also be looking to support or develop festivals around the whole city,not just the centre.

But these are early days. What we are doing is starting a conversation and a consultation about taking this forward, what can be done, and how it can be funded. Saturday was the start of that.
On Saturday I saw a great dance-off between a 20 something and someone who was in probably his 50s, and I was dancing the after-party in the Cellar at 2.30 to some great Dance music and I'm beyond that. It's 50 years since the Beatles first Single was released - so we're not hung up about ages and who should like what. But our idea about festivals isn't just music. We think there are lots of things here to celebrate. If orchestral music is your thing, then look at the Music in the City schedule - it has choirs and orchestras in the library in the next week for free. When you say "do for the older generation" we aren't going to be doing things "for" - it's definitely "with" becasue this is all about Southampton and its people. I've worked to keep the Over 50s festival going with its committee, alongside Age Concern, and that's something we would want see as part of the city's festival season -it's been going nearly 30 years - and we'd be offering it the same sort of support that we would to other festivals like Film Week or Ejector Seat. We would also be looking to support or develop festivals around the whole city,not just the centre. But these are early days. What we are doing is starting a conversation and a consultation about taking this forward, what can be done, and how it can be funded. Saturday was the start of that. southamptonfestivals
  • Score: 0

9:09pm Mon 1 Oct 12

loosehead says...

southamptonfestivals wrote:
On Saturday I saw a great dance-off between a 20 something and someone who was in probably his 50s, and I was dancing the after-party in the Cellar at 2.30 to some great Dance music and I'm beyond that. It's 50 years since the Beatles first Single was released - so we're not hung up about ages and who should like what.

But our idea about festivals isn't just music. We think there are lots of things here to celebrate. If orchestral music is your thing, then look at the Music in the City schedule - it has choirs and orchestras in the library in the next week for free.

When you say "do for the older generation" we aren't going to be doing things "for" - it's definitely "with" becasue this is all about Southampton and its people. I've worked to keep the Over 50s festival going with its committee, alongside Age Concern, and that's something we would want see as part of the city's festival season -it's been going nearly 30 years - and we'd be offering it the same sort of support that we would to other festivals like Film Week or Ejector Seat. We would also be looking to support or develop festivals around the whole city,not just the centre.

But these are early days. What we are doing is starting a conversation and a consultation about taking this forward, what can be done, and how it can be funded. Saturday was the start of that.
Let's get something straight I think concerts/festivals are great.
I was asking if you were or could arrange a last night of the proms in either Guildhall Square or Mayflower Park?
Then you come back with this post?
I've been to many CLASSICAL concerts at Broadlands & Victoria Country Park & there's all ages but let's get it right many of the older aged group ( over 25) don't go to festivals but would go to the last night of the proms.
I remember it up at the Sports Centre but Labour scrapped it for being middle class.
I would love to see concerts/festivals of all types of music so the whole of this city can enjoy it.
I too would get up & enjoy the music ( if I liked it) & dance & I'm 55 so p-lease answer this post in a positive manner or forget it
[quote][p][bold]southamptonfestivals[/bold] wrote: On Saturday I saw a great dance-off between a 20 something and someone who was in probably his 50s, and I was dancing the after-party in the Cellar at 2.30 to some great Dance music and I'm beyond that. It's 50 years since the Beatles first Single was released - so we're not hung up about ages and who should like what. But our idea about festivals isn't just music. We think there are lots of things here to celebrate. If orchestral music is your thing, then look at the Music in the City schedule - it has choirs and orchestras in the library in the next week for free. When you say "do for the older generation" we aren't going to be doing things "for" - it's definitely "with" becasue this is all about Southampton and its people. I've worked to keep the Over 50s festival going with its committee, alongside Age Concern, and that's something we would want see as part of the city's festival season -it's been going nearly 30 years - and we'd be offering it the same sort of support that we would to other festivals like Film Week or Ejector Seat. We would also be looking to support or develop festivals around the whole city,not just the centre. But these are early days. What we are doing is starting a conversation and a consultation about taking this forward, what can be done, and how it can be funded. Saturday was the start of that.[/p][/quote]Let's get something straight I think concerts/festivals are great. I was asking if you were or could arrange a last night of the proms in either Guildhall Square or Mayflower Park? Then you come back with this post? I've been to many CLASSICAL concerts at Broadlands & Victoria Country Park & there's all ages but let's get it right many of the older aged group ( over 25) don't go to festivals but would go to the last night of the proms. I remember it up at the Sports Centre but Labour scrapped it for being middle class. I would love to see concerts/festivals of all types of music so the whole of this city can enjoy it. I too would get up & enjoy the music ( if I liked it) & dance & I'm 55 so p-lease answer this post in a positive manner or forget it loosehead
  • Score: 0

11:03am Tue 2 Oct 12

southamptonfestivals says...

Didn't realise I wasn't being positive, loosehead. I was saying that we aim to work with people planning lots of different things in the city - and Music in the City has a free choirs and orchestra concert coming up just this week.

Ultimately it will boil down to funding and sponsorship as to the things that we can plan to put on, and the people we can work with to do it. We are also committed to showcasing what we have ourselves in Southampton - bands, orchestras, choirs, poets, authors - all sorts. But don't expect us to be bring in a lot of events/ acts etc.from elsewhere because that is not our purpose.
Didn't realise I wasn't being positive, loosehead. I was saying that we aim to work with people planning lots of different things in the city - and Music in the City has a free choirs and orchestra concert coming up just this week. Ultimately it will boil down to funding and sponsorship as to the things that we can plan to put on, and the people we can work with to do it. We are also committed to showcasing what we have ourselves in Southampton - bands, orchestras, choirs, poets, authors - all sorts. But don't expect us to be bring in a lot of events/ acts etc.from elsewhere because that is not our purpose. southamptonfestivals
  • Score: 0

12:31pm Tue 2 Oct 12

loosehead says...

southamptonfestivals wrote:
Didn't realise I wasn't being positive, loosehead. I was saying that we aim to work with people planning lots of different things in the city - and Music in the City has a free choirs and orchestra concert coming up just this week.

Ultimately it will boil down to funding and sponsorship as to the things that we can plan to put on, and the people we can work with to do it. We are also committed to showcasing what we have ourselves in Southampton - bands, orchestras, choirs, poets, authors - all sorts. But don't expect us to be bring in a lot of events/ acts etc.from elsewhere because that is not our purpose.
I apologise for my outburst!
I like you would like to see concerts & festivals of all tastes of music.
I also would like to see re-enactments of the cities history with school children involved & I can only say well done to any one who even starts one line of this activity
[quote][p][bold]southamptonfestivals[/bold] wrote: Didn't realise I wasn't being positive, loosehead. I was saying that we aim to work with people planning lots of different things in the city - and Music in the City has a free choirs and orchestra concert coming up just this week. Ultimately it will boil down to funding and sponsorship as to the things that we can plan to put on, and the people we can work with to do it. We are also committed to showcasing what we have ourselves in Southampton - bands, orchestras, choirs, poets, authors - all sorts. But don't expect us to be bring in a lot of events/ acts etc.from elsewhere because that is not our purpose.[/p][/quote]I apologise for my outburst! I like you would like to see concerts & festivals of all tastes of music. I also would like to see re-enactments of the cities history with school children involved & I can only say well done to any one who even starts one line of this activity loosehead
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree