Asbestos U-turn denies families compensation

Daily Echo: Asbestos U-turn denies families compensation Asbestos U-turn denies families compensation

HAMPSHIRE families whose relatives die after asbestos exposure will be denied compensation after a Government U-turn condemned as a “disgrace”.

The Queen’s Speech promised a Mesothelioma Bill to provide payouts to sufferers unable to trace the employer who exposed them to the deadly dust.

The move has long been demanded in areas such as Southampton, which – because of its docks and the use of asbestos in ships – is a known blackspot for asbestos deaths.

But a trade union immediately warned a £335m fund fell far short of what was originally promised, because: l Only victims of mesothelioma, a cancer of the lung lining, will be helped – not people dying from other asbestos-related conditions l Only those diagnosed after July 2012 will receive payouts – denying help to huge numbers of older cases.

l Payouts will be only 70 per cent of the average compensation levels for asbestos, because of a complicated banding system.

Steve Murphy, general secretary of UCATT, said: “Deaths from asbestos are entirely preventable. For decades, Governments and employers knew the risks but chose to do nothing.

“It is disgraceful that even now they are trying wherever possible to deny workers compensation.”

Nearly 2,400 people, mostly men, die from mesothelioma every year – of which 300 do not have an insurer, or that insurer cannot be traced.

A ‘standardised mortality ratio’ (SMR) is used to identify blackspots, where a figure of 100 would be the expected number of deaths, given the age of the population.

The figures are far, far higher in Southampton (282), Eastleigh (253), Gosport (240) and Fareham (208) – and even in Winchester (139), New Forest (133) and Test Valley (130).

A proposal for a £400m fund – mainly funded by insurers – was put forward by Labour, but progress ground to a halt after the Coalition came to power.

Comments (5)

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8:26am Sat 11 May 13

FoysCornerBoy says...

This is truly appalling. There in incontrovertible evidence that people working in Southampton docks and related areas such as shipping are considerably more likely to succumb to fatal diseases related to asbestos including mesothelioma.

The secrecy and prevarication of those companies (and government authorities) in admitting culpability underline the importance of health and safety legislation - vigilantly but sensibly enforced.

I fear that the issues raised here will only heighten the fears of local residents in the docks area about te risks to health from some of the proposed industrial developments there including the sulphur pastillation plant and the biomass power station.

The council needs to ensure that all existing and any new developments dockside are subjected to a rigorous health impact assessment.
This is truly appalling. There in incontrovertible evidence that people working in Southampton docks and related areas such as shipping are considerably more likely to succumb to fatal diseases related to asbestos including mesothelioma. The secrecy and prevarication of those companies (and government authorities) in admitting culpability underline the importance of health and safety legislation - vigilantly but sensibly enforced. I fear that the issues raised here will only heighten the fears of local residents in the docks area about te risks to health from some of the proposed industrial developments there including the sulphur pastillation plant and the biomass power station. The council needs to ensure that all existing and any new developments dockside are subjected to a rigorous health impact assessment. FoysCornerBoy
  • Score: 0

8:27am Sat 11 May 13

FoysCornerBoy says...

This is truly appalling. There in incontrovertible evidence that people working in Southampton docks and related areas such as shipping are considerably more likely to succumb to fatal diseases related to asbestos including mesothelioma.

The secrecy and prevarication of those companies (and government authorities) in admitting culpability underline the importance of health and safety legislation - vigilantly but sensibly enforced.

I fear that the issues raised here will only heighten the fears of local residents in the docks area about te risks to health from some of the proposed industrial developments there including the sulphur pastillation plant and the biomass power station.

The council needs to ensure that all existing and any new developments dockside are subjected to a rigorous health impact assessment.
This is truly appalling. There in incontrovertible evidence that people working in Southampton docks and related areas such as shipping are considerably more likely to succumb to fatal diseases related to asbestos including mesothelioma. The secrecy and prevarication of those companies (and government authorities) in admitting culpability underline the importance of health and safety legislation - vigilantly but sensibly enforced. I fear that the issues raised here will only heighten the fears of local residents in the docks area about te risks to health from some of the proposed industrial developments there including the sulphur pastillation plant and the biomass power station. The council needs to ensure that all existing and any new developments dockside are subjected to a rigorous health impact assessment. FoysCornerBoy
  • Score: 0

10:53am Sat 11 May 13

southy says...

Its not just people working in the docks its also those living close by, I am on the asbestos exposure watch list, because of what happen in 1990 at the refinery, We came in one morning while building the Residfinder plant (by Coach) they had open up the boilers on another plant that was shut down as part of the turn-around operations and the air was nice and still clear blue skys but the air was glistening like if you had a real hard air frost, what it was, was asbestos in the air, as far as i know every one who turned to that morning was put on that watch list.
But the thing is here, it was in the air how far had it gone, no one knows if it was like this in the villages around the refinery, because the time the air tester turned up it had thined it self out in the air and was below the safe levels, it was gone 10am when they turned up to test the air, and we had been there for a number of hours breathing it in.
Its not just people working in the docks its also those living close by, I am on the asbestos exposure watch list, because of what happen in 1990 at the refinery, We came in one morning while building the Residfinder plant (by Coach) they had open up the boilers on another plant that was shut down as part of the turn-around operations and the air was nice and still clear blue skys but the air was glistening like if you had a real hard air frost, what it was, was asbestos in the air, as far as i know every one who turned to that morning was put on that watch list. But the thing is here, it was in the air how far had it gone, no one knows if it was like this in the villages around the refinery, because the time the air tester turned up it had thined it self out in the air and was below the safe levels, it was gone 10am when they turned up to test the air, and we had been there for a number of hours breathing it in. southy
  • Score: 0

3:22pm Sat 11 May 13

Zexagon says...

What has the doctor said to you south?
What has the doctor said to you south? Zexagon
  • Score: 0

9:38am Sun 12 May 13

southy says...

come back on a later date for recheck (at the moment i am being check every 5 years), the trouble with asbestos it don't effect you right away it can take years for the effect to take place, in a lot of cases it happens when your a youngish worker and effects you after you retired.
come back on a later date for recheck (at the moment i am being check every 5 years), the trouble with asbestos it don't effect you right away it can take years for the effect to take place, in a lot of cases it happens when your a youngish worker and effects you after you retired. southy
  • Score: 0

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