Experts and carers welcome Government pledge to tackle dementia 'crisis'

Carer Jane Ward and her mum Ella Fuller.

Carer Jane Ward and her mum Ella Fuller.

First published in Health Daily Echo: Photograph of the Author by , Crime Reporter

IT is one of the things we fear most about old age, and if things do not change, one in three of us will be struck down by the debilitating disease.

Over the next decade Hampshire and Southampton will see the number of people suffering from dementia increase by 40 per cent, to more than 28,500.

So a call to arms by the Prime Minister yesterday to tackle the “national crisis” of dementia and end the “scandal” of ignorance has been welcomed by Hampshire’s leading experts and carers.

Researchers at the University of Southampton, which is already a leading centre for dementia research, hope that the extra funding promised by David Cameron will ensure the city’s international reputation.

Yesterday, Mr Cameron announced the first ever Prime Ministerial challenge on dementia, outlining plans to boost research by doubling funding to £66m by 2015, address the quality of dementia care and increase the understanding of the condition.

Dr Roxana Carare, neuroscientist at the University of Southampton, said: “The capacity for research into dementia in the UK is phenomenal – we have superb skills, ambition and knowledge.

“Unfortunately, up until now, anxiety about the lack of funding in dementia research dampens the enthusiasm of scientists and the quest for securing funds takes valuable time away from the laboratory.

“This announcement will revitalise researchers and renew optimism in the field.

“Southampton is already a leading centre for dementia research and we hope that this money will continue that reputation and bring in new, young talent to the city that will make a difference to ensure fewer people suffer from this disease.”

Related links

Currently in Hampshire and Southampton, 20,541 people are suffering from the disease and this is expected to rise to about 28,847 by 2021 – an increase of 40 per cent.

And if nothing is done now to improve rates of diagnosis, about 15,000 will be unknowingly living with the disease.

Jane Ward, 50, from Bishop’s Waltham, has been caring for her mother, Ella Fuller, 83, since she was diagnosed with vascular dementia in 2008. She believes the UK is facing a crisis similar to that of the cancer scare in the 1970s.

Jane said: “The statistics are shocking and I think the major problem is that many people are in denial because, like with cancer in the 1970s, they don’t see a future once dementia has been diagnosed.

“But with more awareness people can learn that this is not the case and although there are bad days and the disease does get worse, catching it early is vital because it can slow the progression.

"I would never claim living with dementia is easy, and I would give anything for Mum to be back to her independent self, but there can be wonderful moments.

“People also need to know that there are groups out there to help which have proven vital for me, from day centres that give me a break to support groups. It all helps to make life a little easier.”

Comments (4)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

12:40pm Tue 27 Mar 12

downfader says...

I think its good that funding is increasing. One of the supermarkets was recently collecting for the Alzheimers association, if you see a collection pot for them put some change in!

However the Government funding will in no way cover this problem. So we have to donate to the research bodies and care charities ourselves.

I have read some news in various science publications that diet may be playing a part in the increase. We know its making us fatter, increasing diabetes, but it possibly might be increasing the chances of mental illness and dementia.

http://www.scienceda
ily.com/releases/200
7/11/071106164725.ht
m

If we block our bodies with saturated and transfats then some of this might well be clogging our brains.

http://www.alzheimer
s.org.uk/site/index.
php
I think its good that funding is increasing. One of the supermarkets was recently collecting for the Alzheimers association, if you see a collection pot for them put some change in! However the Government funding will in no way cover this problem. So we have to donate to the research bodies and care charities ourselves. I have read some news in various science publications that diet may be playing a part in the increase. We know its making us fatter, increasing diabetes, but it possibly might be increasing the chances of mental illness and dementia. http://www.scienceda ily.com/releases/200 7/11/071106164725.ht m If we block our bodies with saturated and transfats then some of this might well be clogging our brains. http://www.alzheimer s.org.uk/site/index. php downfader
  • Score: 0

3:52pm Tue 27 Mar 12

Huffter says...

The research in dementia is mainly due to increased longevity. There needs to be a more balanced approach to funding physical and mental illness otherwise we'll end up with much longer lives that aren't worth living.
The research in dementia is mainly due to increased longevity. There needs to be a more balanced approach to funding physical and mental illness otherwise we'll end up with much longer lives that aren't worth living. Huffter
  • Score: 0

5:52pm Tue 27 Mar 12

Lone Ranger. says...

PrettyOld wrote:
Researchers in London showed that the key to reversing dementia and heart disease is to use a speciialized diabetes diet.
All Alzheimer's and heart disease can be reversed in many people by using a specialized diabetes diet. This was proven in Scandinavia News. You may not have diabetes but Alzheimer's is related to blood sugar. Alzheimer's and diabetes has risen at the same exact level over the last 30 years. A specialized diabetes diet in Denmark was shown to improve memory in Dementia and Alzheimer's sufferers.
Just google SPIRIT HAPPY DIET
Not sure what diet is the one that you are refering to but there was also a study carried out by Newcastle Uni.
.
Out of 40 people who went through the process only 4 failed to respond to the diet. The others have reveresed Diabetes.
.
However, as this was timed only over about 6-9 months it cannot yet be fully proven that this diet works.
.
But it may be a different diet ... ... and numbers may not be 100%
[quote][p][bold]PrettyOld[/bold] wrote: Researchers in London showed that the key to reversing dementia and heart disease is to use a speciialized diabetes diet. All Alzheimer's and heart disease can be reversed in many people by using a specialized diabetes diet. This was proven in Scandinavia News. You may not have diabetes but Alzheimer's is related to blood sugar. Alzheimer's and diabetes has risen at the same exact level over the last 30 years. A specialized diabetes diet in Denmark was shown to improve memory in Dementia and Alzheimer's sufferers. Just google SPIRIT HAPPY DIET[/p][/quote]Not sure what diet is the one that you are refering to but there was also a study carried out by Newcastle Uni. . Out of 40 people who went through the process only 4 failed to respond to the diet. The others have reveresed Diabetes. . However, as this was timed only over about 6-9 months it cannot yet be fully proven that this diet works. . But it may be a different diet ... ... and numbers may not be 100% Lone Ranger.
  • Score: 0

9:05pm Tue 27 Mar 12

downfader says...

Lone Ranger. wrote:
PrettyOld wrote:
Researchers in London showed that the key to reversing dementia and heart disease is to use a speciialized diabetes diet.
All Alzheimer's and heart disease can be reversed in many people by using a specialized diabetes diet. This was proven in Scandinavia News. You may not have diabetes but Alzheimer's is related to blood sugar. Alzheimer's and diabetes has risen at the same exact level over the last 30 years. A specialized diabetes diet in Denmark was shown to improve memory in Dementia and Alzheimer's sufferers.
Just google SPIRIT HAPPY DIET
Not sure what diet is the one that you are refering to but there was also a study carried out by Newcastle Uni.
.
Out of 40 people who went through the process only 4 failed to respond to the diet. The others have reveresed Diabetes.
.
However, as this was timed only over about 6-9 months it cannot yet be fully proven that this diet works.
.
But it may be a different diet ... ... and numbers may not be 100%
I'd be pensively concerned to go on the basis of 40 people alone. Its what is sometimes called an "indicator" and shows that more extensive research needs to be done.

However there appear to be lots of these indicators now, all broadly pointing at diet.
[quote][p][bold]Lone Ranger.[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]PrettyOld[/bold] wrote: Researchers in London showed that the key to reversing dementia and heart disease is to use a speciialized diabetes diet. All Alzheimer's and heart disease can be reversed in many people by using a specialized diabetes diet. This was proven in Scandinavia News. You may not have diabetes but Alzheimer's is related to blood sugar. Alzheimer's and diabetes has risen at the same exact level over the last 30 years. A specialized diabetes diet in Denmark was shown to improve memory in Dementia and Alzheimer's sufferers. Just google SPIRIT HAPPY DIET[/p][/quote]Not sure what diet is the one that you are refering to but there was also a study carried out by Newcastle Uni. . Out of 40 people who went through the process only 4 failed to respond to the diet. The others have reveresed Diabetes. . However, as this was timed only over about 6-9 months it cannot yet be fully proven that this diet works. . But it may be a different diet ... ... and numbers may not be 100%[/p][/quote]I'd be pensively concerned to go on the basis of 40 people alone. Its what is sometimes called an "indicator" and shows that more extensive research needs to be done. However there appear to be lots of these indicators now, all broadly pointing at diet. downfader
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree