Another dog killed by mystery toxin in New Forest

Daily Echo: Gemma, who died last year Gemma, who died last year

IT has killed at least 12 dogs and left two others seriously ill.

Now a mystery toxin that struck fear into the hearts of dog owners across the New Forest is thought to have poisoned another two pets.

One dog managed to fight off the substance but another animal had to be put down.

It comes a year after the first outbreak, sparking fears that the next few months will see another spate of deaths.

But experts are no nearer identifying the toxin, which causes skin lesions and acute kidney failure in its victims.

Most of the initial fatalities occurred at various locations across the Forest between December 2012 and March 2013.

The timing of the two new cases suggest that the cause could be seasonal in nature but the poison’s origin remains a mystery – despite extensive testing carried out by various organisations last year.

Vets alarmed at the possibility of a fresh outbreak are urging dog owners in the Forest to be vigilant.

One of the practices involved in treating the poisoned pets and investigating their deaths is Winchester-based Anderson Moores.

Commenting on the two new incidents vet David Walker said: “The first dog developed skin lesions and went on to suffer kidney problems. It was hospitalised for more than a week but managed to pull through.

“The second animal became ill incredibly quickly and was in hospital for only 48 hours before it had to be put down.”

The dogs are understood to have been infected in the Sway and Wilverley areas of the Forest.

Mr Walker added: “Some of the first cases were presented this time last year and it’s incredibly concerning that it might be starting again.

“A huge amount of testing was done in 2013 but failed to provide a conclusive answer.

“Our message to pet owners is to be vigilant and consult a vet immediately if their dog develops skin lesions.”

One of the 2013 victims was three-year-old Gemma, who died after being exercised at Linwood, near Ringwood.

A Jack Russell called Squibby is one of only three pets known to have survived the toxin. She developed a swollen paw after going for a run near Latchmore Brook and spent nine days on a drip.

No other animal species appears to have been affected by the poison.

The mystery took a new twist last year after it was revealed that similar cases had been reported elsewhere in the UK, including Cornwall, County Durham and Surrey.

Comments (8)

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4:15pm Tue 14 Jan 14

bigfella777 says...

It has been reported all over the place, it must be a plant or fungi, surely if it were a human they would identify the toxin?
It has been reported all over the place, it must be a plant or fungi, surely if it were a human they would identify the toxin? bigfella777
  • Score: 2

11:48pm Tue 14 Jan 14

Jonnybeal says...

Here we go again. This killed my spaniel Bruno last year. Swollen wounds around the paw and arm area, difference in the way your dog behaves and is active go and see a vet immediately, and importantly link them to this, as vets have not realised that this is not just an infected wound. They must check renal status. Duncan at Linwood vets has also been investigating the illness and has surveyed homes around the Gorley and Ringwood areas.
Here we go again. This killed my spaniel Bruno last year. Swollen wounds around the paw and arm area, difference in the way your dog behaves and is active go and see a vet immediately, and importantly link them to this, as vets have not realised that this is not just an infected wound. They must check renal status. Duncan at Linwood vets has also been investigating the illness and has surveyed homes around the Gorley and Ringwood areas. Jonnybeal
  • Score: 1

9:49am Wed 15 Jan 14

Hollister1 says...

Has anyone tested the groundwater given the flooding and erosion factors in this area?
Has anyone tested the groundwater given the flooding and erosion factors in this area? Hollister1
  • Score: 2

1:11pm Wed 15 Jan 14

soobear says...

I still think it is a fungi of some sort. Animals indigenous to the forest know instinctively what they can and cannot eat. Dogs, not all but many, will eat just about anything. We walk ours regularly in the forest and he is quite happy to eat horse, rabbit & deer poop (I know its gross lol!), a lot of the small fungi grow in the grass around where the animals do their business and can easily be caught up at the same time as a naughty dog eating what he shouldn't.
I still think it is a fungi of some sort. Animals indigenous to the forest know instinctively what they can and cannot eat. Dogs, not all but many, will eat just about anything. We walk ours regularly in the forest and he is quite happy to eat horse, rabbit & deer poop (I know its gross lol!), a lot of the small fungi grow in the grass around where the animals do their business and can easily be caught up at the same time as a naughty dog eating what he shouldn't. soobear
  • Score: 0

5:07pm Wed 15 Jan 14

Dan Soton says...

No idea just guessing




NASTY INFECTIOUS DISEASES YOU WANT TO AVOID - LEPTOSPIROSIS

This is a bacterial disease CHARACTERIZED BY A SKIN RASH and flulike symptoms caused by a spirochete bacterium excreted by rodents. Also known as autumn fever, there are about 100 cases and a few deaths reported in the United States each year

http://hallicino.hub
pages.com/hub/Nasty-
Infectious-Diseases-
You-Want-To-Avoid---
Leptospirosis



LEPTOSPIROSIS.. FROM WIKIPEDIA,

Leptospirosis (also known as Weil's syndrome, canicola fever, canefield fever, nanukayami fever, 7-day fever, Rat Catcher's Yellows, Fort Bragg fever, black jaundice, and Pretibial fever is caused by infection with bacteria of the genus Leptospira and affects humans as well as other animals.

Leptospirosis is among the world's most common diseases that transmits from animals to people (zoonosis). The infection is commonly transmitted to humans by allowing water that has been contaminated by animal urine to come in contact with unhealed breaks in the skin, the eyes, or with the mucous membranes. Outside of tropical areas, leptospirosis cases have a relatively distinct seasonality—most cases occur in spring and autumn.

Leptospirosis is caused by a spirochaete bacterium called Leptospira spp. At least five important serotypes exist in the United States and Canada, ALL OF WHICH CAUSE DISEASE IN DOGS:

Icterohaemorrhagiae

Canicola

Pomona

Grippotyphosa

Bratislava

Leptospirosis is transmitted by the urine of an infected animal, and is contagious as long as the urine is still moist. Rats, mice, and moles are important primary hosts—but a wide range of other mammals including dogs, deer, rabbits, hedgehogs, cows, sheep, raccoons, opossums, skunks, and certain marine mammals carry and transmit the disease as secondary hosts. In Africa, the banded mongoose has been identified as a carrier of the pathogen, likely in addition to other African wildlife hosts. Dogs may lick the urine of an infected animal off the grass or soil, or drink from an infected puddle.

HOUSE-BOUND DOMESTIC DOGS HAVE CONTRACTED LEPTOSPIROSIS, APPARENTLY FROM LICKING THE URINE OF INFECTED MICE IN THE HOUSE. THE TYPE OF HABITATS MOST LIKELY TO CARRY INFECTIVE BACTERIA ARE MUDDY RIVERBANKS, DITCHES, GULLIES, AND MUDDY LIVESTOCK REARING AREAS WHERE THERE IS REGULAR PASSAGE OF WILD OR FARM MAMMALS. the incidence of leptospirosis correlates directly with the amount of rainfall, making it seasonal in temperate climates and year-round in tropical climates. leptospirosis also transmits via the semen of infected animals

Incubation (time of exposure to first symptoms) in animals is ANYWHERE FROM 2 TO 20 DAYS. IN DOGS, LEPTOSPIROSIS MOST OFTEN DAMAGES THE LIVER AND KIDNEY. In addition, recent reports describe a pulmonary form of canine leptospirosis associated with severe hemorrhage in the lungs—similar to human pulmonary hemorrhagic syndrome. Vasculitis may occur, causing edema and potentially disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Myocarditis, pericarditis, meningitis, and uveitis are also possible sequelae.

Leptospirosis should be strongly suspected and included as part of a differential diagnosis if the sclerae of a dog's eyes appear jaundiced (even slightly yellow). The absence of jaundice does not eliminate the possibility of leptospirosis, and its presence could indicate hepatitis or other liver pathology rather than leptospirosis. Vomiting, fever, failure to eat, reduced urine output, unusually dark or brown urine, and lethargy are also indications of the disease.

http://en.wikipedia.
org/wiki/Leptospiros
is




,,
No idea just guessing NASTY INFECTIOUS DISEASES YOU WANT TO AVOID - LEPTOSPIROSIS This is a bacterial disease CHARACTERIZED BY A SKIN RASH and flulike symptoms caused by a spirochete bacterium excreted by rodents. Also known as autumn fever, there are about 100 cases and a few deaths reported in the United States each year http://hallicino.hub pages.com/hub/Nasty- Infectious-Diseases- You-Want-To-Avoid--- Leptospirosis LEPTOSPIROSIS.. FROM WIKIPEDIA, Leptospirosis (also known as Weil's syndrome, canicola fever, canefield fever, nanukayami fever, 7-day fever, Rat Catcher's Yellows, Fort Bragg fever, black jaundice, and Pretibial fever is caused by infection with bacteria of the genus Leptospira and affects humans as well as other animals. Leptospirosis is among the world's most common diseases that transmits from animals to people (zoonosis). The infection is commonly transmitted to humans by allowing water that has been contaminated by animal urine to come in contact with unhealed breaks in the skin, the eyes, or with the mucous membranes. Outside of tropical areas, leptospirosis cases have a relatively distinct seasonality—most cases occur in spring and autumn.[citation needed] Leptospirosis is caused by a spirochaete bacterium called Leptospira spp. At least five important serotypes exist in the United States and Canada, ALL OF WHICH CAUSE DISEASE IN DOGS: Icterohaemorrhagiae Canicola Pomona Grippotyphosa Bratislava Leptospirosis is transmitted by the urine of an infected animal, and is contagious as long as the urine is still moist. Rats, mice, and moles are important primary hosts—but a wide range of other mammals including dogs, deer, rabbits, hedgehogs, cows, sheep, raccoons, opossums, skunks, and certain marine mammals carry and transmit the disease as secondary hosts. In Africa, the banded mongoose has been identified as a carrier of the pathogen, likely in addition to other African wildlife hosts.[5] Dogs may lick the urine of an infected animal off the grass or soil, or drink from an infected puddle. HOUSE-BOUND DOMESTIC DOGS HAVE CONTRACTED LEPTOSPIROSIS, APPARENTLY FROM LICKING THE URINE OF INFECTED MICE IN THE HOUSE. THE TYPE OF HABITATS MOST LIKELY TO CARRY INFECTIVE BACTERIA ARE MUDDY RIVERBANKS, DITCHES, GULLIES, AND MUDDY LIVESTOCK REARING AREAS WHERE THERE IS REGULAR PASSAGE OF WILD OR FARM MAMMALS. the incidence of leptospirosis correlates directly with the amount of rainfall, making it seasonal in temperate climates and year-round in tropical climates. leptospirosis also transmits via the semen of infected animals Incubation (time of exposure to first symptoms) in animals is ANYWHERE FROM 2 TO 20 DAYS. IN DOGS, LEPTOSPIROSIS MOST OFTEN DAMAGES THE LIVER AND KIDNEY. In addition, recent reports describe a pulmonary form of canine leptospirosis associated with severe hemorrhage in the lungs—similar to human pulmonary hemorrhagic syndrome.[11][12] Vasculitis may occur, causing edema and potentially disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Myocarditis, pericarditis, meningitis, and uveitis are also possible sequelae.[2] Leptospirosis should be strongly suspected and included as part of a differential diagnosis if the sclerae of a dog's eyes appear jaundiced (even slightly yellow). The absence of jaundice does not eliminate the possibility of leptospirosis, and its presence could indicate hepatitis or other liver pathology rather than leptospirosis. Vomiting, fever, failure to eat, reduced urine output, unusually dark or brown urine, and lethargy are also indications of the disease. http://en.wikipedia. org/wiki/Leptospiros is ,, Dan Soton
  • Score: 4

7:05pm Fri 17 Jan 14

Dan Soton says...

Dan Soton wrote:
No idea just guessing




NASTY INFECTIOUS DISEASES YOU WANT TO AVOID - LEPTOSPIROSIS

This is a bacterial disease CHARACTERIZED BY A SKIN RASH and flulike symptoms caused by a spirochete bacterium excreted by rodents. Also known as autumn fever, there are about 100 cases and a few deaths reported in the United States each year

http://hallicino.hub

pages.com/hub/Nasty-

Infectious-Diseases-

You-Want-To-Avoid---

Leptospirosis



LEPTOSPIROSIS.. FROM WIKIPEDIA,

Leptospirosis (also known as Weil's syndrome, canicola fever, canefield fever, nanukayami fever, 7-day fever, Rat Catcher's Yellows, Fort Bragg fever, black jaundice, and Pretibial fever is caused by infection with bacteria of the genus Leptospira and affects humans as well as other animals.

Leptospirosis is among the world's most common diseases that transmits from animals to people (zoonosis). The infection is commonly transmitted to humans by allowing water that has been contaminated by animal urine to come in contact with unhealed breaks in the skin, the eyes, or with the mucous membranes. Outside of tropical areas, leptospirosis cases have a relatively distinct seasonality—most cases occur in spring and autumn.

Leptospirosis is caused by a spirochaete bacterium called Leptospira spp. At least five important serotypes exist in the United States and Canada, ALL OF WHICH CAUSE DISEASE IN DOGS:

Icterohaemorrhagiae

Canicola

Pomona

Grippotyphosa

Bratislava

Leptospirosis is transmitted by the urine of an infected animal, and is contagious as long as the urine is still moist. Rats, mice, and moles are important primary hosts—but a wide range of other mammals including dogs, deer, rabbits, hedgehogs, cows, sheep, raccoons, opossums, skunks, and certain marine mammals carry and transmit the disease as secondary hosts. In Africa, the banded mongoose has been identified as a carrier of the pathogen, likely in addition to other African wildlife hosts. Dogs may lick the urine of an infected animal off the grass or soil, or drink from an infected puddle.

HOUSE-BOUND DOMESTIC DOGS HAVE CONTRACTED LEPTOSPIROSIS, APPARENTLY FROM LICKING THE URINE OF INFECTED MICE IN THE HOUSE. THE TYPE OF HABITATS MOST LIKELY TO CARRY INFECTIVE BACTERIA ARE MUDDY RIVERBANKS, DITCHES, GULLIES, AND MUDDY LIVESTOCK REARING AREAS WHERE THERE IS REGULAR PASSAGE OF WILD OR FARM MAMMALS. the incidence of leptospirosis correlates directly with the amount of rainfall, making it seasonal in temperate climates and year-round in tropical climates. leptospirosis also transmits via the semen of infected animals

Incubation (time of exposure to first symptoms) in animals is ANYWHERE FROM 2 TO 20 DAYS. IN DOGS, LEPTOSPIROSIS MOST OFTEN DAMAGES THE LIVER AND KIDNEY. In addition, recent reports describe a pulmonary form of canine leptospirosis associated with severe hemorrhage in the lungs—similar to human pulmonary hemorrhagic syndrome. Vasculitis may occur, causing edema and potentially disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Myocarditis, pericarditis, meningitis, and uveitis are also possible sequelae.

Leptospirosis should be strongly suspected and included as part of a differential diagnosis if the sclerae of a dog's eyes appear jaundiced (even slightly yellow). The absence of jaundice does not eliminate the possibility of leptospirosis, and its presence could indicate hepatitis or other liver pathology rather than leptospirosis. Vomiting, fever, failure to eat, reduced urine output, unusually dark or brown urine, and lethargy are also indications of the disease.

http://en.wikipedia.

org/wiki/Leptospiros

is




,,
Good news mystery solved...

BBC South today reports that all the dogs tested showed symptoms of a bacterial infection known as Alabama skin rot...


Time will tell if it's in anyway related to the Leptospirosis spirochete bacterium....



,,,
[quote][p][bold]Dan Soton[/bold] wrote: No idea just guessing NASTY INFECTIOUS DISEASES YOU WANT TO AVOID - LEPTOSPIROSIS This is a bacterial disease CHARACTERIZED BY A SKIN RASH and flulike symptoms caused by a spirochete bacterium excreted by rodents. Also known as autumn fever, there are about 100 cases and a few deaths reported in the United States each year http://hallicino.hub pages.com/hub/Nasty- Infectious-Diseases- You-Want-To-Avoid--- Leptospirosis LEPTOSPIROSIS.. FROM WIKIPEDIA, Leptospirosis (also known as Weil's syndrome, canicola fever, canefield fever, nanukayami fever, 7-day fever, Rat Catcher's Yellows, Fort Bragg fever, black jaundice, and Pretibial fever is caused by infection with bacteria of the genus Leptospira and affects humans as well as other animals. Leptospirosis is among the world's most common diseases that transmits from animals to people (zoonosis). The infection is commonly transmitted to humans by allowing water that has been contaminated by animal urine to come in contact with unhealed breaks in the skin, the eyes, or with the mucous membranes. Outside of tropical areas, leptospirosis cases have a relatively distinct seasonality—most cases occur in spring and autumn.[citation needed] Leptospirosis is caused by a spirochaete bacterium called Leptospira spp. At least five important serotypes exist in the United States and Canada, ALL OF WHICH CAUSE DISEASE IN DOGS: Icterohaemorrhagiae Canicola Pomona Grippotyphosa Bratislava Leptospirosis is transmitted by the urine of an infected animal, and is contagious as long as the urine is still moist. Rats, mice, and moles are important primary hosts—but a wide range of other mammals including dogs, deer, rabbits, hedgehogs, cows, sheep, raccoons, opossums, skunks, and certain marine mammals carry and transmit the disease as secondary hosts. In Africa, the banded mongoose has been identified as a carrier of the pathogen, likely in addition to other African wildlife hosts.[5] Dogs may lick the urine of an infected animal off the grass or soil, or drink from an infected puddle. HOUSE-BOUND DOMESTIC DOGS HAVE CONTRACTED LEPTOSPIROSIS, APPARENTLY FROM LICKING THE URINE OF INFECTED MICE IN THE HOUSE. THE TYPE OF HABITATS MOST LIKELY TO CARRY INFECTIVE BACTERIA ARE MUDDY RIVERBANKS, DITCHES, GULLIES, AND MUDDY LIVESTOCK REARING AREAS WHERE THERE IS REGULAR PASSAGE OF WILD OR FARM MAMMALS. the incidence of leptospirosis correlates directly with the amount of rainfall, making it seasonal in temperate climates and year-round in tropical climates. leptospirosis also transmits via the semen of infected animals Incubation (time of exposure to first symptoms) in animals is ANYWHERE FROM 2 TO 20 DAYS. IN DOGS, LEPTOSPIROSIS MOST OFTEN DAMAGES THE LIVER AND KIDNEY. In addition, recent reports describe a pulmonary form of canine leptospirosis associated with severe hemorrhage in the lungs—similar to human pulmonary hemorrhagic syndrome.[11][12] Vasculitis may occur, causing edema and potentially disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Myocarditis, pericarditis, meningitis, and uveitis are also possible sequelae.[2] Leptospirosis should be strongly suspected and included as part of a differential diagnosis if the sclerae of a dog's eyes appear jaundiced (even slightly yellow). The absence of jaundice does not eliminate the possibility of leptospirosis, and its presence could indicate hepatitis or other liver pathology rather than leptospirosis. Vomiting, fever, failure to eat, reduced urine output, unusually dark or brown urine, and lethargy are also indications of the disease. http://en.wikipedia. org/wiki/Leptospiros is ,,[/p][/quote]Good news mystery solved... BBC South today reports that all the dogs tested showed symptoms of a bacterial infection known as Alabama skin rot... Time will tell if it's in anyway related to the Leptospirosis spirochete bacterium.... ,,, Dan Soton
  • Score: 1

12:50pm Sat 18 Jan 14

Dan Soton says...

Dan Soton wrote:
Dan Soton wrote:
No idea just guessing




NASTY INFECTIOUS DISEASES YOU WANT TO AVOID - LEPTOSPIROSIS

This is a bacterial disease CHARACTERIZED BY A SKIN RASH and flulike symptoms caused by a spirochete bacterium excreted by rodents. Also known as autumn fever, there are about 100 cases and a few deaths reported in the United States each year

http://hallicino.hub


pages.com/hub/Nasty-


Infectious-Diseases-


You-Want-To-Avoid---


Leptospirosis



LEPTOSPIROSIS.. FROM WIKIPEDIA,

Leptospirosis (also known as Weil's syndrome, canicola fever, canefield fever, nanukayami fever, 7-day fever, Rat Catcher's Yellows, Fort Bragg fever, black jaundice, and Pretibial fever is caused by infection with bacteria of the genus Leptospira and affects humans as well as other animals.

Leptospirosis is among the world's most common diseases that transmits from animals to people (zoonosis). The infection is commonly transmitted to humans by allowing water that has been contaminated by animal urine to come in contact with unhealed breaks in the skin, the eyes, or with the mucous membranes. Outside of tropical areas, leptospirosis cases have a relatively distinct seasonality—most cases occur in spring and autumn.

Leptospirosis is caused by a spirochaete bacterium called Leptospira spp. At least five important serotypes exist in the United States and Canada, ALL OF WHICH CAUSE DISEASE IN DOGS:

Icterohaemorrhagiae

Canicola

Pomona

Grippotyphosa

Bratislava

Leptospirosis is transmitted by the urine of an infected animal, and is contagious as long as the urine is still moist. Rats, mice, and moles are important primary hosts—but a wide range of other mammals including dogs, deer, rabbits, hedgehogs, cows, sheep, raccoons, opossums, skunks, and certain marine mammals carry and transmit the disease as secondary hosts. In Africa, the banded mongoose has been identified as a carrier of the pathogen, likely in addition to other African wildlife hosts. Dogs may lick the urine of an infected animal off the grass or soil, or drink from an infected puddle.

HOUSE-BOUND DOMESTIC DOGS HAVE CONTRACTED LEPTOSPIROSIS, APPARENTLY FROM LICKING THE URINE OF INFECTED MICE IN THE HOUSE. THE TYPE OF HABITATS MOST LIKELY TO CARRY INFECTIVE BACTERIA ARE MUDDY RIVERBANKS, DITCHES, GULLIES, AND MUDDY LIVESTOCK REARING AREAS WHERE THERE IS REGULAR PASSAGE OF WILD OR FARM MAMMALS. the incidence of leptospirosis correlates directly with the amount of rainfall, making it seasonal in temperate climates and year-round in tropical climates. leptospirosis also transmits via the semen of infected animals

Incubation (time of exposure to first symptoms) in animals is ANYWHERE FROM 2 TO 20 DAYS. IN DOGS, LEPTOSPIROSIS MOST OFTEN DAMAGES THE LIVER AND KIDNEY. In addition, recent reports describe a pulmonary form of canine leptospirosis associated with severe hemorrhage in the lungs—similar to human pulmonary hemorrhagic syndrome. Vasculitis may occur, causing edema and potentially disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Myocarditis, pericarditis, meningitis, and uveitis are also possible sequelae.

Leptospirosis should be strongly suspected and included as part of a differential diagnosis if the sclerae of a dog's eyes appear jaundiced (even slightly yellow). The absence of jaundice does not eliminate the possibility of leptospirosis, and its presence could indicate hepatitis or other liver pathology rather than leptospirosis. Vomiting, fever, failure to eat, reduced urine output, unusually dark or brown urine, and lethargy are also indications of the disease.

http://en.wikipedia.


org/wiki/Leptospiros


is




,,
Good news mystery solved...

BBC South today reports that all the dogs tested showed symptoms of a bacterial infection known as Alabama skin rot...


Time will tell if it's in anyway related to the Leptospirosis spirochete bacterium....



,,,
Dog quarantine tests for bacterial antibodies and climate change..


In recent times bacterial infections Alabama rot and Lyme ( Connecticut USA) disease have both presumably found there way to the New Forest via America..

Given climate change is time to tighten up the relaxed dog quarantine laws and have more tests ?




,,,
[quote][p][bold]Dan Soton[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dan Soton[/bold] wrote: No idea just guessing NASTY INFECTIOUS DISEASES YOU WANT TO AVOID - LEPTOSPIROSIS This is a bacterial disease CHARACTERIZED BY A SKIN RASH and flulike symptoms caused by a spirochete bacterium excreted by rodents. Also known as autumn fever, there are about 100 cases and a few deaths reported in the United States each year http://hallicino.hub pages.com/hub/Nasty- Infectious-Diseases- You-Want-To-Avoid--- Leptospirosis LEPTOSPIROSIS.. FROM WIKIPEDIA, Leptospirosis (also known as Weil's syndrome, canicola fever, canefield fever, nanukayami fever, 7-day fever, Rat Catcher's Yellows, Fort Bragg fever, black jaundice, and Pretibial fever is caused by infection with bacteria of the genus Leptospira and affects humans as well as other animals. Leptospirosis is among the world's most common diseases that transmits from animals to people (zoonosis). The infection is commonly transmitted to humans by allowing water that has been contaminated by animal urine to come in contact with unhealed breaks in the skin, the eyes, or with the mucous membranes. Outside of tropical areas, leptospirosis cases have a relatively distinct seasonality—most cases occur in spring and autumn.[citation needed] Leptospirosis is caused by a spirochaete bacterium called Leptospira spp. At least five important serotypes exist in the United States and Canada, ALL OF WHICH CAUSE DISEASE IN DOGS: Icterohaemorrhagiae Canicola Pomona Grippotyphosa Bratislava Leptospirosis is transmitted by the urine of an infected animal, and is contagious as long as the urine is still moist. Rats, mice, and moles are important primary hosts—but a wide range of other mammals including dogs, deer, rabbits, hedgehogs, cows, sheep, raccoons, opossums, skunks, and certain marine mammals carry and transmit the disease as secondary hosts. In Africa, the banded mongoose has been identified as a carrier of the pathogen, likely in addition to other African wildlife hosts.[5] Dogs may lick the urine of an infected animal off the grass or soil, or drink from an infected puddle. HOUSE-BOUND DOMESTIC DOGS HAVE CONTRACTED LEPTOSPIROSIS, APPARENTLY FROM LICKING THE URINE OF INFECTED MICE IN THE HOUSE. THE TYPE OF HABITATS MOST LIKELY TO CARRY INFECTIVE BACTERIA ARE MUDDY RIVERBANKS, DITCHES, GULLIES, AND MUDDY LIVESTOCK REARING AREAS WHERE THERE IS REGULAR PASSAGE OF WILD OR FARM MAMMALS. the incidence of leptospirosis correlates directly with the amount of rainfall, making it seasonal in temperate climates and year-round in tropical climates. leptospirosis also transmits via the semen of infected animals Incubation (time of exposure to first symptoms) in animals is ANYWHERE FROM 2 TO 20 DAYS. IN DOGS, LEPTOSPIROSIS MOST OFTEN DAMAGES THE LIVER AND KIDNEY. In addition, recent reports describe a pulmonary form of canine leptospirosis associated with severe hemorrhage in the lungs—similar to human pulmonary hemorrhagic syndrome.[11][12] Vasculitis may occur, causing edema and potentially disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Myocarditis, pericarditis, meningitis, and uveitis are also possible sequelae.[2] Leptospirosis should be strongly suspected and included as part of a differential diagnosis if the sclerae of a dog's eyes appear jaundiced (even slightly yellow). The absence of jaundice does not eliminate the possibility of leptospirosis, and its presence could indicate hepatitis or other liver pathology rather than leptospirosis. Vomiting, fever, failure to eat, reduced urine output, unusually dark or brown urine, and lethargy are also indications of the disease. http://en.wikipedia. org/wiki/Leptospiros is ,,[/p][/quote]Good news mystery solved... BBC South today reports that all the dogs tested showed symptoms of a bacterial infection known as Alabama skin rot... Time will tell if it's in anyway related to the Leptospirosis spirochete bacterium.... ,,,[/p][/quote]Dog quarantine tests for bacterial antibodies and climate change.. In recent times bacterial infections Alabama rot and Lyme ( Connecticut USA) disease have both presumably found there way to the New Forest via America.. Given climate change is time to tighten up the relaxed dog quarantine laws and have more tests ? ,,, Dan Soton
  • Score: 1

5:39pm Mon 10 Feb 14

Rainey999 says...

Can I just say it is important to clarify the chronolgy of the progession of this most distressing illness - the dog is walked, hours / days later a lesion typically will appear on the leg / paw - the damage is already occuring to the kidneys and the lesion is a manifestation of the damage being done. My daughter's dog, Starbuck also developed a lesion on his tongue. Within 6 days of the lesion appearing, despite receiving all the veterinary help possible, Starbuck had to be put to sleep as he was in complete renal failure. The dogs DO NOT get a cut and it goes from there.....the lesion / wound is caused after the toxin has started its' destruction.
Can I just say it is important to clarify the chronolgy of the progession of this most distressing illness - the dog is walked, hours / days later a lesion typically will appear on the leg / paw - the damage is already occuring to the kidneys and the lesion is a manifestation of the damage being done. My daughter's dog, Starbuck also developed a lesion on his tongue. Within 6 days of the lesion appearing, despite receiving all the veterinary help possible, Starbuck had to be put to sleep as he was in complete renal failure. The dogs DO NOT get a cut and it goes from there.....the lesion / wound is caused after the toxin has started its' destruction. Rainey999
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

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