Dibden Bay development would improve Waterside

Daily Echo: Dibden Bay development would improve Waterside Dibden Bay development would improve Waterside

A TOPIC that has raised many people’s interest over the years is the development of Dibden Bay as an extension of the already thriving container port.

Now I appreciate all the arguments against this proposal, but as a Marchwood resident I would like to hold my head above the parapet and say I am for the development!

All I hear is people saying it will ruin the area. Really? An area already having massive industrial development, power station, waste plant etc, isn’t exactly an area of outstanding natural beauty!

The one thing that people always moan about is traffic: “A development like this will make traffic unbearable.”

Actually, part of the proposal is massive upgrades to the road and rail infrastructure for the area. As I see it, this development is the only way traffic will be addressed on this side of the water.

We need this development to improve the Waterside, not just for the economics of the south but also for the people who live here!

ANDREW KIDMAN, Marchwood.

Comments (5)

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1:10pm Thu 27 Mar 14

Knulp1972 says...

You say:
'All I hear is people saying it will ruin the area. Really? An area already having massive industrial development, power station, waste plant etc, isn’t exactly an area of outstanding natural beauty!'

Well, may I reply that Dibden bay is a small and exceedingly precious jewel amongst all that industrial development and therefore even more deserving of our protection.

As a Hythe resident I can within five minutes walk be surrounded by nature and enjoying a sense of peace, solitude and tranquillity that is becoming harder and harder to find in the modern world.

I suggest you take a walk along the footpath one day. Surely there can be few things more breathtaking and joyful that seeing a kingfisher flashing past you along the river or watching lapwings performing their spring display flight. I have watched barn owls hunting in meadowland ,seen nightjars and noctule bats hawking for insects on warm summer evenings over meadowland and pasture that would surely be destroyed.

This small area is abundantly rich in wildlife, I could write a long list of species I have seen in the area, but it is even more than that, it is part of our heritage, a small pocket of something indescribably priceless in our increasingly barren landscape and hearts.
You say: 'All I hear is people saying it will ruin the area. Really? An area already having massive industrial development, power station, waste plant etc, isn’t exactly an area of outstanding natural beauty!' Well, may I reply that Dibden bay is a small and exceedingly precious jewel amongst all that industrial development and therefore even more deserving of our protection. As a Hythe resident I can within five minutes walk be surrounded by nature and enjoying a sense of peace, solitude and tranquillity that is becoming harder and harder to find in the modern world. I suggest you take a walk along the footpath one day. Surely there can be few things more breathtaking and joyful that seeing a kingfisher flashing past you along the river or watching lapwings performing their spring display flight. I have watched barn owls hunting in meadowland ,seen nightjars and noctule bats hawking for insects on warm summer evenings over meadowland and pasture that would surely be destroyed. This small area is abundantly rich in wildlife, I could write a long list of species I have seen in the area, but it is even more than that, it is part of our heritage, a small pocket of something indescribably priceless in our increasingly barren landscape and hearts. Knulp1972
  • Score: 5

1:26pm Thu 27 Mar 14

Forest Resident says...

Knulp1972 wrote:
You say:
'All I hear is people saying it will ruin the area. Really? An area already having massive industrial development, power station, waste plant etc, isn’t exactly an area of outstanding natural beauty!'

Well, may I reply that Dibden bay is a small and exceedingly precious jewel amongst all that industrial development and therefore even more deserving of our protection.

As a Hythe resident I can within five minutes walk be surrounded by nature and enjoying a sense of peace, solitude and tranquillity that is becoming harder and harder to find in the modern world.

I suggest you take a walk along the footpath one day. Surely there can be few things more breathtaking and joyful that seeing a kingfisher flashing past you along the river or watching lapwings performing their spring display flight. I have watched barn owls hunting in meadowland ,seen nightjars and noctule bats hawking for insects on warm summer evenings over meadowland and pasture that would surely be destroyed.

This small area is abundantly rich in wildlife, I could write a long list of species I have seen in the area, but it is even more than that, it is part of our heritage, a small pocket of something indescribably priceless in our increasingly barren landscape and hearts.
I am vehemently against it for the same reasons, though I also recognise that our democratic substantive objections to schemes such as Dibden Bay are often overlooked in favour of far off faceless capitalists desire to increase their wealth at the expense of local communities. If, god forbid, this scheme were to be forced through then it is undeniably essential that the roads infrastructure needs massively upgrading BEFORE they so much as put a fork in the ground at Dibden Bay. One can only hope that it's SSSI status and proximity to the National Park affords us the means to hang on to one of the few remaining green spaces on the waterside.
[quote][p][bold]Knulp1972[/bold] wrote: You say: 'All I hear is people saying it will ruin the area. Really? An area already having massive industrial development, power station, waste plant etc, isn’t exactly an area of outstanding natural beauty!' Well, may I reply that Dibden bay is a small and exceedingly precious jewel amongst all that industrial development and therefore even more deserving of our protection. As a Hythe resident I can within five minutes walk be surrounded by nature and enjoying a sense of peace, solitude and tranquillity that is becoming harder and harder to find in the modern world. I suggest you take a walk along the footpath one day. Surely there can be few things more breathtaking and joyful that seeing a kingfisher flashing past you along the river or watching lapwings performing their spring display flight. I have watched barn owls hunting in meadowland ,seen nightjars and noctule bats hawking for insects on warm summer evenings over meadowland and pasture that would surely be destroyed. This small area is abundantly rich in wildlife, I could write a long list of species I have seen in the area, but it is even more than that, it is part of our heritage, a small pocket of something indescribably priceless in our increasingly barren landscape and hearts.[/p][/quote]I am vehemently against it for the same reasons, though I also recognise that our democratic substantive objections to schemes such as Dibden Bay are often overlooked in favour of far off faceless capitalists desire to increase their wealth at the expense of local communities. If, god forbid, this scheme were to be forced through then it is undeniably essential that the roads infrastructure needs massively upgrading BEFORE they so much as put a fork in the ground at Dibden Bay. One can only hope that it's SSSI status and proximity to the National Park affords us the means to hang on to one of the few remaining green spaces on the waterside. Forest Resident
  • Score: 5

4:03pm Thu 27 Mar 14

loosehead says...

Knulp1972 wrote:
You say:
'All I hear is people saying it will ruin the area. Really? An area already having massive industrial development, power station, waste plant etc, isn’t exactly an area of outstanding natural beauty!'

Well, may I reply that Dibden bay is a small and exceedingly precious jewel amongst all that industrial development and therefore even more deserving of our protection.

As a Hythe resident I can within five minutes walk be surrounded by nature and enjoying a sense of peace, solitude and tranquillity that is becoming harder and harder to find in the modern world.

I suggest you take a walk along the footpath one day. Surely there can be few things more breathtaking and joyful that seeing a kingfisher flashing past you along the river or watching lapwings performing their spring display flight. I have watched barn owls hunting in meadowland ,seen nightjars and noctule bats hawking for insects on warm summer evenings over meadowland and pasture that would surely be destroyed.

This small area is abundantly rich in wildlife, I could write a long list of species I have seen in the area, but it is even more than that, it is part of our heritage, a small pocket of something indescribably priceless in our increasingly barren landscape and hearts.
So sorry but if that land/dirt was taken back for development of the docks at Southampton exactly how would you walk along it?
If ABP stopped dredging the River how soon would it be before your homes are flooded each year?
This area was/is a temporary wildlife area as it was always earmarked for dock use so why make it out to be anything other than that?
If this was a wildlife reserve & was never reclaimed land I'd agree with you but let's not get all gooey eyed about a piece of waste reclaimed land shall we?
How many houses since the 60's would have been built on the waterside if we thought about wildlife or the forest? the answer is NONE so Hythe Marina wouldn't exist.
[quote][p][bold]Knulp1972[/bold] wrote: You say: 'All I hear is people saying it will ruin the area. Really? An area already having massive industrial development, power station, waste plant etc, isn’t exactly an area of outstanding natural beauty!' Well, may I reply that Dibden bay is a small and exceedingly precious jewel amongst all that industrial development and therefore even more deserving of our protection. As a Hythe resident I can within five minutes walk be surrounded by nature and enjoying a sense of peace, solitude and tranquillity that is becoming harder and harder to find in the modern world. I suggest you take a walk along the footpath one day. Surely there can be few things more breathtaking and joyful that seeing a kingfisher flashing past you along the river or watching lapwings performing their spring display flight. I have watched barn owls hunting in meadowland ,seen nightjars and noctule bats hawking for insects on warm summer evenings over meadowland and pasture that would surely be destroyed. This small area is abundantly rich in wildlife, I could write a long list of species I have seen in the area, but it is even more than that, it is part of our heritage, a small pocket of something indescribably priceless in our increasingly barren landscape and hearts.[/p][/quote]So sorry but if that land/dirt was taken back for development of the docks at Southampton exactly how would you walk along it? If ABP stopped dredging the River how soon would it be before your homes are flooded each year? This area was/is a temporary wildlife area as it was always earmarked for dock use so why make it out to be anything other than that? If this was a wildlife reserve & was never reclaimed land I'd agree with you but let's not get all gooey eyed about a piece of waste reclaimed land shall we? How many houses since the 60's would have been built on the waterside if we thought about wildlife or the forest? the answer is NONE so Hythe Marina wouldn't exist. loosehead
  • Score: -7

9:53am Fri 28 Mar 14

Linesman says...

loosehead wrote:
Knulp1972 wrote:
You say:
'All I hear is people saying it will ruin the area. Really? An area already having massive industrial development, power station, waste plant etc, isn’t exactly an area of outstanding natural beauty!'

Well, may I reply that Dibden bay is a small and exceedingly precious jewel amongst all that industrial development and therefore even more deserving of our protection.

As a Hythe resident I can within five minutes walk be surrounded by nature and enjoying a sense of peace, solitude and tranquillity that is becoming harder and harder to find in the modern world.

I suggest you take a walk along the footpath one day. Surely there can be few things more breathtaking and joyful that seeing a kingfisher flashing past you along the river or watching lapwings performing their spring display flight. I have watched barn owls hunting in meadowland ,seen nightjars and noctule bats hawking for insects on warm summer evenings over meadowland and pasture that would surely be destroyed.

This small area is abundantly rich in wildlife, I could write a long list of species I have seen in the area, but it is even more than that, it is part of our heritage, a small pocket of something indescribably priceless in our increasingly barren landscape and hearts.
So sorry but if that land/dirt was taken back for development of the docks at Southampton exactly how would you walk along it?
If ABP stopped dredging the River how soon would it be before your homes are flooded each year?
This area was/is a temporary wildlife area as it was always earmarked for dock use so why make it out to be anything other than that?
If this was a wildlife reserve & was never reclaimed land I'd agree with you but let's not get all gooey eyed about a piece of waste reclaimed land shall we?
How many houses since the 60's would have been built on the waterside if we thought about wildlife or the forest? the answer is NONE so Hythe Marina wouldn't exist.
Which river has ABP dredged?

Southampton Water is a tidal waterway, not a river and, to the best of my knowledge, has occasionally flooded areas of Hythe at exceptionally high tides, and this would Not have been affected by any dredging, as it has happened both before and after dredging has taken place.

The area of Dibden Bay was reclaimed decades before ABP became involved with Southampton Docks, and if memory serves me correctly, before container ships arrived and while the Castle Line was still making the South Africa run.

In my opinion, the preservation of a green, open space on the Western shore of Southampton Water is important, if only to preserve the identity of the area.

Might is not always Right, and the wishes of those living in that area should be listened to, and not have them disregarded by big business who think that Pounds are more important than People.
[quote][p][bold]loosehead[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Knulp1972[/bold] wrote: You say: 'All I hear is people saying it will ruin the area. Really? An area already having massive industrial development, power station, waste plant etc, isn’t exactly an area of outstanding natural beauty!' Well, may I reply that Dibden bay is a small and exceedingly precious jewel amongst all that industrial development and therefore even more deserving of our protection. As a Hythe resident I can within five minutes walk be surrounded by nature and enjoying a sense of peace, solitude and tranquillity that is becoming harder and harder to find in the modern world. I suggest you take a walk along the footpath one day. Surely there can be few things more breathtaking and joyful that seeing a kingfisher flashing past you along the river or watching lapwings performing their spring display flight. I have watched barn owls hunting in meadowland ,seen nightjars and noctule bats hawking for insects on warm summer evenings over meadowland and pasture that would surely be destroyed. This small area is abundantly rich in wildlife, I could write a long list of species I have seen in the area, but it is even more than that, it is part of our heritage, a small pocket of something indescribably priceless in our increasingly barren landscape and hearts.[/p][/quote]So sorry but if that land/dirt was taken back for development of the docks at Southampton exactly how would you walk along it? If ABP stopped dredging the River how soon would it be before your homes are flooded each year? This area was/is a temporary wildlife area as it was always earmarked for dock use so why make it out to be anything other than that? If this was a wildlife reserve & was never reclaimed land I'd agree with you but let's not get all gooey eyed about a piece of waste reclaimed land shall we? How many houses since the 60's would have been built on the waterside if we thought about wildlife or the forest? the answer is NONE so Hythe Marina wouldn't exist.[/p][/quote]Which river has ABP dredged? Southampton Water is a tidal waterway, not a river and, to the best of my knowledge, has occasionally flooded areas of Hythe at exceptionally high tides, and this would Not have been affected by any dredging, as it has happened both before and after dredging has taken place. The area of Dibden Bay was reclaimed decades before ABP became involved with Southampton Docks, and if memory serves me correctly, before container ships arrived and while the Castle Line was still making the South Africa run. In my opinion, the preservation of a green, open space on the Western shore of Southampton Water is important, if only to preserve the identity of the area. Might is not always Right, and the wishes of those living in that area should be listened to, and not have them disregarded by big business who think that Pounds are more important than People. Linesman
  • Score: 4

1:51pm Wed 2 Apr 14

phil maccavity says...

Linesman wrote:
loosehead wrote:
Knulp1972 wrote:
You say:
'All I hear is people saying it will ruin the area. Really? An area already having massive industrial development, power station, waste plant etc, isn’t exactly an area of outstanding natural beauty!'

Well, may I reply that Dibden bay is a small and exceedingly precious jewel amongst all that industrial development and therefore even more deserving of our protection.

As a Hythe resident I can within five minutes walk be surrounded by nature and enjoying a sense of peace, solitude and tranquillity that is becoming harder and harder to find in the modern world.

I suggest you take a walk along the footpath one day. Surely there can be few things more breathtaking and joyful that seeing a kingfisher flashing past you along the river or watching lapwings performing their spring display flight. I have watched barn owls hunting in meadowland ,seen nightjars and noctule bats hawking for insects on warm summer evenings over meadowland and pasture that would surely be destroyed.

This small area is abundantly rich in wildlife, I could write a long list of species I have seen in the area, but it is even more than that, it is part of our heritage, a small pocket of something indescribably priceless in our increasingly barren landscape and hearts.
So sorry but if that land/dirt was taken back for development of the docks at Southampton exactly how would you walk along it?
If ABP stopped dredging the River how soon would it be before your homes are flooded each year?
This area was/is a temporary wildlife area as it was always earmarked for dock use so why make it out to be anything other than that?
If this was a wildlife reserve & was never reclaimed land I'd agree with you but let's not get all gooey eyed about a piece of waste reclaimed land shall we?
How many houses since the 60's would have been built on the waterside if we thought about wildlife or the forest? the answer is NONE so Hythe Marina wouldn't exist.
Which river has ABP dredged?

Southampton Water is a tidal waterway, not a river and, to the best of my knowledge, has occasionally flooded areas of Hythe at exceptionally high tides, and this would Not have been affected by any dredging, as it has happened both before and after dredging has taken place.

The area of Dibden Bay was reclaimed decades before ABP became involved with Southampton Docks, and if memory serves me correctly, before container ships arrived and while the Castle Line was still making the South Africa run.

In my opinion, the preservation of a green, open space on the Western shore of Southampton Water is important, if only to preserve the identity of the area.

Might is not always Right, and the wishes of those living in that area should be listened to, and not have them disregarded by big business who think that Pounds are more important than People.
The main channel in Southampton Water and areas of the Itchen and Test have to be dredged on a fairly regular basis to prevent siltation although the scouring benefits of the double tides does assist
Dibden Bay was reclaimed in the 1960's by the Govt operated BTDB 'for the purpose of future port development'
The Govt sold off their interests in Uk ports in 1982 but Dibden Bay remained in the Hampshire Plan as a port development area
In 1966 a Parliamentary Bill was put forward for Royal Assent for the provision of new Container facilities at 201/2 berth.
Plans for were in hand to extend this to 203/7 berths and also to Dibden bay (subject to prevailing demand)
203/7 berths were operational in 1972 and the Union Castle mail ships stopped operating in 1977/8
Hythe Marina was built on a corner of the Dibden Bay reclaim area in the mid 1980's around the same time as many of the new houses in Marchwood and Hythe were built
These are the facts of the matter
[quote][p][bold]Linesman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]loosehead[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Knulp1972[/bold] wrote: You say: 'All I hear is people saying it will ruin the area. Really? An area already having massive industrial development, power station, waste plant etc, isn’t exactly an area of outstanding natural beauty!' Well, may I reply that Dibden bay is a small and exceedingly precious jewel amongst all that industrial development and therefore even more deserving of our protection. As a Hythe resident I can within five minutes walk be surrounded by nature and enjoying a sense of peace, solitude and tranquillity that is becoming harder and harder to find in the modern world. I suggest you take a walk along the footpath one day. Surely there can be few things more breathtaking and joyful that seeing a kingfisher flashing past you along the river or watching lapwings performing their spring display flight. I have watched barn owls hunting in meadowland ,seen nightjars and noctule bats hawking for insects on warm summer evenings over meadowland and pasture that would surely be destroyed. This small area is abundantly rich in wildlife, I could write a long list of species I have seen in the area, but it is even more than that, it is part of our heritage, a small pocket of something indescribably priceless in our increasingly barren landscape and hearts.[/p][/quote]So sorry but if that land/dirt was taken back for development of the docks at Southampton exactly how would you walk along it? If ABP stopped dredging the River how soon would it be before your homes are flooded each year? This area was/is a temporary wildlife area as it was always earmarked for dock use so why make it out to be anything other than that? If this was a wildlife reserve & was never reclaimed land I'd agree with you but let's not get all gooey eyed about a piece of waste reclaimed land shall we? How many houses since the 60's would have been built on the waterside if we thought about wildlife or the forest? the answer is NONE so Hythe Marina wouldn't exist.[/p][/quote]Which river has ABP dredged? Southampton Water is a tidal waterway, not a river and, to the best of my knowledge, has occasionally flooded areas of Hythe at exceptionally high tides, and this would Not have been affected by any dredging, as it has happened both before and after dredging has taken place. The area of Dibden Bay was reclaimed decades before ABP became involved with Southampton Docks, and if memory serves me correctly, before container ships arrived and while the Castle Line was still making the South Africa run. In my opinion, the preservation of a green, open space on the Western shore of Southampton Water is important, if only to preserve the identity of the area. Might is not always Right, and the wishes of those living in that area should be listened to, and not have them disregarded by big business who think that Pounds are more important than People.[/p][/quote]The main channel in Southampton Water and areas of the Itchen and Test have to be dredged on a fairly regular basis to prevent siltation although the scouring benefits of the double tides does assist Dibden Bay was reclaimed in the 1960's by the Govt operated BTDB 'for the purpose of future port development' The Govt sold off their interests in Uk ports in 1982 but Dibden Bay remained in the Hampshire Plan as a port development area In 1966 a Parliamentary Bill was put forward for Royal Assent for the provision of new Container facilities at 201/2 berth. Plans for were in hand to extend this to 203/7 berths and also to Dibden bay (subject to prevailing demand) 203/7 berths were operational in 1972 and the Union Castle mail ships stopped operating in 1977/8 Hythe Marina was built on a corner of the Dibden Bay reclaim area in the mid 1980's around the same time as many of the new houses in Marchwood and Hythe were built These are the facts of the matter phil maccavity
  • Score: 0

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