Traffic chaos in Southampton

Daily Echo: Traffic chaos in Southampton Traffic chaos in Southampton

HAVING digested all the letters on Southampton’s traffic chaos, I wish to give my views. I agree/ disagree with a lot of the letters.

Jacqui Rayment has been giving excuse after excuse.

What if she had been caught up in all this chaos and needed the loo? Would she have a bucket with her?

In my view, Jacqui Rayment and her workforce sit on their backsides dreaming up ‘What can we now do to upset the folks of Southampton?’.

She is up a creek without a paddle, with nowhere to go or turn.

It is about time she did the honourable thing and resigned.

I am sure there are more competent staff within the council who could do a lot better job.

When is an emergency not an emergency? The Daily Echo (January 14) stated crisis talks with senior management, transport chiefs and cruise operators was to take place. It has suggested a series of proposals, but will they work? I am not aware of any feedback from the cruise operators.

Why are the cruise liners being made the scapegoats for all this chaos? If they decided to leave Southampton, what then?

Think of the negative knockon effect on the city, trade, jobs, etc. All due to the incompetence of Jacqui Rayment, and the councillors of the transport department.

Do councillors think they can dictate to the cruise line owners, what time they can dock and leave? I wonder what their answer would be.

Why this gridlock? It has never happened before.

Readers, cast your minds back to mid-June last year when five cruise ships were in port.

What a sight, when they sailed down Southampton Water, line astern, perhaps never to be seen again.

We must have been the envy of the world.

The roads were busy, but there was no chaos or gridlock. So what has gone wrong in such a short period of time?

NAME & ADDRESS SUPPLIED.

Comments (6)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

11:09am Tue 28 Jan 14

HillsidePaul says...

If you are going to write letters to the Echo you should at least try to learn something about the subject first.

Councillors are not "staff", and there are no "Councillors of the transport department". I could try and explain how local government works to you. But since you are too dim,or more likely too bone idle to bother learning it yourself why should I bother.
If you are going to write letters to the Echo you should at least try to learn something about the subject first. Councillors are not "staff", and there are no "Councillors of the transport department". I could try and explain how local government works to you. But since you are too dim,or more likely too bone idle to bother learning it yourself why should I bother. HillsidePaul

12:22pm Tue 28 Jan 14

downfader says...

HillsidePaul wrote:
If you are going to write letters to the Echo you should at least try to learn something about the subject first.

Councillors are not "staff", and there are no "Councillors of the transport department". I could try and explain how local government works to you. But since you are too dim,or more likely too bone idle to bother learning it yourself why should I bother.
Possibly why they wouldnt put their name to it. Balfour Beatty are technically the staff yet they seem to have escaped much of the criticism.

What people need to understand is that a lot of things have changed in the past 2-3 years. More traffic, settlers to the area, expansion of Woolston and City Center for homes and flats, cuts to buses. Add in that its winter and many get in the car instead of walking it and we have exactly what Rayment described as a perfect storm.
[quote][p][bold]HillsidePaul[/bold] wrote: If you are going to write letters to the Echo you should at least try to learn something about the subject first. Councillors are not "staff", and there are no "Councillors of the transport department". I could try and explain how local government works to you. But since you are too dim,or more likely too bone idle to bother learning it yourself why should I bother.[/p][/quote]Possibly why they wouldnt put their name to it. Balfour Beatty are technically the staff yet they seem to have escaped much of the criticism. What people need to understand is that a lot of things have changed in the past 2-3 years. More traffic, settlers to the area, expansion of Woolston and City Center for homes and flats, cuts to buses. Add in that its winter and many get in the car instead of walking it and we have exactly what Rayment described as a perfect storm. downfader

12:42am Wed 29 Jan 14

metalmunki says...

When it comes to Southampton's roads, me and my parter have a theory that, while Southampton's councils have seemingly never had a problem with tearing down historic landmarks and buildings to make way for whatever new and unsightly monstrosity they can come up with , it appears that all roads must follow the same ancient tracks and byways they have since medieval times. It's the only explanation we can come up with for Southampton's counterintuitive, congestive and often dangerous road designs.

Predictably, each new council seems to tackle it in exactly the same way: ever-lower speed limits, which do absolutely nothing but delay motorists, but is obviously a cheaper 'solution' than actually tackling the problem by having some decent planning.
When it comes to Southampton's roads, me and my parter have a theory that, while Southampton's councils have seemingly never had a problem with tearing down historic landmarks and buildings to make way for whatever new and unsightly monstrosity they can come up with , it appears that all roads must follow the same ancient tracks and byways they have since medieval times. It's the only explanation we can come up with for Southampton's counterintuitive, congestive and often dangerous road designs. Predictably, each new council seems to tackle it in exactly the same way: ever-lower speed limits, which do absolutely nothing but delay motorists, but is obviously a cheaper 'solution' than actually tackling the problem by having some decent planning. metalmunki

1:07am Wed 29 Jan 14

Mary80 says...

Its simply the fact our roads aren't designed for the amount of cars and we have several sets of road works always going on, its just simply several things at once
Its simply the fact our roads aren't designed for the amount of cars and we have several sets of road works always going on, its just simply several things at once Mary80

12:03pm Wed 29 Jan 14

downfader says...

metalmunki wrote:
When it comes to Southampton's roads, me and my parter have a theory that, while Southampton's councils have seemingly never had a problem with tearing down historic landmarks and buildings to make way for whatever new and unsightly monstrosity they can come up with , it appears that all roads must follow the same ancient tracks and byways they have since medieval times. It's the only explanation we can come up with for Southampton's counterintuitive, congestive and often dangerous road designs.

Predictably, each new council seems to tackle it in exactly the same way: ever-lower speed limits, which do absolutely nothing but delay motorists, but is obviously a cheaper 'solution' than actually tackling the problem by having some decent planning.
Studies have been done on Southampton traffic (from back at the begining of the Tory admin before) and found that average speeds were 13mph between 7am to 10am, and 3pm to 7pm.

Motorists are slowing themselves down. You cant just keep building roads, you have to deal with population and car-addiction over alternatives.
[quote][p][bold]metalmunki[/bold] wrote: When it comes to Southampton's roads, me and my parter have a theory that, while Southampton's councils have seemingly never had a problem with tearing down historic landmarks and buildings to make way for whatever new and unsightly monstrosity they can come up with , it appears that all roads must follow the same ancient tracks and byways they have since medieval times. It's the only explanation we can come up with for Southampton's counterintuitive, congestive and often dangerous road designs. Predictably, each new council seems to tackle it in exactly the same way: ever-lower speed limits, which do absolutely nothing but delay motorists, but is obviously a cheaper 'solution' than actually tackling the problem by having some decent planning.[/p][/quote]Studies have been done on Southampton traffic (from back at the begining of the Tory admin before) and found that average speeds were 13mph between 7am to 10am, and 3pm to 7pm. Motorists are slowing themselves down. You cant just keep building roads, you have to deal with population and car-addiction over alternatives. downfader

12:49pm Sun 2 Feb 14

mawangi says...

I do agree that we have to consider the road network and the volume of cars in Southampton. It is clear we cannot keep building more roads and the issue is to manage the existing highway network to its maximum capacity.
Residents want Southampton to be a vibrant city which require investment from developers/ businesses. This creates jobs in Southampton but will increase the volume of vehicles in the City.
There are other factors to be considered roadworks to improve the highway network and the weather.
Public transport can be improved which maybe better used and reduce traffic on the roads.
I do agree that we have to consider the road network and the volume of cars in Southampton. It is clear we cannot keep building more roads and the issue is to manage the existing highway network to its maximum capacity. Residents want Southampton to be a vibrant city which require investment from developers/ businesses. This creates jobs in Southampton but will increase the volume of vehicles in the City. There are other factors to be considered roadworks to improve the highway network and the weather. Public transport can be improved which maybe better used and reduce traffic on the roads. mawangi

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree