‘Bulge year’ blamed for a dozen youngsters being unable to attend Hamble Primary School

Daily Echo: Angry parents protest about their youngsters missing out on places at their local school. Angry parents protest about their youngsters missing out on places at their local school.

Parents say they do not know how they are going to get their children to school after a dozen were refused places at their village primary.

Families of youngsters who were hoping to get their children into Hamble Primary School say they have been left devastated as they have been unable to secure a place despite living in the catchment area.

Education bosses in Hampshire say that due to a “bulge year” there have been a lot more children applying for places than there are those available.

It means that families now face more than a half-hour round trip to take their children to Bursledon where 12 children have been offered places after failing in their appeals.

However, many of the parents cannot drive and with one family also having a sibling already at Hamble, they fear they physically will not be able to get their children to school on time due to the lack of public transport.

Education chiefs are willing to provide a taxi service but parents have rejected this.

One mum told the Daily Echo she is now considering moving to Bursledon just to ensure their child is able to arrive at school on time.

Cheryl Mislebrook said: “I am just devastated. I don’t drive, there is no public transport and the solution is apparently to put my four-year-old in a taxi and wave him off to school.

“I am seriously looking into moving to Bursledon to make sure I can get my son to school.”

Fellow parent Fiona Best said she too did not anticipate any problems getting into Hamble, living just over half a mile away.

The group is calling on education bosses to expand Hamble Primary School to cater for the extra numbers which they say will continue to grow in light of the increasing development in the village.

Mrs Best said: “We have worked out that the money the extra children would bring in would pay for an extra teacher and we believe there is space to accommodate them for this year giving them enough time to move on an expansion plan for the coming years.

“Our children are being overlooked and something needs to be done now.”

Hampshire’s education boss, Cllr Peter Edgar, said while he sympathised with the parents the pupil numbers did not justify expansion.

“According to the forecasts which we have to work and plan to, there isn’t this bulge in numbers coming through in future years. This means if we expanded the school now it would destabilise other schools in years to come and there would be spare places in Hamble which could have knock on effects at other schools in the area.”

Hampshire offered 97 per cent of families one of their first three choices for schools this year and is currently undertaking a £150m expansion programme across a number of schools in the county.

Comments (14)

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11:30am Wed 2 Jul 14

southy says...

Schools should take in catchment area children first
Schools should take in catchment area children first southy
  • Score: 10

11:59am Wed 2 Jul 14

Bagamn says...

How did kids get on when there were fifty plus in a class? I went to Ludlow Rd in the forties and was given a good education. We sat in desks and not allowed to wander round as seems the practice now. Teaching standards have not got higher, just more lax. We had one set of major exams per year just to find out how we were getting on and the big exam when we were eleven. I went to a Grammar school and so did a lot of my mates. All this before calculators and computers. You could tell the year of the school you were passing by the sound of the times table that was being chanted out. That is learning.
How did kids get on when there were fifty plus in a class? I went to Ludlow Rd in the forties and was given a good education. We sat in desks and not allowed to wander round as seems the practice now. Teaching standards have not got higher, just more lax. We had one set of major exams per year just to find out how we were getting on and the big exam when we were eleven. I went to a Grammar school and so did a lot of my mates. All this before calculators and computers. You could tell the year of the school you were passing by the sound of the times table that was being chanted out. That is learning. Bagamn
  • Score: -1

12:30pm Wed 2 Jul 14

bigfella777 says...

Some children in the world walk 10 miles to school and 10 miles back.
No wonder we are a nation of obese when children have to be driven to school.
Oh and before you have a go at me are your kids wearing clothes from Primary? Because a child under the age of 10 working a 12 hour day probably made it.
Pampered moaners.
Some children in the world walk 10 miles to school and 10 miles back. No wonder we are a nation of obese when children have to be driven to school. Oh and before you have a go at me are your kids wearing clothes from Primary? Because a child under the age of 10 working a 12 hour day probably made it. Pampered moaners. bigfella777
  • Score: -4

12:39pm Wed 2 Jul 14

wilson castaway says...

I was in the same situation last year.I was walking 8 miles a day to get my son to school he was walking 4 at 4yrs of age.The bus journey was ok if it turned up but was often quicker to walk.getting home was a nightmare especialy in the bad weather.I had to cross riverside which was often flooded.My son was exhausted and his school work suffered.I phoned school allocations often.We were first on the list of the local school for 6 months.One day I called on the offchance and was told a place was available.When I visited the school the headteacher told me they were waiting for us for 8 weeks! My advice is keep calling allocations.I spoke to many different people,our records got lost then found and there was no communication between the school and council.If you have been placed in a school over 2 miles away you can apply for a buss pass thats if you have a bus service to the school.I didn't where I lived and had to walk a mile to the nearest bus stop.This situation is going to get worse, not better . More primary schools either need to be built or expanded as this problem is not going to go away.
I was in the same situation last year.I was walking 8 miles a day to get my son to school he was walking 4 at 4yrs of age.The bus journey was ok if it turned up but was often quicker to walk.getting home was a nightmare especialy in the bad weather.I had to cross riverside which was often flooded.My son was exhausted and his school work suffered.I phoned school allocations often.We were first on the list of the local school for 6 months.One day I called on the offchance and was told a place was available.When I visited the school the headteacher told me they were waiting for us for 8 weeks! My advice is keep calling allocations.I spoke to many different people,our records got lost then found and there was no communication between the school and council.If you have been placed in a school over 2 miles away you can apply for a buss pass thats if you have a bus service to the school.I didn't where I lived and had to walk a mile to the nearest bus stop.This situation is going to get worse, not better . More primary schools either need to be built or expanded as this problem is not going to go away. wilson castaway
  • Score: 10

12:44pm Wed 2 Jul 14

wilson castaway says...

bigfella777 wrote:
Some children in the world walk 10 miles to school and 10 miles back.
No wonder we are a nation of obese when children have to be driven to school.
Oh and before you have a go at me are your kids wearing clothes from Primary? Because a child under the age of 10 working a 12 hour day probably made it.
Pampered moaners.
Yes your right, some children do.Especially in third world countries which is a shame.But the problem is worse as some people have to get 2 children to different schools at the same time.Parents have to get to work or don't drive, then have to rely on public transport which quite frankly is a joke.So much so I learnt to drive.Unless you have been in a situation like this how would you know what its like.
[quote][p][bold]bigfella777[/bold] wrote: Some children in the world walk 10 miles to school and 10 miles back. No wonder we are a nation of obese when children have to be driven to school. Oh and before you have a go at me are your kids wearing clothes from Primary? Because a child under the age of 10 working a 12 hour day probably made it. Pampered moaners.[/p][/quote]Yes your right, some children do.Especially in third world countries which is a shame.But the problem is worse as some people have to get 2 children to different schools at the same time.Parents have to get to work or don't drive, then have to rely on public transport which quite frankly is a joke.So much so I learnt to drive.Unless you have been in a situation like this how would you know what its like. wilson castaway
  • Score: 11

1:05pm Wed 2 Jul 14

SFC-Matt says...

Bagamn wrote:
How did kids get on when there were fifty plus in a class? I went to Ludlow Rd in the forties and was given a good education. We sat in desks and not allowed to wander round as seems the practice now. Teaching standards have not got higher, just more lax. We had one set of major exams per year just to find out how we were getting on and the big exam when we were eleven. I went to a Grammar school and so did a lot of my mates. All this before calculators and computers. You could tell the year of the school you were passing by the sound of the times table that was being chanted out. That is learning.
Absolutely clueless. Get with the times.
[quote][p][bold]Bagamn[/bold] wrote: How did kids get on when there were fifty plus in a class? I went to Ludlow Rd in the forties and was given a good education. We sat in desks and not allowed to wander round as seems the practice now. Teaching standards have not got higher, just more lax. We had one set of major exams per year just to find out how we were getting on and the big exam when we were eleven. I went to a Grammar school and so did a lot of my mates. All this before calculators and computers. You could tell the year of the school you were passing by the sound of the times table that was being chanted out. That is learning.[/p][/quote]Absolutely clueless. Get with the times. SFC-Matt
  • Score: 0

1:20pm Wed 2 Jul 14

tootle says...

The times? Went to school in 60s. Must have been 15 before there were less than 30 in the class but i did receive an education, scared stiff most of the time(of the teachers), teachers had aspirations for their students. My children recently finished school and there was far more disruption in every lesson than was permitted in my day even though the class sizes were much smaller, they certainly did not receive an adequate education to fit them for work or study, scared stiff most of the time(of the pack of bullies ruling the school), teachers mostly assumed children from the "inner city" (yep, Southampton) were going nowhere and wouldn't achieve much Have a grandchild soon to start so it will be interesting to see what the educators have learnt. There has to be a median between draconic 60s and lax 90s. Bulge year? - my kids were bulge years, then came smaller years and places were reduced, now we have a bulge year - uncontrolled immigration and excessive house building - catching the LEAs on the hop. Bulge years always happened - surely 12 children with 12 extra chairs could be fitted in!.
The times? Went to school in 60s. Must have been 15 before there were less than 30 in the class but i did receive an education, scared stiff most of the time(of the teachers), teachers had aspirations for their students. My children recently finished school and there was far more disruption in every lesson than was permitted in my day even though the class sizes were much smaller, they certainly did not receive an adequate education to fit them for work or study, scared stiff most of the time(of the pack of bullies ruling the school), teachers mostly assumed children from the "inner city" (yep, Southampton) were going nowhere and wouldn't achieve much Have a grandchild soon to start so it will be interesting to see what the educators have learnt. There has to be a median between draconic 60s and lax 90s. Bulge year? - my kids were bulge years, then came smaller years and places were reduced, now we have a bulge year - uncontrolled immigration and excessive house building - catching the LEAs on the hop. Bulge years always happened - surely 12 children with 12 extra chairs could be fitted in!. tootle
  • Score: 0

1:21pm Wed 2 Jul 14

tootle says...

southy wrote:
Schools should take in catchment area children first
As far as I can see these parents are in catchment but it is closest to school that gets the places.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: Schools should take in catchment area children first[/p][/quote]As far as I can see these parents are in catchment but it is closest to school that gets the places. tootle
  • Score: 0

1:47pm Wed 2 Jul 14

SilvanDryad says...

Not sure why they have cut of their noses to spite their faces, as the saying goes, by refusing the offer of a free taxi from HCC. It won’t help them get their children into their catchment school any quicker. But they can always club together and hire a minibus for all their children, or set up a rota for the parents with their own transport to take the other children with their own.
Not sure why they have cut of their noses to spite their faces, as the saying goes, by refusing the offer of a free taxi from HCC. It won’t help them get their children into their catchment school any quicker. But they can always club together and hire a minibus for all their children, or set up a rota for the parents with their own transport to take the other children with their own. SilvanDryad
  • Score: 5

3:41pm Wed 2 Jul 14

southy says...

tootle wrote:
southy wrote:
Schools should take in catchment area children first
As far as I can see these parents are in catchment but it is closest to school that gets the places.
Families of youngsters who were hoping to get their children into Hamble Primary School say they have been left devastated as they have been unable to secure a place despite living in the catchment area.

Whitch is telling you that the School as taken on children out side of the catchment area.
A school will know how many new kids that come into there catchment area as they are informed before the end of the last term and will make room for that number and extra on top before the new term begins
[quote][p][bold]tootle[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: Schools should take in catchment area children first[/p][/quote]As far as I can see these parents are in catchment but it is closest to school that gets the places.[/p][/quote]Families of youngsters who were hoping to get their children into Hamble Primary School say they have been left devastated as they have been unable to secure a place despite living in the catchment area. Whitch is telling you that the School as taken on children out side of the catchment area. A school will know how many new kids that come into there catchment area as they are informed before the end of the last term and will make room for that number and extra on top before the new term begins southy
  • Score: 1

5:38pm Wed 2 Jul 14

sally208 says...

I wonder if any of these people missed the closing date and therefore did not secure their first choice school????
I wonder if any of these people missed the closing date and therefore did not secure their first choice school???? sally208
  • Score: 1

7:11pm Wed 2 Jul 14

thesouth says...

southy wrote:
Schools should take in catchment area children first
It has but there are too many. They can't physically take them all on
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: Schools should take in catchment area children first[/p][/quote]It has but there are too many. They can't physically take them all on thesouth
  • Score: -1

12:37am Thu 3 Jul 14

southy says...

thesouth wrote:
southy wrote:
Schools should take in catchment area children first
It has but there are too many. They can't physically take them all on
Then the school as slip up bigg time as they are told how many kids are in the catchment area and the school should provide plus extras. They can do what schools have done in the pass bring in the porta cabin schools
[quote][p][bold]thesouth[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: Schools should take in catchment area children first[/p][/quote]It has but there are too many. They can't physically take them all on[/p][/quote]Then the school as slip up bigg time as they are told how many kids are in the catchment area and the school should provide plus extras. They can do what schools have done in the pass bring in the porta cabin schools southy
  • Score: -2

1:01am Thu 3 Jul 14

Poppy22 says...

Amazing how, from the post-War years to very recently (at least 50 years!), local authorities and primary schools managed to fit in the massive "baby boomer" population increase and any child which lived in the school's catchment area attended their nearest, walking-distance, primary school, yet it isn't possible now! Why not? And especially for such a small number of children as in the Hamble case.
As for relying on excess Hamble primary schoolchildren going to Bursledon primary school, don't try to drive as there's already no space to park near the school at opening/closing times as the road locks up totally due to parents/guardians parking right up to - and around - the T-junction and many not giving way where they're supposed to because they're all in such a rush.
And when the Eastleigh Lib Dems have built approx 200 new "family" houses on the A27 at Bursledon over the next 0-5 years and large numbers of children are expecting to go to the primary school at Bursledon, what will happen then? There's talk of expanding the school, but where will all the parents'/guardians' cars go?? (Park and ride from the car boot sale site????!!).
As always, it's Government and Council greed to attract in more and more people to the area, whilst not having or building the schools, doctors' surgeries, etc needed for the current population, let alone any increase in population.
Amazing how, from the post-War years to very recently (at least 50 years!), local authorities and primary schools managed to fit in the massive "baby boomer" population increase and any child which lived in the school's catchment area attended their nearest, walking-distance, primary school, yet it isn't possible now! Why not? And especially for such a small number of children as in the Hamble case. As for relying on excess Hamble primary schoolchildren going to Bursledon primary school, don't try to drive as there's already no space to park near the school at opening/closing times as the road locks up totally due to parents/guardians parking right up to - and around - the T-junction and many not giving way where they're supposed to because they're all in such a rush. And when the Eastleigh Lib Dems have built approx 200 new "family" houses on the A27 at Bursledon over the next 0-5 years and large numbers of children are expecting to go to the primary school at Bursledon, what will happen then? There's talk of expanding the school, but where will all the parents'/guardians' cars go?? (Park and ride from the car boot sale site????!!). As always, it's Government and Council greed to attract in more and more people to the area, whilst not having or building the schools, doctors' surgeries, etc needed for the current population, let alone any increase in population. Poppy22
  • Score: 2
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