Fawley refinery evacuated after reports of suspicious package

Fawley refinery

Fawley refinery

First published in New Forest

PART of Fawley refinery was cordoned off today following reports of a suspicious package.

Members of Hampshire Constabulary flocked to the scene, setting up a zone around the package while it was investigated.

The conference centre at the site was evacuated as a precaution.

The scene was cordoned off while the item was assessed and found to be of no risk to the public.

The cordon has now been lifted and workers at the refinery have been allowed back on to the site.

Police now say there was no danger to members of the public or those working at the refinery at any time.

Sergeant Deborah Holman said: “We have to treat reports of suspicious packages seriously but it was quickly ascertained that this was a case of some property left at the site in good faith and with no intention of causing alarm or harm to those working at the refinery.”

Comments (31)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

1:19pm Mon 20 Aug 12

southy says...

The SBS been training down here again
The SBS been training down here again southy
  • Score: 0

4:48pm Mon 20 Aug 12

Tottonion says...

Bugger, where's me sarnies
Bugger, where's me sarnies Tottonion
  • Score: 0

7:31pm Mon 20 Aug 12

Fatty x Ford Worker says...

Its me signing on book me a subby re eastern european!
Its me signing on book me a subby re eastern european! Fatty x Ford Worker
  • Score: 0

7:53pm Mon 20 Aug 12

Ginger_cyclist says...

****, they sent my alarm clock to the wrong address.
****, they sent my alarm clock to the wrong address. Ginger_cyclist
  • Score: 0

9:20pm Mon 20 Aug 12

J.P.M says...

"The conference centre at the sitre" ???
Is that an ancient waterside praying place?
"The conference centre at the sitre" ??? Is that an ancient waterside praying place? J.P.M
  • Score: 0

9:26pm Mon 20 Aug 12

forest hump says...

southy wrote:
The SBS been training down here again
you really do not have a clue, do you?
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: The SBS been training down here again[/p][/quote]you really do not have a clue, do you? forest hump
  • Score: 0

12:23am Tue 21 Aug 12

freefinker says...

forest hump wrote:
southy wrote:
The SBS been training down here again
you really do not have a clue, do you?
.. on that, fh, we will always agree.
[quote][p][bold]forest hump[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: The SBS been training down here again[/p][/quote]you really do not have a clue, do you?[/p][/quote].. on that, fh, we will always agree. freefinker
  • Score: 0

10:17am Tue 21 Aug 12

southy says...

freefinker wrote:
forest hump wrote:
southy wrote:
The SBS been training down here again
you really do not have a clue, do you?
.. on that, fh, we will always agree.
Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers.
Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak.
Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up.
[quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]forest hump[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: The SBS been training down here again[/p][/quote]you really do not have a clue, do you?[/p][/quote].. on that, fh, we will always agree.[/p][/quote]Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers. Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak. Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up. southy
  • Score: 0

11:00am Tue 21 Aug 12

espanuel says...

For once I have to agree with Southy, this does happen down Southampton water, not very often but they also target other installations. How do I know? I worked at those Chemical plants for 40 years one for 33years.
For once I have to agree with Southy, this does happen down Southampton water, not very often but they also target other installations. How do I know? I worked at those Chemical plants for 40 years one for 33years. espanuel
  • Score: 0

11:07am Tue 21 Aug 12

Shoong says...

southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
forest hump wrote:
southy wrote:
The SBS been training down here again
you really do not have a clue, do you?
.. on that, fh, we will always agree.
Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers.
Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak.
Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up.
Yeh, but who cares?

You get up early in the morning - what a hero.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]forest hump[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: The SBS been training down here again[/p][/quote]you really do not have a clue, do you?[/p][/quote].. on that, fh, we will always agree.[/p][/quote]Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers. Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak. Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up.[/p][/quote]Yeh, but who cares? You get up early in the morning - what a hero. Shoong
  • Score: 0

12:42pm Tue 21 Aug 12

southy says...

espanuel wrote:
For once I have to agree with Southy, this does happen down Southampton water, not very often but they also target other installations. How do I know? I worked at those Chemical plants for 40 years one for 33years.
They target all installations even ships, seen them about 6 times in the last 30 years, and spoke to one pair that had just slip out of Marchwood Military Docks.
[quote][p][bold]espanuel[/bold] wrote: For once I have to agree with Southy, this does happen down Southampton water, not very often but they also target other installations. How do I know? I worked at those Chemical plants for 40 years one for 33years.[/p][/quote]They target all installations even ships, seen them about 6 times in the last 30 years, and spoke to one pair that had just slip out of Marchwood Military Docks. southy
  • Score: 0

12:46pm Tue 21 Aug 12

southy says...

Shoong wrote:
southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
forest hump wrote:
southy wrote:
The SBS been training down here again
you really do not have a clue, do you?
.. on that, fh, we will always agree.
Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers.
Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak.
Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up.
Yeh, but who cares?

You get up early in the morning - what a hero.
Well you do not know what you are missing in the world of Nature, in the summer this is a wonderful time to be up and about, seeing the night l returning and the day life just waking up.
The time of the day when you can learn some thing new every time, or see things that you never seen before.
[quote][p][bold]Shoong[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]forest hump[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: The SBS been training down here again[/p][/quote]you really do not have a clue, do you?[/p][/quote].. on that, fh, we will always agree.[/p][/quote]Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers. Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak. Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up.[/p][/quote]Yeh, but who cares? You get up early in the morning - what a hero.[/p][/quote]Well you do not know what you are missing in the world of Nature, in the summer this is a wonderful time to be up and about, seeing the night l returning and the day life just waking up. The time of the day when you can learn some thing new every time, or see things that you never seen before. southy
  • Score: 0

1:01pm Tue 21 Aug 12

freefinker says...

southy wrote:
Shoong wrote:
southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
forest hump wrote:
southy wrote:
The SBS been training down here again
you really do not have a clue, do you?
.. on that, fh, we will always agree.
Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers.
Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak.
Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up.
Yeh, but who cares?

You get up early in the morning - what a hero.
Well you do not know what you are missing in the world of Nature, in the summer this is a wonderful time to be up and about, seeing the night l returning and the day life just waking up.
The time of the day when you can learn some thing new every time, or see things that you never seen before.
.. ah, the 'world of Nature'.

Well, on that subject, I'm still wondering why you appear to be the only person in the world who insists the Meadow Fritillary is a native UK butterfly.

I’ve checked in both printed literature and on the internet and there is not even one scrap of evidence to support this hypothesis. Can you help us with a reference or two?
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Shoong[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]forest hump[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: The SBS been training down here again[/p][/quote]you really do not have a clue, do you?[/p][/quote].. on that, fh, we will always agree.[/p][/quote]Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers. Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak. Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up.[/p][/quote]Yeh, but who cares? You get up early in the morning - what a hero.[/p][/quote]Well you do not know what you are missing in the world of Nature, in the summer this is a wonderful time to be up and about, seeing the night l returning and the day life just waking up. The time of the day when you can learn some thing new every time, or see things that you never seen before.[/p][/quote].. ah, the 'world of Nature'. Well, on that subject, I'm still wondering why you appear to be the only person in the world who insists the Meadow Fritillary is a native UK butterfly. I’ve checked in both printed literature and on the internet and there is not even one scrap of evidence to support this hypothesis. Can you help us with a reference or two? freefinker
  • Score: 0

1:09pm Tue 21 Aug 12

southy says...

freefinker wrote:
southy wrote:
Shoong wrote:
southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
forest hump wrote:
southy wrote:
The SBS been training down here again
you really do not have a clue, do you?
.. on that, fh, we will always agree.
Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers.
Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak.
Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up.
Yeh, but who cares?

You get up early in the morning - what a hero.
Well you do not know what you are missing in the world of Nature, in the summer this is a wonderful time to be up and about, seeing the night l returning and the day life just waking up.
The time of the day when you can learn some thing new every time, or see things that you never seen before.
.. ah, the 'world of Nature'.

Well, on that subject, I'm still wondering why you appear to be the only person in the world who insists the Meadow Fritillary is a native UK butterfly.

I’ve checked in both printed literature and on the internet and there is not even one scrap of evidence to support this hypothesis. Can you help us with a reference or two?
Freefinker I not the only one in the know, Its been recorded on the South Coast since the victorian times, all Fritillarys come from the Continant at some point in time. Try going places and looking for them and you might just might start learning some thing.
Like if you want to see Chalkhill Blue thats not on the downs, theres a place between Somerton and Langport where you can find a colony.
[quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Shoong[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]forest hump[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: The SBS been training down here again[/p][/quote]you really do not have a clue, do you?[/p][/quote].. on that, fh, we will always agree.[/p][/quote]Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers. Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak. Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up.[/p][/quote]Yeh, but who cares? You get up early in the morning - what a hero.[/p][/quote]Well you do not know what you are missing in the world of Nature, in the summer this is a wonderful time to be up and about, seeing the night l returning and the day life just waking up. The time of the day when you can learn some thing new every time, or see things that you never seen before.[/p][/quote].. ah, the 'world of Nature'. Well, on that subject, I'm still wondering why you appear to be the only person in the world who insists the Meadow Fritillary is a native UK butterfly. I’ve checked in both printed literature and on the internet and there is not even one scrap of evidence to support this hypothesis. Can you help us with a reference or two?[/p][/quote]Freefinker I not the only one in the know, Its been recorded on the South Coast since the victorian times, all Fritillarys come from the Continant at some point in time. Try going places and looking for them and you might just might start learning some thing. Like if you want to see Chalkhill Blue thats not on the downs, theres a place between Somerton and Langport where you can find a colony. southy
  • Score: 0

1:17pm Tue 21 Aug 12

southy says...

southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
southy wrote:
Shoong wrote:
southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
forest hump wrote:
southy wrote:
The SBS been training down here again
you really do not have a clue, do you?
.. on that, fh, we will always agree.
Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers.
Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak.
Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up.
Yeh, but who cares?

You get up early in the morning - what a hero.
Well you do not know what you are missing in the world of Nature, in the summer this is a wonderful time to be up and about, seeing the night l returning and the day life just waking up.
The time of the day when you can learn some thing new every time, or see things that you never seen before.
.. ah, the 'world of Nature'.

Well, on that subject, I'm still wondering why you appear to be the only person in the world who insists the Meadow Fritillary is a native UK butterfly.

I’ve checked in both printed literature and on the internet and there is not even one scrap of evidence to support this hypothesis. Can you help us with a reference or two?
Freefinker I not the only one in the know, Its been recorded on the South Coast since the victorian times, all Fritillarys come from the Continant at some point in time. Try going places and looking for them and you might just might start learning some thing.
Like if you want to see Chalkhill Blue thats not on the downs, theres a place between Somerton and Langport where you can find a colony.
try some of the old victorian books, modern books deals with what you are likey to see, unless you buy a book on the rareitys.
Each area as people around that knows, like if you want to find out about birds then the person to talk to is Phil Toy, even Frank Vosper go's to this man to find out information.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Shoong[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]forest hump[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: The SBS been training down here again[/p][/quote]you really do not have a clue, do you?[/p][/quote].. on that, fh, we will always agree.[/p][/quote]Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers. Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak. Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up.[/p][/quote]Yeh, but who cares? You get up early in the morning - what a hero.[/p][/quote]Well you do not know what you are missing in the world of Nature, in the summer this is a wonderful time to be up and about, seeing the night l returning and the day life just waking up. The time of the day when you can learn some thing new every time, or see things that you never seen before.[/p][/quote].. ah, the 'world of Nature'. Well, on that subject, I'm still wondering why you appear to be the only person in the world who insists the Meadow Fritillary is a native UK butterfly. I’ve checked in both printed literature and on the internet and there is not even one scrap of evidence to support this hypothesis. Can you help us with a reference or two?[/p][/quote]Freefinker I not the only one in the know, Its been recorded on the South Coast since the victorian times, all Fritillarys come from the Continant at some point in time. Try going places and looking for them and you might just might start learning some thing. Like if you want to see Chalkhill Blue thats not on the downs, theres a place between Somerton and Langport where you can find a colony.[/p][/quote]try some of the old victorian books, modern books deals with what you are likey to see, unless you buy a book on the rareitys. Each area as people around that knows, like if you want to find out about birds then the person to talk to is Phil Toy, even Frank Vosper go's to this man to find out information. southy
  • Score: 0

1:21pm Tue 21 Aug 12

southy says...

Freefinker, its like 6 years ago I never filed a report about a Swallow Tail and its location on the river test, nore did the 4 witnesses, we kept it to our selfs, reason being did not want people around distrubing area looking for it.
Freefinker, its like 6 years ago I never filed a report about a Swallow Tail and its location on the river test, nore did the 4 witnesses, we kept it to our selfs, reason being did not want people around distrubing area looking for it. southy
  • Score: 0

1:53pm Tue 21 Aug 12

freefinker says...

southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
southy wrote:
Shoong wrote:
southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
forest hump wrote:
southy wrote:
The SBS been training down here again
you really do not have a clue, do you?
.. on that, fh, we will always agree.
Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers.
Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak.
Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up.
Yeh, but who cares?

You get up early in the morning - what a hero.
Well you do not know what you are missing in the world of Nature, in the summer this is a wonderful time to be up and about, seeing the night l returning and the day life just waking up.
The time of the day when you can learn some thing new every time, or see things that you never seen before.
.. ah, the 'world of Nature'.

Well, on that subject, I'm still wondering why you appear to be the only person in the world who insists the Meadow Fritillary is a native UK butterfly.

I’ve checked in both printed literature and on the internet and there is not even one scrap of evidence to support this hypothesis. Can you help us with a reference or two?
Freefinker I not the only one in the know, Its been recorded on the South Coast since the victorian times, all Fritillarys come from the Continant at some point in time. Try going places and looking for them and you might just might start learning some thing.
Like if you want to see Chalkhill Blue thats not on the downs, theres a place between Somerton and Langport where you can find a colony.
.. so that's a big no, is it?.

You can't supply even a single reference.

You say its "been recorded on the South Coast since the victorian times" but you are totally unable to point me in the direction of where and when it has been recorded and to which documents demonstrate this?
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Shoong[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]forest hump[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: The SBS been training down here again[/p][/quote]you really do not have a clue, do you?[/p][/quote].. on that, fh, we will always agree.[/p][/quote]Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers. Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak. Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up.[/p][/quote]Yeh, but who cares? You get up early in the morning - what a hero.[/p][/quote]Well you do not know what you are missing in the world of Nature, in the summer this is a wonderful time to be up and about, seeing the night l returning and the day life just waking up. The time of the day when you can learn some thing new every time, or see things that you never seen before.[/p][/quote].. ah, the 'world of Nature'. Well, on that subject, I'm still wondering why you appear to be the only person in the world who insists the Meadow Fritillary is a native UK butterfly. I’ve checked in both printed literature and on the internet and there is not even one scrap of evidence to support this hypothesis. Can you help us with a reference or two?[/p][/quote]Freefinker I not the only one in the know, Its been recorded on the South Coast since the victorian times, all Fritillarys come from the Continant at some point in time. Try going places and looking for them and you might just might start learning some thing. Like if you want to see Chalkhill Blue thats not on the downs, theres a place between Somerton and Langport where you can find a colony.[/p][/quote].. so that's a big no, is it?. You can't supply even a single reference. You say its "been recorded on the South Coast since the victorian times" but you are totally unable to point me in the direction of where and when it has been recorded and to which documents demonstrate this? freefinker
  • Score: 0

1:55pm Tue 21 Aug 12

freefinker says...

southy wrote:
Freefinker, its like 6 years ago I never filed a report about a Swallow Tail and its location on the river test, nore did the 4 witnesses, we kept it to our selfs, reason being did not want people around distrubing area looking for it.
.. well done southy, you witnessed a Swallowtail 6 years ago. Congratulations. While rare this is not unique. There ARE records of this migratory butterfly, subspecies ‘gorganus’, most years somewhere along the south coast.

Note, however, this IS a migratory butterfly in continental Europe. So, the odd sighting in the UK is to be expected.

The Meadow Fritillary IS NOT migratory. It inhabits SW Europe and there it stays. It is NOT found in the northern half of France or the Low Countries. It is not found, EVER, in the UK.

I realise you made this silly mistake in your list of UK fritillaries and I gave you several opportunities to check your facts. But it’s the same old story, southy will NEVER admit to making a mistake and will lie, lie and lie again to maintain an indefensible position.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: Freefinker, its like 6 years ago I never filed a report about a Swallow Tail and its location on the river test, nore did the 4 witnesses, we kept it to our selfs, reason being did not want people around distrubing area looking for it.[/p][/quote].. well done southy, you witnessed a Swallowtail 6 years ago. Congratulations. While rare this is not unique. There ARE records of this migratory butterfly, subspecies ‘gorganus’, most years somewhere along the south coast. Note, however, this IS a migratory butterfly in continental Europe. So, the odd sighting in the UK is to be expected. The Meadow Fritillary IS NOT migratory. It inhabits SW Europe and there it stays. It is NOT found in the northern half of France or the Low Countries. It is not found, EVER, in the UK. I realise you made this silly mistake in your list of UK fritillaries and I gave you several opportunities to check your facts. But it’s the same old story, southy will NEVER admit to making a mistake and will lie, lie and lie again to maintain an indefensible position. freefinker
  • Score: 0

2:09pm Tue 21 Aug 12

freefinker says...

southy wrote:
southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
southy wrote:
Shoong wrote:
southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
forest hump wrote:
southy wrote:
The SBS been training down here again
you really do not have a clue, do you?
.. on that, fh, we will always agree.
Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers.
Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak.
Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up.
Yeh, but who cares?

You get up early in the morning - what a hero.
Well you do not know what you are missing in the world of Nature, in the summer this is a wonderful time to be up and about, seeing the night l returning and the day life just waking up.
The time of the day when you can learn some thing new every time, or see things that you never seen before.
.. ah, the 'world of Nature'.

Well, on that subject, I'm still wondering why you appear to be the only person in the world who insists the Meadow Fritillary is a native UK butterfly.

I’ve checked in both printed literature and on the internet and there is not even one scrap of evidence to support this hypothesis. Can you help us with a reference or two?
Freefinker I not the only one in the know, Its been recorded on the South Coast since the victorian times, all Fritillarys come from the Continant at some point in time. Try going places and looking for them and you might just might start learning some thing.
Like if you want to see Chalkhill Blue thats not on the downs, theres a place between Somerton and Langport where you can find a colony.
try some of the old victorian books, modern books deals with what you are likey to see, unless you buy a book on the rareitys.
Each area as people around that knows, like if you want to find out about birds then the person to talk to is Phil Toy, even Frank Vosper go's to this man to find out information.
.. yes southy and in this area it's Phil Budd, Andy Barker and myself who are "people around that knows" as far as butterflies are concerned..

I have just asked myself and can confirm you are wrong and I am right.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Shoong[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]forest hump[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: The SBS been training down here again[/p][/quote]you really do not have a clue, do you?[/p][/quote].. on that, fh, we will always agree.[/p][/quote]Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers. Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak. Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up.[/p][/quote]Yeh, but who cares? You get up early in the morning - what a hero.[/p][/quote]Well you do not know what you are missing in the world of Nature, in the summer this is a wonderful time to be up and about, seeing the night l returning and the day life just waking up. The time of the day when you can learn some thing new every time, or see things that you never seen before.[/p][/quote].. ah, the 'world of Nature'. Well, on that subject, I'm still wondering why you appear to be the only person in the world who insists the Meadow Fritillary is a native UK butterfly. I’ve checked in both printed literature and on the internet and there is not even one scrap of evidence to support this hypothesis. Can you help us with a reference or two?[/p][/quote]Freefinker I not the only one in the know, Its been recorded on the South Coast since the victorian times, all Fritillarys come from the Continant at some point in time. Try going places and looking for them and you might just might start learning some thing. Like if you want to see Chalkhill Blue thats not on the downs, theres a place between Somerton and Langport where you can find a colony.[/p][/quote]try some of the old victorian books, modern books deals with what you are likey to see, unless you buy a book on the rareitys. Each area as people around that knows, like if you want to find out about birds then the person to talk to is Phil Toy, even Frank Vosper go's to this man to find out information.[/p][/quote].. yes southy and in this area it's Phil Budd, Andy Barker and myself who are "people around that knows" as far as butterflies are concerned.. I have just asked myself and can confirm you are wrong and I am right. freefinker
  • Score: 0

2:18pm Tue 21 Aug 12

southy says...

freefinker wrote:
southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
southy wrote:
Shoong wrote:
southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
forest hump wrote:
southy wrote:
The SBS been training down here again
you really do not have a clue, do you?
.. on that, fh, we will always agree.
Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers.
Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak.
Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up.
Yeh, but who cares?

You get up early in the morning - what a hero.
Well you do not know what you are missing in the world of Nature, in the summer this is a wonderful time to be up and about, seeing the night l returning and the day life just waking up.
The time of the day when you can learn some thing new every time, or see things that you never seen before.
.. ah, the 'world of Nature'.

Well, on that subject, I'm still wondering why you appear to be the only person in the world who insists the Meadow Fritillary is a native UK butterfly.

I’ve checked in both printed literature and on the internet and there is not even one scrap of evidence to support this hypothesis. Can you help us with a reference or two?
Freefinker I not the only one in the know, Its been recorded on the South Coast since the victorian times, all Fritillarys come from the Continant at some point in time. Try going places and looking for them and you might just might start learning some thing.
Like if you want to see Chalkhill Blue thats not on the downs, theres a place between Somerton and Langport where you can find a colony.
.. so that's a big no, is it?.

You can't supply even a single reference.

You say its "been recorded on the South Coast since the victorian times" but you are totally unable to point me in the direction of where and when it has been recorded and to which documents demonstrate this?
I giving a hint Go and buy a book on the rareitys, its easy as that, read books like Darwin and others around this time, The great natralist era when things really got named, that should keep you busy reading for a few mths and more, there are loads of them from this era.
ukbiodiversitylibrar
y
[quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Shoong[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]forest hump[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: The SBS been training down here again[/p][/quote]you really do not have a clue, do you?[/p][/quote].. on that, fh, we will always agree.[/p][/quote]Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers. Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak. Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up.[/p][/quote]Yeh, but who cares? You get up early in the morning - what a hero.[/p][/quote]Well you do not know what you are missing in the world of Nature, in the summer this is a wonderful time to be up and about, seeing the night l returning and the day life just waking up. The time of the day when you can learn some thing new every time, or see things that you never seen before.[/p][/quote].. ah, the 'world of Nature'. Well, on that subject, I'm still wondering why you appear to be the only person in the world who insists the Meadow Fritillary is a native UK butterfly. I’ve checked in both printed literature and on the internet and there is not even one scrap of evidence to support this hypothesis. Can you help us with a reference or two?[/p][/quote]Freefinker I not the only one in the know, Its been recorded on the South Coast since the victorian times, all Fritillarys come from the Continant at some point in time. Try going places and looking for them and you might just might start learning some thing. Like if you want to see Chalkhill Blue thats not on the downs, theres a place between Somerton and Langport where you can find a colony.[/p][/quote].. so that's a big no, is it?. You can't supply even a single reference. You say its "been recorded on the South Coast since the victorian times" but you are totally unable to point me in the direction of where and when it has been recorded and to which documents demonstrate this?[/p][/quote]I giving a hint Go and buy a book on the rareitys, its easy as that, read books like Darwin and others around this time, The great natralist era when things really got named, that should keep you busy reading for a few mths and more, there are loads of them from this era. ukbiodiversitylibrar y southy
  • Score: 0

2:26pm Tue 21 Aug 12

southy says...

freefinker wrote:
southy wrote:
southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
southy wrote:
Shoong wrote:
southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
forest hump wrote:
southy wrote:
The SBS been training down here again
you really do not have a clue, do you?
.. on that, fh, we will always agree.
Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers.
Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak.
Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up.
Yeh, but who cares?

You get up early in the morning - what a hero.
Well you do not know what you are missing in the world of Nature, in the summer this is a wonderful time to be up and about, seeing the night l returning and the day life just waking up.
The time of the day when you can learn some thing new every time, or see things that you never seen before.
.. ah, the 'world of Nature'.

Well, on that subject, I'm still wondering why you appear to be the only person in the world who insists the Meadow Fritillary is a native UK butterfly.

I’ve checked in both printed literature and on the internet and there is not even one scrap of evidence to support this hypothesis. Can you help us with a reference or two?
Freefinker I not the only one in the know, Its been recorded on the South Coast since the victorian times, all Fritillarys come from the Continant at some point in time. Try going places and looking for them and you might just might start learning some thing.
Like if you want to see Chalkhill Blue thats not on the downs, theres a place between Somerton and Langport where you can find a colony.
try some of the old victorian books, modern books deals with what you are likey to see, unless you buy a book on the rareitys.
Each area as people around that knows, like if you want to find out about birds then the person to talk to is Phil Toy, even Frank Vosper go's to this man to find out information.
.. yes southy and in this area it's Phil Budd, Andy Barker and myself who are "people around that knows" as far as butterflies are concerned..

I have just asked myself and can confirm you are wrong and I am right.
You know less than me, as do Phil Budd and Andy Barker they just quote from common books.
And if you was wondering, yes I did catch Butterflys and Moths and pind them on boards when you was allowed to, now days I just take pictures, using a macro or tele lens.
Oh by the way you will find a meadow in the natural history museum that was caught at Romney.
Your to much a townie boy freefinker.
[quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Shoong[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]forest hump[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: The SBS been training down here again[/p][/quote]you really do not have a clue, do you?[/p][/quote].. on that, fh, we will always agree.[/p][/quote]Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers. Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak. Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up.[/p][/quote]Yeh, but who cares? You get up early in the morning - what a hero.[/p][/quote]Well you do not know what you are missing in the world of Nature, in the summer this is a wonderful time to be up and about, seeing the night l returning and the day life just waking up. The time of the day when you can learn some thing new every time, or see things that you never seen before.[/p][/quote].. ah, the 'world of Nature'. Well, on that subject, I'm still wondering why you appear to be the only person in the world who insists the Meadow Fritillary is a native UK butterfly. I’ve checked in both printed literature and on the internet and there is not even one scrap of evidence to support this hypothesis. Can you help us with a reference or two?[/p][/quote]Freefinker I not the only one in the know, Its been recorded on the South Coast since the victorian times, all Fritillarys come from the Continant at some point in time. Try going places and looking for them and you might just might start learning some thing. Like if you want to see Chalkhill Blue thats not on the downs, theres a place between Somerton and Langport where you can find a colony.[/p][/quote]try some of the old victorian books, modern books deals with what you are likey to see, unless you buy a book on the rareitys. Each area as people around that knows, like if you want to find out about birds then the person to talk to is Phil Toy, even Frank Vosper go's to this man to find out information.[/p][/quote].. yes southy and in this area it's Phil Budd, Andy Barker and myself who are "people around that knows" as far as butterflies are concerned.. I have just asked myself and can confirm you are wrong and I am right.[/p][/quote]You know less than me, as do Phil Budd and Andy Barker they just quote from common books. And if you was wondering, yes I did catch Butterflys and Moths and pind them on boards when you was allowed to, now days I just take pictures, using a macro or tele lens. Oh by the way you will find a meadow in the natural history museum that was caught at Romney. Your to much a townie boy freefinker. southy
  • Score: 0

2:28pm Tue 21 Aug 12

Shoong says...

southy wrote:
Shoong wrote:
southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
forest hump wrote:
southy wrote:
The SBS been training down here again
you really do not have a clue, do you?
.. on that, fh, we will always agree.
Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers.
Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak.
Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up.
Yeh, but who cares?

You get up early in the morning - what a hero.
Well you do not know what you are missing in the world of Nature, in the summer this is a wonderful time to be up and about, seeing the night l returning and the day life just waking up.
The time of the day when you can learn some thing new every time, or see things that you never seen before.
Yes well seeing as you don't work you have plenty of time don't you?

And, after all, I'll just have to take your word for it. I suspect you're the only wildlife hanging out at 4 o'clock in the morning Peter.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Shoong[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]forest hump[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: The SBS been training down here again[/p][/quote]you really do not have a clue, do you?[/p][/quote].. on that, fh, we will always agree.[/p][/quote]Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers. Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak. Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up.[/p][/quote]Yeh, but who cares? You get up early in the morning - what a hero.[/p][/quote]Well you do not know what you are missing in the world of Nature, in the summer this is a wonderful time to be up and about, seeing the night l returning and the day life just waking up. The time of the day when you can learn some thing new every time, or see things that you never seen before.[/p][/quote]Yes well seeing as you don't work you have plenty of time don't you? And, after all, I'll just have to take your word for it. I suspect you're the only wildlife hanging out at 4 o'clock in the morning Peter. Shoong
  • Score: 0

2:37pm Tue 21 Aug 12

espanuel says...

WHAT THE F88K HAS A BUTTERFLY GOT TO DO WITH A SUSPECT PACKAGE?
WHAT THE F88K HAS A BUTTERFLY GOT TO DO WITH A SUSPECT PACKAGE? espanuel
  • Score: 0

2:48pm Tue 21 Aug 12

freefinker says...

southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
southy wrote:
Shoong wrote:
southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
forest hump wrote:
southy wrote:
The SBS been training down here again
you really do not have a clue, do you?
.. on that, fh, we will always agree.
Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers.
Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak.
Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up.
Yeh, but who cares?

You get up early in the morning - what a hero.
Well you do not know what you are missing in the world of Nature, in the summer this is a wonderful time to be up and about, seeing the night l returning and the day life just waking up.
The time of the day when you can learn some thing new every time, or see things that you never seen before.
.. ah, the 'world of Nature'.

Well, on that subject, I'm still wondering why you appear to be the only person in the world who insists the Meadow Fritillary is a native UK butterfly.

I’ve checked in both printed literature and on the internet and there is not even one scrap of evidence to support this hypothesis. Can you help us with a reference or two?
Freefinker I not the only one in the know, Its been recorded on the South Coast since the victorian times, all Fritillarys come from the Continant at some point in time. Try going places and looking for them and you might just might start learning some thing.
Like if you want to see Chalkhill Blue thats not on the downs, theres a place between Somerton and Langport where you can find a colony.
.. so that's a big no, is it?.

You can't supply even a single reference.

You say its "been recorded on the South Coast since the victorian times" but you are totally unable to point me in the direction of where and when it has been recorded and to which documents demonstrate this?
I giving a hint Go and buy a book on the rareitys, its easy as that, read books like Darwin and others around this time, The great natralist era when things really got named, that should keep you busy reading for a few mths and more, there are loads of them from this era.
ukbiodiversitylibrar

y
southy, I do have access to nearly all old butterfly publications, such as: -
Ford, 1945, Butterflies.
Frohawk, 1924, Natural History of British Butterflies.
Frohawk, 1934, The Complete Book of British Butterflies.
and if you want I can go right back to: -
Thomas Moffett, 1634, The Theatre of Insects, the first known English language book recording UK butterflies.

You know what, no mention anywhere of the Meadow Fritillary. Even when unscrupulous early Victorian dealers were importing exotic species for release, they didn’t bother with the Meadow Fritillary, only described as a separate species by Keferstein in 1851.



.. and southy, there is a limestone ridge between Somerton and Langport so it is fully expected that the Chalkhill Blue will be found in this area. It is restricted to areas where its food plant, Horseshoe Vetch, grows; and that is in limestone areas.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Shoong[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]forest hump[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: The SBS been training down here again[/p][/quote]you really do not have a clue, do you?[/p][/quote].. on that, fh, we will always agree.[/p][/quote]Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers. Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak. Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up.[/p][/quote]Yeh, but who cares? You get up early in the morning - what a hero.[/p][/quote]Well you do not know what you are missing in the world of Nature, in the summer this is a wonderful time to be up and about, seeing the night l returning and the day life just waking up. The time of the day when you can learn some thing new every time, or see things that you never seen before.[/p][/quote].. ah, the 'world of Nature'. Well, on that subject, I'm still wondering why you appear to be the only person in the world who insists the Meadow Fritillary is a native UK butterfly. I’ve checked in both printed literature and on the internet and there is not even one scrap of evidence to support this hypothesis. Can you help us with a reference or two?[/p][/quote]Freefinker I not the only one in the know, Its been recorded on the South Coast since the victorian times, all Fritillarys come from the Continant at some point in time. Try going places and looking for them and you might just might start learning some thing. Like if you want to see Chalkhill Blue thats not on the downs, theres a place between Somerton and Langport where you can find a colony.[/p][/quote].. so that's a big no, is it?. You can't supply even a single reference. You say its "been recorded on the South Coast since the victorian times" but you are totally unable to point me in the direction of where and when it has been recorded and to which documents demonstrate this?[/p][/quote]I giving a hint Go and buy a book on the rareitys, its easy as that, read books like Darwin and others around this time, The great natralist era when things really got named, that should keep you busy reading for a few mths and more, there are loads of them from this era. ukbiodiversitylibrar y[/p][/quote]southy, I do have access to nearly all old butterfly publications, such as: - Ford, 1945, Butterflies. Frohawk, 1924, Natural History of British Butterflies. Frohawk, 1934, The Complete Book of British Butterflies. and if you want I can go right back to: - Thomas Moffett, 1634, The Theatre of Insects, the first known English language book recording UK butterflies. You know what, no mention anywhere of the Meadow Fritillary. Even when unscrupulous early Victorian dealers were importing exotic species for release, they didn’t bother with the Meadow Fritillary, only described as a separate species by Keferstein in 1851. .. and southy, there is a limestone ridge between Somerton and Langport so it is fully expected that the Chalkhill Blue will be found in this area. It is restricted to areas where its food plant, Horseshoe Vetch, grows; and that is in limestone areas. freefinker
  • Score: 0

3:10pm Tue 21 Aug 12

southy says...

espanuel wrote:
WHAT THE F88K HAS A BUTTERFLY GOT TO DO WITH A SUSPECT PACKAGE?
Nowt espanuel freefinker up to his little tricks again by taking it of topic.
[quote][p][bold]espanuel[/bold] wrote: WHAT THE F88K HAS A BUTTERFLY GOT TO DO WITH A SUSPECT PACKAGE?[/p][/quote]Nowt espanuel freefinker up to his little tricks again by taking it of topic. southy
  • Score: 0

3:10pm Tue 21 Aug 12

freefinker says...

southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
southy wrote:
southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
southy wrote:
Shoong wrote:
southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
forest hump wrote:
southy wrote:
The SBS been training down here again
you really do not have a clue, do you?
.. on that, fh, we will always agree.
Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers.
Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak.
Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up.
Yeh, but who cares?

You get up early in the morning - what a hero.
Well you do not know what you are missing in the world of Nature, in the summer this is a wonderful time to be up and about, seeing the night l returning and the day life just waking up.
The time of the day when you can learn some thing new every time, or see things that you never seen before.
.. ah, the 'world of Nature'.

Well, on that subject, I'm still wondering why you appear to be the only person in the world who insists the Meadow Fritillary is a native UK butterfly.

I’ve checked in both printed literature and on the internet and there is not even one scrap of evidence to support this hypothesis. Can you help us with a reference or two?
Freefinker I not the only one in the know, Its been recorded on the South Coast since the victorian times, all Fritillarys come from the Continant at some point in time. Try going places and looking for them and you might just might start learning some thing.
Like if you want to see Chalkhill Blue thats not on the downs, theres a place between Somerton and Langport where you can find a colony.
try some of the old victorian books, modern books deals with what you are likey to see, unless you buy a book on the rareitys.
Each area as people around that knows, like if you want to find out about birds then the person to talk to is Phil Toy, even Frank Vosper go's to this man to find out information.
.. yes southy and in this area it's Phil Budd, Andy Barker and myself who are "people around that knows" as far as butterflies are concerned..

I have just asked myself and can confirm you are wrong and I am right.
You know less than me, as do Phil Budd and Andy Barker they just quote from common books.
And if you was wondering, yes I did catch Butterflys and Moths and pind them on boards when you was allowed to, now days I just take pictures, using a macro or tele lens.
Oh by the way you will find a meadow in the natural history museum that was caught at Romney.
Your to much a townie boy freefinker.
.. well, well, well. Perhaps you could tell us how you know this “fact”. The Natural History Museum does, in fact, have a collection of over 3 million pinned butterflies. 99.99%(approx) are not on display. Yet you know for certain they have a Meadow Fritillary caught at “Romney”.

How amazing, or it would be if not for the fact it is yet another southy lie.

Oh, and I’ve met 10 year old who know much more on this subject than you.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Shoong[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]forest hump[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: The SBS been training down here again[/p][/quote]you really do not have a clue, do you?[/p][/quote].. on that, fh, we will always agree.[/p][/quote]Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers. Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak. Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up.[/p][/quote]Yeh, but who cares? You get up early in the morning - what a hero.[/p][/quote]Well you do not know what you are missing in the world of Nature, in the summer this is a wonderful time to be up and about, seeing the night l returning and the day life just waking up. The time of the day when you can learn some thing new every time, or see things that you never seen before.[/p][/quote].. ah, the 'world of Nature'. Well, on that subject, I'm still wondering why you appear to be the only person in the world who insists the Meadow Fritillary is a native UK butterfly. I’ve checked in both printed literature and on the internet and there is not even one scrap of evidence to support this hypothesis. Can you help us with a reference or two?[/p][/quote]Freefinker I not the only one in the know, Its been recorded on the South Coast since the victorian times, all Fritillarys come from the Continant at some point in time. Try going places and looking for them and you might just might start learning some thing. Like if you want to see Chalkhill Blue thats not on the downs, theres a place between Somerton and Langport where you can find a colony.[/p][/quote]try some of the old victorian books, modern books deals with what you are likey to see, unless you buy a book on the rareitys. Each area as people around that knows, like if you want to find out about birds then the person to talk to is Phil Toy, even Frank Vosper go's to this man to find out information.[/p][/quote].. yes southy and in this area it's Phil Budd, Andy Barker and myself who are "people around that knows" as far as butterflies are concerned.. I have just asked myself and can confirm you are wrong and I am right.[/p][/quote]You know less than me, as do Phil Budd and Andy Barker they just quote from common books. And if you was wondering, yes I did catch Butterflys and Moths and pind them on boards when you was allowed to, now days I just take pictures, using a macro or tele lens. Oh by the way you will find a meadow in the natural history museum that was caught at Romney. Your to much a townie boy freefinker.[/p][/quote].. well, well, well. Perhaps you could tell us how you know this “fact”. The Natural History Museum does, in fact, have a collection of over 3 million pinned butterflies. 99.99%(approx) are not on display. Yet you know for certain they have a Meadow Fritillary caught at “Romney”. How amazing, or it would be if not for the fact it is yet another southy lie. Oh, and I’ve met 10 year old who know much more on this subject than you. freefinker
  • Score: 0

3:17pm Tue 21 Aug 12

freefinker says...

espanuel wrote:
WHAT THE F88K HAS A BUTTERFLY GOT TO DO WITH A SUSPECT PACKAGE?
.. sorry, but yet again southy has been caught telling fibs on another story, but when challenged, he disappeared.

Thus, by mentioning “nature” on this story, southy not only went off topic but opened himself up to a renewed challenge on this issue.
[quote][p][bold]espanuel[/bold] wrote: WHAT THE F88K HAS A BUTTERFLY GOT TO DO WITH A SUSPECT PACKAGE?[/p][/quote].. sorry, but yet again southy has been caught telling fibs on another story, but when challenged, he disappeared. Thus, by mentioning “nature” on this story, southy not only went off topic but opened himself up to a renewed challenge on this issue. freefinker
  • Score: 0

5:34pm Tue 21 Aug 12

southy says...

freefinker wrote:
southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
southy wrote:
southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
southy wrote:
Shoong wrote:
southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
forest hump wrote:
southy wrote:
The SBS been training down here again
you really do not have a clue, do you?
.. on that, fh, we will always agree.
Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers.
Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak.
Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up.
Yeh, but who cares?

You get up early in the morning - what a hero.
Well you do not know what you are missing in the world of Nature, in the summer this is a wonderful time to be up and about, seeing the night l returning and the day life just waking up.
The time of the day when you can learn some thing new every time, or see things that you never seen before.
.. ah, the 'world of Nature'.

Well, on that subject, I'm still wondering why you appear to be the only person in the world who insists the Meadow Fritillary is a native UK butterfly.

I’ve checked in both printed literature and on the internet and there is not even one scrap of evidence to support this hypothesis. Can you help us with a reference or two?
Freefinker I not the only one in the know, Its been recorded on the South Coast since the victorian times, all Fritillarys come from the Continant at some point in time. Try going places and looking for them and you might just might start learning some thing.
Like if you want to see Chalkhill Blue thats not on the downs, theres a place between Somerton and Langport where you can find a colony.
try some of the old victorian books, modern books deals with what you are likey to see, unless you buy a book on the rareitys.
Each area as people around that knows, like if you want to find out about birds then the person to talk to is Phil Toy, even Frank Vosper go's to this man to find out information.
.. yes southy and in this area it's Phil Budd, Andy Barker and myself who are "people around that knows" as far as butterflies are concerned..

I have just asked myself and can confirm you are wrong and I am right.
You know less than me, as do Phil Budd and Andy Barker they just quote from common books.
And if you was wondering, yes I did catch Butterflys and Moths and pind them on boards when you was allowed to, now days I just take pictures, using a macro or tele lens.
Oh by the way you will find a meadow in the natural history museum that was caught at Romney.
Your to much a townie boy freefinker.
.. well, well, well. Perhaps you could tell us how you know this “fact”. The Natural History Museum does, in fact, have a collection of over 3 million pinned butterflies. 99.99%(approx) are not on display. Yet you know for certain they have a Meadow Fritillary caught at “Romney”.

How amazing, or it would be if not for the fact it is yet another southy lie.

Oh, and I’ve met 10 year old who know much more on this subject than you.
They have one I have seen it, and if you ask they will check the number against it and tell you who's colletion it came from and when and any other information that they have, The natural History museum has my collettion butterflys and moths. and if you like to know some thing extra check out who was the person behind the Elephant hawk moth collony in somerset, don't be surprise when you see my name there, and you see my name in the colony chalkhill blue in somerset on the blue lias stone ridge.
I not like you a townie, and if that 10 year knows more than me then good for him it just show how little you really knows.
[quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Shoong[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]forest hump[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: The SBS been training down here again[/p][/quote]you really do not have a clue, do you?[/p][/quote].. on that, fh, we will always agree.[/p][/quote]Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers. Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak. Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up.[/p][/quote]Yeh, but who cares? You get up early in the morning - what a hero.[/p][/quote]Well you do not know what you are missing in the world of Nature, in the summer this is a wonderful time to be up and about, seeing the night l returning and the day life just waking up. The time of the day when you can learn some thing new every time, or see things that you never seen before.[/p][/quote].. ah, the 'world of Nature'. Well, on that subject, I'm still wondering why you appear to be the only person in the world who insists the Meadow Fritillary is a native UK butterfly. I’ve checked in both printed literature and on the internet and there is not even one scrap of evidence to support this hypothesis. Can you help us with a reference or two?[/p][/quote]Freefinker I not the only one in the know, Its been recorded on the South Coast since the victorian times, all Fritillarys come from the Continant at some point in time. Try going places and looking for them and you might just might start learning some thing. Like if you want to see Chalkhill Blue thats not on the downs, theres a place between Somerton and Langport where you can find a colony.[/p][/quote]try some of the old victorian books, modern books deals with what you are likey to see, unless you buy a book on the rareitys. Each area as people around that knows, like if you want to find out about birds then the person to talk to is Phil Toy, even Frank Vosper go's to this man to find out information.[/p][/quote].. yes southy and in this area it's Phil Budd, Andy Barker and myself who are "people around that knows" as far as butterflies are concerned.. I have just asked myself and can confirm you are wrong and I am right.[/p][/quote]You know less than me, as do Phil Budd and Andy Barker they just quote from common books. And if you was wondering, yes I did catch Butterflys and Moths and pind them on boards when you was allowed to, now days I just take pictures, using a macro or tele lens. Oh by the way you will find a meadow in the natural history museum that was caught at Romney. Your to much a townie boy freefinker.[/p][/quote].. well, well, well. Perhaps you could tell us how you know this “fact”. The Natural History Museum does, in fact, have a collection of over 3 million pinned butterflies. 99.99%(approx) are not on display. Yet you know for certain they have a Meadow Fritillary caught at “Romney”. How amazing, or it would be if not for the fact it is yet another southy lie. Oh, and I’ve met 10 year old who know much more on this subject than you.[/p][/quote]They have one I have seen it, and if you ask they will check the number against it and tell you who's colletion it came from and when and any other information that they have, The natural History museum has my collettion butterflys and moths. and if you like to know some thing extra check out who was the person behind the Elephant hawk moth collony in somerset, don't be surprise when you see my name there, and you see my name in the colony chalkhill blue in somerset on the blue lias stone ridge. I not like you a townie, and if that 10 year knows more than me then good for him it just show how little you really knows. southy
  • Score: 0

5:39pm Tue 21 Aug 12

southy says...

freefinker wrote:
espanuel wrote:
WHAT THE F88K HAS A BUTTERFLY GOT TO DO WITH A SUSPECT PACKAGE?
.. sorry, but yet again southy has been caught telling fibs on another story, but when challenged, he disappeared.

Thus, by mentioning “nature” on this story, southy not only went off topic but opened himself up to a renewed challenge on this issue.
You took it off topic deliberity freefinker so don't bend or twist things around, you know Shoong and me banter about bit we seem to know each other.
[quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]espanuel[/bold] wrote: WHAT THE F88K HAS A BUTTERFLY GOT TO DO WITH A SUSPECT PACKAGE?[/p][/quote].. sorry, but yet again southy has been caught telling fibs on another story, but when challenged, he disappeared. Thus, by mentioning “nature” on this story, southy not only went off topic but opened himself up to a renewed challenge on this issue.[/p][/quote]You took it off topic deliberity freefinker so don't bend or twist things around, you know Shoong and me banter about bit we seem to know each other. southy
  • Score: 0

6:20pm Tue 21 Aug 12

freefinker says...

southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
southy wrote:
southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
southy wrote:
Shoong wrote:
southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
forest hump wrote:
southy wrote:
The SBS been training down here again
you really do not have a clue, do you?
.. on that, fh, we will always agree.
Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers.
Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak.
Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up.
Yeh, but who cares?

You get up early in the morning - what a hero.
Well you do not know what you are missing in the world of Nature, in the summer this is a wonderful time to be up and about, seeing the night l returning and the day life just waking up.
The time of the day when you can learn some thing new every time, or see things that you never seen before.
.. ah, the 'world of Nature'.

Well, on that subject, I'm still wondering why you appear to be the only person in the world who insists the Meadow Fritillary is a native UK butterfly.

I’ve checked in both printed literature and on the internet and there is not even one scrap of evidence to support this hypothesis. Can you help us with a reference or two?
Freefinker I not the only one in the know, Its been recorded on the South Coast since the victorian times, all Fritillarys come from the Continant at some point in time. Try going places and looking for them and you might just might start learning some thing.
Like if you want to see Chalkhill Blue thats not on the downs, theres a place between Somerton and Langport where you can find a colony.
try some of the old victorian books, modern books deals with what you are likey to see, unless you buy a book on the rareitys.
Each area as people around that knows, like if you want to find out about birds then the person to talk to is Phil Toy, even Frank Vosper go's to this man to find out information.
.. yes southy and in this area it's Phil Budd, Andy Barker and myself who are "people around that knows" as far as butterflies are concerned..

I have just asked myself and can confirm you are wrong and I am right.
You know less than me, as do Phil Budd and Andy Barker they just quote from common books.
And if you was wondering, yes I did catch Butterflys and Moths and pind them on boards when you was allowed to, now days I just take pictures, using a macro or tele lens.
Oh by the way you will find a meadow in the natural history museum that was caught at Romney.
Your to much a townie boy freefinker.
.. well, well, well. Perhaps you could tell us how you know this “fact”. The Natural History Museum does, in fact, have a collection of over 3 million pinned butterflies. 99.99%(approx) are not on display. Yet you know for certain they have a Meadow Fritillary caught at “Romney”.

How amazing, or it would be if not for the fact it is yet another southy lie.

Oh, and I’ve met 10 year old who know much more on this subject than you.
They have one I have seen it, and if you ask they will check the number against it and tell you who's colletion it came from and when and any other information that they have, The natural History museum has my collettion butterflys and moths. and if you like to know some thing extra check out who was the person behind the Elephant hawk moth collony in somerset, don't be surprise when you see my name there, and you see my name in the colony chalkhill blue in somerset on the blue lias stone ridge.
I not like you a townie, and if that 10 year knows more than me then good for him it just show how little you really knows.
.. well thanks for confirming what I said about the Somerset position. You do realise the Blue Lias is a series of alternate bands of Limestone and Shale. Thus the Horseshoe Vetch and thus the Chalkhill Blue. So, nothing unusual there, as you initially implied.

As for your other assertion I have now asked the NHM for confirmation.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Shoong[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]forest hump[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: The SBS been training down here again[/p][/quote]you really do not have a clue, do you?[/p][/quote].. on that, fh, we will always agree.[/p][/quote]Seems both of you do not know what go's on the local Rivers. Both the SBS and the SAS train on Southampton waters once in awhile, they raid places leving little packages and a warning note letting them know that their sercuity is weak. Try getting up early in the mornings and being on the river between 4-30 and 6-00 am, and you might be lucky to see them drop back to the river to be pick up.[/p][/quote]Yeh, but who cares? You get up early in the morning - what a hero.[/p][/quote]Well you do not know what you are missing in the world of Nature, in the summer this is a wonderful time to be up and about, seeing the night l returning and the day life just waking up. The time of the day when you can learn some thing new every time, or see things that you never seen before.[/p][/quote].. ah, the 'world of Nature'. Well, on that subject, I'm still wondering why you appear to be the only person in the world who insists the Meadow Fritillary is a native UK butterfly. I’ve checked in both printed literature and on the internet and there is not even one scrap of evidence to support this hypothesis. Can you help us with a reference or two?[/p][/quote]Freefinker I not the only one in the know, Its been recorded on the South Coast since the victorian times, all Fritillarys come from the Continant at some point in time. Try going places and looking for them and you might just might start learning some thing. Like if you want to see Chalkhill Blue thats not on the downs, theres a place between Somerton and Langport where you can find a colony.[/p][/quote]try some of the old victorian books, modern books deals with what you are likey to see, unless you buy a book on the rareitys. Each area as people around that knows, like if you want to find out about birds then the person to talk to is Phil Toy, even Frank Vosper go's to this man to find out information.[/p][/quote].. yes southy and in this area it's Phil Budd, Andy Barker and myself who are "people around that knows" as far as butterflies are concerned.. I have just asked myself and can confirm you are wrong and I am right.[/p][/quote]You know less than me, as do Phil Budd and Andy Barker they just quote from common books. And if you was wondering, yes I did catch Butterflys and Moths and pind them on boards when you was allowed to, now days I just take pictures, using a macro or tele lens. Oh by the way you will find a meadow in the natural history museum that was caught at Romney. Your to much a townie boy freefinker.[/p][/quote].. well, well, well. Perhaps you could tell us how you know this “fact”. The Natural History Museum does, in fact, have a collection of over 3 million pinned butterflies. 99.99%(approx) are not on display. Yet you know for certain they have a Meadow Fritillary caught at “Romney”. How amazing, or it would be if not for the fact it is yet another southy lie. Oh, and I’ve met 10 year old who know much more on this subject than you.[/p][/quote]They have one I have seen it, and if you ask they will check the number against it and tell you who's colletion it came from and when and any other information that they have, The natural History museum has my collettion butterflys and moths. and if you like to know some thing extra check out who was the person behind the Elephant hawk moth collony in somerset, don't be surprise when you see my name there, and you see my name in the colony chalkhill blue in somerset on the blue lias stone ridge. I not like you a townie, and if that 10 year knows more than me then good for him it just show how little you really knows.[/p][/quote].. well thanks for confirming what I said about the Somerset position. You do realise the Blue Lias is a series of alternate bands of Limestone and Shale. Thus the Horseshoe Vetch and thus the Chalkhill Blue. So, nothing unusual there, as you initially implied. As for your other assertion I have now asked the NHM for confirmation. freefinker
  • Score: 0

6:24pm Tue 21 Aug 12

freefinker says...

southy wrote:
freefinker wrote:
espanuel wrote:
WHAT THE F88K HAS A BUTTERFLY GOT TO DO WITH A SUSPECT PACKAGE?
.. sorry, but yet again southy has been caught telling fibs on another story, but when challenged, he disappeared.

Thus, by mentioning “nature” on this story, southy not only went off topic but opened himself up to a renewed challenge on this issue.
You took it off topic deliberity freefinker so don't bend or twist things around, you know Shoong and me banter about bit we seem to know each other.
Your whole post at 12:46pm Tue 21 Aug 12 was totally off topic.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]freefinker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]espanuel[/bold] wrote: WHAT THE F88K HAS A BUTTERFLY GOT TO DO WITH A SUSPECT PACKAGE?[/p][/quote].. sorry, but yet again southy has been caught telling fibs on another story, but when challenged, he disappeared. Thus, by mentioning “nature” on this story, southy not only went off topic but opened himself up to a renewed challenge on this issue.[/p][/quote]You took it off topic deliberity freefinker so don't bend or twist things around, you know Shoong and me banter about bit we seem to know each other.[/p][/quote]Your whole post at 12:46pm Tue 21 Aug 12 was totally off topic. freefinker
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree