Don’t suffer in silence – we’re here to help

Don’t suffer in silence – we’re here to help

Don’t suffer in silence – we’re here to help

First published in Readers' Letters

WE know that many people up and down the country are suffering in silence because they are too embarrassed to talk about their poo.

Worrying new research backs this up: according to a new survey a quarter of UK adults have a health question they are too embarrassed to ask their GP.

For almost one in ten it’s their bowels that are taboo.

That’s why this month we’re teaming up with constipation treatment Dulcolax to answer the nation’s embarrassing bowel questions: from ‘what is constipation?’ and ‘what if it hurts to go to the loo?’ to ‘I have piles, what should I do?’.

Following an online call for people’s embarrassing questions earlier in the year, experts, including a GP, a nutritionist and one of our nurses, have recorded straight-talking answers and advice about constipation and other bowel worries, which are available in two new films launched on letstalkconstipation.co.uk.

When it comes to our bowels it’s vital that people are aware of what’s normal for them and are able to talk about any concerns they have.

GPs and nurses aren’t easily shocked and are there to help, so if you’ve been experiencing changes in your bowel habits or blood in your poo for three weeks or more, speak to your GP.

You can also contact us for advice and support by visiting the website beatingbowelcancer.org.

MARK FLANNAGAN, CEO of Beating Bowel Cancer.

Comments (1)

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1:31pm Thu 28 Aug 14

IronLady2010 says...

A superb letter from MARK FLANNAGAN, I remember when I was first admitted to hospital with Chrohn's disease and constantly being asked what my bowel movements were like. It can be very embarrassing when you have 3 doctors standing around the bed. Having to describe what your poo looks like is very personal, but it needn't be.

After having had it diagnosed for more than 20 years I am now comfortable with talking about it and to be fair the GP's have heard it all before.
A superb letter from MARK FLANNAGAN, I remember when I was first admitted to hospital with Chrohn's disease and constantly being asked what my bowel movements were like. It can be very embarrassing when you have 3 doctors standing around the bed. Having to describe what your poo looks like is very personal, but it needn't be. After having had it diagnosed for more than 20 years I am now comfortable with talking about it and to be fair the GP's have heard it all before. IronLady2010
  • Score: 4

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