Ringwood School bans girl from lessons for having red hair

Alisha Kay-Tyler, who was banned from lessons at Ringwood School because of her dyed red hair

Alisha Kay-Tyler, who was banned from lessons at Ringwood School because of her dyed red hair

First published in New Forest Daily Echo: Photograph of the Author by , Education Reporter

A SECOND mum has criticised a Hampshire school after her daughter was placed in isolation – for having her hair dyed dark red.

Alisha Kay-Tyler was taken out of classes at Ringwood School today after turning up with her new haircut.

The 13-year-old’s furious mum, Sarah Kay, accused the school of “over-reacting” because her daughter had been told the “unnatural” hair colour would distract other pupils.

It comes just days after the Daily Echo reported how Year 8 pupil Billie Halford was taken out of the same school temporarily by her mum after she was placed in isolation because of hair pink dip dye hairstyle.

Bosses at the Parsonage Barn Lane school say there are strict policies in place over youngsters’ appearance, which all parents sign up to when they send their children there.

Sarah, from Poulner, said she had only allowed Alisha to have her hair dyed once she was satisfied it would not be an outlandish colour.

She told the Daily Echo: “If it was up to Alisha I can guarantee that her hair would be dip-died pink too, but I know that’s unacceptable.

“It’s not really an unnatural colour. It’s quite dark and it’s quite nice. Her natural colour has a lot of red in it anyway.

“If it was bright pink or blue or orange then that’s fair enough, but it’s in no means offensive – I think that’s the word they used.

“They’ve just taken it way too far.”

Sarah said she has now had to take Alisha, a Year 9 pupil, back to the salon where her hair had been dyed to have it coloured again, this time a dark brown, costing £40.

She said: “I don’t agree that she should have it done again, especially within 24 hours because that’s not good for her hair, but I’m doing it because she will miss school.

“She was going to be in isolation until it’s gone and I think that’s disgusting. That’s for children who have been naughty.

“I would have made a stand against this but the whole time she would be missing out on school. But I’m going to be writing to the school and speaking to the head teacher.”

Ringwood’s head, Chris Edwards was not immediately available for comment this afternoon.

But in response to the earlier row over Billie’s hair, she said: “At Ringwood School we have very clear rules with regard to appearance and uniform which parents agree to when they send their child to the school.

“Our rules state that hair should be traditionally styled – extremes of fashion such as shaved hair, beads, braids, unnatural tints, dyes and highlights are not acceptable.

“If a student arrives at school with inappropriate uniform or appearance arrangements are made to continue with learning in isolation while contact is made with parents to arrange to resolve the problem.”

Comments (17)

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3:00pm Thu 17 Jan 13

Lockssmart says...

I'm so glad I'm bald.
I'm so glad I'm bald. Lockssmart
  • Score: 0

3:51pm Thu 17 Jan 13

dly397 says...

For goodness sake! What is it about hair colour? Why not just leave it as it was originally intended until after you leave school.

You'd have thought after the hullaballoo earlier in the week that ANY parent would refuse to let their offspring colour their hair.

To any other stupid parents out there - if you really must allow your offspring to colour their hair, try asking the school if the intended hair colour is acceptable BEFORE it is done.

Rocket science it really isn't!!!
For goodness sake! What is it about hair colour? Why not just leave it as it was originally intended until after you leave school. You'd have thought after the hullaballoo earlier in the week that ANY parent would refuse to let their offspring colour their hair. To any other stupid parents out there - if you really must allow your offspring to colour their hair, try asking the school if the intended hair colour is acceptable BEFORE it is done. Rocket science it really isn't!!! dly397
  • Score: -2

3:54pm Thu 17 Jan 13

Uberarticuno says...

Either the mother and/or daughter saw the news article about the first girl and wanted their own 15 minutes of fame or this mother is just as immature and idiotic as the first.
Either the mother and/or daughter saw the news article about the first girl and wanted their own 15 minutes of fame or this mother is just as immature and idiotic as the first. Uberarticuno
  • Score: -3

3:54pm Thu 17 Jan 13

Ford Prefect says...

Schools have rules. You sign up to these when you send your child there.

If you don't think they are reasonable, discuss it with the headteacher or governing body.

I can't see how it benefits your child to discuss it instead in the local newspaper.
Schools have rules. You sign up to these when you send your child there. If you don't think they are reasonable, discuss it with the headteacher or governing body. I can't see how it benefits your child to discuss it instead in the local newspaper. Ford Prefect
  • Score: -3

4:02pm Thu 17 Jan 13

sparkster says...

exactly if girls want to dye their hair why not do it in the 6 week summer holidays it'll have grown out before they go back to school. Rules are rules and they're in place for a reason
exactly if girls want to dye their hair why not do it in the 6 week summer holidays it'll have grown out before they go back to school. Rules are rules and they're in place for a reason sparkster
  • Score: -4

4:23pm Thu 17 Jan 13

Rockhopper says...

School is an educational learning establishment and not a fashion show.
It is right pupils should be excluded if they disobey appearance policies eg. uniform/make-up/hair
care.
Surely any sensible parent would want their child to adhere to school rules?
If not they are not setting a good example.
School is an educational learning establishment and not a fashion show. It is right pupils should be excluded if they disobey appearance policies eg. uniform/make-up/hair care. Surely any sensible parent would want their child to adhere to school rules? If not they are not setting a good example. Rockhopper
  • Score: -3

4:35pm Thu 17 Jan 13

Skay2406 says...

Ok I will clear this up and no I did not want fame but actually was disgusted that my daughter was treated like a criminal because she had saved her own money to colour her hair at a salon so that she had a more natural colour than the home hair colours give. I totally agree that if students colour their hair in bright colours then that is unacceptable and yes I do as a responsible parent adhere to the rules, but her hair is a dark red in which about 50% of the students at her school have the same or very similar colours so that is what I am furious about. She has been picked out and made to feel like she has commited a crime and has really upset her.

Last term my mother went into the school to do a talk to the students and the teacher had pink streaks in her hair so how is that acceptable!!!
Ok I will clear this up and no I did not want fame but actually was disgusted that my daughter was treated like a criminal because she had saved her own money to colour her hair at a salon so that she had a more natural colour than the home hair colours give. I totally agree that if students colour their hair in bright colours then that is unacceptable and yes I do as a responsible parent adhere to the rules, but her hair is a dark red in which about 50% of the students at her school have the same or very similar colours so that is what I am furious about. She has been picked out and made to feel like she has commited a crime and has really upset her. Last term my mother went into the school to do a talk to the students and the teacher had pink streaks in her hair so how is that acceptable!!! Skay2406
  • Score: 3

4:47pm Thu 17 Jan 13

SaffaInTheUk says...

No shaved head? I wonder if a student has chemo, has their hair fall out but refuses to wear a wig, will they put that student in isolation?

I had blonde highlights, nothing extreme mind you, in school and that didn't distract my classmates. Then again, in St Annes they don't care what you do.
No shaved head? I wonder if a student has chemo, has their hair fall out but refuses to wear a wig, will they put that student in isolation? I had blonde highlights, nothing extreme mind you, in school and that didn't distract my classmates. Then again, in St Annes they don't care what you do. SaffaInTheUk
  • Score: 3

4:47pm Thu 17 Jan 13

Ford Prefect says...

The difference is that they are teachers and adults. Your daughter is a student and a child. Teachers will also be required to be professionally dressed but do not have to wear uniforms. Your daughter does.

It's easy to pick off items on a school uniform list and say "Oh, those trainers are very nearly black shoes", "Those earrings are only a little bigger than the school permits" and "Well her hair is very nearly a normal colour".

My basic point, though, is why aren't you discussing this with the headteacher or chair of governors if you feel so strongly? Don't you think that running to the Echo undermines you in your desire to make a reasonable point?
The difference is that they are teachers and adults. Your daughter is a student and a child. Teachers will also be required to be professionally dressed but do not have to wear uniforms. Your daughter does. It's easy to pick off items on a school uniform list and say "Oh, those trainers are very nearly black shoes", "Those earrings are only a little bigger than the school permits" and "Well her hair is very nearly a normal colour". My basic point, though, is why aren't you discussing this with the headteacher or chair of governors if you feel so strongly? Don't you think that running to the Echo undermines you in your desire to make a reasonable point? Ford Prefect
  • Score: -3

4:56pm Thu 17 Jan 13

Skay2406 says...

I am and her hair is a very normal colour thank you very much. If you are a teacher working at a school with rules then I'm sorry but you should not go into school with pink hair as that is highly unprofessional for an adult anyway.
I am and her hair is a very normal colour thank you very much. If you are a teacher working at a school with rules then I'm sorry but you should not go into school with pink hair as that is highly unprofessional for an adult anyway. Skay2406
  • Score: 2

5:20pm Thu 17 Jan 13

Funrun says...

This is why this country is now over run with chavy children.

Parents with lack of respect for authority that think setting a example is trying to undermine everyone that dares to do whats right for the majority.

No doubt the same parents that encourage getting pregnant to get a free house. Use the system for there own benift but dont want to respect the rules of the land when it does not suit them!!

Makes me so angrrrryyyyy!!
This is why this country is now over run with chavy children. Parents with lack of respect for authority that think setting a example is trying to undermine everyone that dares to do whats right for the majority. No doubt the same parents that encourage getting pregnant to get a free house. Use the system for there own benift but dont want to respect the rules of the land when it does not suit them!! Makes me so angrrrryyyyy!! Funrun
  • Score: -3

5:39pm Thu 17 Jan 13

business-guru says...

another chav story... move along, nothing to see here....
another chav story... move along, nothing to see here.... business-guru
  • Score: -3

6:34pm Thu 17 Jan 13

The Watcher says...

Her mother should be ashamed of the terrible example she is setting for her child.
.
The School's rules are quite clear and are quite rightly not up for negotiation. Well done to the Headmaster for sticking to his guns.
.
The school rules are not a menu from which you pick and choose.
.
Well done to The Echo for highlighting just how poorly some parents dispense their duties and the lack of support our schools and teachers receive.
Her mother should be ashamed of the terrible example she is setting for her child. . The School's rules are quite clear and are quite rightly not up for negotiation. Well done to the Headmaster for sticking to his guns. . The school rules are not a menu from which you pick and choose. . Well done to The Echo for highlighting just how poorly some parents dispense their duties and the lack of support our schools and teachers receive. The Watcher
  • Score: -4

6:35pm Thu 17 Jan 13

Scuba2000 says...

Come on Echo - have you nothing better to report on? We are lucky to have a good school in Ringwood - lets keep it so!
Come on Echo - have you nothing better to report on? We are lucky to have a good school in Ringwood - lets keep it so! Scuba2000
  • Score: -1

7:15pm Thu 17 Jan 13

Rockhopper says...

Surely now the girl has her picture and story in the Daily Echo & Website the potential to be identified and 'picked out' has increased by millions!
A better solution if you are unhappy with the schools decision is to take this matter up with the Local Education Authority.
Surely now the girl has her picture and story in the Daily Echo & Website the potential to be identified and 'picked out' has increased by millions! A better solution if you are unhappy with the schools decision is to take this matter up with the Local Education Authority. Rockhopper
  • Score: -1

7:38pm Thu 17 Jan 13

Olivia Lenton says...

This is so pathetic, girls should be aloud to dye their hair dark red it is a very natural hair colour and cannot be a distract to any other students considering students already have this hair colour.
This is so pathetic, girls should be aloud to dye their hair dark red it is a very natural hair colour and cannot be a distract to any other students considering students already have this hair colour. Olivia Lenton
  • Score: -1

2:20pm Fri 18 Jan 13

forest tony says...

There are so many inane rules that our youth are becoming more and more immature when they leave school, I thought part of growing up was to express yourself and to learn by your mistakes, from the time when ancient Britons wore woad, through, zoot suits, drapes, quiffs and mohicans its all part of self expression, part of growing up, never judge a person, even a young person by the way they dress or look, school rules certainly seems to stop self expression an essential part of being part of society! By saying this, commonsense is needed but this young lady looks no different to so many in the street of all ages and certainly would not distract other pupils in class, normal looking person to most.....probably more a case of discrimination for some unknown reason!
There are so many inane rules that our youth are becoming more and more immature when they leave school, I thought part of growing up was to express yourself and to learn by your mistakes, from the time when ancient Britons wore woad, through, zoot suits, drapes, quiffs and mohicans its all part of self expression, part of growing up, never judge a person, even a young person by the way they dress or look, school rules certainly seems to stop self expression an essential part of being part of society! By saying this, commonsense is needed but this young lady looks no different to so many in the street of all ages and certainly would not distract other pupils in class, normal looking person to most.....probably more a case of discrimination for some unknown reason! forest tony
  • Score: 2

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