Chairman of the Hampshire Police Federation labels problems at Southampton Central Police Station 'an embarrassment'

Police station water leaks 'an embarrassment'

Police station water leaks 'an embarrassment'

First published in News Daily Echo: Photograph of the Author by , Senior reporter

“It's an embarrassment.”

Those are the words of the chairman of the Hampshire Police Federation, after the Daily Echo revealed widespread failures in pipe work at the force's Southampton headquarters.

John Apter has hit out at contractors Kier, who have admitted full responsibility for the problems.

But Mr Apter called on the Southampton-based firm to cover all the costs involved in the repair work, which could see offices and staff being temporarily relocated.

As reported in Saturday's Daily Echo, the city's £30m police station has been riddled with leaking pipes that will force major reconstruction work at the Southern Road site.

Maintenance staff have been dealing with the problems for months, which have affected the plush custody suite and put lifts out of action due to flooding in the shafts.

Speaking on behalf of the county's police federation, which represents uniformed officers, Mr Apter said: “It's a bit of an embarrassment. But it's not our embarrassment. It's been forced upon us by the failings of Kier.

“For our newest and most modern building to be faced with such a problem is highly disappointing and despite the reassurances, I fear the disruption to offices and staff will be considerable.

“It's good to hear the PCC is taking the matter seriously and has refused to rule out legal action. The Police Federation support this position.

“Kier must not only cover the cost of the repairs, but also cover all the costs of relocating the custody block and the offices and staff.”

Comments (3)

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8:21am Mon 14 Jan 13

BIGGLM says...

quite interesting to read all of the comments which are based on fantasy, The fact is this. Kier employed Balfour Beatty Engineering services to carry out the mechanical installation. They should have thoroughly flushd all of the pipework on completeion. They obviously did not and the chemicals that were left in the pipework have corroded the copper pipework leaving pinholes which leak. The Echo have never had a good word to say about this project, but leaving all of the political rubbish to one side, at least the builder has accepted responsibility and i expect will sort it.
quite interesting to read all of the comments which are based on fantasy, The fact is this. Kier employed Balfour Beatty Engineering services to carry out the mechanical installation. They should have thoroughly flushd all of the pipework on completeion. They obviously did not and the chemicals that were left in the pipework have corroded the copper pipework leaving pinholes which leak. The Echo have never had a good word to say about this project, but leaving all of the political rubbish to one side, at least the builder has accepted responsibility and i expect will sort it. BIGGLM
  • Score: 0

9:26am Mon 14 Jan 13

loosehead says...

As on the Article isn't an inspection of all works done & all appliance suppose to take place before a completion certificate is issued?
As on the Article isn't an inspection of all works done & all appliance suppose to take place before a completion certificate is issued? loosehead
  • Score: 0

9:52am Mon 14 Jan 13

Sovietobserver says...

Perhaps the pinholes in the copper piping were not detectable at the time of the inpection, and only became apparent later after the residual chemicals started to cause some corrosion.
Another lesson learnt by someone, and how many other new buildings will reveal similar problems. Have the mix of materials used and the type of chemicals been modified recently to cut costs ? I suspect that is where the answer may be.Perhaps it would be wise for some urgent investigation to take place, and further analysis would be appropriate to save even more expensive bungling.
Perhaps the pinholes in the copper piping were not detectable at the time of the inpection, and only became apparent later after the residual chemicals started to cause some corrosion. Another lesson learnt by someone, and how many other new buildings will reveal similar problems. Have the mix of materials used and the type of chemicals been modified recently to cut costs ? I suspect that is where the answer may be.Perhaps it would be wise for some urgent investigation to take place, and further analysis would be appropriate to save even more expensive bungling. Sovietobserver
  • Score: 0

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