Gradually getting a job

Daily Echo: Georgina Dawson Georgina Dawson

I am a recent graduate. Not THE Graduate, that title belongs to Dustin Hoffman, in a time when graduating University actually meant something, when one was thrown parties and put on display to family and friends for successfully completing university.

I am a long way away from being THE Graduate. I am just one of the 335,000 graduates leaving UK University’s this year, which doesn’t make me sound very special at all, really. In fact, I’d stand out a lot more if I didn’t have a degree.

I should point out that I don’t even technically have a degree yet, my results come out tomorrow, or today, it depends when you’re reading this. But when they do come out, I’m not going to feel any more special. I’m not going to suddenly feel like I’m a cut above the rest. I’m still going to feel like I’m one in 300,000.

And that’s when I’ll start to act like Dustin Hoffman in The Graduate. You know that scene at the graduation party? Where friends and relatives are surrounding the young Benjamin Braddock, shaking his hand and demanding to know what he’s going to do next? And all he can say is ‘I was just going to go upstairs for a minute’? And all he can do is panic and try to run away?

That’s me.

That’s me now, and that’s me after I get my results on Friday July 8, 2011. Completely lost and scared witless.

Hopefully, this blog is going to be about me conquering those feelings, and becoming more than just another graduate.

Comments (4)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

3:58pm Fri 15 Jul 11

LadySam says...

It really depends on what your degree is. Many still have real value - but many more sadly don't and have no relevance.
It really depends on what your degree is. Many still have real value - but many more sadly don't and have no relevance. LadySam
  • Score: 0

4:24pm Fri 15 Jul 11

George4th says...

The bar keeps being raised.
25 years ago you needed an MA. Now you need a PhD or MBA, or both!
>
It never ceases to amaze me why a lot of people do not study for a particular profession/field/out
come.
The bar keeps being raised. 25 years ago you needed an MA. Now you need a PhD or MBA, or both! > It never ceases to amaze me why a lot of people do not study for a particular profession/field/out come. George4th
  • Score: 0

11:50am Sun 17 Jul 11

cliffwalker says...

The problem is that the vast majority of the degree awarding institutions are given a very low rating by employers and, for some of the subjects, you would be better off not mentioning the subject you studied.
The problem is that the vast majority of the degree awarding institutions are given a very low rating by employers and, for some of the subjects, you would be better off not mentioning the subject you studied. cliffwalker
  • Score: 0

1:48pm Mon 18 Jul 11

vag says...

As an employer, all I can say is that the quality of candidates I'm seeing lately is depressing. I may see thirty applications for any given job, of those, twenty may have a degree. Of the twenty who have a degree, fifteen may have a 2:1 or above. This used to be a reasonably effective filter. A good degree usually meant a literate, numerate candidate, with good communication skills. Sadly, in my experience, this really is not the case anymore, in the majority of cases. Now it would seem that youngsters are coached to pass exams, rather than educated. I like to see evidence of a candidate going above and beyond, before I consider their application. I look for evidence of quality work experience, be it paid or unpaid / voluntary. The education system is failing these youngsters, and supplying ill prepared workers, with ridiculous expectations. Something needs to be done to move the system away from these increasingly meaningless, exam based courses.
As an employer, all I can say is that the quality of candidates I'm seeing lately is depressing. I may see thirty applications for any given job, of those, twenty may have a degree. Of the twenty who have a degree, fifteen may have a 2:1 or above. This used to be a reasonably effective filter. A good degree usually meant a literate, numerate candidate, with good communication skills. Sadly, in my experience, this really is not the case anymore, in the majority of cases. Now it would seem that youngsters are coached to pass exams, rather than educated. I like to see evidence of a candidate going above and beyond, before I consider their application. I look for evidence of quality work experience, be it paid or unpaid / voluntary. The education system is failing these youngsters, and supplying ill prepared workers, with ridiculous expectations. Something needs to be done to move the system away from these increasingly meaningless, exam based courses. vag
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree