Dibden Purlieu council flat ‘has black mould on every wall’

Sarah and Paul Sawyer are concerned about the damp and mould in their home

Sarah and Paul Sawyer are concerned about the damp and mould in their home

First published in News

“I cannot live in these conditions, I can barely breathe.”

Those are the words of a Hampshire woman who lives in a mouldy flat and claims it is exacerbating her health problems.

Large black spots of mould can be found in every corner and on every wall of Sarah Jane Sawyer’s two-bedroom flat in Waterman’s Lane, Dibden Purlieu.

The problem has meant that Sarah, a 49-year-old mum-of-two, has had to throw away cherished photos and clothes and it has triggered an increase in her asthma attacks.

She told the Daily Echo how her 29-year-old son, Charlie, who suffers from ADHD, Tourette’s Syndrome and other learning difficulties, has had to move and lives with her daughter because the mould was making him ill.

Sarah originally moved into the flat in October with her husband Paul, 44, after being rehomed by New Forest District Council.

The couple say they have done everything to try to remove the mould but it keeps coming back.

She said: “The smell is awful – we have to have the windows open all the time.

“I am worried that I am going to end up in hospital because of it, because my asthma is getting so bad, I just feel trapped here.

“It is making me feel very down. I can’t sleep properly and I can barely breathe at the moment.”

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Sarah’s GP from the Waterfront and Solent surgery in Hythe has also written to New Forest District Council.

Her plight comes after the Daily Echo revealed last month how a Southampton couple were living in a house with mould growing in all corners.

Colin Simpson and his wife – whose three-year-old son Zachary developed asthma – said their one-bedroom flat in Tangmere Drive, Lordshill, was unliveable.

Housing bosses from Western Challenge have since agreed to rehouse them.

In a statement, New Forest District Council said that Sarah was given priority status to be rehomed – but because of the amount of other households on their waiting list they are unable to re-house her at this time.

A statement from the council added that a recent inspection of the property found that the problem was due to condensation and bad ventilation. Inspectors will now visit the flat again in coming days.

Comments (17)

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11:16am Mon 10 Feb 14

massimoosti says...

Good job Frogmella is able to put the son up.
Good job Frogmella is able to put the son up. massimoosti
  • Score: -5

12:08pm Mon 10 Feb 14

loosehead says...

surely if it's condensation as the council has stated it's a case of opening windows or installing fans isn't it?> didn't she inspect the flat before agreeing to move in?
has this problem only happened since she moved in & if so what is she doing to cause it?
in their kitchen & bathroom you can buy paint that doesn't absorb moisture which other wise makes the walls damp which gives you mould you can buy this paint in Wilkinsons.
you can have extractor fans or vents put into the wall but this will increase your electricity bills but would you use either?
surely if it's condensation as the council has stated it's a case of opening windows or installing fans isn't it?> didn't she inspect the flat before agreeing to move in? has this problem only happened since she moved in & if so what is she doing to cause it? in their kitchen & bathroom you can buy paint that doesn't absorb moisture which other wise makes the walls damp which gives you mould you can buy this paint in Wilkinsons. you can have extractor fans or vents put into the wall but this will increase your electricity bills but would you use either? loosehead
  • Score: -4

2:35pm Mon 10 Feb 14

sjsawyer says...

massimoosti wrote:
Good job Frogmella is able to put the son up.
We didn't get a chance to look around before signing as that is not the NFC policy we signed for the flat at the flat and there was no mold but the Windows ceilings and the corners of our room were freshly painted. We have since found out it was with mold repellant paint .the mold has grown round this. The council are now saying we have a leaking roof but no one has been to sedition.
Our Windows are open all day we sit here freezing but it is not stopping the growth of the mold. From he looks of it there were extractor fans here as the switches are here but no fans. The mold started as soon as we put the heating on a black mold patch appeared the living room ceiling which is why we called the council out and wit all respects to the council yes the officer did say it was down to condensation until our housing officer came out and saw it she said she was going to get a specialist team they use outside the council to come and find the problem and fix it but that was five weeks ago and we sit here every day with every window open and the mold continues to growth is now all over our bedroom ceiling all round our living room the kitchen is everywhere. We have washed it with bleach but to no avail we have done everything we can and we have been constantly ill. We have been told that the damp is a problem here if we had seen the mold of course we would not have accepted it.
[quote][p][bold]massimoosti[/bold] wrote: Good job Frogmella is able to put the son up.[/p][/quote]We didn't get a chance to look around before signing as that is not the NFC policy we signed for the flat at the flat and there was no mold but the Windows ceilings and the corners of our room were freshly painted. We have since found out it was with mold repellant paint .the mold has grown round this. The council are now saying we have a leaking roof but no one has been to sedition. Our Windows are open all day we sit here freezing but it is not stopping the growth of the mold. From he looks of it there were extractor fans here as the switches are here but no fans. The mold started as soon as we put the heating on a black mold patch appeared the living room ceiling which is why we called the council out and wit all respects to the council yes the officer did say it was down to condensation until our housing officer came out and saw it she said she was going to get a specialist team they use outside the council to come and find the problem and fix it but that was five weeks ago and we sit here every day with every window open and the mold continues to growth is now all over our bedroom ceiling all round our living room the kitchen is everywhere. We have washed it with bleach but to no avail we have done everything we can and we have been constantly ill. We have been told that the damp is a problem here if we had seen the mold of course we would not have accepted it. sjsawyer
  • Score: 3

6:10pm Mon 10 Feb 14

loosehead says...

sjsawyer wrote:
massimoosti wrote:
Good job Frogmella is able to put the son up.
We didn't get a chance to look around before signing as that is not the NFC policy we signed for the flat at the flat and there was no mold but the Windows ceilings and the corners of our room were freshly painted. We have since found out it was with mold repellant paint .the mold has grown round this. The council are now saying we have a leaking roof but no one has been to sedition.
Our Windows are open all day we sit here freezing but it is not stopping the growth of the mold. From he looks of it there were extractor fans here as the switches are here but no fans. The mold started as soon as we put the heating on a black mold patch appeared the living room ceiling which is why we called the council out and wit all respects to the council yes the officer did say it was down to condensation until our housing officer came out and saw it she said she was going to get a specialist team they use outside the council to come and find the problem and fix it but that was five weeks ago and we sit here every day with every window open and the mold continues to growth is now all over our bedroom ceiling all round our living room the kitchen is everywhere. We have washed it with bleach but to no avail we have done everything we can and we have been constantly ill. We have been told that the damp is a problem here if we had seen the mold of course we would not have accepted it.
I bought a bungalow & we did all you did but in the end we bought a cheap dehumidifier to dry the rooms out.
in the kitchen there was no vent or fan so we installed these cleaned the mold off painted it & didn't have a problem in those rooms we had a problem in the bathroom as my wife refused to open the window at night whilst she was having a shower we were going to put in a fan but we moved.
if it's condensation a fan would work wonders if not & it is a leaky roof then yes it's the council/housing association responsibility to fix it but good luck!
[quote][p][bold]sjsawyer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]massimoosti[/bold] wrote: Good job Frogmella is able to put the son up.[/p][/quote]We didn't get a chance to look around before signing as that is not the NFC policy we signed for the flat at the flat and there was no mold but the Windows ceilings and the corners of our room were freshly painted. We have since found out it was with mold repellant paint .the mold has grown round this. The council are now saying we have a leaking roof but no one has been to sedition. Our Windows are open all day we sit here freezing but it is not stopping the growth of the mold. From he looks of it there were extractor fans here as the switches are here but no fans. The mold started as soon as we put the heating on a black mold patch appeared the living room ceiling which is why we called the council out and wit all respects to the council yes the officer did say it was down to condensation until our housing officer came out and saw it she said she was going to get a specialist team they use outside the council to come and find the problem and fix it but that was five weeks ago and we sit here every day with every window open and the mold continues to growth is now all over our bedroom ceiling all round our living room the kitchen is everywhere. We have washed it with bleach but to no avail we have done everything we can and we have been constantly ill. We have been told that the damp is a problem here if we had seen the mold of course we would not have accepted it.[/p][/quote]I bought a bungalow & we did all you did but in the end we bought a cheap dehumidifier to dry the rooms out. in the kitchen there was no vent or fan so we installed these cleaned the mold off painted it & didn't have a problem in those rooms we had a problem in the bathroom as my wife refused to open the window at night whilst she was having a shower we were going to put in a fan but we moved. if it's condensation a fan would work wonders if not & it is a leaky roof then yes it's the council/housing association responsibility to fix it but good luck! loosehead
  • Score: 1

6:12pm Mon 10 Feb 14

loosehead says...

sjsawyer wrote:
massimoosti wrote:
Good job Frogmella is able to put the son up.
We didn't get a chance to look around before signing as that is not the NFC policy we signed for the flat at the flat and there was no mold but the Windows ceilings and the corners of our room were freshly painted. We have since found out it was with mold repellant paint .the mold has grown round this. The council are now saying we have a leaking roof but no one has been to sedition.
Our Windows are open all day we sit here freezing but it is not stopping the growth of the mold. From he looks of it there were extractor fans here as the switches are here but no fans. The mold started as soon as we put the heating on a black mold patch appeared the living room ceiling which is why we called the council out and wit all respects to the council yes the officer did say it was down to condensation until our housing officer came out and saw it she said she was going to get a specialist team they use outside the council to come and find the problem and fix it but that was five weeks ago and we sit here every day with every window open and the mold continues to growth is now all over our bedroom ceiling all round our living room the kitchen is everywhere. We have washed it with bleach but to no avail we have done everything we can and we have been constantly ill. We have been told that the damp is a problem here if we had seen the mold of course we would not have accepted it.
get a dehumidifier & you can buy a anti fungal spray so once cleaned spray it & put on the dehumidifier it saves having to have the window open day & night
[quote][p][bold]sjsawyer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]massimoosti[/bold] wrote: Good job Frogmella is able to put the son up.[/p][/quote]We didn't get a chance to look around before signing as that is not the NFC policy we signed for the flat at the flat and there was no mold but the Windows ceilings and the corners of our room were freshly painted. We have since found out it was with mold repellant paint .the mold has grown round this. The council are now saying we have a leaking roof but no one has been to sedition. Our Windows are open all day we sit here freezing but it is not stopping the growth of the mold. From he looks of it there were extractor fans here as the switches are here but no fans. The mold started as soon as we put the heating on a black mold patch appeared the living room ceiling which is why we called the council out and wit all respects to the council yes the officer did say it was down to condensation until our housing officer came out and saw it she said she was going to get a specialist team they use outside the council to come and find the problem and fix it but that was five weeks ago and we sit here every day with every window open and the mold continues to growth is now all over our bedroom ceiling all round our living room the kitchen is everywhere. We have washed it with bleach but to no avail we have done everything we can and we have been constantly ill. We have been told that the damp is a problem here if we had seen the mold of course we would not have accepted it.[/p][/quote]get a dehumidifier & you can buy a anti fungal spray so once cleaned spray it & put on the dehumidifier it saves having to have the window open day & night loosehead
  • Score: -1

6:41pm Mon 10 Feb 14

sjsawyer says...

loosehead wrote:
sjsawyer wrote:
massimoosti wrote:
Good job Frogmella is able to put the son up.
We didn't get a chance to look around before signing as that is not the NFC policy we signed for the flat at the flat and there was no mold but the Windows ceilings and the corners of our room were freshly painted. We have since found out it was with mold repellant paint .the mold has grown round this. The council are now saying we have a leaking roof but no one has been to sedition.
Our Windows are open all day we sit here freezing but it is not stopping the growth of the mold. From he looks of it there were extractor fans here as the switches are here but no fans. The mold started as soon as we put the heating on a black mold patch appeared the living room ceiling which is why we called the council out and wit all respects to the council yes the officer did say it was down to condensation until our housing officer came out and saw it she said she was going to get a specialist team they use outside the council to come and find the problem and fix it but that was five weeks ago and we sit here every day with every window open and the mold continues to growth is now all over our bedroom ceiling all round our living room the kitchen is everywhere. We have washed it with bleach but to no avail we have done everything we can and we have been constantly ill. We have been told that the damp is a problem here if we had seen the mold of course we would not have accepted it.
I bought a bungalow & we did all you did but in the end we bought a cheap dehumidifier to dry the rooms out.
in the kitchen there was no vent or fan so we installed these cleaned the mold off painted it & didn't have a problem in those rooms we had a problem in the bathroom as my wife refused to open the window at night whilst she was having a shower we were going to put in a fan but we moved.
if it's condensation a fan would work wonders if not & it is a leaky roof then yes it's the council/housing association responsibility to fix it but good luck!
Ty it is getting so bad that the lights in the living room are hissing.. we know that when it rains we cannot the main light in thriving room sowed us our lamp I have never been in a home where you have to keep the Windows open all day in every room we sit freezing all day until we shut them at around finish I the evening.
[quote][p][bold]loosehead[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sjsawyer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]massimoosti[/bold] wrote: Good job Frogmella is able to put the son up.[/p][/quote]We didn't get a chance to look around before signing as that is not the NFC policy we signed for the flat at the flat and there was no mold but the Windows ceilings and the corners of our room were freshly painted. We have since found out it was with mold repellant paint .the mold has grown round this. The council are now saying we have a leaking roof but no one has been to sedition. Our Windows are open all day we sit here freezing but it is not stopping the growth of the mold. From he looks of it there were extractor fans here as the switches are here but no fans. The mold started as soon as we put the heating on a black mold patch appeared the living room ceiling which is why we called the council out and wit all respects to the council yes the officer did say it was down to condensation until our housing officer came out and saw it she said she was going to get a specialist team they use outside the council to come and find the problem and fix it but that was five weeks ago and we sit here every day with every window open and the mold continues to growth is now all over our bedroom ceiling all round our living room the kitchen is everywhere. We have washed it with bleach but to no avail we have done everything we can and we have been constantly ill. We have been told that the damp is a problem here if we had seen the mold of course we would not have accepted it.[/p][/quote]I bought a bungalow & we did all you did but in the end we bought a cheap dehumidifier to dry the rooms out. in the kitchen there was no vent or fan so we installed these cleaned the mold off painted it & didn't have a problem in those rooms we had a problem in the bathroom as my wife refused to open the window at night whilst she was having a shower we were going to put in a fan but we moved. if it's condensation a fan would work wonders if not & it is a leaky roof then yes it's the council/housing association responsibility to fix it but good luck![/p][/quote]Ty it is getting so bad that the lights in the living room are hissing.. we know that when it rains we cannot the main light in thriving room sowed us our lamp I have never been in a home where you have to keep the Windows open all day in every room we sit freezing all day until we shut them at around finish I the evening. sjsawyer
  • Score: 1

6:43pm Mon 10 Feb 14

sjsawyer says...

sjsawyer wrote:
loosehead wrote:
sjsawyer wrote:
massimoosti wrote:
Good job Frogmella is able to put the son up.
We didn't get a chance to look around before signing as that is not the NFC policy we signed for the flat at the flat and there was no mold but the Windows ceilings and the corners of our room were freshly painted. We have since found out it was with mold repellant paint .the mold has grown round this. The council are now saying we have a leaking roof but no one has been to sedition.
Our Windows are open all day we sit here freezing but it is not stopping the growth of the mold. From he looks of it there were extractor fans here as the switches are here but no fans. The mold started as soon as we put the heating on a black mold patch appeared the living room ceiling which is why we called the council out and wit all respects to the council yes the officer did say it was down to condensation until our housing officer came out and saw it she said she was going to get a specialist team they use outside the council to come and find the problem and fix it but that was five weeks ago and we sit here every day with every window open and the mold continues to growth is now all over our bedroom ceiling all round our living room the kitchen is everywhere. We have washed it with bleach but to no avail we have done everything we can and we have been constantly ill. We have been told that the damp is a problem here if we had seen the mold of course we would not have accepted it.
I bought a bungalow & we did all you did but in the end we bought a cheap dehumidifier to dry the rooms out.
in the kitchen there was no vent or fan so we installed these cleaned the mold off painted it & didn't have a problem in those rooms we had a problem in the bathroom as my wife refused to open the window at night whilst she was having a shower we were going to put in a fan but we moved.
if it's condensation a fan would work wonders if not & it is a leaky roof then yes it's the council/housing association responsibility to fix it but good luck!
Ty it is getting so bad that the lights in the living room are hissing.. we know that when it rains we cannot the main light in thriving room sowed us our lamp I have never been in a home where you have to keep the Windows open all day in every room we sit freezing all day until we shut them at around finish I the evening.
Five in the evening
[quote][p][bold]sjsawyer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]loosehead[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sjsawyer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]massimoosti[/bold] wrote: Good job Frogmella is able to put the son up.[/p][/quote]We didn't get a chance to look around before signing as that is not the NFC policy we signed for the flat at the flat and there was no mold but the Windows ceilings and the corners of our room were freshly painted. We have since found out it was with mold repellant paint .the mold has grown round this. The council are now saying we have a leaking roof but no one has been to sedition. Our Windows are open all day we sit here freezing but it is not stopping the growth of the mold. From he looks of it there were extractor fans here as the switches are here but no fans. The mold started as soon as we put the heating on a black mold patch appeared the living room ceiling which is why we called the council out and wit all respects to the council yes the officer did say it was down to condensation until our housing officer came out and saw it she said she was going to get a specialist team they use outside the council to come and find the problem and fix it but that was five weeks ago and we sit here every day with every window open and the mold continues to growth is now all over our bedroom ceiling all round our living room the kitchen is everywhere. We have washed it with bleach but to no avail we have done everything we can and we have been constantly ill. We have been told that the damp is a problem here if we had seen the mold of course we would not have accepted it.[/p][/quote]I bought a bungalow & we did all you did but in the end we bought a cheap dehumidifier to dry the rooms out. in the kitchen there was no vent or fan so we installed these cleaned the mold off painted it & didn't have a problem in those rooms we had a problem in the bathroom as my wife refused to open the window at night whilst she was having a shower we were going to put in a fan but we moved. if it's condensation a fan would work wonders if not & it is a leaky roof then yes it's the council/housing association responsibility to fix it but good luck![/p][/quote]Ty it is getting so bad that the lights in the living room are hissing.. we know that when it rains we cannot the main light in thriving room sowed us our lamp I have never been in a home where you have to keep the Windows open all day in every room we sit freezing all day until we shut them at around finish I the evening.[/p][/quote]Five in the evening sjsawyer
  • Score: 1

6:44pm Mon 10 Feb 14

sjsawyer says...

loosehead wrote:
sjsawyer wrote:
massimoosti wrote:
Good job Frogmella is able to put the son up.
We didn't get a chance to look around before signing as that is not the NFC policy we signed for the flat at the flat and there was no mold but the Windows ceilings and the corners of our room were freshly painted. We have since found out it was with mold repellant paint .the mold has grown round this. The council are now saying we have a leaking roof but no one has been to sedition.
Our Windows are open all day we sit here freezing but it is not stopping the growth of the mold. From he looks of it there were extractor fans here as the switches are here but no fans. The mold started as soon as we put the heating on a black mold patch appeared the living room ceiling which is why we called the council out and wit all respects to the council yes the officer did say it was down to condensation until our housing officer came out and saw it she said she was going to get a specialist team they use outside the council to come and find the problem and fix it but that was five weeks ago and we sit here every day with every window open and the mold continues to growth is now all over our bedroom ceiling all round our living room the kitchen is everywhere. We have washed it with bleach but to no avail we have done everything we can and we have been constantly ill. We have been told that the damp is a problem here if we had seen the mold of course we would not have accepted it.
get a dehumidifier & you can buy a anti fungal spray so once cleaned spray it & put on the dehumidifier it saves having to have the window open day & night
We are just following what the council says we have had it so bad water droplets were forming thought the mold
[quote][p][bold]loosehead[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sjsawyer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]massimoosti[/bold] wrote: Good job Frogmella is able to put the son up.[/p][/quote]We didn't get a chance to look around before signing as that is not the NFC policy we signed for the flat at the flat and there was no mold but the Windows ceilings and the corners of our room were freshly painted. We have since found out it was with mold repellant paint .the mold has grown round this. The council are now saying we have a leaking roof but no one has been to sedition. Our Windows are open all day we sit here freezing but it is not stopping the growth of the mold. From he looks of it there were extractor fans here as the switches are here but no fans. The mold started as soon as we put the heating on a black mold patch appeared the living room ceiling which is why we called the council out and wit all respects to the council yes the officer did say it was down to condensation until our housing officer came out and saw it she said she was going to get a specialist team they use outside the council to come and find the problem and fix it but that was five weeks ago and we sit here every day with every window open and the mold continues to growth is now all over our bedroom ceiling all round our living room the kitchen is everywhere. We have washed it with bleach but to no avail we have done everything we can and we have been constantly ill. We have been told that the damp is a problem here if we had seen the mold of course we would not have accepted it.[/p][/quote]get a dehumidifier & you can buy a anti fungal spray so once cleaned spray it & put on the dehumidifier it saves having to have the window open day & night[/p][/quote]We are just following what the council says we have had it so bad water droplets were forming thought the mold sjsawyer
  • Score: 1

8:55pm Mon 10 Feb 14

SotonLad says...

sjsawyer wrote:
loosehead wrote:
sjsawyer wrote:
massimoosti wrote:
Good job Frogmella is able to put the son up.
We didn't get a chance to look around before signing as that is not the NFC policy we signed for the flat at the flat and there was no mold but the Windows ceilings and the corners of our room were freshly painted. We have since found out it was with mold repellant paint .the mold has grown round this. The council are now saying we have a leaking roof but no one has been to sedition.
Our Windows are open all day we sit here freezing but it is not stopping the growth of the mold. From he looks of it there were extractor fans here as the switches are here but no fans. The mold started as soon as we put the heating on a black mold patch appeared the living room ceiling which is why we called the council out and wit all respects to the council yes the officer did say it was down to condensation until our housing officer came out and saw it she said she was going to get a specialist team they use outside the council to come and find the problem and fix it but that was five weeks ago and we sit here every day with every window open and the mold continues to growth is now all over our bedroom ceiling all round our living room the kitchen is everywhere. We have washed it with bleach but to no avail we have done everything we can and we have been constantly ill. We have been told that the damp is a problem here if we had seen the mold of course we would not have accepted it.
get a dehumidifier & you can buy a anti fungal spray so once cleaned spray it & put on the dehumidifier it saves having to have the window open day & night
We are just following what the council says we have had it so bad water droplets were forming thought the mold
Are you going to buy a dehumidifier or not?
[quote][p][bold]sjsawyer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]loosehead[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sjsawyer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]massimoosti[/bold] wrote: Good job Frogmella is able to put the son up.[/p][/quote]We didn't get a chance to look around before signing as that is not the NFC policy we signed for the flat at the flat and there was no mold but the Windows ceilings and the corners of our room were freshly painted. We have since found out it was with mold repellant paint .the mold has grown round this. The council are now saying we have a leaking roof but no one has been to sedition. Our Windows are open all day we sit here freezing but it is not stopping the growth of the mold. From he looks of it there were extractor fans here as the switches are here but no fans. The mold started as soon as we put the heating on a black mold patch appeared the living room ceiling which is why we called the council out and wit all respects to the council yes the officer did say it was down to condensation until our housing officer came out and saw it she said she was going to get a specialist team they use outside the council to come and find the problem and fix it but that was five weeks ago and we sit here every day with every window open and the mold continues to growth is now all over our bedroom ceiling all round our living room the kitchen is everywhere. We have washed it with bleach but to no avail we have done everything we can and we have been constantly ill. We have been told that the damp is a problem here if we had seen the mold of course we would not have accepted it.[/p][/quote]get a dehumidifier & you can buy a anti fungal spray so once cleaned spray it & put on the dehumidifier it saves having to have the window open day & night[/p][/quote]We are just following what the council says we have had it so bad water droplets were forming thought the mold[/p][/quote]Are you going to buy a dehumidifier or not? SotonLad
  • Score: -1

4:48pm Mon 17 Feb 14

Madge@No.6 says...

For some years now we have been pestered by telephone callers and doorstep salesmen trying to induce us to put cavity insulation into our home. My husband, who before retirement was a buildings inspector for a local authority, has always been adamant that this is a really bad thing to do to a older building as blocked cavities would cause just the sort of problems that now seem to be confusing the experts at the Council. The whole point of cavity walls is to allow buildings to breathe, he says, and by removing that ability, mould and condensation occurs. Some years ago, there was barely more than one child in a school who suffered from asthma, now the seems to be very few that do not. Maybe there is a connection here? I am sure that the lucrative businesses who push this energy saving scheme will totally disagree, but it seems strange that the advice is now to keep windows open to air properties. This would seem to totally defeat the object of the additions to the buildings to keep the heat in, both cavity wall insulation and loft insulation. It hardly seems like rocket science, does it!
For some years now we have been pestered by telephone callers and doorstep salesmen trying to induce us to put cavity insulation into our home. My husband, who before retirement was a buildings inspector for a local authority, has always been adamant that this is a really bad thing to do to a older building as blocked cavities would cause just the sort of problems that now seem to be confusing the experts at the Council. The whole point of cavity walls is to allow buildings to breathe, he says, and by removing that ability, mould and condensation occurs. Some years ago, there was barely more than one child in a school who suffered from asthma, now the seems to be very few that do not. Maybe there is a connection here? I am sure that the lucrative businesses who push this energy saving scheme will totally disagree, but it seems strange that the advice is now to keep windows open to air properties. This would seem to totally defeat the object of the additions to the buildings to keep the heat in, both cavity wall insulation and loft insulation. It hardly seems like rocket science, does it! Madge@No.6
  • Score: 0

5:12pm Mon 17 Feb 14

sjsawyer says...

Madge@No.6 wrote:
For some years now we have been pestered by telephone callers and doorstep salesmen trying to induce us to put cavity insulation into our home. My husband, who before retirement was a buildings inspector for a local authority, has always been adamant that this is a really bad thing to do to a older building as blocked cavities would cause just the sort of problems that now seem to be confusing the experts at the Council. The whole point of cavity walls is to allow buildings to breathe, he says, and by removing that ability, mould and condensation occurs. Some years ago, there was barely more than one child in a school who suffered from asthma, now the seems to be very few that do not. Maybe there is a connection here? I am sure that the lucrative businesses who push this energy saving scheme will totally disagree, but it seems strange that the advice is now to keep windows open to air properties. This would seem to totally defeat the object of the additions to the buildings to keep the heat in, both cavity wall insulation and loft insulation. It hardly seems like rocket science, does it!
We have now had the building inspector out and he said that he thinks that there could be several problems in the roof loft area when asked a dehumidifier would help he said we would need one in every room so utmost not practical and there is no way we could afford to buy of them
[quote][p][bold]Madge@No.6[/bold] wrote: For some years now we have been pestered by telephone callers and doorstep salesmen trying to induce us to put cavity insulation into our home. My husband, who before retirement was a buildings inspector for a local authority, has always been adamant that this is a really bad thing to do to a older building as blocked cavities would cause just the sort of problems that now seem to be confusing the experts at the Council. The whole point of cavity walls is to allow buildings to breathe, he says, and by removing that ability, mould and condensation occurs. Some years ago, there was barely more than one child in a school who suffered from asthma, now the seems to be very few that do not. Maybe there is a connection here? I am sure that the lucrative businesses who push this energy saving scheme will totally disagree, but it seems strange that the advice is now to keep windows open to air properties. This would seem to totally defeat the object of the additions to the buildings to keep the heat in, both cavity wall insulation and loft insulation. It hardly seems like rocket science, does it![/p][/quote]We have now had the building inspector out and he said that he thinks that there could be several problems in the roof loft area when asked a dehumidifier would help he said we would need one in every room so utmost not practical and there is no way we could afford to buy of them sjsawyer
  • Score: 0

5:35pm Mon 17 Feb 14

loosehead says...

Madge@No.6 wrote:
For some years now we have been pestered by telephone callers and doorstep salesmen trying to induce us to put cavity insulation into our home. My husband, who before retirement was a buildings inspector for a local authority, has always been adamant that this is a really bad thing to do to a older building as blocked cavities would cause just the sort of problems that now seem to be confusing the experts at the Council. The whole point of cavity walls is to allow buildings to breathe, he says, and by removing that ability, mould and condensation occurs. Some years ago, there was barely more than one child in a school who suffered from asthma, now the seems to be very few that do not. Maybe there is a connection here? I am sure that the lucrative businesses who push this energy saving scheme will totally disagree, but it seems strange that the advice is now to keep windows open to air properties. This would seem to totally defeat the object of the additions to the buildings to keep the heat in, both cavity wall insulation and loft insulation. It hardly seems like rocket science, does it!
Madge before you have wall insulation they are suppose to check the building & if yours is likely to fall in the can't be done category they don't do it unless you get a cowboy
[quote][p][bold]Madge@No.6[/bold] wrote: For some years now we have been pestered by telephone callers and doorstep salesmen trying to induce us to put cavity insulation into our home. My husband, who before retirement was a buildings inspector for a local authority, has always been adamant that this is a really bad thing to do to a older building as blocked cavities would cause just the sort of problems that now seem to be confusing the experts at the Council. The whole point of cavity walls is to allow buildings to breathe, he says, and by removing that ability, mould and condensation occurs. Some years ago, there was barely more than one child in a school who suffered from asthma, now the seems to be very few that do not. Maybe there is a connection here? I am sure that the lucrative businesses who push this energy saving scheme will totally disagree, but it seems strange that the advice is now to keep windows open to air properties. This would seem to totally defeat the object of the additions to the buildings to keep the heat in, both cavity wall insulation and loft insulation. It hardly seems like rocket science, does it![/p][/quote]Madge before you have wall insulation they are suppose to check the building & if yours is likely to fall in the can't be done category they don't do it unless you get a cowboy loosehead
  • Score: 0

5:37pm Mon 17 Feb 14

loosehead says...

sjsawyer wrote:
Madge@No.6 wrote:
For some years now we have been pestered by telephone callers and doorstep salesmen trying to induce us to put cavity insulation into our home. My husband, who before retirement was a buildings inspector for a local authority, has always been adamant that this is a really bad thing to do to a older building as blocked cavities would cause just the sort of problems that now seem to be confusing the experts at the Council. The whole point of cavity walls is to allow buildings to breathe, he says, and by removing that ability, mould and condensation occurs. Some years ago, there was barely more than one child in a school who suffered from asthma, now the seems to be very few that do not. Maybe there is a connection here? I am sure that the lucrative businesses who push this energy saving scheme will totally disagree, but it seems strange that the advice is now to keep windows open to air properties. This would seem to totally defeat the object of the additions to the buildings to keep the heat in, both cavity wall insulation and loft insulation. It hardly seems like rocket science, does it!
We have now had the building inspector out and he said that he thinks that there could be several problems in the roof loft area when asked a dehumidifier would help he said we would need one in every room so utmost not practical and there is no way we could afford to buy of them
you could more than likely get at least one cheaply from cash convertors Shirley as we sold one there before we went overseas but what price health?
If you can't afford to buy them would the council lend you some?
[quote][p][bold]sjsawyer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Madge@No.6[/bold] wrote: For some years now we have been pestered by telephone callers and doorstep salesmen trying to induce us to put cavity insulation into our home. My husband, who before retirement was a buildings inspector for a local authority, has always been adamant that this is a really bad thing to do to a older building as blocked cavities would cause just the sort of problems that now seem to be confusing the experts at the Council. The whole point of cavity walls is to allow buildings to breathe, he says, and by removing that ability, mould and condensation occurs. Some years ago, there was barely more than one child in a school who suffered from asthma, now the seems to be very few that do not. Maybe there is a connection here? I am sure that the lucrative businesses who push this energy saving scheme will totally disagree, but it seems strange that the advice is now to keep windows open to air properties. This would seem to totally defeat the object of the additions to the buildings to keep the heat in, both cavity wall insulation and loft insulation. It hardly seems like rocket science, does it![/p][/quote]We have now had the building inspector out and he said that he thinks that there could be several problems in the roof loft area when asked a dehumidifier would help he said we would need one in every room so utmost not practical and there is no way we could afford to buy of them[/p][/quote]you could more than likely get at least one cheaply from cash convertors Shirley as we sold one there before we went overseas but what price health? If you can't afford to buy them would the council lend you some? loosehead
  • Score: 0

8:46pm Mon 17 Feb 14

sjsawyer says...

loosehead wrote:
sjsawyer wrote:
Madge@No.6 wrote:
For some years now we have been pestered by telephone callers and doorstep salesmen trying to induce us to put cavity insulation into our home. My husband, who before retirement was a buildings inspector for a local authority, has always been adamant that this is a really bad thing to do to a older building as blocked cavities would cause just the sort of problems that now seem to be confusing the experts at the Council. The whole point of cavity walls is to allow buildings to breathe, he says, and by removing that ability, mould and condensation occurs. Some years ago, there was barely more than one child in a school who suffered from asthma, now the seems to be very few that do not. Maybe there is a connection here? I am sure that the lucrative businesses who push this energy saving scheme will totally disagree, but it seems strange that the advice is now to keep windows open to air properties. This would seem to totally defeat the object of the additions to the buildings to keep the heat in, both cavity wall insulation and loft insulation. It hardly seems like rocket science, does it!
We have now had the building inspector out and he said that he thinks that there could be several problems in the roof loft area when asked a dehumidifier would help he said we would need one in every room so utmost not practical and there is no way we could afford to buy of them
you could more than likely get at least one cheaply from cash convertors Shirley as we sold one there before we went overseas but what price health?
If you can't afford to buy them would the council lend you some?
I will look but he told us that one will be no good just a waste as we need them everywhere
[quote][p][bold]loosehead[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sjsawyer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Madge@No.6[/bold] wrote: For some years now we have been pestered by telephone callers and doorstep salesmen trying to induce us to put cavity insulation into our home. My husband, who before retirement was a buildings inspector for a local authority, has always been adamant that this is a really bad thing to do to a older building as blocked cavities would cause just the sort of problems that now seem to be confusing the experts at the Council. The whole point of cavity walls is to allow buildings to breathe, he says, and by removing that ability, mould and condensation occurs. Some years ago, there was barely more than one child in a school who suffered from asthma, now the seems to be very few that do not. Maybe there is a connection here? I am sure that the lucrative businesses who push this energy saving scheme will totally disagree, but it seems strange that the advice is now to keep windows open to air properties. This would seem to totally defeat the object of the additions to the buildings to keep the heat in, both cavity wall insulation and loft insulation. It hardly seems like rocket science, does it![/p][/quote]We have now had the building inspector out and he said that he thinks that there could be several problems in the roof loft area when asked a dehumidifier would help he said we would need one in every room so utmost not practical and there is no way we could afford to buy of them[/p][/quote]you could more than likely get at least one cheaply from cash convertors Shirley as we sold one there before we went overseas but what price health? If you can't afford to buy them would the council lend you some?[/p][/quote]I will look but he told us that one will be no good just a waste as we need them everywhere sjsawyer
  • Score: 0

9:00pm Mon 17 Feb 14

loosehead says...

sjsawyer wrote:
loosehead wrote:
sjsawyer wrote:
Madge@No.6 wrote:
For some years now we have been pestered by telephone callers and doorstep salesmen trying to induce us to put cavity insulation into our home. My husband, who before retirement was a buildings inspector for a local authority, has always been adamant that this is a really bad thing to do to a older building as blocked cavities would cause just the sort of problems that now seem to be confusing the experts at the Council. The whole point of cavity walls is to allow buildings to breathe, he says, and by removing that ability, mould and condensation occurs. Some years ago, there was barely more than one child in a school who suffered from asthma, now the seems to be very few that do not. Maybe there is a connection here? I am sure that the lucrative businesses who push this energy saving scheme will totally disagree, but it seems strange that the advice is now to keep windows open to air properties. This would seem to totally defeat the object of the additions to the buildings to keep the heat in, both cavity wall insulation and loft insulation. It hardly seems like rocket science, does it!
We have now had the building inspector out and he said that he thinks that there could be several problems in the roof loft area when asked a dehumidifier would help he said we would need one in every room so utmost not practical and there is no way we could afford to buy of them
you could more than likely get at least one cheaply from cash convertors Shirley as we sold one there before we went overseas but what price health?
If you can't afford to buy them would the council lend you some?
I will look but he told us that one will be no good just a waste as we need them everywhere
you put it on for a few hours then empty it out then move it to another room.
it sounds as if it's condensation & it sounds like the whole place needs to be dried out.
does it happen in the summer?
[quote][p][bold]sjsawyer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]loosehead[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sjsawyer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Madge@No.6[/bold] wrote: For some years now we have been pestered by telephone callers and doorstep salesmen trying to induce us to put cavity insulation into our home. My husband, who before retirement was a buildings inspector for a local authority, has always been adamant that this is a really bad thing to do to a older building as blocked cavities would cause just the sort of problems that now seem to be confusing the experts at the Council. The whole point of cavity walls is to allow buildings to breathe, he says, and by removing that ability, mould and condensation occurs. Some years ago, there was barely more than one child in a school who suffered from asthma, now the seems to be very few that do not. Maybe there is a connection here? I am sure that the lucrative businesses who push this energy saving scheme will totally disagree, but it seems strange that the advice is now to keep windows open to air properties. This would seem to totally defeat the object of the additions to the buildings to keep the heat in, both cavity wall insulation and loft insulation. It hardly seems like rocket science, does it![/p][/quote]We have now had the building inspector out and he said that he thinks that there could be several problems in the roof loft area when asked a dehumidifier would help he said we would need one in every room so utmost not practical and there is no way we could afford to buy of them[/p][/quote]you could more than likely get at least one cheaply from cash convertors Shirley as we sold one there before we went overseas but what price health? If you can't afford to buy them would the council lend you some?[/p][/quote]I will look but he told us that one will be no good just a waste as we need them everywhere[/p][/quote]you put it on for a few hours then empty it out then move it to another room. it sounds as if it's condensation & it sounds like the whole place needs to be dried out. does it happen in the summer? loosehead
  • Score: 0

9:38pm Mon 17 Feb 14

sjsawyer says...

loosehead wrote:
sjsawyer wrote:
loosehead wrote:
sjsawyer wrote:
Madge@No.6 wrote:
For some years now we have been pestered by telephone callers and doorstep salesmen trying to induce us to put cavity insulation into our home. My husband, who before retirement was a buildings inspector for a local authority, has always been adamant that this is a really bad thing to do to a older building as blocked cavities would cause just the sort of problems that now seem to be confusing the experts at the Council. The whole point of cavity walls is to allow buildings to breathe, he says, and by removing that ability, mould and condensation occurs. Some years ago, there was barely more than one child in a school who suffered from asthma, now the seems to be very few that do not. Maybe there is a connection here? I am sure that the lucrative businesses who push this energy saving scheme will totally disagree, but it seems strange that the advice is now to keep windows open to air properties. This would seem to totally defeat the object of the additions to the buildings to keep the heat in, both cavity wall insulation and loft insulation. It hardly seems like rocket science, does it!
We have now had the building inspector out and he said that he thinks that there could be several problems in the roof loft area when asked a dehumidifier would help he said we would need one in every room so utmost not practical and there is no way we could afford to buy of them
you could more than likely get at least one cheaply from cash convertors Shirley as we sold one there before we went overseas but what price health?
If you can't afford to buy them would the council lend you some?
I will look but he told us that one will be no good just a waste as we need them everywhere
you put it on for a few hours then empty it out then move it to another room.
it sounds as if it's condensation & it sounds like the whole place needs to be dried out.
does it happen in the summer?
I don't know we have only been there since October but they have said it is fault somewhere in loft roof area there could be several problems and they getting an inspection done by an expert that is not an employee of the council
[quote][p][bold]loosehead[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sjsawyer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]loosehead[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sjsawyer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Madge@No.6[/bold] wrote: For some years now we have been pestered by telephone callers and doorstep salesmen trying to induce us to put cavity insulation into our home. My husband, who before retirement was a buildings inspector for a local authority, has always been adamant that this is a really bad thing to do to a older building as blocked cavities would cause just the sort of problems that now seem to be confusing the experts at the Council. The whole point of cavity walls is to allow buildings to breathe, he says, and by removing that ability, mould and condensation occurs. Some years ago, there was barely more than one child in a school who suffered from asthma, now the seems to be very few that do not. Maybe there is a connection here? I am sure that the lucrative businesses who push this energy saving scheme will totally disagree, but it seems strange that the advice is now to keep windows open to air properties. This would seem to totally defeat the object of the additions to the buildings to keep the heat in, both cavity wall insulation and loft insulation. It hardly seems like rocket science, does it![/p][/quote]We have now had the building inspector out and he said that he thinks that there could be several problems in the roof loft area when asked a dehumidifier would help he said we would need one in every room so utmost not practical and there is no way we could afford to buy of them[/p][/quote]you could more than likely get at least one cheaply from cash convertors Shirley as we sold one there before we went overseas but what price health? If you can't afford to buy them would the council lend you some?[/p][/quote]I will look but he told us that one will be no good just a waste as we need them everywhere[/p][/quote]you put it on for a few hours then empty it out then move it to another room. it sounds as if it's condensation & it sounds like the whole place needs to be dried out. does it happen in the summer?[/p][/quote]I don't know we have only been there since October but they have said it is fault somewhere in loft roof area there could be several problems and they getting an inspection done by an expert that is not an employee of the council sjsawyer
  • Score: 0

8:19am Tue 18 Feb 14

loosehead says...

sjsawyer wrote:
loosehead wrote:
sjsawyer wrote:
loosehead wrote:
sjsawyer wrote:
Madge@No.6 wrote:
For some years now we have been pestered by telephone callers and doorstep salesmen trying to induce us to put cavity insulation into our home. My husband, who before retirement was a buildings inspector for a local authority, has always been adamant that this is a really bad thing to do to a older building as blocked cavities would cause just the sort of problems that now seem to be confusing the experts at the Council. The whole point of cavity walls is to allow buildings to breathe, he says, and by removing that ability, mould and condensation occurs. Some years ago, there was barely more than one child in a school who suffered from asthma, now the seems to be very few that do not. Maybe there is a connection here? I am sure that the lucrative businesses who push this energy saving scheme will totally disagree, but it seems strange that the advice is now to keep windows open to air properties. This would seem to totally defeat the object of the additions to the buildings to keep the heat in, both cavity wall insulation and loft insulation. It hardly seems like rocket science, does it!
We have now had the building inspector out and he said that he thinks that there could be several problems in the roof loft area when asked a dehumidifier would help he said we would need one in every room so utmost not practical and there is no way we could afford to buy of them
you could more than likely get at least one cheaply from cash convertors Shirley as we sold one there before we went overseas but what price health?
If you can't afford to buy them would the council lend you some?
I will look but he told us that one will be no good just a waste as we need them everywhere
you put it on for a few hours then empty it out then move it to another room.
it sounds as if it's condensation & it sounds like the whole place needs to be dried out.
does it happen in the summer?
I don't know we have only been there since October but they have said it is fault somewhere in loft roof area there could be several problems and they getting an inspection done by an expert that is not an employee of the council
well I hope they fix it for you but even then you'll need to dry out the walls.
[quote][p][bold]sjsawyer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]loosehead[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sjsawyer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]loosehead[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sjsawyer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Madge@No.6[/bold] wrote: For some years now we have been pestered by telephone callers and doorstep salesmen trying to induce us to put cavity insulation into our home. My husband, who before retirement was a buildings inspector for a local authority, has always been adamant that this is a really bad thing to do to a older building as blocked cavities would cause just the sort of problems that now seem to be confusing the experts at the Council. The whole point of cavity walls is to allow buildings to breathe, he says, and by removing that ability, mould and condensation occurs. Some years ago, there was barely more than one child in a school who suffered from asthma, now the seems to be very few that do not. Maybe there is a connection here? I am sure that the lucrative businesses who push this energy saving scheme will totally disagree, but it seems strange that the advice is now to keep windows open to air properties. This would seem to totally defeat the object of the additions to the buildings to keep the heat in, both cavity wall insulation and loft insulation. It hardly seems like rocket science, does it![/p][/quote]We have now had the building inspector out and he said that he thinks that there could be several problems in the roof loft area when asked a dehumidifier would help he said we would need one in every room so utmost not practical and there is no way we could afford to buy of them[/p][/quote]you could more than likely get at least one cheaply from cash convertors Shirley as we sold one there before we went overseas but what price health? If you can't afford to buy them would the council lend you some?[/p][/quote]I will look but he told us that one will be no good just a waste as we need them everywhere[/p][/quote]you put it on for a few hours then empty it out then move it to another room. it sounds as if it's condensation & it sounds like the whole place needs to be dried out. does it happen in the summer?[/p][/quote]I don't know we have only been there since October but they have said it is fault somewhere in loft roof area there could be several problems and they getting an inspection done by an expert that is not an employee of the council[/p][/quote]well I hope they fix it for you but even then you'll need to dry out the walls. loosehead
  • Score: 0

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