Southampton community to share million pound grant

Daily Echo: Southampton community to share million pound grant Southampton community to share million pound grant

A SOUTHAMPTON community will share part of a £1 million Government windfall aimed at breathing new life in to high streets, it was revealed today.

Part of the cash will be ploughed in to revitalising Northam Road under a scheme rolled out by the Department of Communities and Local Government. The area is one of seven in the country sharing the cash.

It comes as housing and local government minister, Mark Prisk, warned shop owners must do more if they are to win back customers who have turned to the internet.

Mr Prisk said the Government is doing ''all it could'' to help shops survive, including reducing business rates and encouraging local councils to be more flexible with parking.

''We will keep providing support where it is needed, but it takes more than funding to make this work,'' he told the Daily Telegraph.

''As consumers, our behaviour has changed. High streets need to respond to that change if they are to prosper.''

He added that local communities need to support their high street shops, with online shopping now accounting for 15% of retail trade.

The seven communities which who won a share of the grant are Northam Road in Southampton, Herne Hill in south London, , Altrincham in Greater Manchester, Market Rasen in Lincolnshire, Gloucester and Rotherham.

Rotherham town centre was handed £268,058 of the High Street Renewal award for creating a strategy which focuses on supporting new and existing independent shops, which has resulted in an eight per cent increase in footfall.

Gloucester city centre received £133,057 for its launch of a night market while Herne Hill was given £93,057 for helping its market to thrive by cutting red tape.

The High Street Renewal fund is a new Government initiative, set up in the wake of retail guru Mary Portas's review into how to rejuvenate struggling town centres.

Comments (17)

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12:19pm Sat 4 May 13

Miguel Raton says...

Money down the drain
Money down the drain Miguel Raton

12:52pm Sat 4 May 13

kingnotail says...

The shops on Northam road do look like they might have been rather nice many years ago, so regeneration is rightly needed here. There has to be some link to the city centre though, otherwise you just won't get the numbers of people visiting to make them successful.

I notice though that Ipswich will put their grant towards a project to link the main shopping district with their waterfront. This would have been a far better use of money for Southampton too.
The shops on Northam road do look like they might have been rather nice many years ago, so regeneration is rightly needed here. There has to be some link to the city centre though, otherwise you just won't get the numbers of people visiting to make them successful. I notice though that Ipswich will put their grant towards a project to link the main shopping district with their waterfront. This would have been a far better use of money for Southampton too. kingnotail

1:17pm Sat 4 May 13

massimoosti says...

Did northam road not get thousands and thousands as part of a regeneration funding approx. 10 - 15 years ago ?
Did northam road not get thousands and thousands as part of a regeneration funding approx. 10 - 15 years ago ? massimoosti

1:27pm Sat 4 May 13

Jayne388 says...

Wasn't the area, that includes Northam and St Mary's, the site of the original settlement, Hamwic, that eventually became the Southampton that we know and love (?) today ? For that reason alone it ought to be kept tidy, at least.

Southampton is a mad jumble of ill-conceived architectural ideas propagated by successive local administrations. This, I believe, had much to do with the need to rebuild after the war with limited cash and resources.

It has taken well over half a century to create the disjointed appearance that Southampton has today. Those "Then and Now" calendars testify that once, Southampton was a fine town/city with beautiful buildings.
Wasn't the area, that includes Northam and St Mary's, the site of the original settlement, Hamwic, that eventually became the Southampton that we know and love (?) today ? For that reason alone it ought to be kept tidy, at least. Southampton is a mad jumble of ill-conceived architectural ideas propagated by successive local administrations. This, I believe, had much to do with the need to rebuild after the war with limited cash and resources. It has taken well over half a century to create the disjointed appearance that Southampton has today. Those "Then and Now" calendars testify that once, Southampton was a fine town/city with beautiful buildings. Jayne388

2:40pm Sat 4 May 13

bigfella777 says...

Did you know there is a shop on Old Northam Rd that only sells Spanish Jamon Iberico or Iberian ham, like the big legs that they cut the thin slivers off in tapas bars. I mean who is this marketed at? It is an area where a lot of people don't eat pork for religious reasons and most of the other people eat junk food, it's beyond me. How long will this one last?
Did you know there is a shop on Old Northam Rd that only sells Spanish Jamon Iberico or Iberian ham, like the big legs that they cut the thin slivers off in tapas bars. I mean who is this marketed at? It is an area where a lot of people don't eat pork for religious reasons and most of the other people eat junk food, it's beyond me. How long will this one last? bigfella777

3:21pm Sat 4 May 13

red/whitearmy says...

That road needs overhaul. It needs knocking down and re building. The only decent shop there is south coast audio. Couldnt they pedestrianise that area.
That road needs overhaul. It needs knocking down and re building. The only decent shop there is south coast audio. Couldnt they pedestrianise that area. red/whitearmy

4:28pm Sat 4 May 13

skin2000 says...

massimoosti wrote:
Did northam road not get thousands and thousands as part of a regeneration funding approx. 10 - 15 years ago ?
Yes I remember reading about that, not sure what happened to that money. Don't forget it states 'share in £ 1 million grant', so it might not be, that much in monetary terms.
[quote][p][bold]massimoosti[/bold] wrote: Did northam road not get thousands and thousands as part of a regeneration funding approx. 10 - 15 years ago ?[/p][/quote]Yes I remember reading about that, not sure what happened to that money. Don't forget it states 'share in £ 1 million grant', so it might not be, that much in monetary terms. skin2000

4:42pm Sat 4 May 13

massimoosti says...

9th September 1999

New lease of life for antique street

HALF a century ago Southampton's Old Northam Road was one of the South's busiest antiques centres, in competition with London, Bournemouth and Brighton for trade.

Now the street is once more set to be returned to its former glory thanks to just over £600,000 in grant aid from the city's regeneration board.

During the 1940s people would travel down from London to browse among the many different antique shops along the road.

But the recession of the late 1980s saw a demise in the industry, with the shops in Old Northam Road in Northam suffering and most of the units along the street becoming empty and boarded up.

But for years the traders have dreamt that the area could once more become a renowned and respected antiques centre, and these dreams are set to become reality thanks to the £616,000 funding from the regeneration board.

Five of the street's original Edwardian shops will be restored and 20 new one- and two-bedroomed flats created.

The bid was set up after traders got together with a property development and restoration company based in the road to try and breathe new life back into the area.

The Old Northam Road Property Development and Restoration Company has already restored two of the shops to their former state and was keen to expand its work further.

Project manager Ian Loveridge said: "It has been hard getting to this point. But it is with the support of the traders and having faith, confidence and a belief that the road has a future that we have been able to do it.

"It was becoming like a ghost town down here but now the area is starting to buzz and it is coming back to life again.

"I was over the moon to hear the project had been approved and am excited about getting started. Without the support of the businesses in the road we would never have got this far."

Already life has started to be breathed back into the once-thriving community with about 15 different shops already up and trading specialising in a wide variety of antiques.

One of the original traders who returned to the street last year is Peter Parr, who re-set up his business in one of the already restored shops.

"I am astounded that we have been given the grant and am just so pleased that this street is going to get going again," he said.

Fellow trader Sue Jackson, who set up business with two colleagues just three weeks ago, said: "It is excellent news. It is important to restore the buildings to their original state. The appearance of the street is Edwardian which is evocative of what we are trying to do. It sets the scene and gives the road an ambience."

The project will also provide jobs for seven trainees who will learn traditional building skills and design.

Head of the city's regeneration board, Paul Jenks, said: "This is a really good value-for-money, high quality, renovation project that preserves the properties in the street and provides really good training for local people.

"It is being done by a local builder who has a proven track record of high quality restoration."

The funding bid still has to receive formal ratification from the South East Development Agency.
9th September 1999 New lease of life for antique street HALF a century ago Southampton's Old Northam Road was one of the South's busiest antiques centres, in competition with London, Bournemouth and Brighton for trade. Now the street is once more set to be returned to its former glory thanks to just over £600,000 in grant aid from the city's regeneration board. During the 1940s people would travel down from London to browse among the many different antique shops along the road. But the recession of the late 1980s saw a demise in the industry, with the shops in Old Northam Road in Northam suffering and most of the units along the street becoming empty and boarded up. But for years the traders have dreamt that the area could once more become a renowned and respected antiques centre, and these dreams are set to become reality thanks to the £616,000 funding from the regeneration board. Five of the street's original Edwardian shops will be restored and 20 new one- and two-bedroomed flats created. The bid was set up after traders got together with a property development and restoration company based in the road to try and breathe new life back into the area. The Old Northam Road Property Development and Restoration Company has already restored two of the shops to their former state and was keen to expand its work further. Project manager Ian Loveridge said: "It has been hard getting to this point. But it is with the support of the traders and having faith, confidence and a belief that the road has a future that we have been able to do it. "It was becoming like a ghost town down here but now the area is starting to buzz and it is coming back to life again. "I was over the moon to hear the project had been approved and am excited about getting started. Without the support of the businesses in the road we would never have got this far." Already life has started to be breathed back into the once-thriving community with about 15 different shops already up and trading specialising in a wide variety of antiques. One of the original traders who returned to the street last year is Peter Parr, who re-set up his business in one of the already restored shops. "I am astounded that we have been given the grant and am just so pleased that this street is going to get going again," he said. Fellow trader Sue Jackson, who set up business with two colleagues just three weeks ago, said: "It is excellent news. It is important to restore the buildings to their original state. The appearance of the street is Edwardian which is evocative of what we are trying to do. It sets the scene and gives the road an ambience." The project will also provide jobs for seven trainees who will learn traditional building skills and design. Head of the city's regeneration board, Paul Jenks, said: "This is a really good value-for-money, high quality, renovation project that preserves the properties in the street and provides really good training for local people. "It is being done by a local builder who has a proven track record of high quality restoration." The funding bid still has to receive formal ratification from the South East Development Agency. massimoosti

4:43pm Sat 4 May 13

massimoosti says...

http://www.dailyecho
.co.uk/news/9781203.
__1_4m_revival_of_Ol
d_Northam/
http://www.dailyecho .co.uk/news/9781203. __1_4m_revival_of_Ol d_Northam/ massimoosti

4:44pm Sat 4 May 13

massimoosti says...

The money that Loveridge has squirreled out of all the funding - lol


I bet Cowey & Stent are kicking themselves now.
The money that Loveridge has squirreled out of all the funding - lol I bet Cowey & Stent are kicking themselves now. massimoosti

5:06pm Sat 4 May 13

Bowmore says...

bigfella777 wrote:
Did you know there is a shop on Old Northam Rd that only sells Spanish Jamon Iberico or Iberian ham, like the big legs that they cut the thin slivers off in tapas bars. I mean who is this marketed at? It is an area where a lot of people don't eat pork for religious reasons and most of the other people eat junk food, it's beyond me. How long will this one last?
For an area like Old Northam Road to work it's very specialist shops like this and the Desk Centre that do not rely solely on passing trade. People are prepared to travel to get specialist item. Also many of their customers will be other businesses rather than the general public.

One thing that does often seem to happen when run down areas are regenerated is that small businesses that were able to make the owners a modest living become unviable because once the area has been tarted up the rents and rates become unaffordable for businesses like these.
[quote][p][bold]bigfella777[/bold] wrote: Did you know there is a shop on Old Northam Rd that only sells Spanish Jamon Iberico or Iberian ham, like the big legs that they cut the thin slivers off in tapas bars. I mean who is this marketed at? It is an area where a lot of people don't eat pork for religious reasons and most of the other people eat junk food, it's beyond me. How long will this one last?[/p][/quote]For an area like Old Northam Road to work it's very specialist shops like this and the Desk Centre that do not rely solely on passing trade. People are prepared to travel to get specialist item. Also many of their customers will be other businesses rather than the general public. One thing that does often seem to happen when run down areas are regenerated is that small businesses that were able to make the owners a modest living become unviable because once the area has been tarted up the rents and rates become unaffordable for businesses like these. Bowmore

5:41pm Sat 4 May 13

cliffwalker says...

Bowmore is right. Northam Road can never compete on level terms with city centre streets but it might do well along the lines of East Street or Portswood. However, it can only work with fairly low rents which won't whittle away the small profits made in small businesses.
Bowmore is right. Northam Road can never compete on level terms with city centre streets but it might do well along the lines of East Street or Portswood. However, it can only work with fairly low rents which won't whittle away the small profits made in small businesses. cliffwalker

10:04am Sun 5 May 13

georgetheseventh says...

Jayne388 wrote:
Wasn't the area, that includes Northam and St Mary's, the site of the original settlement, Hamwic, that eventually became the Southampton that we know and love (?) today ? For that reason alone it ought to be kept tidy, at least.

Southampton is a mad jumble of ill-conceived architectural ideas propagated by successive local administrations. This, I believe, had much to do with the need to rebuild after the war with limited cash and resources.

It has taken well over half a century to create the disjointed appearance that Southampton has today. Those "Then and Now" calendars testify that once, Southampton was a fine town/city with beautiful buildings.
Google...May Blitz Liverpool/Bootle

that's what you call 'bombing'.
[quote][p][bold]Jayne388[/bold] wrote: Wasn't the area, that includes Northam and St Mary's, the site of the original settlement, Hamwic, that eventually became the Southampton that we know and love (?) today ? For that reason alone it ought to be kept tidy, at least. Southampton is a mad jumble of ill-conceived architectural ideas propagated by successive local administrations. This, I believe, had much to do with the need to rebuild after the war with limited cash and resources. It has taken well over half a century to create the disjointed appearance that Southampton has today. Those "Then and Now" calendars testify that once, Southampton was a fine town/city with beautiful buildings.[/p][/quote]Google...May Blitz Liverpool/Bootle that's what you call 'bombing'. georgetheseventh

2:07pm Sun 5 May 13

HillsidePaul says...

This area did get funding to create an antiques quarter about 15 yrs ago. It worked to some extent, but what nobody (at the time) saw coming was the meteoric rise of the internet and sites like eBay. this made it even more difficult to sustain antique shops.

Hopefully this new investment will be able to take account of that.
This area did get funding to create an antiques quarter about 15 yrs ago. It worked to some extent, but what nobody (at the time) saw coming was the meteoric rise of the internet and sites like eBay. this made it even more difficult to sustain antique shops. Hopefully this new investment will be able to take account of that. HillsidePaul

5:07pm Sun 5 May 13

Paramjit Bahia says...

HillsidePaul wrote:
This area did get funding to create an antiques quarter about 15 yrs ago. It worked to some extent, but what nobody (at the time) saw coming was the meteoric rise of the internet and sites like eBay. this made it even more difficult to sustain antique shops.

Hopefully this new investment will be able to take account of that.
Hillside, you may be aware that certain person with financial interest in many properties in that area may also have misled or manipulated the regeneration project to secure massive amount of money to repair same properties. Which may appear to be shops but with large parts converted for private residential lettings.

Then there was also an Arts Centre promised, probably by the same person or firm in which he/she may have shares.. But that promise of building Arts Centre was not honoured.

You may recall sometime back Echo had news item that some businesses which were tempted into this area by dangling attraction of Arts Centre were complaining that it's absence was hurting those.

Why those who by failing to deliver on promises made to secure grants have not been chased by authorities for so many years?

Why those who made massive profits by manipulating the system are not named?

As one comment posted above has named certain Loveridge having done well out of that regeneration, could it be the same person or someone else?

I know that Loveridge used to be very active in opposing regeneration project so wonder if he later on got somehow involved in it later. Perhaps somebody may clear this mystery or Echo may dig into details?
[quote][p][bold]HillsidePaul[/bold] wrote: This area did get funding to create an antiques quarter about 15 yrs ago. It worked to some extent, but what nobody (at the time) saw coming was the meteoric rise of the internet and sites like eBay. this made it even more difficult to sustain antique shops. Hopefully this new investment will be able to take account of that.[/p][/quote]Hillside, you may be aware that certain person with financial interest in many properties in that area may also have misled or manipulated the regeneration project to secure massive amount of money to repair same properties. Which may appear to be shops but with large parts converted for private residential lettings. Then there was also an Arts Centre promised, probably by the same person or firm in which he/she may have shares.. But that promise of building Arts Centre was not honoured. You may recall sometime back Echo had news item that some businesses which were tempted into this area by dangling attraction of Arts Centre were complaining that it's absence was hurting those. Why those who by failing to deliver on promises made to secure grants have not been chased by authorities for so many years? Why those who made massive profits by manipulating the system are not named? As one comment posted above has named certain Loveridge having done well out of that regeneration, could it be the same person or someone else? I know that Loveridge used to be very active in opposing regeneration project so wonder if he later on got somehow involved in it later. Perhaps somebody may clear this mystery or Echo may dig into details? Paramjit Bahia

11:07pm Sun 5 May 13

Donald2000 says...

The scheme is a complete and utter dead duck and could be better spent on the NHS. I am sure children with cancer could benefit from this money, rather than giving it to a load of antique dealers.
The scheme is a complete and utter dead duck and could be better spent on the NHS. I am sure children with cancer could benefit from this money, rather than giving it to a load of antique dealers. Donald2000

11:14pm Sun 5 May 13

Paramjit Bahia says...

Donald2000 wrote:
The scheme is a complete and utter dead duck and could be better spent on the NHS. I am sure children with cancer could benefit from this money, rather than giving it to a load of antique dealers.
Very true.
[quote][p][bold]Donald2000[/bold] wrote: The scheme is a complete and utter dead duck and could be better spent on the NHS. I am sure children with cancer could benefit from this money, rather than giving it to a load of antique dealers.[/p][/quote]Very true. Paramjit Bahia

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